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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(42) "eventbriefing_stackablecredentials1018.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "400212" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(7301) "Stackable Credentials in Career Education at California Community Colleges October 23, 2018 Sarah Bohn and Shannon McConville Supported with funding from the ECMC Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund The state is investing in career education programs  Career education pathways allow students to acquire skills for advanced jobs and higher earnings – Especially important for students who do not get four-year degrees  Community colleges are primary providers of career education – Wide range of students  Since 2014, the state has invested more than $1 billion – Career Pathways Trust and CTE incentive grants – Strong Workforce program provides ongoing support 2 Stackable credentials are especially important for students who start with short-term credentials  Multiple, related credentials allow students to build skills over time – Sequences often start with short-term certificates – Multiple exit and entry points, clear mapping  Opportunities for career advancement and increased earnings  Connected to other initiatives within the community college system – Guided pathways, new online college 3 We need comprehensive evidence on pathways and students who stack credentials  Previous findings on stackable credentials in health were promising – Significant returns to stacking credentials – Few pathways exist  We expanded our focus across several other major disciplines – Identified stackable pathway features – Examined which groups of students obtain related credentials  We also connected pathway designs to student outcomes 4 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 5 First-time students are increasingly likely to earn career education credentials Number of first-time students earning career education credential(s) 50,000 40,000 30,000 Total career education credentials Associate Short-term certificate Long-term certificate 20,000 10,000 0 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 6 Stackable sequences most often start with short-term certificates  Short-term credentials can be earned relatively quickly  But research suggests earnings return is lower  40% of community college students start with short-term awards – Nearly half are age 30 or older, 80% have no more than a high school education  To improve long-term employment opportunities and earnings, students could benefit from completing additional credentials 7 Most short-term certificate earners return to college but fewer than one in four earn another credential Three-year trajectories for students who initially earn a short-term certificate 9% 23% 35% Stop after 1st credential Return, no additional credential Complete multiple credentials Transfer to four-year college 33% 8 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 9 Identifying stackable credential programs  Scanned community college websites and course catalogs – Identified programs that offer related coursework and credentials  Developed criteria to identify features of two types of pathways – Progressive pathways offer a sequence of awards that lead to higherlevel credentials – Lattice pathways offer clusters of interconnected credentials that start from core set of course(s) 10 Progressive pathways are the most common type… A progressive information technology (IT) pathway at Consumnes Rivers Community College Application Specialist Certificate (11 units) Application Expert Certificate (22 units) Application Master Certificate (40 units) 11 …but few are explicitly identified Any upgrade potential Certificate-only paths Explicit path sequence 80% 47% 12% 12 Lattice pathways are less common… An energy technology pathway at Los Angeles Trade Tech Community College Energy Tech Fundamentals Certificate Energy Efficiency Certificate Solar PV Installation Certificate Solar Thermal Installation Certificate General Ed (GE) requirements Add’l renewable energy courses Associate of Science Energy Efficiency OR Associate of Science Solar PV OR Associate of Science Solar Thermal 13 …and most lattice sequences are not well-defined Launchpad to multiple credentials Launchpad defined Launchpad credential 54% 6% 3% 14 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 15 Connecting program design to student success  Link pathway features to student-level data  Control for multiple program, student, and college factors  Examine whether students in programs with well-defined stackable pathways are more likely to stack credentials 16 Share of students who stack along a pathway Small differences in stacking across demographic groups 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Notes: Estimates are regression adjusted for several student characteristics including demographics, markers of disadvantage, and measures of ability. 17 Programs with explicit stackable pathways compared to… Well-defined pathways increase the odds of stacking Programs with stackable features (but not explicit) Programs with minimal stackable features Programs with no stackable feature 0 5 10 15 20 Change in likelihood of stacking (percentage point) Notes: Estimates from fixed effects models that control for student characteristics, program characteristics, and colleges. All results shown are statistically significant. 18 Explicit pathways could help narrow achievement gaps Race/Ethncity Gender Female Male White Asian Latino Overall 012345678 Change in likelihood of stacking for explicit pathways compared to all others (percentage point) Notes: Estimates from separate fixed effects models for each group that control for additional student characteristics, program characteristics, and college. All results shown are statistically significant. 9 19 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 20 Key takeaways  Large share of career education students who earn short-term certificates return to community colleges for additional training  Colleges can strengthen career pathways for these students by designing career education programs with explicit credential sequences  It is important to ensure that additional credentials expand career opportunities and improve labor market outcomes 21 Stackable Credentials in Career Education at California Community Colleges October 23, 2018 Sarah Bohn and Shannon McConville Supported with funding from the ECMC Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. They do not include full documentation of sources, data samples, methods, and interpretations. To avoid misinterpretations, please contact: Shannon McConville (mcconville@ppic.org; 415-291-4481) or Sarah Bohn (bohn@ppic.org; 415-291-4413) Thank you for your interest in this work. 23" } ["___content":protected]=> string(162) "

Eventbriefing Stackablecredentials1018

