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Event Briefing Slides – Priorities for California’s Water

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They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Ellen Hanak (hanak@ppic.org, 415-291-4433) Thank you for your interest in this work. Priorities for California’s Water October 26, 2017 Ellen Hanak Supported with funding from the annual sponsors of the PPIC Water Policy Center 19" } ["___content":protected]=> string(176) "

Event Briefing Slides - Priorities for California's Water

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