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Managing Wastewater in a Changing Climate, Event Briefing

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(40) "eventbriefing_managingwastewater0419.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "818757" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5706) "Managing Wastewater in a Changing Climate April 22, 2019 Caitrin Chappelle Research supported by the California Association of Sanitation Agencies, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, and the US Environmental Protection Agency California’s wastewater sector is at a turning point  Wastewater management helps protect public health and the environment, is source for recycled water  Shifts in policies, better planning can help sector prepare for drought, changing water demands, climate change  New report based on first-hand information from agencies – Surveyed wastewater managers on experiences before, during, after latest drought (133 responses) – Focus groups with local and state agencies helped define challenges, innovations 2 Drought and changing climate complicate wastewater management  Reduced indoor water use reduces volumes into treatment plants  Shifts to alternative water sources can affect influent quality  Lower flows, higher temperatures in rivers and streams will further stress ecosystems that depend on treated wastewater  More “atmospheric rivers” will increase flood risk to treatment plants, bring unplanned spills  Sea level rise will affect wastewater treatment plants on the coast 3 A shift is needed in how we manage wastewater Key Challenges:  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 4 Outline  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 5 Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Wastewater managers must adapt to: – Periodic short-term water conservation in response to droughts – Long-term increases in urban water use efficiency 6 The unusually warm drought of 2012–16 was a window into the future 7 Urban water use rapidly declined during mandated conservation period Water use per capita (gpcd) 250 Governor's mandate 225 announced End of drought emergency declared 200 175 150 125 100 75 50 Jun Oct Feb Jun Oct Feb Jun Oct Feb Jun Oct Feb June Oct Feb 14 14 15 15 15 16 16 16 17 17 17 18 18 18 19 San Joaquin Valley Northern California Statewide Southern California Central Coast San Francisco Bay 8 Reduced indoor water use led to reduced influent flow, changes to influent quality Reduced influent flows 85 Change in influent or effluent quality 0 61 20 40 60 80 Share of surveyed wastewater agencies (%) 100 9 Wastewater agencies experienced problems with collection and treatment during the drought Collection challenges Increased solids deposition Increased corrosion Increased odor problem Treatment challenges Processing issues Damaged infrastructure 0 6 27 19 18 37 20 40 60 80 Share of surveyed wastewater agencies (%) 100 10 Agencies must adapt to long-term reductions in indoor water use  Long-term indoor water use efficiency will impact amount, quality of influent  Per capita water use is declining, further declines likely as a result of state, local policies 11 Recommendations for building resilience  Increase information sharing and coordination with water suppliers  Plan for future droughts  Improve understanding of wastewater system vulnerability “Coordination between water suppliers and wastewater agencies needs to ______.” Increase significantly 38% Maintain its current levels 31% Increase slightly 31% 12 Outline  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 13 Wastewater is the source for recycled water, a growing water supply  Reduced influent flows during drought cut into recycled water production  Changing influent characteristics creates challenges  Evolving regulations and state policies will change demand Recycled Water Use (acre-feet) 800,000 Recycled water use is growing 700,000 600,000 500,000 Urban Agriculture Groundwater recharge Other 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 1970 1977 1987 2001 2009 2015 14 Recommendations for building resilience  Regional plans for recycled water investments are needed  Focus on flexible recycled water investments Clovis Water Reuse Facility 15 Outline  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 16 Most plants discharge treated wastewater into inland watersheds  Adapting to declining water use and meeting increased demand for recycled water may mean less treated wastewater for: – Environmental water needs – Downstream users  Climate change exacerbates these conflicts Salton Sea 17 Recommendations for building resilience  Identify watersheds vulnerable to changes in wastewater management  Develop science to support management and regulatory decisions  Evaluate tradeoffs caused by the interplay of state policies LA River 18 Awareness of these challenges is growing, providing an opportunity for action 19 Thank you! These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Caitrin Chappelle (chappelle@ppic.org; 415-291-4435) Thank you for your interest in this work. Managing Wastewater in a Changing Climate April 22, 2019 Caitrin Chappelle Research supported by the California Association of Sanitation Agencies, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, and the US Environmental Protection Agency" } ["___content":protected]=> string(179) "

