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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "R_609MWR.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "2732545" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(530029) "California School Finance Revenue Manual Margaret Weston Jon Sonstelie Heather Rose Supported with funding from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation June 2009 4 Table of Contents Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 11 Overview of Fundin g ................................................................................................................................... 12 Data Sources and Method .......................................................................................................................... 13 Organiza tion ................................................................................................................................................ 15 Categorical Flexibility: The 2009 Budget Act .............................................................................................. 17 Glossary of Acronyms ................................................................................................................................. 18 School District and Charter School Unrestricted Revenues ........................................................................ 22 Revenue Limit Entitlement ..................................................................................................................... 23 Base Revenue Limit ............................................................................................................................. 24 Declining Enrollment Adjustment ....................................................................................................... 26 Necessary Small School (NSS) Adjustment ......................................................................................... 28 Locally Funded Charter Schools Adjustment ...................................................................................... 30 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment ............................................................................................... 32 All Other Revenue Limit Adjustments ................................................................................................. 34 Charter School General Purpose Block Grant ......................................................................................... 36 Charter School Block Grant ................................................................................................................. 37 Other Unrestricted State Funding ........................................................................................................... 38 Lottery: Proposition 37 ....................................................................................................................... 39 Excess Taxes and Federal In -Lieu Property Taxes ................................................................................... 41 Excess Taxes ........................................................................................................................................ 42 Federal Impact Aid .............................................................................................................................. 44 Forest Reserve Funds .......................................................................................................................... 46 School District and Charter School Restricted Revenues ............................................................................ 48 Administrative and Support Programs .................................................................................................... 49 California School Information Services (CSIS): Statewide Student Identifier Maintenance Reimbursement .................................................................................................................................. 50 Mandates ............................................................................................................................................ 52 Pupil Residency Verification ................................................................................................................ 54 5 Pupil Transportation: Home-to -School and Special Education ........................................................... 55 General Instruction ................................................................................................................................. 57 Charter School Categorical Block Grant .............................................................................................. 58 Class Size Reduction: Grade Nine (CSR 9) .......................................................................................... 60 Class Size Reduction: Kindergarten through Grade Three (K-3 CSR) .................................................. 62 Instructional Materials Funding Realignment ..................................................................................... 64 Lottery: Proposition 20 ....................................................................................................................... 66 School a nd Library Improvement Block Grant (SLIBG) ....................................................................... 68 School Safety and Violence Prevention Act ........................................................................................ 70 Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE) ........................................................................................ 72 Year -Round Education Grants ............................................................................................................. 74 Special Education Programs .................................................................................................................... 76 AB 602: Base Funding .......................................................................................................................... 77 AB 602: Declining Enrollment Adjustment ......................................................................................... 79 AB 602: Severity Cost Pool Adjustment .............................................................................................. 81 AB 602: Special Disability Adjustment (SDA) ...................................................................................... 83 AB 602: All Other Adjustments ........................................................................................................... 85 Low Incidence Support Services Funding ............................................................................................ 87 Special Education Mandate Settlement .............................................................................................. 89 Mental Health Services ....................................................................................................................... 91 Personnel Development Programs ..................................................................................................... 93 Regional Occupational Center/Program (ROCP) Hand icapped .......................................................... 95 Workability .......................................................................................................................................... 97 Targeted Programs .................................................................................................................................. 98 Advanced Place ment (AP) Test Fee Reimbursement ......................................................................... 99 After School Education and Safety (ASES) ........................................................................................ 101 California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Intensive Instruction and Services ............................... 103 California School Age Families Education (CalSAFE) ......................................................................... 105 Community Day School Additional Funding ..................................................................................... 107 Economic Impact Aid (EIA) ................................................................................................................ 109 English Language Acquisition Program (ELAP) .................................................................................. 111 Foster Youth Services (FYS) ............................................................................................................... 113 6 Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) ............................................................................................. 115 High Priority Schools Grant Program (HPSGP) .................................................................................. 117 Immediate Intervention for Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP) ........................................ 119 International Baccalaureate (IB) ....................................................................................................... 121 Nell Soto Parent Involvement ........................................................................................................... 123 Pupil Retention Block Grant (PRBG).................................................................................................. 124 Refugee Children Supplemental Assistance Program ....................................................................... 126 School Community Violence Prevention (SCVP) ............................................................................... 128 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program ...................................................................................... 129 School Nutrition: State Meal Program .............................................................................................. 131 Specialized Secondary Programs (SSP) ............................................................................................. 133 State -Monitored Schools Program ................................................................................................... 135 Supplemental Instruction: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE Remedial) ............................ 137 Supplemental Instruction: Core Academic Program ........................................................................ 139 Supplemental Instruction: Low STAR ............................................................................................... 141 Supplemental Instruction: Retained and Recommended for Retention ......................................... 143 Targeted Instruction Improvement Block Grant (TIIBG) ................................................................... 145 Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs ................................................................. 147 Chief Business Officer (CBO) Training Program ................................................................................ 148 Math and Reading Professional Development ................................................................................. 149 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Incentive Award ............................................ 151 Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) .................................................................................................... 153 Principal Training Program ................................................................................................................ 155 Professional Development Block Grant (PDBG) ................................................................................ 157 Reader Services for Legally Blind Teachers ....................................................................................... 159 Teacher Dismissal Apportionment .................................................................................................... 161 Teacher Recruitment and Retention Program .................................................................................. 162 Vocational Programs ............................................................................................................................. 164 Agricultural Vocational Education Incentive Grants ......................................................................... 