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Eventbriefing Reformingmathpathways1017

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(43) "eventbriefing_reformingmathpathways1017.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "449893" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5225) "Reforming Math Pathways in California’s Community Colleges October 24, 2017 Olga Rodriguez, Hans Johnson, Marisol Cuellar Mejia, and Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Developmental math is an obstacle for community college students  The California Community Colleges (CCC) system is large and diverse – Educates almost half of the state’s undergraduates – High numbers of historically underrepresented students enroll – Critical to the production of bachelor’s degrees  Equity is a major concern in developmental (remedial) math – 65% of incoming students enroll but few complete transfer-level math—49% of students one level below transfer and only 8% of those four levels below – Historically underrepresented students are disproportionately represented  Community colleges are experimenting with alternative pathways to transfer-level math, as well as other reforms – Revising assessment and placement procedures – Exploring alternative curricular approaches 2 Two key reforms aim to shorten the path to transferlevel math  Statistics pathway – Provides accelerated pathway to transfer level math for students in liberal arts and humanities majors – Aims to better align with transfer-level statistics  Compressed math pathway – Accelerates pathway to transfer math by combines two developmental math courses into a single course – Aims to streamline content by reducing time spent on review and eliminating redundancy  Reforms only reach a small share of students Comparing traditional math and statistics pathways Students in statistics pathways are much more likely to complete a transfer-level course Share of students (%) 100 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Enrolled 75 64 Completed Beginning algebra or pre-statisics 44 38 Enrolled Completed Intermediate algebra Statistics pathway Traditional math pathway 67 49 26 22 16 13 Enrolled Completed Transfer-level math Earned a degree, certificate, or transferred 5 Outcomes improve for a broad range of students, but equity gaps remain Share of students completing transfer-level math (%) 60 50 40 33 30 20 12 10 0 African American 47 16 Latino 51 20 Asian American Traditional math pathway Statistics pathway 58 55 53 49 45 18 16 18 19 14 White Low-income Not Male low-income Female 6 Comparing traditional and compressed math pathways The compressed algebra pathway has a modest impact Share of students progressing (%) 100 100 90 80 70 Compressed algebra pathway Traditional math pathway 66 60 50 59 43 40 51 28 30 38 20 15 10 0 20 15 13 Enrolled Completed Enrolled Completed Enrolled Completed Earned a degree, certificate, Beginning algebra or compressed algebra Intermediate algebra Transfer-level math or transferred 8 Outcomes improve for a broad range of students, but equity gaps have not narrowed Share of students completing transfer-level math (%) 60 50 40 30 20 13 10 6 0 African American 20 9 25 12 Latino Asian American 17 10 White Traditional math pathway Compressed algebra pathway 18 10 28 14 18 9 23 10 Male Female Low-income Not low-income 9 Students in compressed arithmetic and pre-algebra pathways have poor outcomes Share of students progressing (%) 100 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 17 10 0 Start in traditional or Completed compressed math developmental math Traditional math pathway Compressed arithmetic-pre-algebra pathway 8 Enrolled in transfer math 5 Completed transfer math 5 Earned a degree, certificate, or transferred 10 Developmental math reforms improve overall outcomes but have not closed gaps between student groups  Longstanding gaps between students overall and students in underrepresented groups have not narrowed – Race/ethnicity, gender, and low-income status  Community colleges have begun to consider the equity implications of developmental education – Partly in response to student equity funding  Colleges have begun to address equity gaps – Integrating student supports – Professional development – Reforming assessment and placement 11 Policy recommendations  Expand access to statistics and compressed algebra pathways  Consider curricular reform in compressed algebra  Consider eliminating lowest developmental math levels  Integrate developmental math reforms and guided pathways to support student success beyond developmental education  Encourage innovations and monitor their impact – Evaluate outcomes as colleges implement and expand math reforms – Assess whether interventions help to close equity gaps 12 Reforming Math Pathways in California’s Community Colleges October 24, 2017 Olga Rodriguez, Hans Johnson, Marisol Cuellar Mejia, and Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Olga Rodriguez (rodriguez@ppic.org; 415-291-4457) Thank you for your interest in this work. 14" } ["___content":protected]=> string(164) "

Eventbriefing Reformingmathpathways1017

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October 24, 2017 Olga Rodriguez, Hans Johnson, Marisol Cuellar Mejia, and Bonnie Brooks Supported with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the College Futures Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Developmental math is an obstacle for community college students  The California Community Colleges (CCC) system is large and diverse – Educates almost half of the state’s undergraduates – High numbers of historically underrepresented students enroll – Critical to the production of bachelor’s degrees  Equity is a major concern in developmental (remedial) math – 65% of incoming students enroll but few complete transfer-level math—49% of students one level below transfer and only 8% of those four levels below – Historically underrepresented students are disproportionately represented  Community colleges are experimenting with alternative pathways to transfer-level math, as well as other reforms – Revising assessment and placement procedures – Exploring alternative curricular approaches 2 Two key reforms aim to shorten the path to transferlevel math  Statistics pathway – Provides accelerated pathway to transfer level math for students in liberal arts and humanities majors – Aims to better align with transfer-level statistics  Compressed math pathway – Accelerates pathway to transfer math by combines two developmental math courses into a single course – Aims to streamline content by reducing time spent on review and eliminating redundancy  Reforms only reach a small share of students Comparing traditional math and statistics pathways Students in statistics pathways are much more likely to complete a transfer-level course Share of students (%) 100 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Enrolled 75 64 Completed Beginning algebra or pre-statisics 44 38 Enrolled Completed Intermediate algebra Statistics pathway Traditional math pathway 67 49 26 22 16 13 Enrolled Completed Transfer-level math Earned a degree, certificate, or transferred 5 Outcomes improve for a 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