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This interactive shows 2018 poverty rates across demographic groups in California, according to the California Poverty Measure (CPM). It shows poverty rates by age, education, employment, family composition, immigrant status, and race/ethnicity. The CPM is a joint research effort between PPIC and the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality that, unlike the official poverty measure, takes into account the cost of living and resources from social safety net programs.

For more information or questions, please contact Caroline DanielsonTess Thorman, and Sarah Bohn.

FAQ

How do I navigate in the interactive map?


Navigation tools are located in the upper-left corner of the map view. To zoom in and out, click on  and , or you can use the magnifying glass icon () to search. Reset the map by clicking on the home icon (). The right arrow () displays more tools. To move within the map, use the pan icon (), or hold down Shift and then click and drag your mouse across the map view. Click here for more information on the navigation tools.

Can I download data, an image, or a pdf from this interactive tool?


Select the download icon () in the toolbar below the interactive for download options, including image and pdf. To download data (where available), make sure to first click in the map or chart view (near the map or chart); otherwise this option will be disabled. Downloading all data rows as a text file will create a .csv file that can be opened in Excel.

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These interactive maps show 2016–18 average poverty rates for counties, congressional districts, state senate districts, state assembly districts, and local areas, according to the California Poverty Measure (CPM). The CPM is a joint research effort between PPIC and the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality that, unlike the official poverty measure, takes into account the cost of living and resources from social safety net programs.

For more information or questions, please contact Caroline DanielsonTess Thorman, and Sarah Bohn.

FAQ

How do I navigate in the interactive map?


Navigation tools are located in the upper-left corner of the map view. To zoom in and out, click on  and , or you can use the magnifying glass icon () to search. Reset the map by clicking on the home icon (). The right arrow () displays more tools. To move within the map, use the pan icon (), or hold down Shift and then click and drag your mouse across the map view. Click here for more information on the navigation tools.

Can I download data, an image, or a pdf from this interactive tool?


Select the download icon () in the toolbar below the interactive for download options, including image and pdf. To download data (where available), make sure to first click in the map or chart view (near the map or chart); otherwise this option will be disabled. Downloading all data rows as a text file will create a .csv file that can be opened in Excel.

Does PPIC have other Tableau interactives?


Click here to see more PPIC interactives on Tableau Public.

More

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Poverty in California

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Who’s in Poverty in California?

As the number of Californians who test positive for the coronavirus rises, concerns also rise over critical care resources and how they are distributed across the state. This is a companion piece to COVID-19 and California’s Vulnerable Populations.

The state’s K–12 system may be entering a long period of declining enrollment. But statewide trends tell only part of the story and can mask important differences across counties and districts. This interactive map allows you to see historical and projected changes in K–12 enrollment in each of California’s 58 counties. For more information, see the PPIC report Declining Enrollment in California Schools: Fiscal Challenges and Opportunities in the Coming Decade.

Home values and rents in California are among the most expensive in the nation, and the state has one of the highest rates of homelessness. Californians are increasingly concerned about these issues, with more than a third saying they’ve considered leaving the state due to housing costs.

Employment does not eliminate poverty. Struggling workers in California can face many barriers to exiting poverty, including low wages, a high cost of living, and a changing job market.

Voters in California are unrepresentative of the state as a whole. But the decisions they make at the ballot box affect the future of all Californians.

This interactive tool allows you to explore arrests statewide and by county—including the demographics of those arrested, how arrest rates have changed over time, and the most common offenses. Note that various factors can contribute to changes in arrests and differences across counties, including crime rates, demographics, fiscal conditions, jail capacity, law enforcement staffing and policing, and criminal justice reforms.

For more information on arrests in California, see the PPIC report New Insights into California Arrests: Trends, Disparities, and County Differences or contact Magnus Lofstrom, Brandon Martin, or Joseph Hayes.

This research is supported with funding from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

FAQ

How do I navigate in the interactive map?


Navigation tools are located in the upper-left corner of the map view. To zoom in and out, click on  and , or you can use the magnifying glass icon () to search. Reset the map by clicking on the home icon (). The right arrow () displays more tools. To move within the map, use the pan icon (), or hold down Shift and then click and drag your mouse across the map view. Click here for more information on the navigation tools.

Can I download data, an image, or a pdf from this interactive tool?


