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Eventbriefing Nextgenerationscience0318

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(43) "eventbriefing_nextgenerationscience0318.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "415324" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3640) "Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards Early Evidence from California March 8, 2018 Niu Gao, Sara Adan, Lunna Lopes, Grace Lee Supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation California is redesigning K–12 science education  California is at the bottom of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) rankings in science  The State Board of Education adopted the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) in 2013 – Internationally benchmarked – Applied to all students and all science disciplines – Fully integrated with Common Core math and English standards – Three-dimensional learning 2 California has a timeline for NGSS implementation Adopts NGSS Develops state implementation plan Approves Science Curriculum Framework CAST field testing 2013 2014 2015 2016 Develops Science Curriculum Framework 2017 California Science Test (CAST) pilot testing 2018 2019 CAST fully operational 3 PPIC surveyed districts about NGSS implementation  The survey was administered in spring 2017 – 49% of districts responded  Awareness and implementation is uneven across districts – 25% of low-performance districts are not familiar with NGSS – 94% of urban districts are implementing NGSS 4 Most districts have chosen the integrated model for middle schools 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 21% 25% 51% All districts 29% 55% 10% Rural districts 11% 9% Not decided Discipline specific Integrated 76% Urban districts 5 About half chose three-course model for high schools All districts 3 course (Earth science covered in biology, chemistry, physics) 4 course (Earth science covered as separate course) Undecided 47% 17% 23% Rural districts 52% 26% 18% Urban districts High school districts 50% 5% 29% 41% 17% 33% 6 Districts report instructional and equipment challenges  Most districts are having difficulty selecting NGSS-aligned instructional materials – The state is scheduled to adopt textbooks and other instructional materials in 2018  Science labs are also a big challenge  Three in four districts report teacher training gaps 7 Teacher shortages lead to larger class sizes in science Middle school 35 30 25 20 15 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 High school 35 Science 30 Math English 25 US average, science 20 15 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 8 Challenges beyond NGSS  The statewide graduation requirement is not aligned with NGSS – The state requires two years of science instruction – The NGSS require at least three years—as do 40% of districts – UC and CSU are discussing three-year area “d” requirements  Science has taken a back seat to math and English – Science is not a priority in most districts  Most students do not get quality science education in early grades 9 Policy recommendations  Raise NGSS awareness in low-performance districts  Release approved K‒8 instructional materials on schedule  Provide more guidance on new course sequences  Update statewide science graduation requirements  Leverage NGSS to make science a priority in schools  Add more science-specific indicators to LCAPs 10 Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards Early Evidence from California March 8, 2018 Niu Gao, Sara Adan, Lunna Lopes, Grace Lee Supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Niu Gao (gao@ppic.org; 415-291-4491) Thank you for your interest in this work. 12" } ["___content":protected]=> string(164) "

Eventbriefing Nextgenerationscience0318

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Bechtel, Jr. Foundation California is redesigning K–12 science education  California is at the bottom of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) rankings in science  The State Board of Education adopted the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) in 2013 – Internationally benchmarked – Applied to all students and all science disciplines – Fully integrated with Common Core math and English standards – Three-dimensional learning 2 California has a timeline for NGSS implementation Adopts NGSS Develops state implementation plan Approves Science Curriculum Framework CAST field testing 2013 2014 2015 2016 Develops Science Curriculum Framework 2017 California Science Test (CAST) pilot testing 2018 2019 CAST fully operational 3 PPIC surveyed districts about NGSS implementation  The survey was administered in spring 2017 – 49% of districts responded  Awareness and implementation is uneven across districts – 25% of low-performance districts are not familiar with NGSS – 94% of urban districts are implementing NGSS 4 Most districts have chosen the integrated model for middle schools 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 21% 25% 51% All districts 29% 55% 10% Rural districts 11% 9% Not decided Discipline specific Integrated 76% Urban districts 5 About half chose three-course model for high schools All districts 3 course (Earth science covered in biology, chemistry, physics) 4 course (Earth science covered as separate course) Undecided 47% 17% 23% Rural districts 52% 26% 18% Urban districts High school districts 50% 5% 29% 41% 17% 33% 6 Districts report instructional and equipment challenges  Most districts are having difficulty selecting NGSS-aligned instructional materials – The state is scheduled to adopt textbooks and other instructional materials in 2018  Science labs are also a big challenge  Three in four districts report teacher training gaps 7 Teacher shortages lead to larger class sizes in science Middle school 35 30 25 20 15 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 High school 35 Science 30 Math English 25 US average, science 20 15 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 8 Challenges beyond NGSS  The statewide graduation requirement is not aligned with NGSS – The state requires two years of science instruction – The NGSS require at least three years—as do 40% of districts – UC and CSU are discussing three-year area “d” requirements  Science has taken a back seat to math and English – Science is not a priority in most districts  Most students do not get quality science education in early grades 9 Policy recommendations  Raise NGSS awareness in low-performance districts  Release approved K‒8 instructional materials on schedule  Provide more guidance on new course sequences  Update statewide science graduation requirements  Leverage NGSS to make science a priority in schools  Add more science-specific indicators to LCAPs 10 Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards Early Evidence from California March 8, 2018 Niu Gao, Sara Adan, Lunna Lopes, Grace Lee Supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. 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