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From the Latest Survey

Crosstabs: All Adults | Likely Voters

Complete crosstabs for each survey question.

Top Time Trends: All Adults | Likely Voters

Includes approval of Governor Brown, the state legislature, President Trump, Senator Feinstein, Senator Harris, and the US Congress; opinions on housing, healthcare, immigration, Russia, and North Korea.

FAQ

Who do I contact for questions regarding the Statewide Survey?


For any questions on the PPIC Statewide Survey, please email survey@ppic.org and a member of our survey team will get back to you promptly.

I would like to cite the PPIC Statewide Survey data in my work. How do I obtain permission to cite and what is the correct citation?


All manuscripts, articles, books, and other papers and publications using PPIC Statewide Survey data should reference Mark Baldassare as Survey Director and the Public Policy Institute of California as the source of the data. Citations should acknowledge that PPIC bears no responsibility for the interpretations presented or conclusions reached based on analysis of the data.

What is the PPIC Statewide Survey methodology?


PPIC Statewide Survey: Methodology

The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California. Survey reports are co-authored with associate survey director Dean Bonner and research associate Lunna Lopes.

How do we select the respondents for interviewing?

We go through a specific process to make sure that all PPIC Statewide Surveys represent California’s adult population. Each survey includes interviews with at least 1,700 Californians aged 18 or older. Using random-digit-dialing of both landline and cell phone numbers, households are randomly sampled within the state—meaning that each person in the California population has an equal probability of being selected for an interview. All landline telephone exchanges in California and all cell phone numbers with California area codes are eligible for selection.

Do we include cell phones in our surveys?

Thirty-five percent of interviews are conducted on landline phones and 65 percent on cell phones. Respondents can have landline service only, cell phone service only, or have both landline and cell phone service. We verify that cell phone respondents can answer interview questions in a safe manner—for example, when they are not driving.

How do we define the registered voter and likely voter subsamples?

For many survey questions, results are presented for registered voters or likely voters only. Respondents who report that they are citizens and are absolutely certain they are registered to vote in California are included in the registered voter subsamples. Registered voters are further defined as likely voters if they:

a) report voting always or nearly always, and

b) intend to vote in the upcoming election (during an election cycle), and

c) have followed election news very or fairly closely (during an election cycle), and

d) meet one of the following conditions:

    • report having a great deal or fair amount of interest in politics, have resided at their current residence less than five years, and have at least some college education; or
    • report having at least a little interest in politics, and have resided at their current residence for more than five years.

For more detailed information about sampling, languages, statistical weighting, margin of error, and the interviewing process, see: http://www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf. Additional questions can be emailed to survey@ppic.org.

How do I use the raw survey data?


We strongly recommend that only experienced analysts who are familiar with SPSS (or equivalent) data files attempt to download these data sets. Other users should consult the individual survey reports for survey results and related information. PPIC’s survey staff is available to answer questions, but we can provide only limited assistance in using and analyzing the data. These individual survey reports also include methodological detail for each survey.

The data archived here are stored by year of survey and report title. For each survey, there is a single compressed archive file (zip-file) that contains an SPSS dataset and a data dictionary file (in Microsoft Word). Software for decompressing archive files is available at download.com and on many freeware/shareware sites on the web. All data files include a weight variable (sample is weighted by age, sex, and region) that should be used in analysis (variable name is WEIGHT).

All manuscripts, articles, books, and other papers and publications using Institute’s data should reference Mark Baldassare as Survey Director and the Public Policy Institute of California as the source of the data, and should acknowledge that PPIC bears no responsibility for the interpretations presented or conclusions reached based on analysis of the data.

How do I use the Survey Questions Search Tool?


The Survey Questions Search Tool allows you to perform simple searches by keywords, phrases, and dates. To use:

Step 1: Enter search terms.
All Words
Enter one or more keywords. Use a space to separate keywords, not a comma or semicolon. For example: state ballot

Any Words
Enter one or more keywords. Use a space to separate keywords, not a comma or semicolon. For example: 2006 election

Date Range
Word searches may be performed along with a date search. Or you may specify your search by date range only, leaving the other fields blank. Select Date From and Date To, Last Month, Last Six Months, or Last Year. To specify dates use the month/day/year pull down menus. If no dates are selected, the Date From and Date To fields will automatically default to 1/1/1998 and 12/31/2017, which includes all the Statewide Survey data. Please note that the date(s) refers to the last date of the survey interviews, not the survey’s publication date.

Step 2: Select a time frame.
The Date Sort Order pull-down menu allows you to display results by date. If no selection is made in this menu, the most recent results are displayed first.

Step 3: Search.
Click the Search button. This should bring up a list of questions and results that match your search criteria.

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