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PPIC’s research has set the agenda for policy discussions about California’s water system. In recent years, the institute’s highly regarded publications have tackled some of the most critical and controversial aspects of water policy, from water markets to a peripheral canal.

In 2011, PPIC took a major step to advance the discussion of this important topic. A groundbreaking book, Managing California’s Water: From Conflict to Reconciliation, argued that the state must consider a set of wide-ranging reforms—for the benefit of the economy and the environment.

The book was the culmination of a two-year project by PPIC senior policy fellow Ellen Hanak and a team of scientists, engineers, economists, and legal experts from three University of California campuses and Stanford University. Its ambitious goal: to chart a new course for water management for the coming decades, outlining a broad reform agenda to better meet growing needs for reliable, high-quality water supply, healthy ecosystems, and flood protection. This effort was supported by a consortium of funders, including the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Pisces Foundation, Resources Legacy Fund, and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority.

Through events, legislative testimony, and outreach efforts combining both traditional and social media, our experts sought to build broad support for practical, incremental policies to address the state’s water challenges. We worked in partnership with organizations across the state and in Washington, D.C., to organize large, high-profile events. Leveraging our solid relationships with key decisionmakers in Sacramento and in the nation’s capital, we organized briefings with members of the legislature, Congress, and agency leadership. Our experts testified before committees of the state legislature and before the Delta Stewardship Council.

We continue to engage audiences across the state on the importance of moving beyond business as usual to meet the state’s water policy challenges. As debate begins about the size and scope of a possible state water bond in 2012, PPIC will foster productive, forward‐looking discussions about this defining issue for California’s future.
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California's Water Woes: A Way Out
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Managing California's Water: Economy vs. Environment?
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