165 Apprenticeship .................................................................................................................................. 167 California Partn ership Academies (CPA) ........................................................................................... 169 Regional Occupational Center/Program (ROCP) ............................................................................... 171 7 County Offices of Education Unrestricted Revenues ................................................................................ 173 Base Revenue Limit ........................................................................................................................... 174 Direct Services to Districts ................................................................................................................ 175 Ed ucation Services Revenue Limit .................................................................................................... 176 Locally Funded COE Charter Schools Adjustment ............................................................................. 177 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment ............................................................................................. 178 All Other Adjustments ....................................................................................................................... 179 Miscellane ous Revenue .................................................................................................................... 180 County Offices of Education Restricted Revenues .................................................................................... 181 County Office of Education (COE) Fiscal Oversight ........................................................................... 182 County Oversight: Williams Case Settlement ................................................................................... 183 County School Service Fund .............................................................................................................. 184 Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE): COE Oversight and Assistance .................................... 185 Unemployment Insurance Management System ............................................................................. 186 Other Statewide or Regional Support Program Revenues ....................................................................... 187 Administrative and Support Services .................................................................................................... 188 After School Education and Safety (ASES): Regional After School Techni cal Assistance System ..... 189 California School Information Services (CSIS) ................................................................................... 190 Education Technology: California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) ........................................ 191 Education Technology: K- 12 High-Speed Network .......................................................................... 192 Education Technology: Statewide Education Technology Services (SETS) ....................................... 193 Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) ................................................................ 194 School Community Violence Prevention (SCVP): School Safety and Violence Prevention Training . 195 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Training and Evaluation ............................................... 196 Student Friendly Services (SFS) ......................................................................................................... 197 Teacher Recruitment and Retention: COE Contract ......................................................................... 198 Testing: Assessment Review and Reporting .................................................................................... 199 Testing: California English Language Development Test (CELDT) .................................................... 200 Testing: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) ........................................................................ 201 Testing: California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) .............................................................. 202 Testing: Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) ....................................................................... 203 8 General Instruction Programs ............................................................................................................... 204 Ad vancement via Individual Determination (AVID) .......................................................................... 205 American Indian Education Centers (AIEC) ....................................................................................... 206 California Association of Student Councils ....................................................................................... 207 Center for Civic Education ................................................................................................................. 208 Envi ronmental Education (EE) .......................................................................................................... 209 Teacher Training and Professional Development Programs ................................................................. 210 Alternative Certification Programs ................................................................................................... 211 Bilingual Teacher Training (BTTP) ..................................................................................................... 212 Teacher Credentialing Block Grant (TCBG) ....................................................................................... 213 Adult Education Programs ........................................................................................................................ 214 Adult Education ................................................................................................................................. 215 Adults in Correctional Facilities ......................................................................................................... 217 Community -Based English Tutoring (CBET) ...................................................................................... 218 Direct Support Professional Training Program ................................................................................. 220 Child Care and Development Programs .................................................................................................... 221 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 2 ......................................................................................... 222 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 3 ......................................................................................... 223 Alternative Payment: non CalWORKs .............................................................................................. 224 American Indian Early Childhood Education (AIECE) ........................................................................ 225 California Child Care Initiative ........................................................................................................... 227 Campus Tax Bailout ........................................................................................................................... 228 Centralized Eligibility List .................................................................................................................. 229 Community Colleges Program .......................................................................................................... 230 General Child Care and Development ............................................................................................... 231 Handicapped Program ...................................................................................................................... 232 Local Planning Councils (LPCs) .......................................................................................................... 233 Migrant Child Care and Development .............................................................................................. 234 Quality Improvement Funds: Child Development Retention and Training Program........................ 235 Quality Improvement Funds: Child Development Training Consortium (CDTC) .............................. 236 Resource and Referral ....................................................................................................................... 237 9 School Age Community Child Care Services (SACCC) ........................................................................ 238 State Preschool ................................................................................................................................. 239 Facilities Funding ....................................................................................................................................... 240 Charter School Facility Grant Program ............................................................................................. 241 Charter School Revolving Loan Fund ................................................................................................ 242 Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fund (CCFRF) ............................................................................ 243 Deferred Maintenance (DMP) .......................................................................................................... 244 Emergency Repair Account, Williams Settlement ............................................................................ 246 School Facility Program ..................................................................................................................... 247 School Nutrition: School Breakfast and Summer School Start -Ups .................................................. 248 Small School District and County Office of Education Bus Replacement ......................................... 249 Special Education Programs ...................................................................................................................... 250 Early Start Early Intervention Grants ................................................................................................ 251 Infant Funding ................................................................................................................................... 252 Ravenswood Monitoring ................................................................................................................... 253 State Staff Training ............................................................................................................................ 254 Local Revenue ........................................................................................................................................... 255 Leases, Rentals, I nterest and Other Capital Proceeds ...................................................................... 256 Other Fees and Taxes ........................................................................................................................ 258 Parcel Taxes ...................................................................................................................................... 260 All Other Local Revenue .................................................................................................................... 262 Federal Revenue ....................................................................................................................................... 264 Federal Child Nutrition Programs ..................................................................................................... 265 Title I ................................................................................................................................................. 267 All Other Federal Funds .................................................................................................................... 269 Appendix 1: Funding Terminology ............................................................................................................ 271 Appendix 2: Funding Authority Budget Act Line Items ............................................................................ 