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Event Briefing Improving Outcomes For English Learners

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(62) "eventbriefing_improving-outcomes-for-english-learners-0518.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "387609" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3329) "K–12 Reforms and California’s English Learner Achievement Gap May 31, 2018 Laura Hill English Learner students are California’s future  1.3 million English Learner (EL) students – 21% of K‒12 students – 38% including former ELs  EL status is meant to be temporary – Assessed at school entry – Provided with services and supports to improve English proficiency – Reclassified as English proficient according to criteria set by district (with state guidance) 2 Most of the state’s ELs speak Spanish at home Cantonese, 1% Arabic, 1% Filipino, 1% Mandarin, 1% Vietnamese, 2% Other, 9% Spanish, 83% 3 EL students live in almost every county 4 Some students take many years to reclassify Ever EL (in thousands) 200 150 100 50 0 KN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Grade Source: CDE, 2016–17 school year. Reclassified Long-term EL EL 4–5 years EL 0–3 years 5 Reclassified ELs are among the state’s strongest performers % met standard 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 ELA Source: CDE Smarter Balanced Assessment Results, 2016–17 school year. Math EL Reclassified English only 6 ELs are affected by new academic standards and tests  Common Core State Standards – ELA and math standards require more language skills than old standards – Smarter Balanced assessment reflects this; students not scoring as well  English Language Development standards – Align with new Common Core standards – New assessment (ELPAC) this year  English Learner Roadmap will help implement and link 7 EL reclassification is in flux  Reclassification rate is 13%  Reclassification decision is based on: – English proficiency (CELDT  ELPAC) – Basic skills in English (CST  SBAC) – Teacher and parent recommendations  Reclassification policy should be uniform across districts – Keep same basic criteria, using SBAC and ELPAC? – Use fewer criteria – just the ELPAC? – Allow multiple measures – Should criteria vary by grade level or type of EL? 8 Reforms are intended to support EL progress  Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) directs funding to EL (and other high-need students)  Local Control and Accountability Plans – Establish priorities and goals – Explain how funds support goals, emphasis on high-need students  Prop 58 (bilingual education)  To monitor the impact of reforms, need to track spending and how it is helping students succeed 9 Accountability efforts require good data  District and school dashboards – Allow parents to assess annual data – Will include all statewide and district-specific priorities  State has made some data improvements – Reporting Smarter Balanced scores for “ever-ELs” – Counts of long-term ELs and of students at risk of becoming long-term ELs  Using existing K‒12 data to track student progress over time would be a tremendous improvement – Better still would be linking to post-secondary data 10 K–12 Reforms and California’s English Learner Achievement Gap May 31, 2018 Laura Hill Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Laura Hill (hill@ppic.org; 415-291-4424) Thank you for your interest in this work. 12" } ["___content":protected]=> string(198) "

Event Briefing Improving Outcomes For English Learners

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