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Eventbriefing Remedialplacement0918

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San JacinLt.oA. Trade-Tech Solano West L.A. West Hills Coalinga San Mateo 0 10 20 30 40 50 Change in the share of first-time English students starting directly in transfer-level (pp) 60 6 This relationship is stronger for math Change in throughput rate (pp) 40 30 20 10 0 -10 -20 -10 Cuyamaca Los Medanos Canyons Siskiyous 0 10 20 30 40 50 Change in the share of first-time math students starting directly in transfer-math (pp) 60 7 Students in co-requisite courses were much more likely to complete college composition within one year One-year throughput rate (%) Traditional remediation One-semester acceleration 100 96 Co-requisite remediation 85 80 79 78 67 77 72 69 60 49 46 40 35 31 33 30 34 37 41 34 24 20 18 0 Cuyamaca Fullerton Mira Costa Sacramento San Diego City Mesa Skyline Solano West Hills Coalinga 8 Similarly, students in statistics co-requisites had much higher throughput rates One-year throughput rate (%) 100 80 72 60 40 32 33 20 0 Cuyamaca Traditional remediation Pre-Stats Co-requisite (Statistics) 69 20 12 Los Medanos 9 Equity considerations  At early implementer colleges, significantly more underrepresented students are accessing transfer-level math courses – The average throughput rate is more than twice the statewide average – Equity gaps are smaller than statewide averages  Improvements in average college-level composition access and throughput rates are less dramatic – Equity gaps in English are slightly smaller than statewide averages 10 Looking ahead  Accountability, monitoring, and evaluation are going to be key  Research will continue to play a critical role – Types of concurrent support that work best – Longer-term impacts – Unintended consequences 11 Early Evidence on Placement and Curricular Reforms in California Community Colleges September 7, 2018 Olga Rodriguez, Marisol Cuellar Mejia, and Hans Johnson Supported with funding from the California Acceleration Project and the Sutton Family Fund Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. 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Eventbriefing Remedialplacement0918

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