274 Appendix 3: Sources of Data .................................................................................................................... 280 Appendix 4: Categorical Flexibility ........................................................................................................... 284 Appendix 5: Statewide Summary Charts ................................................................................................. 286 10 Appendix 6: Frequently Asked Questions ................................................................................................ 293 References ................................................................................................................................................ 295 About the Authors .................................................................................................................................... 296 Related PPIC Publications ......................................................................................................................... 297 11 Introduction Revenue flows to California’s public schools through many different channels. The complexity of that funding system has led to calls for more simplicity and transparenc y, but the complexity itself is an obstacle to reform. The purpose of this manual is to help overcome that obstacle. The manual briefly describes each source of revenue for California public schools and provides basic statistics on how that source distri butes revenue among school districts, county offices of education, charter schools, and other non -profit organizations. The descriptions and statistics are for 2005 -2006, the latest year for which complete information on each program was available. This manual is meant to accompany the PPIC School Finance Model1 , which details how much revenue each school district received from each revenue source in 2005 -2006. The model also allows users to compare the distribution of revenue under the current system with the distribution under alternative systems that they specify. By developing the model and writing this manual, we intend to facilitate a more open and informed discussion of school finance policy. The complexity of California’s system has tended to make those discussions the province of a few experts, an unfortunate situation for such an important public service. Moreover, even experts suffer from a lack of information about how re venue is distributed in the current system. In that vacuum, school finance policy is too often based on a few anecdotes rather than the broad empirical perspective necessary to represent the wide variety of California’s public schools. We believe our model and manual can be useful to both those who wish to play a more active role in the school finance discussion and to those who are already at the center of that discussion. 1 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org 12 Overview of Funding California’s charter schools, districts, and county offices of education are financed through a combination of local, state, and federal dollars. There are two main types of funds: unrestricted funds that may be spent on any legitimate purpose and restricted funds that may have eligibility requirements or expenditure restrictions. School districts and county offices receive most of the unrestricted funds through California’s revenue limit system, which combines local property taxes and state aid to achieve revenue targets specified by the Legislature. Charter schools receive most of their unrestricted revenue through their general purpose block grant, which mimics the revenue limit system. These sources constitute approximately 60 percent of the funding received by school districts. Charters, districts, and county offices may also be eligible for a number of state categorical programs. These programs vary in their purpose, funding, and scope. In general, each categorical program has specific eligibility crite ria, and its funding is restricted to specific expenditures. Many of these revenue sources are related, making any count of sources somewhat arbitrary. However, using broad definitions, the state had at least 60 of these revenue sources in 2005 -2006. These sources account for about 25 percent of the revenue received by school districts and about 30 percent of the state’s expenditure s on K -12 education. Some categorical program revenues come from special funds, such as the lottery. These special funds provide less than 2 percent of all funding to school districts, county offices, and charter schools. The federal government also provides revenue to school districts, county offices, and charter schools through a number of categorical programs. Additional ly, some state programs involve federal funds. In total, California schools receive approximately 9 percent of their funding from the federal government. Finally, some school districts benefit from other sources of local funds, such as parcel taxes. Other local funds account for approximately 8 percent of all revenues to districts. This manual focuses on state revenues and does not provide details on specific federal and local sources of revenues. 13 Data Sources and Method The data included in this man ual are from a variety of sources, most of which are publicly available. The majority of revenues are allocated through the principal apportionment administered by the California Department of Education (CDE). The biggest revenue source in the principal apportionment is the state aid portion of revenue limits for districts and county offices. The CDE provided us with the principal apportionment data for 2005 -2006. The CDE also provided us with data from CalSTARS, the department’s intern al accounting system. The system tracks Budget Act appropriations as well as transfers across agencies and special funds. For revenue sources not in the principal apportionment, we first turned to CalSTARS. In a number of cases, CalSTARS shows the funding recipient of a program as a division within the CDE. In those cases, we relied on the apportionment files in the Finance and Grants section of CDE’s website. Some restricted revenues are allocated by other state age ncies, such as the Controller’s Office or the Office of Public School Construction. These revenues include lottery funds (Controller’s Office) and deferred maintenance (Office of Public School Construction). For these programs, we contacted the respectiv e office to get data. In some instances, we were unable to obtain allocations to school districts, county offices, or charter schools. These cases are noted in the Special Considerations section of the program descriptions. Finally, for federal and local revenue we were not able to obtain through other sources, we rely on the Standardized Account Code Structure (SACS) 2005 -2006 dataset. SACS is a compilation of unaudited accounting data provided by school districts and county offices. A complete list of each revenue’s data source is available in Appendix 3: Sources of Data. The data are all for 2005-2006, the latest audited and certified data available from CDE. In some instances, funding for activities completed in 2005 -2006 is appropriated in later years or appropriations in 2005-2006 fund activities completed in other years. We have attempted to compile all revenues that are for activities completed in 2005 -2006. The PPIC School Finance Model 2 includ es the 978 districts that receive funding. Locally funded charter schools are rolled up to their sponsoring district. However, some revenue is allocated to consortia of districts and county offices. Examples include the 73 regional occupation centers an d programs (ROCPs) , the 120 special education local plan areas (SELPAs) , a food service joint powers authority (JPA), and 8 transportation JPAs. We do not include these entities as separate organizations; rather, we prorate their total funding to their members based on the number of students each had. The following descr iptions of each revenue source contain a table describing the allocation of revenue from that source across four broad classes of organizations. The first class is the 978 school districts, including their locally funded charters, the second is the 58 county offices, and the third is the 356 direct funded charter schools. The fourth is a category or organizations not usually consider to be local education agencies (LEAs). The non -LEAs include the State Special Schools, California Youth Authorities (CYAs) , American Indian Education Centers and tribal councils, community colleges and other 2 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org 14 institutions of higher education, child care contractors, CDE program divisions, local governments, and other state agencies. There are approximately 2,250 non -LEAs included in our data. Determining what constitutes a program or revenue source can be quite subjective. In some instances a Budget Act line item may contain several schedules each considered different programs. This is the case for the Child Care and Develo pment programs, where Budget Item 196 funds 13 programs in two schedules. Our categorization of revenue sources was guided by our main goal, which is to describe the revenue of California’s K -12 school districts and charter schools. For revenue sources that flow mostly to school districts and charter schools, we tended to represent the various schedules of Budget Act items as separate revenue sources. On the other hand, for revenue sources that flow mostly to LEAs that are not school districts or charte r schools, we tended to combine those schedules and represent the item itself as one program In addition, COE oversight or administrative components of programs can appear in the Budget Act as a separate appropriation, a provision of an appropriation, or not at all. The Tobacco Use Prevention Education program’s oversight component receives a separate appropriation, while the School Safety Competitive Block Grant’s training component is included as a provision of the appropriation. To be consistent, wher e administrative, training, or oversight activities are specifically mentioned in the Budget Act, we consider them a separate revenue source or program. Where the Budget Act does not include such language, as in the case with testing contracts, we keep th at funding in the program’s total. The Special Considerations or Level of Funding sections of the program descriptions include language about these administrative or separate components of the overall funding. In describing the allocation of funds in a p rogram, we often provide statistics on dollars per pupil for districts of a certain type. The number of pupils is based on average daily attendance (ADA). The apportionment formulas use many different measures of ADA depending on the program or purpose. Our measure is current year (2005-2006) actual ADA in schools operated by the district. This includes the ADA in locally funded charters and necessary small schools, but it excludes district students who are transferred to schools operated by the county offices of education. Unlike the measure of ADA used in the revenue limit calculations, we use ADA in the current year not the highest of the current and previous year, a condition protecting districts with declining enrollment. Finally, in some cases, demographic data was missing. Twelve of the 978 districts had missing free and reduced price lunch data and 80 of the 978 districts have missing English learner (EL) counts. We treated all missing data as zero. Therefore, we may be underestimating the number and percentage of English learners and disadvantaged students for some districts. More data and methods information may be available in Appendix 6: Frequently Asked Questions. 