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English as a Second Language in California Community Colleges, Event Briefing

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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(37) "eventbriefing_englishlearners0419.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "479300" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4079) "English as a Second Language in California’s Community Colleges April 30, 2019 Olga Rodriguez, Sarah Bohn, Laura Hill, Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund ESL programs can facilitate economic and social mobility for non-native speakers  Every year, thousands of new students enroll in ESL coursework at California’s community colleges – Some simply want to improve their English – Others are pursuing career credentials or a college degree  Given statewide reforms to “credit ESL,” we need to know more about ESL programs and outcomes for degree-seeking students 2 Reforms to ESL programs are well under way  Assembly Bill (AB) 705 requires colleges to reform credit ESL programs so that they do not deter or delay educational progress – Colleges must maximize the probability that a student in credit ESL will enter and complete transfer-level English within three years – Utilize assessment and placement policies that are in line with maximizing probability – Achieve full implementation by Fall 2020  Students affected: – Those with goals to seek a degree or transfer – Those who are enrolled in courses that will lead to transfer-level English 3 One-third of ESL students are degree-seeking General ESL population 53% Non-sequence 47% Sequence 34% Sequence, degree-seeking 13% Sequence, not degree-seeking 4 Degree-seeking students are demographically diverse Race/Ethnicity Asian (47%) Latino (23%) White (19%) Permanent resident (38%) Citizenship status Student visa (25%) US citizen (23%) Foreign HS diploma (41%) Education status US HS diploma (33%) Other/Unknown (15%) 5 Many colleges are moving away from traditional sequences Traditional Integrated ESL Developmental English Transfer-level English ESL Transfer-level English 6 Some ESL sequences are lengthy… Percent 30% 25% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 6% 14% 8% 17% 16% 11% 0% 9+ 8 76543 Levels below transfer-level English Colleges 2% 2% 21 7 …but most students start only a few levels below transfer-level English Percent 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 25% Colleges Degree-seeking students 14% 8% 6% 1% 2% 4% 19% 21% 17% 16% 13% 10% 11% 21% 8% 2% 2% 9+ 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Levels below transfer-level English 8 Students who start ESL sequences at higher levels are more likely to complete transfer-level English Six-year progression in ESL sequence 100 100 80 85 69 60 60 54 40 46 20 0 100 86 41 35 62 56 56 32 28 23 51 20 Two levels below Five levels below transfer Percent Enroll Complete Enroll Complete Enroll Complete Enroll Complete Enroll Complete Enroll Complete 5 levels below 4 levels below 3 levels below 2 levels below 1 level Transferbelow level English 9 Three key ESL features increase the likelihood of students completing transfer-level English Transferable ESL Integration DirecDt itroecTtLtEo transfer-level English 0 20.4 11.2 11.5 5 10 15 20 25 Change in likelihood of completing transfer-level English (percentage point) 10 Recommendations  Several ESL reforms seem especially promising • Shorter ESL sequences • Transferable ESL courses • Integrated approaches to teaching English skills • Direct pathways from ESL to transfer-level English  Connections between non-credit and credit ESL should be seamless  Monitoring assessment and placement policies will ensure accuracy, effectiveness, and equity  All ESL students should be encouraged to pursue a degree or transfer 11 English as a Second Language in California’s Community Colleges April 30, 2019 Olga Rodriguez, Sarah Bohn, Laura Hill, Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Thank you! These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Olga Rodriguez (rodriguez@ppic.org; 415-291-4457) Thank you for your interest in this work. 13" } ["___content":protected]=> string(196) "

English as a Second Language in California Community Colleges, Event Briefing

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