Managing Wastewater in a Changing Climate, Event Briefing

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D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, and the US Environmental Protection Agency California’s wastewater sector is at a turning point  Wastewater management helps protect public health and the environment, is source for recycled water  Shifts in policies, better planning can help sector prepare for drought, changing water demands, climate change  New report based on first-hand information from agencies – Surveyed wastewater managers on experiences before, during, after latest drought (133 responses) – Focus groups with local and state agencies helped define challenges, innovations 2 Drought and changing climate complicate wastewater management  Reduced indoor water use reduces volumes into treatment plants  Shifts to alternative water sources can affect influent quality  Lower flows, higher temperatures in rivers and streams will further stress ecosystems that depend on treated wastewater  More “atmospheric rivers” will increase flood risk to treatment plants, bring unplanned spills  Sea level rise will affect wastewater treatment plants on the coast 3 A shift is needed in how we manage wastewater Key Challenges:  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 4 Outline  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 5 Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Wastewater managers must adapt to: – Periodic short-term water conservation in response to droughts – Long-term increases in urban water use efficiency 6 The unusually warm drought of 2012–16 was a window into the future 7 Urban water use rapidly declined during mandated conservation period Water use per capita (gpcd) 250 Governor's mandate 225 announced End of drought emergency declared 200 175 150 125 100 75 50 Jun Oct Feb Jun Oct Feb Jun Oct Feb Jun Oct Feb June Oct Feb 14 14 15 15 15 16 16 16 17 17 17 18 18 18 19 San Joaquin Valley Northern California Statewide Southern California Central Coast San Francisco Bay 8 Reduced indoor water use led to reduced influent flow, changes to influent quality Reduced influent flows 85 Change in influent or effluent quality 0 61 20 40 60 80 Share of surveyed wastewater agencies (%) 100 9 Wastewater agencies experienced problems with collection and treatment during the drought Collection challenges Increased solids deposition Increased corrosion Increased odor problem Treatment challenges Processing issues Damaged infrastructure 0 6 27 19 18 37 20 40 60 80 Share of surveyed wastewater agencies (%) 100 10 Agencies must adapt to long-term reductions in indoor water use  Long-term indoor water use efficiency will impact amount, quality of influent  Per capita water use is declining, further declines likely as a result of state, local policies 11 Recommendations for building resilience  Increase information sharing and coordination with water suppliers  Plan for future droughts  Improve understanding of wastewater system vulnerability “Coordination between water suppliers and wastewater agencies needs to ______.” Increase significantly 38% Maintain its current levels 31% Increase slightly 31% 12 Outline  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 13 Wastewater is the source for recycled water, a growing water supply  Reduced influent flows during drought cut into recycled water production  Changing influent characteristics creates challenges  Evolving regulations and state policies will change demand Recycled Water Use (acre-feet) 800,000 Recycled water use is growing 700,000 600,000 500,000 Urban Agriculture Groundwater recharge Other 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 1970 1977 1987 2001 2009 2015 14 Recommendations for building resilience  Regional plans for recycled water investments are needed  Focus on flexible recycled water investments Clovis Water Reuse Facility 15 Outline  Maintaining water quality in the face of reduced indoor water use  Making smart recycled water investments  Balancing conflicting objectives within watersheds 16 Most plants discharge treated wastewater into inland watersheds  Adapting to declining water use and meeting increased demand for recycled water may mean less treated wastewater for: – Environmental water needs – Downstream users  Climate change exacerbates these conflicts Salton Sea 17 Recommendations for building resilience  Identify watersheds vulnerable to changes in wastewater management  Develop science to support management and regulatory decisions  Evaluate tradeoffs caused by the interplay of state policies LA River 18 Awareness of these challenges is growing, providing an opportunity for action 19 Thank you! 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