15 Organization Each revenue source has be en categorized according to its beneficiary and type of revenue. The first section lists and explains the unrestricted general purpose district and charter school revenues. These include the district revenue limit entitlement and the charter school block grant. The second section continues with district and charter school restricted revenues. The subsequent two sections list unrestricted and restricted revenues for COEs. The final section lists other programs and revenues that are included in the Budget Act under K -12 programs but that are statewide or regional services available to all LEAs or that do not support K-12 students. Within each section, revenues are characterized by broad category. We attempt to categorize each revenue or program into one of the following categories: administrative and support services, adult education, child care and development, facilities, general instruction, special education, targeted programs, teacher and professional development programs, and vocational programs. Each revenue source has at least one page. The first page describes the purpose or intent of the program and the types of activities funded by the program; any eligibility criteria; the funding allocation formula, including 2005 -2006 rates when available ; any special considerations; and the total funding available under the program for 2005-2006 and 2007 -2008, if available. The first page also includes a box in the upper right -hand corner with any relevant Education Code sections, the funding source, and the funding authority. Appendix 1: Funding Terminology defines the codes used in this box. For all programs funded through an appropriation by the Budget Act, the hyperlinked Budget Act in the box takes you to Budget Act line numbers for 2005-2006 and 2007-2008. These may also be found in Appendix 2: Funding Authority Budget Act Line Items. Finally, the first page includes a table with overview statistics, including the number of en tities getting funding and the percentage of the total funding going to those entities, by entity type. The second page analyzes the funding formula by breaking down per pupil funding across important groups. For each program, with some exceptions, the t ables show mean per pupil funding among district groups receiving program funding across four different categories: the proportion of low -income students, the proportion of English learners, district size and type, and district enrollment density (enrollm ent divided by land area). Districts are categorized by type and quantile. The first column lists the total number of districts within the type -quantile receiving funding . The second column lists the percentage receiving funding. The final column shows the average district per pupil funding within the type-quantile. For poverty, English learners, and enrollment density, the quantiles were created based on all districts in the state. District size quantiles were created within district types to be roughly evenly distributed within the district type. Quantile membership may change by measure. For example, a district may have a high concentration of low -income students, have very few English learners (EL), be of a medium size, and be geographically dense. Thus it could be in the high poverty, low EL, medium size, and medium density quantiles. Finally, to be clear, the tables show the mean per pupil funding for districts that receive funding within each group and not the funding per EL or poor student within a district. District poverty concentration is measured by the percentage of students in the district on free and/or reduced price lunch and ranges from zero to 100 percent. English learner concentration is measured by the percentage of students in the district that are identified as English learners and ranges from zero to 16 89 percent. Enrollment density is measured by the district’s enrollment per square kilometer and ranges from zero to 2,122 students per square ki lometer. District size is measured by average daily attendance (ADA) and ranges from 4.32 to 644,928.25. Demographic data for COEs and direct funded charter schools was inconsistent and largely unavailable. Therefore, second page analys es exclude COEs a nd direct funded charters. Revenues for non K-12 programs, including all Child Care and Development programs and those listed in the Other Statewide or Regional Support Service Program Revenues and subsequent sections do not have second page analyses. Finally, Appendix 5: Statewide Summary Charts provides statewide summaries of total funding and district -only funding. 17 Categorical Flexibility: The 2009 Budget Act The 2009 Budget Act granted expenditure flexibility for 42 state revenue programs. The total funding now considered flexible is $4,876,300,000 for 2008-2009 and $4,595,567,000 for 2009-2010, approximately 10.9 and 9.5 percent of the total Proposition 98 K -12 budget s, respectively. The selected programs vary in purpose and funding formula. Please see Appendix 4 : Categorical Flexibility for the list of programs granted expenditure flexibility. This information is current as of the February passage of the 2009 Budget Act. 18 Glossary of Acronyms AB Assembly Bill ADA Average daily attendance. Defined as the total days of student attendance divided by the total days of instruction. Revenue limits and many categorical programs use ADA as a per pupil funding unit. ADA is typically lower than enrollment. AP Advanced Placement. A program that offers high school students the opportunity to complete college -level courses and earn colleg e credit for them. College credit is earned by achieving typically a three or better out of five on the AP exam for a given course. API Academic Performance Index. The API is a measure of school performance, which ranges from 200 to 1000, that summarizes a school’s performance over a number of indicators, currently consisting of results from statewide tests that are based on the standards for what California students are expected to learn in every grade. See the CDE website for more information. APP Alternative Payment program. Part of the Child Care and Development programs. AYP Adequate yearly progress. A series of measures under NCLB that determine the annual academic performance of schools, districts, and the state. BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs. CAHSEE California High School Exit Exam. A state exam that California public high school students must p ass in order to graduate. CalWORKs California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids. A welfare program that gives cash aid and services to eligible needy California families. The program is operated locally by county welfare departments. CBEDS California Basic Educational Data System . This system houses enrollment. CDE California Department of Education, the state agency that oversees K -12 education. Please see the CDE website for more information. CDS County district school code. Unique identifier for each entity in the state. County codes are two digits and range from 01 to 58. District codes are five digits long; school codes are seven digits long. COE and districts’ school codes are 0000000. COE County office of education. All of California’s 58 counties have one as they are required by California’s Constitution. In some counties there may several sites serving regions of the county. COEs serve special populations in their schools, such truants and pregnant minors, as well as provide regional administrative services. 19 COLA Cost of living adjustment . An increase in funding for schools from the state or federal government due to inflation. In California, it is based on the Implicit Price Deflator for State and Local Government Purchases of Goods and Services. CSIS California School Information Services . Please see the CSIS website for more information. CTC California Commission on Teacher Credentialing . Please see the CTC website for more information. DSS California Department of Social Services . Please see the DSS website for more information. EL English learner. A student whose native language is something other than English. These students may be enrolled in many English language acquisition programs, including English as a Second Language (ESL) or bilingual education. The number or proportion of E L students in a school or district is frequently used as a measure of that school or district’s disadvantage and may determine eligibility for additional funding . ERAF Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund. After the passage of Prop osition 13, the State shifted the property tax allocation away from local governments to LEAs. Please see this summary by the California State Association of Counties. ESEA Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The principal federal law affecting K-12 education. NCLB reauthorized ESEA in 2002. FRPL Free and/or Reduced Price Lunch. The National School Lunch Program provides free or reduced price breakf ast and/or lunch to low income students, defined as 130% or 185% of the federal poverty line, respectively. The number or proportion of students participating in the program is typically used as a poverty measure for schools and districts. In some cases it’s used to determine a school or district’s eligibility for funding aimed at helping lower -income students. FY Fiscal year. July 1 of the first year to June 30 of the following year. IDEA Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Federal law that guarantees children with exceptional needs a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment, determined on an individual basis. IEP Individualized education program. A written plan developed by the parents and the school special education team that specifies the student’s achievement goals and method to obtain these goals. IDEA requires that all students receiving special education services have an IEP. JPA Joint powers agreement. An agreement among LEAs to sha re services or responsibilities governed by a board made up of representatives from the LEAs. Most JPAs are ROCPs or in transportation. 20 LCI Licensed children’s institution. Students with severe disabilities may be enrolled in these types of institutions should the d istrict or COE be unable to support the educational or health needs of the student. LEA Local education agency. A public board or other authority within a state that maintains administrative control of public elementary or secondary schools . For the purposes of this paper and model, only the 1,409 COEs, districts, and direct funded charter schools are considered LEAs. NCLB The No Child Left Behind Act. The controversial 2002 reauthorization of the ESEA that adds many new provisions in the areas of asse ssment, accountability, and teacher quality. It is set for reauthorization soon. NPS Nonpublic school. Students with severe disabilities may be enrolled in these types of institutions should the district or COE be unable to support the educational or health needs of the student. OPSC Office of Public School Construction, a division of the State Allocation Board that typically allocates facilities funding. Please see the OPSC website for more information. PI Program Improvement. One of the consequences under NCLB. Schools and districts that receive federal Title I funds enter PI when they fail to make AYP after two consecutive years. For each year that a school or district remains in PI, the interventions and policies for that school or district become increasingly stringent, ranging from school choice to a state takeover. ROCP Regional occupational center/program. A center or program established by a school, district, group of d istricts, or COE to provide training for entry -level jobs, job-related counseling and skills upgrading for students aged 16 and older and adults in CalWORKS. SB Senate Bill SBE California State Board of Education. SBE is the governing and policy -making body of CDE. SBE sets K -12 education policy in the areas of standards, instructional materials, assessment, and accountability. The SBE adopts textbooks for grades K-8, adopts regulations to implement legislation, and ha s authority to grant waivers of the Education Code . There are 11 SBE members, all appointed by the Governor. Please see the SBE website for more information. SELPA Special education local plan area. A regional adm inistrative unit responsible for special education services. SELPAs may be a single large district, a group of districts, or an entire county. SELPAs may include charter schools. Districts, charters, and COEs are not bound by geography when joining a SE LPA. SSID Statewide student identifiers, a unique identifier for each student in the longitudinal CALPADS data system. 21 STAR California’s standardized testing and reporting program. A statewide testing system with three elements the California Standards Tests, based on state’s academic content standards; California Achievement Tests, Sixth Edition Survey, a nationally normed, standardized, multiple- choice, basic skills test give only to third and seventh graders; and Aprenda 3, a norm-referenced test adm inistered to Spanish-speaking ELs who have been in school in the US fewer than twelve months. Williams 2004 Eliezer Williams, et al. v. State of California, et al. case settlement. The Williams case was filed as a class action suit in 2000 on the basis th at public school students were not provided with equal access to instructional materials, safe and decent school facilities, and qualified teachers. 