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Eventbriefing Headwaterforests0917

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(40) "eventbriefing_headwaterforests0917-3.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1716251" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4155) "Improving the Health of California’s Headwater Forests September 20, 2017 Van Butsic, Henry McCann, Jodi Axelson, Brian Gray, Yufang Jin, Jeffrey Mount, Scott Stephens, William Stewart Supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and the US Environmental Protection Agency Why focus on headwater forests? Benefits of headwater forests: – Source of 2/3 of state’s surface water – Habitat for endangered species – Timber production for rural development and urban housing – Recreation 2 Key takeaways for improving headwater forests  Decades of fire suppression made forests too dense, vulnerable to die-offs and catastrophic wildfires  Treatments to improve forest resilience are difficult to use in complex management environment  Suggested reforms: – Manage for long term and over large scales – Bundle treatments with revenue generating projects – Enhance cooperation between various types of landowners and other stakeholders 3 Outline  Forest health is in decline  Treatments for improving forest health  Reforms for increasing the pace and scale of action 4 Headwater forests too dense, with many small trees Tree density in the headwater forests 200 150 Trees per acre 100 50 0 Small trees Medium trees Large trees 1930s 2000s All trees 5 The drought accelerated forest health decline Latest drought impacts: – 15 million more dead trees per year, most from bark beetle outbreak – Two of largest wildfires in state history Recent tree die-off in the Sierra Nevada 6 Outline  Forest health is in decline  Treatments for improving forest health  Reforms for increasing the pace and scale of action 7 Removing forest fuels will improve forest health Prescribed and managed wildfire Mechanical thinning 8 Barriers to increasing use of these treatments  Focus on avoiding short-term impacts limits ability to manage for long-term health  Treatment needs are poorly understood  No single formula for funding expansion of treatments  Many parties across a patchwork of landownership need to coordinate to be effective at large-enough scale 9 Outline  Forest health is in decline  Treatments for improving forest health  Reforms for increasing the pace and scale of action 10 Make forest health a top priority Actions: – Use broader permitting tools to support long-term forest health on federal lands – Level playing field between fire suppression and other management actions – Embed forest health objectives into state forest management practices Smoke from a Sierra wildfire 11 Define needs and make the most of available funding Actions: – Improve and standardize forest treatment accounting practices – Bundle harvesting with other treatments to help cover costs – Collaborate for funding Idaho sawmill 12 Utilize new and existing tools that facilitate collaboration Actions: – Long-term and financially viable stewardship contracts on national forests – Federal and state collaboration through the Good Neighbor Authority – Private forest owner collaboration through forest health districts Malheur National Forest, Oregon 13 Solutions are not easy and not one-size-fits-all  It took decades to create poor conditions in today’s forests, and will take decades to improve their health  Barriers to improving forest health are not technical―they are legal, social, and financial  Reforms will require determined leadership at local, state, federal levels  Forest health should be a common goal for all Californians 14 Thank you! 15 About these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Van Butsic (vanbutsic@berkeley.edu) Thank you for your interest in this work. Improving the Health of California’s Headwater Forests September 20, 2017 Van Butsic, Henry McCann, Jodi Axelson, Brian Gray, Yufang Jin, Jeffrey Mount, Scott Stephens, William Stewart Supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and the US Environmental Protection Agency" } ["___content":protected]=> string(156) "

Eventbriefing Headwaterforests0917

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Benefits of headwater forests: – Source of 2/3 of state’s surface water – Habitat for endangered species – Timber production for rural development and urban housing – Recreation 2 Key takeaways for improving headwater forests  Decades of fire suppression made forests too dense, vulnerable to die-offs and catastrophic wildfires  Treatments to improve forest resilience are difficult to use in complex management environment  Suggested reforms: – Manage for long term and over large scales – Bundle treatments with revenue generating projects – Enhance cooperation between various types of landowners and other stakeholders 3 Outline  Forest health is in decline  Treatments for improving forest health  Reforms for increasing the pace and scale of action 4 Headwater forests too dense, with many small trees Tree density in the headwater forests 200 150 Trees per acre 100 50 0 Small trees Medium trees Large trees 1930s 2000s All trees 5 The drought accelerated forest health decline Latest drought impacts: – 15 million more dead trees per year, most from bark beetle outbreak – Two of largest wildfires in state history Recent tree die-off in the Sierra Nevada 6 Outline  Forest health is in decline  Treatments for improving forest health  Reforms for increasing the pace and scale of action 7 Removing forest fuels will improve forest health Prescribed and managed wildfire Mechanical thinning 8 Barriers to increasing use of these treatments  Focus on avoiding short-term impacts limits ability to manage for long-term health  Treatment needs are poorly understood  No single formula for funding expansion of treatments  Many parties across a patchwork of landownership need to coordinate to be effective at large-enough scale 9 Outline  Forest health is in decline  Treatments for improving forest health  Reforms for increasing the pace and scale of action 10 Make forest health a top priority Actions: – Use broader permitting tools to support long-term forest health on federal lands – Level playing field between fire suppression and other management actions – Embed forest health objectives into state forest management practices Smoke from a Sierra wildfire 11 Define needs and make the most of available funding Actions: – Improve and standardize forest treatment accounting practices – Bundle harvesting with other treatments to help cover costs – Collaborate for funding Idaho sawmill 12 Utilize new and existing tools that facilitate collaboration Actions: – Long-term and financially viable stewardship contracts on national forests – Federal and state collaboration through the Good Neighbor Authority – Private forest owner collaboration through forest health districts Malheur National Forest, Oregon 13 Solutions are not easy and not one-size-fits-all  It took decades to create poor conditions in today’s forests, and will take decades to improve their health  Barriers to improving forest health are not technical―they are legal, social, and financial  Reforms will require determined leadership at local, state, federal levels  Forest health should be a common goal for all Californians 14 Thank you! 15 About these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. 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