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(141) "https://www.ppic.org/event/stackable-credentials-in-career-education-at-california-community-colleges/eventbriefing_stackablecredentials1018/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(16799) ["ID"]=> int(16799) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "9" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-10-23 09:46:14" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(16414) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Eventbriefing Stackablecredentials1018" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(38) "eventbriefing_stackablecredentials1018" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(42) "eventbriefing_stackablecredentials1018.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "400212" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(7301) "Stackable Credentials in Career Education at California Community Colleges October 23, 2018 Sarah Bohn and Shannon McConville Supported with funding from the ECMC Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund The state is investing in career education programs  Career education pathways allow students to acquire skills for advanced jobs and higher earnings – Especially important for students who do not get four-year degrees  Community colleges are primary providers of career education – Wide range of students  Since 2014, the state has invested more than $1 billion – Career Pathways Trust and CTE incentive grants – Strong Workforce program provides ongoing support 2 Stackable credentials are especially important for students who start with short-term credentials  Multiple, related credentials allow students to build skills over time – Sequences often start with short-term certificates – Multiple exit and entry points, clear mapping  Opportunities for career advancement and increased earnings  Connected to other initiatives within the community college system – Guided pathways, new online college 3 We need comprehensive evidence on pathways and students who stack credentials  Previous findings on stackable credentials in health were promising – Significant returns to stacking credentials – Few pathways exist  We expanded our focus across several other major disciplines – Identified stackable pathway features – Examined which groups of students obtain related credentials  We also connected pathway designs to student outcomes 4 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 5 First-time students are increasingly likely to earn career education credentials Number of first-time students earning career education credential(s) 50,000 40,000 30,000 Total career education credentials Associate Short-term certificate Long-term certificate 20,000 10,000 0 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 6 Stackable sequences most often start with short-term certificates  Short-term credentials can be earned relatively quickly  But research suggests earnings return is lower  40% of community college students start with short-term awards – Nearly half are age 30 or older, 80% have no more than a high school education  To improve long-term employment opportunities and earnings, students could benefit from completing additional credentials 7 Most short-term certificate earners return to college but fewer than one in four earn another credential Three-year trajectories for students who initially earn a short-term certificate 9% 23% 35% Stop after 1st credential Return, no additional credential Complete multiple credentials Transfer to four-year college 33% 8 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 9 Identifying stackable credential programs  Scanned community college websites and course catalogs – Identified programs that offer related coursework and credentials  Developed criteria to identify features of two types of pathways – Progressive pathways offer a sequence of awards that lead to higherlevel credentials – Lattice pathways offer clusters of interconnected credentials that start from core set of course(s) 10 Progressive pathways are the most common type… A progressive information technology (IT) pathway at Consumnes Rivers Community College Application Specialist Certificate (11 units) Application Expert Certificate (22 units) Application Master Certificate (40 units) 11 …but few are explicitly identified Any upgrade potential Certificate-only paths Explicit path sequence 80% 47% 12% 12 Lattice pathways are less common… An energy technology pathway at Los Angeles Trade Tech Community College Energy Tech Fundamentals Certificate Energy Efficiency Certificate Solar PV Installation Certificate Solar Thermal Installation Certificate General Ed (GE) requirements Add’l renewable energy courses Associate of Science Energy Efficiency OR Associate of Science Solar PV OR Associate of Science Solar Thermal 13 …and most lattice sequences are not well-defined Launchpad to multiple credentials Launchpad defined Launchpad credential 54% 6% 3% 14 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 15 Connecting program design to student success  Link pathway features to student-level data  Control for multiple program, student, and college factors  Examine whether students in programs with well-defined stackable pathways are more likely to stack credentials 16 Share of students who stack along a pathway Small differences in stacking across demographic groups 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Notes: Estimates are regression adjusted for several student characteristics including demographics, markers of disadvantage, and measures of ability. 17 Programs with explicit stackable pathways compared to… Well-defined pathways increase the odds of stacking Programs with stackable features (but not explicit) Programs with minimal stackable features Programs with no stackable feature 0 5 10 15 20 Change in likelihood of stacking (percentage point) Notes: Estimates from fixed effects models that control for student characteristics, program characteristics, and colleges. All results shown are statistically significant. 18 Explicit pathways could help narrow achievement gaps Race/Ethncity Gender Female Male White Asian Latino Overall 012345678 Change in likelihood of stacking for explicit pathways compared to all others (percentage point) Notes: Estimates from separate fixed effects models for each group that control for additional student characteristics, program characteristics, and college. All results shown are statistically significant. 9 19 Outline  Overview of career education students  Stackable credential pathways at community colleges  Pathway features that foster student success  Key takeaways 20 Key takeaways  Large share of career education students who earn short-term certificates return to community colleges for additional training  Colleges can strengthen career pathways for these students by designing career education programs with explicit credential sequences  It is important to ensure that additional credentials expand career opportunities and improve labor market outcomes 21 Stackable Credentials in Career Education at California Community Colleges October 23, 2018 Sarah Bohn and Shannon McConville Supported with funding from the ECMC Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation, and the Sutton Family Fund Notes on the use of these slides These slides were created to accompany a presentation. 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