22 School District and Charter School Unrestricted Revenues The majority of funding to districts and charter schools are unrestricted, general purpose revenues designed to support classroom instruction and school operation. These include the district revenue limit entitlement and the charter school general purpose block grant. Additionally, districts an d direct funded charter schools may have other unrestricted revenues, such as excess local property taxes or in -lieu federal property taxes. Finally, we count the Proposition 37 lottery revenues as unrestricted because, unlike the Proposition 20 lottery r evenues, there are few restrictions on expenditures. 23 Revenue Limit Entitlement Most unrestricted revenue received by school districts comes through the revenue limit system. This system combines two sources of revenue. The first is property tax revenue from parcels within a district’s boundaries. The second is state aid, which makes up the difference between a district’s revenue limit entitlement and its property tax revenue. If a district’s property tax revenue exceeds its entitlement, the excess is re tained by the school district and no state aid is provided. These districts are referred to as “basic aid” or “excess tax” districts. The starting point for each district’s entitlement is its base revenue limit, a dollar amount per student in average daily attendance (ADA). This limit is modified according to several factors to arrive at the district’s revenue limit entitlement per student. To demonstrate the role of these factors, this manual represents the revenue limit entitlement of districts as the sum of six components. The first component is a district’s base revenue limit. The remaining five components explain the difference between a district’s revenue limit entitlement per ADA and its base revenue limit. In actuality, these components a re not separate revenue streams for school districts. In the pages that follow, however, we represent each component as if it were a separate revenue stream. The funding descripti ons for each component describe how we define the component. The sum of al l six components is a district’s revenue limit entitlement. In that sense, the manual merely decomposes a district’s entitlement into six parts. 24 Base Revenue Limit Program Description: Funds provide the foundation for a district’s revenue limit entitlement. Ignoring various modifications and complications, a district’s entitlement is its base revenue limit multiplied by the average daily attendance (ADA) of i ts students. Eligibility Criteria: All districts, including all -charter districts, are eligible. Funding Description: Base revenue limits are based on historical per pupil expenditures in 197 2-197 3 and have been updated each year. For each district, the base revenue limit is calculated by taking the sum of the prior year’s base revenue limit, any equalization aid or miscellaneous funding authorized by the Legislature, and an inflation adjustment. The adjustment starts with the average base revenue limits in the prior year by district type . This average is then multiplied by the annual percentage change in the Implicit Price Deflator for State and Local Government Purchases of Goods and Services for the United States. The result, a do llar amount per ADA, is the inflation adjustment added to each district’s base revenue limit from the prior year. This result is multiplied by a deficit factor , which we then call the base revenue limit . It is this base revenue limit that is described in the tables below. In defining the revenue limit adjustments that follow, the baseline is a situation in which a district’s entitlement is its deficited base revenue limit multiplied by the ADA of students in both regular and locally funded charter school s. Special Considerations: SB 813 (Chapter 498, Statutes 1983) folded in the longer day and year incentives into the base revenue limit. The additions each district previously received from these incentives were added to its base revenue limit. SB 727 (Chapter 855, Statutes 1997) made similar changes when the state changed the way in which attendance was calculated. That legislation increased the base revenue limit of districts that would have seen a reduction in revenue limit funds because of the n ew attendance rules. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $29,853,477,360. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 557 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 19.1 11.1 69.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42238 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 25 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 4,919.89 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 4,966.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 4,965.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 4,947.45 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 4,935.35 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 4,926.24 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 5,910.15 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 5,908.65 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 5,946.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 5,943.98 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 5,975.73 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 5,917.69 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 5,162.68 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 5,248.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 5,138.13 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 5,149.67 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 5,151.47 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 5,139.63 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 5,198.85 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 5,032.45 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 4,949.38 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 4,941.93 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4,932.03 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 4,931.99 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 6,067.38 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 5,953.26 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 5,922.12 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 5,920.25 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 5,927.51 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 5,936.29 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 5,339.85 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 5,323.77 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 5,174.70 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 5,175.76 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 5,135.95 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 5,141.51 26 Declining Enrollment Adjustment Program Description: Funds supplement the revenue limit entitlement of districts with declining enrollment. A district’s baseline entitlement is its deficited base revenue limit multiplied by its current ADA. If a district’s ADA has fallen, its ADA in the prior year is used to calculate its revenue limit entitlement. This adjustment is intended to shield districts with declining enrollment from large revenue declines. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs funded through the revenue limit are eligible if current year ADA is les s than prior year ADA. Funding Description: The declining enrollment adjustment is calculated in the following way. First, calculate the difference in the district’s prior year and current year ADA. Then, multiply this difference by the district’s defic ited base revenue limit. The adjustment is this difference divided by the district’s ADA. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $402,351,057. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 308 38 199 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 23.0 2.7 74.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42238.5 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 27 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 102 54.8 112.52 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 109 50.2 152.10 Medium (33 – 60%) 90 55.2 114.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 83 53.9 121.66 High (66 – 100 %) 116 55.8 149.76 High (23 – 89%) 116 62.4 130.85 High Low (0 – 33 %) 24 54.5 82.56 High Low (0 – 6%) 19 55.9 124.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 10 37.0 29.99 Medium (6 – 23%) 14 35.9 72.76 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 53.84 High (23 – 89%) 5 38.5 21.15 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 52 54.2 84.73 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 50 66.7 121.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 84 61.8 99.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 73 54.9 84.38 High (66 – 100 %) 63 61.2 119.81 High (23 – 89%) 76 59.8 116.73 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with fun ding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 83 43.5 355.56 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 97 45.8 222.84 Medium (251 – 1,500) 113 62.1 192.07 Medium (6 – 50) 119 61.7 161.69 High (1,501 +) 112 60.9 120.45 High (50 – 2,122) 92 60.5 118.79 High Low (0 – 1,500) 16 61.5 146.22 High Low (0 – 6) 23 63.9 116.96 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 13 44.8 108.01 Medium (6 – 50) 11 34.4 69.66 High (6,001+) 9 29.0 38.82 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 19.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 86 66.7 153.27 Unified Low (0 – 6) 53 67.9 207.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 48 49.0 97.25 Medium (6 – 50) 54 53.5 83.98 High (10,001+) 65 60.2 107.79 High (50 – 2,122) 92 59.0 108.57 28 Necessary Small School (NSS) Adjustment Program Description: Funds augment a district’s revenue limit entitlement to offset the additional costs of operating small schools. For districts with eligible schools, a separate revenue limit entitlement is calculated for the students in those schools. Eligibility Criteria: Districts must have fewer than 2,501 ADA and have an elementary school with fewer than 96 ADA and/or a high school with fewer than 286 ADA and meet the criteria of having a “necessary” small school per Education Code 42280. Funding Description: The revenue limit entitlement for students in necessary small schools is calculated using a hybrid formula based on current year staffing or the lesser of prior year staffing and ADA. In 2005 -2006, the funding ranged from $108,975 to $435,900 for elementa ry schools and $176,920 to $1,454,700 for high schools. A deficit factor is then applied to this entitlement to yield the revenue limit entitlement of students in necessary small schools. The NSS adjustment is defined in the following way. First, comp ute the difference between the revenue limit entitlement of students in necessary small schools and the entitlement those students would have generated with the deficited base revenue limit of their district. Then, divide that difference by the district’s ADA . Special Considerations: Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $37,704,192. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 68 6 69 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 11.8 8.3 79.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42280 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 29 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 233.69 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 50 23.0 463.35 Medium (33 – 60%) 20 12.3 706.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 13 8.4 517.21 High (66 – 100 %) 29 13.9 454.48 High (23 – 89%) 6 3.2 168.91 High Low (0 – 33 %) 3 6.8 974.12 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 1,092.22 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 3.7 1,183.71 Medium (6 – 23%) 1 2.6 2,289.29 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 2,384.17 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 7 7.3 363.91 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 33 44.0 721.