Select the download icon () in the toolbar below the interactive for download options, including image and pdf. To download data (where available), make sure to first click in the map or chart view (near the map or chart); otherwise this option will be disabled. Downloading all data rows as a text file will create a .csv file that can be opened in Excel.

Does PPIC have other Tableau interactives?


Click here to see more PPIC interactives on Tableau Public.

More

Much is at stake for California in the 2020 Census. The state’s political representation depends on an accurate count, as does the distribution of billions in federal funds for critical public investments and services. Many California communities are vulnerable: about 75 percent of residents are considered hard to count.

These interactive maps highlight hard-to-count communities across the state. The “likelihood of no response” category offers an overall assessment, while the other categories—undercounted racial/ethnic groups, noncitizens, young children, housing, and internet access—identify underlying characteristics that can help guide outreach efforts. The maps provide information for counties, congressional districts, state senate and assembly districts, and census tracts.

For more information, please contact Tess Thorman or Sarah Bohn.

This research is supported with funding from the California Community Foundation, the California Endowment, the California Health Care Foundation, and Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

FAQ

How do I navigate in the interactive map?


Navigation tools are located in the upper-left corner of the map view. To zoom in and out, click on  and , or you can use the magnifying glass icon () to search. Reset the map by clicking on the home icon (). The right arrow () displays more tools. To move within the map, use the pan icon (), or hold down Shift and then click and drag your mouse across the map view. Click here for more information on the navigation tools.

Can I download data, an image, or a pdf from this interactive tool?


Select the download icon () in the toolbar below the interactive for download options, including image and pdf. To download data (where available), make sure to first click in the map or chart view (near the map or chart); otherwise this option will be disabled. Downloading all data rows as a text file will create a .csv file that can be opened in Excel.

Does PPIC have other Tableau interactives?


Click here to see more PPIC interactives on Tableau Public.

More

This interactive tool allows you to explore how changes to housing costs, minimum wage, and the social safety net could affect child poverty statewide and in your county. We find lower housing costs and minimum wage increases could lower child poverty substantially—while helping Californians across the income spectrum. And though investments in California’s safety net would need to draw from the state budget, these approaches could also reduce child poverty considerably—while concentrating resources on vulnerable populations. See the PPIC report Reducing Child Poverty in California: A Look at Housing Costs, Wages, and the Safety Net for more information.

We focus on poverty among young children ages 0–5 using the California Poverty Measure, which—unlike the official poverty measure—accounts for variation in the cost of living and the cash value of safety net benefits. The California Poverty Measure is a joint research effort between PPIC and the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality.

NOTES: Our analysis uses detailed 2012–15 California Poverty Measure (CPM) data to simulate changes in the policy environment. Our baseline includes major policy changes that have occurred by 2017, such as cost-of-living adjustments in the CalWORKs and Supplemental Security Income programs, the expansion of the state’s EITC as passed in 2017, and the minimum wage in effect as of January 2017. We take a restricted, short-term view of likely policy outcomes; we do not incorporate the behavioral or macroeconomic effects that would result from major policy changes. In particular, we assume no changes in employment as a result of additional benefits or higher wages (exceptions are explored in the technical appendices). In addition, we do not consider how the simulated policy expansions might interact if combined. As such, the effects we estimate are not additive. For some less populous counties, poverty rates cannot be calculated individually; those counties are grouped. Income ranges reflect poverty thresholds for a family of four that rents their dwelling, and the groupings shown divide the income spectrum into the following ranges: 0–49%, 50–99%, 100–149%, and 150%+ of the CPM threshold for the given county or county group (or the average across the state). “Deep poverty” refers to the first range (family resources less than half of the poverty line). Family resources include cash income (from earnings, investments, retirement, etc.), taxes paid or credited, and benefits from safety net programs. Necessary work expenses and out-of-pocket medical expenses are subtracted from these family resources. Median and total increases in family resources are marked as “n/a” in the housing scenarios because family resources are unchanged. Rounding leads to small anomalies in some counties. For more information about data and methodology, see the technical appendices.


Related ContentPublications
Reducing Child Poverty in California: A Look at Housing Costs, Wages, and the Safety Net
Geography of Child Poverty in California
Just the Facts: Child Poverty in California
Just the Facts: Poverty in California
Just the Facts: The Working Poor in California

Map
California Poverty by County and Legislative District

 

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