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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(37) "eventbriefing_englishpathways0218.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "348902" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3944) "Reforming English Pathways at California’s Community Colleges February 28, 2018 Marisol Cuellar Mejia, Olga Rodriguez, Hans Johnson, and Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Developmental education is an obstacle to college success  The vast majority of students entering California’s community colleges are deemed unprepared and placed into developmental (or remedial) education  Very few complete college-level English or math, or transfer to a four-year college  The structure of developmental education is a primary obstacle  Colleges are experimenting with reforms – Improving assessment and placement – Streamlining developmental education course sequences 2 The traditional developmental English pathway is long College Composition Writing 3 and Reading 3 Writing 2 and Reading 2 Writing 1 and Reading 1 Transfer-level course Developmental English course Reform pathways shorten the traditional sequence Writing-only sequence Mixed sequence Integrated Reading and Writing sequence Low acceleration One-semester acceleration College composition Co-requisite remediation College composition + Support course Writing 3 IRW 3 Writing 2 Writing 1 IRW 2 Writing 1 and Reading 1 IRW 3 IRW 2 IRW 1 Accelerated (Writing or IRW) Reading, Writing, or IRW Accelerated (Writing or IRW) Accelerated pathways are a popular reform  Two types of accelerated pathways: – One-semester acceleration (open access) – Low acceleration (has a prerequisite)  Often entail structural, curricular, and pedagogical reforms – Reducing exit points – Integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking – Employing “backward design” from the college-level course 5 The number of colleges offering accelerated pathways is increasing rapidly Number of colleges offering accelerated pathways 50 One-semester acceleration 40 Low acceleration 30 20 10 0 2006–07 2008–09 2010–11 2012–13 2014–15 2016–17 6 Students who take accelerated pathways have better outcomes… Percent of students successfully completing college composition within two years 50 42 40 41 30 27 20 14 10 0 One-semester acceleration Low acceleration Started two levels Started three levels below below 7 … but equity gaps remain large Percent of students successfully completing college composition within two years 60 Asian American 50 White Latino 40 African American 30 20 10 0 One-semester acceleration Started two levels below Started three levels below 8 Co-requisite remediation is a promising approach  Evidence from other states shows larger gains from co-requisite remediation than what we find with one-semester acceleration  Only eight colleges offered co-requisite remediation in 2016–17 – Combined enrollment of about 2,500 students  But we expect these numbers to grow significantly  Ongoing PPIC research will assess the effectiveness of co-requisite remediation in our state 9 More work needs to be done  Only a few colleges are offering reform pathways at scale; most colleges continue to offer multilevel sequences  Professional development is key  Reducing equity gaps should be a main consideration  AB 705 provides a tremendous opportunity for adopting and scaling up reforms 10 Reforming English Pathways at California’s Community Colleges February 28, 2018 Marisol Cuellar Mejia, Olga Rodriguez, Hans Johnson, and Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Marisol Cuellar Mejia (cuellar@ppic.org; 916-440-1135) Thank you for your interest in this work. 12" } ["___content":protected]=> string(152) "

Eventbriefing Englishpathways0218

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