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 30 22.1 553.87 Medium (6 – 23%) 19 14.3 360.28 High (66 – 100 %) 32 31.1 350.67 High (23 – 89%) 17 13.4 223.85 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 60 31.4 1,430.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 60 28.3 750.42 Medium (251 – 1,500) 7 3.8 142.27 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 110.00 High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 31.50 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 7,772.43 High Low (0 – 1,500) 6 23.1 1,158.69 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 1,106.26 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 2,526.95 High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 67 51.9 608.37 Unified Low (0 – 6) 57 73.1 693.72 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 13.43 Medium (6 – 50) 10 9.9 103.31 High (10,001+) 1 0.9 31.63 High (50 – 2,122) 2 1.3 531.69 30 Locally Funded Charter Schools Adjustment Program Description: Funds provided to school districts for students in locally funded charter schools, charter schools in which state revenue flows through the district that chartered the school. School dis tricts receive the general purpose charter school block grant for students in these schools, but do not receive revenue limit funds for them. Please see the Charter School Block Grant for more information about the f unding formula for general purpose charter school block grants. Eligibility Criteria: All districts with locally funded charter schools are eligible. Funding Description: The locally funded charter schools adjustment is defined in the following way. Fir st, calculate the difference between the charter school block grant a district receives and the entitlement it would have received if the students in those schools had been funded by the district’s base revenue limit. Then, divide that difference by the A DA of the district’s regular and locally funded charter schools. Special Considerations: The locally funded charter schools adjustment is negative when a locally funded charter school’s general purpose block grant is less than the district’s base revenu e limit. Level of Funding : The total funding allocated in 2007-2008 is $3,443,532. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 40 9 28 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 27.2 -39.8 112.6 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47633- 47635 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 31 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 -28.17 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 21 9.7 -51.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 16 9.8 14.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 7.1 30.92 High (66 – 100 %) 12 5.8 15.63 High (23 – 89%) 16 8.6 16.08 High Low (0 – 33 %) 11 25.0 -7.33 High Low (0 – 6%) 7 20.6 -20.61 Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 -1.03 Medium (6 – 23%) 7 17.9 -2.37 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 -61.60 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 -14.63 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 10.44 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 6 8.0 -17.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 20 14.7 2.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 23 17.3 8.46 High (66 – 100 %) 14 13.6 0.89 High (23 – 89%) 20 15.7 0.70 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 135.24 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 7 3.3 6.97 Medium (251 – 1,500) 24 13.2 61.10 Medium (6 – 50) 25 13.0 -27.63 High (1,501 +) 23 12.5 -1.16 High (50 – 2,122) 16 10.5 18.45 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 0.15 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 -17.64 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 -23.28 Medium (6 – 50) 4 12.5 -6.16 High (6,001+) 8 25.8 -6.81 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 -7.25 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 8 6.2 -40.71 Unified Low (0 – 6) 6 7.7 -60.96 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 15 15.3 9.00 Medium (6 – 50) 14 13.9 4.74 High (10,001+) 26 24.1 2.27 High (50 – 2,122) 29 18.6 2.53 32 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment Program Description: Funds reimburse districts for an increase in costs due to rate increases for unemployment insurance since 1975-1976. Eligibility Criteria: Any LEA funded through the revenue limit with 1975 -1976 unemployment insurance expenditures is eligible for funding. Funding Description: A district’s 1975-1976 unemployment insurance expenditures are subtracted from its current year expenditures, excluding those spent for charter schools funded through the general purpose block grant. If that dif ference is positive, a deficit factor is applied and the result is added to the district’s revenue limit entitlement The unemployment insurance adjustment is this addition divided by the district’s current ADA. Special Considerations: Level of Fundi ng: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $135,234,983. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 554 86 334 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 19.1 9.8 71.1 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42241.7, 43001.8 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 33 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 21.99 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 22.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 22.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 152 98.7 21.31 High (66 – 100 %) 207 99.5 22.56 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 22.88 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 24.04 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 24.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 23.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 23.18 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 24.28 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 24.67 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 21.84 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 22.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 22.80 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 21.88 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 25.54 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 25.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 189 99.0 24.07 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 210 99.1 22.53 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 21.87 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 21.83 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 22.35 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 22.46 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 24.04 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 22.67 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 24.08 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 22.96 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 23.71 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 24.71 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 24.52 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 25.38 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 22.51 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 22.50 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 23.97 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 23.93 34 All Other Revenue Limit Adjustments Program Description: Funds in this category are the net result of modifications to the base revenue limit in addition to the five adjustments enumerated above. The adjustments can be characterized as incenti ves, special funding, and accounting issues. Incentive adjustments include the Basic Aid Choice /Court-Ordered Voluntary Pupil transfer, Beginning Teacher Salary Incentive, Charter School Block Grant offset , Class Size Penalties, and Longer Day/Year Pena lty. The Basic Aid Choice transfer compensates basic aid districts for the costs of non -resident students, students who do not generate increases in revenue limit entitlements in a basic aid district. Strictly speaking, it is not part of the revenue limi t system. However, it acts as a revenue limit entitlement for non -resident students in basic aid districts. Special funding includes Meals for Needy Pupils and the Spe cial Revenue Limits Adjustment. Meals for Needy Pupils funding is only available to districts that, prior to Proposition 13 in 1978, levied special property tax rates to fund meal programs for low -income students. The Special Revenue Limits Adjustment includes special funding for seven districts per Education Code sections 46610, 42285.1, 42283.1, and AB 552 (Chapter 1076, Statutes of 1991). The remaining modifications deal with technical accounting issues or the continuation of one -time savings attempted by the state. They are the All Charter District Revenue Limit Adjustment, County O ffice Transfer, Gain/Loss from Interdistrict Attendance Agreements, Miscellaneous Revenue Limit Adjustment, PERS Adjustment, PERS Safety Adjustment, and Reduction for Excess ROCP Reserves. Some of these, such as PERS, are negative. Eligibility Criteria: Varies by LEA. Funding Description: The net effect of these modifications is calculated in the following way. The revenue limit entitlement of the district is calculated with and without the modifications. The difference is then divided by district ADA. Special Considerations: AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004) folded the Continuation High School revenue limit adjustment into the Pupil Retention Block Grant. It provides extra funding for necessary small con tinuation high schools. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $62,783,583. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 233 40 134 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 20.3 55.0 24.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 35 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 -4.11 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 14.79 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 28.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 23.12 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 11.50 High (23 – 89%) 184 98.9 3.73 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 -6.10 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 -4.64 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 135.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 91.71 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 97.08 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 37.55 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 -5.90 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 -8.03 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 11.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 5.27 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 3.68 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 189 99.0 41.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 210 99.1 27.22 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 16.20 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 14.79 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 9.85 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 9.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 1,168.95 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 47.60 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 11.48 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 99.24 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 24.86 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 32.80 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 61.82 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 51.73 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 3.84 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 13.94 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 0.91 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 1.05 36 Charter School General Purpose Block Grant The charter school general purpose block grant is the equivalent of revenue limit funding for charter schools. However, unlike the revenue limit entitlement, all charter schools receive the same per pupil funding based on the statewide average revenue limit e ntitlement for specific grade bands. Charter schools may be locally or direct funded. A locally funded charter school receives its funding through its sponsoring district. A direct funded charter school receives its funding directly from the state. Ple ase see the California Charter Schools Act of 1992, as amended by AB 2030 (Chapter 757, Statutes of 2006) and CDE’s website for more information about California charter schools. For the purposes of this manual, all locally funded charter school funding has been aggregated up to the district level. Th e following analysis is only for the 356 direct funded charters in existence in 2005 -2006. 37 Charter School Block Grant Program Description: Funds provide the bulk of unrestricted revenue for charter schools. The entitlement is met by local revenue and state General Fund aid. It is an alternative funding formula to the revenue limit entitlement for regular district schools. Eligibility Criteria: All charter schools are eligible for block grant funding. Funding Description: Funding is based on the statewide average of revenue limit funding for selected grade bands. All K-5 ADA in charter schools generates funding, based on the statewide average of revenue limit funding per ADA for elementary districts per ADA . Funding for grades 6-8 charter ADA is based on the equivalent statewide average of unified districts. Charter high school funding is based on the statewide average for high school districts. The entitlement is met by in-lieu property taxes from districts and by stat e aid. Special Considerations: All-charter districts may choose between revenue limit and block grant funding. Of the eight all -charter districts in 2005 -2006, seven chose revenue limit funding over block grant funding. Level of Funding : The total amoun t expended in 2005 -2006 is $698,812,731. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 347 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47633- 47635 Funding Source : L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 38 Other Unrestricted State Funding The only revenue source in this category is the Proposition 37 lottery funds. 39 Lotter y: Proposition 37 Program Description: Funds support most district activities with the exception of the acquisition of real property, the construction of facilities, the financing of research, or any other non-instructional purpose. In November 1984, California’s voters passed Proposition 37, the Calif ornia State Lottery Act. Proposition 37 requires that at least 34 percent o f the total lottery revenues is allocated to LEAs for the benefit of public educa tion. Proposition 37 lottery funds are essentially unrestricted, and are referred to as general purpose lottery funds as opposed to Pro position 20 instructional materials lottery funds. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are allocated on a per ADA basis quarterly by the Controller’s Office. Special Considerations: Please see the Controller’s apportionment summary for more information. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $841,786,825. The total funding allocated in 2007 -2008 is $ 761,197,651 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 280 0 Percent of total funding (%) 2.2 18.3 9.7 68.1 1.7 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Constitution 40 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 131.41 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 132.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 132.61 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 131.67 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 133.94 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 133.55 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 145.72 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 143.48 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 143.86 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 143.94 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 161.10 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 154.52 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 137.97 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 135.32 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 139.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 138.01 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 145.75 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 144.95 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with fun ding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 135.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 132.83 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 132.59 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 131.90 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 132.86 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 133.16 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 140.11 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 140.43 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 148.28 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 141.96 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 146.38 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 151.57 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 136.38 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 135.57 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 138.53 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 134.81 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 142.67 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 143.05 41 Excess Taxes and Federal In -Lieu Property Taxes Districts have excess taxes when their local property tax receipts exceed their revenue limit entitlement. Two other types of unrestricted revenues are added to excess taxes in the PPIC model. These include the Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment and Miscellaneous Funds. The Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment provides additional revenues to excess tax dis tricts with charter schools that accept nonresident students. Miscellaneous Funds are in -lieu taxes or royalties from mineral reserves. The second type of revenue included in this section is federal in-lieu property taxes. COEs, districts, and charter s chools are eligible for funding. The state cannot collect property taxes from land owned by the federal government. The government has two major programs that allocate in -lieu property taxes to affected districts, Federal Impact Aid and Forest Reserve Funds. These programs compensate districts whose geographic boundaries include military bases, American Indian lands, and national forests. 42 Excess Taxes Program Description: Funds are local proper ty tax receipts in excess of a district’s revenue limit entitlement and related revenue that is not counted as local revenue in a districts revenue limit entitlement. These funds are unrestricted revenue that can be used at the district’s discretion. E ligibility Criteria: An LEA must have local property tax revenues in excess of their calculated general purpose revenue limit entitlement. Funding Description: The state aid a district receives is its revenue limit entitlement minus its local revenue. Local revenue is property tax revenue, timber yield taxes, community redevelopment funds, and excess revenue augmentation funds (ERAF). In addition, 50 percent of royalties, bonuses, and certain types of in -lieu taxes are included in local revenue. Local revenue in excess of the revenue limit entitlement is referred to as excess taxes. Districts keep these excess taxes and use them for any purpose. Districts in this position are referred to as “basic aid” or “excess tax” districts. Several related reve nue streams are included with excess taxes in this manual and the PPIC School Finance Model 3 . One stream is the 50 percent of royalties, bonuses, and in -lieu taxes that are not counted as local revenue in revenue limit calculations. Another stream is the Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment , which partially compensate basi c aid districts for additional cost s of serving non -resident students in their charter schools . The funding equals 70 percent of the sending district's revenue limit per ADA , multiplied by the ADA of its students who attend the charter schoo l. Special Considerations: Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $268,491,975. The total funding available in 2007-2008 is $353,653,631. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 108 31 69 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 28.5 28.2 43.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. 3 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 43 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 46 24.7 988.33 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 42 19.4 1,536.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 14.1 166.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 24 15.6 402.00 High (66 – 100 %) 39 18.8 53.83 High (23 – 89%) 42 22.6 76.05 High Low (0 – 33 %) 16 36.4 807.98 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 1,039.65 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 0.19 Medium (6 – 23%) 14 35.9 551.13 High (66 – 100 %) 6 40.0 38.55 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 0.31 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 16 16.7 338.38 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 10 13.3 2,421.11 Medium (33 – 60%) 25 18.4 198.60 Medium (6 – 23%) 25 18.8 110.64 High (66 – 100 %) 28 27.2 2.50 High (23 – 89%) 34 26.8 41.62 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 33 17.3 3,216.64 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 35 16.5 1,476.52 Medium (251 – 1,500) 38 20.9 1,299.87 Medium (6 – 50) 37 19.2 574.54 High (1,501 +) 37 20.1 205.69 High (50 – 2,122) 36 23.7 254.08 High Low (0 – 1,500) 6 23.1 654.67 High Low (0 – 6) 9 25.0 260.79 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 13 44.8 872.63 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 436.60 High (6,001+) 12 38.7 227.77 High (50 – 2,122) 7 38.9 279.40 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 34 26.4 1,107.41 Unified Low (0 – 6) 20 25.6 1,380.33 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 19 19.4 109.30 Medium (6 – 50) 25 24.8 124.67 High (10,001+) 16 14.8 44.84 High (50 – 2,122) 24 15.4 58.61 44 Federal Impact Aid Program Description: Funds compensate school districts for a portion of the property tax revenue they have lost because of tax -exempt federal ownership of property, including American Indian lands, military bases, and low -rent housing projects. Federal Impact Ai d dates back to 1950. It is now Title VIII of ESEA. There are three types of funding available to affected districts: Basic Support Payments (BSP), Payments for Children with Disabilities (PCD), and Construction Grants (CG). Eligibility Criteria: T o be eligible, a school district must demonstrate that the Federal Government has acquired, since 1938, real property with an assessed valuation of at least 10 percent of all real property in the district at the time of acquisition. For BSP, districts mus t have at least 400 ADA or 3 percent of their ADA connected to federal property. Districts with federally connected students eligible for services under IDEA also receive additional funding through PCD. Districts that educate high percentages of students living on American Indian lands or children of members of the uniformed services are also eligible for CGs. Funding Description: Most of the funding is for BCP and is allocated based on an annual count of federally connected students. Similarly, PCD fun ding is allocated based on an annual count of federally connected special education students. CG funding is awarded by application to eligible districts and is related to the number of eligible children they educate. Special Considerations: BSP is unrestricted revenue; PCD funds must be used on services for the federally connected special education students. CG funds are used for facility maintenance and construction. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $95,738,977. The total funding available in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 36 6 42 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 22.1 2.8 74.9 0.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Apportionment Funding Authority: ESEA 45 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 9 4.8 44.29 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 13 6.0 819.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 12 7.4 534.53 Medium (6 – 23%) 10 6.5 80.31 High (66 – 100 %) 15 7.2 54.04 High (23 – 89%) 13 7.0 155.97 High Low (0 – 33 %) 1 2.3 663.20 High Low (0 – 6%) 4 11.8 263.64 Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 356.03 Medium (6 – 23%) 2 5.1 538.17 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 228.16 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 9 9.4 177.59 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 18 24.0 922.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 21 15.4 313.49 Medium (6 – 23%) 13 9.8 62.85 High (66 – 100 %) 12 11.7 125.90 High (23 – 89%) 11 8.7 128.12 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 14 7.3 551.47 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 14 6.6 416.13 Medium (251 – 1,500) 7 3.8 1,122.31 Medium (6 – 50) 14 7.3 680.25 High (1,501 +) 15 8.2 179.38 High (50 – 2,122) 8 5.3 25.83 High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 339.37 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 465.86 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 403.09 Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 184.37 High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 23 17.8 1,472.28 Unified Low (0 – 6) 20 25.6 964.33 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 9 9.2 264.39 Medium (6 – 50) 11 10.9 221.98 High (10,001+) 10 9.3 87.31 High (50 – 2,122) 11 7.1 118.31 46 Forest Reserve Funds Program Description: Funds compensate school districts for the loss in property tax revenue from tax-exempt national forests. The1908 legislation establishing this funding source requires 25 percent of the revenues derived from the National Forest System to be given to counties in which the lands are situated for the equal benefit of public schools and roads. Districts may use this funding as unrestricted general funds. Eligibility Criteria: COEs and districts are eligible for funding if they are geographically situated on federal forest reserves. Funding Description: Funding is apportioned to counties in proportion to the area of the forest reserve in the county as a percentage of total reserves in the state. The county apportions 50 perc ent for county schools and 50 percen t for county roads . Special Considerations: Since th e mid-1908s, the revenue from federal forest reserves has declined for several reasons, including a long term decline in timber sales. In 2000, the federal government repl aced the declining revenue with stable, but short term, funding under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self- Determination Act. The Act expired in 2006, but was extended until 2007. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $32,519,870. The total funding available in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 37 158 30 94 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 29.8 22.3 11.1 36.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Apportionment Funding Authority: 47 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 43 23.1 39.31 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 118 54.4 106.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 67 41.1 101.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 27 17.5 29.90 High (66 – 100 %) 48 23.1 39.86 High (23 – 89%) 13 7.0 3.13 High Low (0 – 33 %) 17 38.6 18.27 High Low (0 – 6%) 19 55.9 96.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 25.16 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 28.2 1.52 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 108.24 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 17 17.7 18.88 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 39 52.0 107.61 Medium (33 – 60%) 46 33.8 28.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 29.3 11.74 High (66 – 100 %) 31 30.1 4.44 High (23 – 89%) 16 12.6 1.43 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 79 41.4 332.34 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 103 48.6 162.04 Medium (251 – 1,500) 62 34.1 98.58 Medium (6 – 50) 47 24.4 57.82 High (1,501 +) 17 9.2 10.59 High (50 – 2,122) 8 5.3 3.83 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 219.19 High Low (0 – 6) 22 61.1 90.24 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 39.34 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 4.85 High (6,001+) 7 22.6 3.64 High (50 – 2,122) 2 11.1 0.65 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 59 45.7 163.63 Unified Low (0 – 6) 49 62.8 187.15 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 21 21.4 17.04 Medium (6 – 50) 32 31.7 11.24 High (10,001+) 14 13.0 0.47 High (50 – 2,122) 13 8.3 0.45 48 S chool District and Charter School Restricted Revenues Revenue programs in this category are restricted to specific uses or are allocated to school districts based on specific characteristics of their schools or students. 49 Administrative and Support Programs The revenue programs in this category compensate school districts for specific administrative activities in LEAs. These programs do not directly support student instruction. 50 California School Information Services (CSIS): Statewide Student Identifier Maintenance Reimbursement Program Description: Funding supports LEAs to assign and maintain individ ual student identifiers to all their students, kindergarten through grade twelve, enrolled in California public and charter schools. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs that have not received funding to participate in the CSIS State Reporting program will receive an apportionment from CDE for the maintenance of t hese identifiers. Funding Description: LEAs do not h ave to apply for reimbursement. LEAs not currently participating in the CSIS program are reimbursed for maintenance of student identifiers at a rate of $0.25 per student annually based on their verified CBEDS enrollment counts. In 2005-2006, this program was funded by the Educational Telecommunication Fund. Special Considerations: Progra m funding source varies by year. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005-2006 is $748,613. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 828,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 36 375 55 183 134 1 Percent of total funding (%) 1.6 20.8 13.0 62.4 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60900(e)(3) Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authorit y: Budget Act 51 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 128 68.8 0.26 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 164 75.6 0.26 Medium (33 – 60%) 123 75.5 0.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 102 66.2 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 124 59.6 0.26 High (23 – 89%) 109 58.6 0.26 High Low (0 – 33 %) 26 59.1 0.27 High Low (0 – 6%) 20 58.8 0.27 Medium (33 – 60%) 19 70.4 0.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 27 69.2 0.27 High (66 – 100 %) 10 66.7 0.27 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 0.27 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 55 57.3 0.26 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 42 56.0 0.26 Medium (33 – 60%) 77 56.6 0.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 72 54.1 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 51 49.5 0.27 High (23 – 89%) 69 54.3 0.27 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 147 77.0 0.26 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 167 78.8 0.26 Medium (251 – 1,500) 127 69.8 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 119 61.7 0.26 High (1,501 +) 101 54.9 0.26 High (50 – 2,122) 89 58.6 0.26 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 0.27 High Low (0 – 6) 22 61.1 0.27 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 22 75.9 0.27 Medium (6 – 50) 23 71.9 0.27 High (6,001+) 18 58.1 0.27 High (50 – 2,122) 10 55.6 0.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 77 59.7 0.27 Unified Low (0 – 6) 44 56.4 0.27 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 53 54.1 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 60 59.4 0.27 High (10,001+) 53 49.1 0.26 High (50 – 2,122) 79 50.6 0.26 52 Mandates Program Description: Funds reimburse schools districts for the costs of new programs or increased levels of service mandated by state government. The state is required to rei mburse districts for such costs because of Proposition 4 in 1979. Claims for reimbursement are heard by the Commission on State Mandates. The Commission has currently approved 42 of these claims. Approved mandates vary from health care activities, such as scoliosis screening, to background checks to collective bargaining and other administrative activities. B eginning in 2002 -2003, the state has deferred payment on these mandates by approving $1,000 per m andate, even though the claims submitted far excee d that amount. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are required to comply with mandates and are eligible for funding through reimbursement. Funding Description: LEAs submit claim s and are reimbursed, often the following year . Special Considerations: On Nove mber 21, 2007, the CSBA’s Education Legal Alliance, along with several COEs, filed suit against the State of California challenging its authority to defer state mandate payments to public schools . On December 8, 2008, the court ruled in their favor. In r esponse to the ruling, the Governor’s 2009-2010 Budget suspends all but three K-14 mandates. LEAs will not be required to perform the mandated activities or file reimbursement claims, thus eliminating the state’s fiscal liability. The State has appealed the ruling; thus the future of mandate funding is uncertain. Please see the LAO report on mandates and advised reform for more information. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $250,860,604. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $38,000 plus any additional appropriations in future years. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 53 433 82 322 2 0 Percent of total funding (%) 3.4 13.0 16.1 67.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 53 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 148 79.6 28.83 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 148 68.2 32.99 Medium (33 – 60%) 124 76.1 29.98 Medium (6 – 23%) 123 79.9 27.21 High (66 – 100 %) 161 77.4 28.61 High (23 – 89%) 162 87.1 28.95 High Low (0 – 33 %) 41 93.2 80.94 High Low (0 – 6%) 32 94.1 47.94 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 58.87 Medium (6 – 23%) 37 94.9 75.24 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 88.00 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 83.46 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 42.60 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 66 88.0 41.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 97.1 39.86 Medium (6 – 23%) 130 97.7 40.78 High (66 – 100 %) 96 93.2 43.04 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 42.68 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 80 41.9 60.49 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 117 55.2 41.43 Medium (251 – 1,500) 171 94.0 36.21 Medium (6 – 50) 167 86.5 30.91 High (1,501 +) 182 98.9 27.87 High (50 – 2,122) 149 98.0 27.93 High Low (0 – 1,500) 23 88.5 75.22 High Low (0 – 6) 34 94.4 67.48 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 63.73 Medium (6 – 50) 30 93.8 62.73 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 74.28 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 81.78 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 116 89.9 53.44 Unified Low (0 – 6) 65 83.3 52.23 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 39.50 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 30.56 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 41.79 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 43.41 54 Pupil Residency Verification Program Description: Funds support the efforts of school districts to verify the residency status of their students. Eligibility Criteria: E ligible school districts are adjacent to the international border in Imperial and San Diego counties only. Funding Description: The apportionment for t he two affected counties is based on a proportionate share of the 1995 -1996 base year appropriation. The appropriation is adjusted annually in the Budget Act to reflect annual changes in ADA in the school districts adjacent to the international border in e ach county as appropriate. Special Considerations: The County Superintendents of Schools in Imperial and San Diego counties must not allocate funds to any school district that has not adopted an appeals procedure for pupils who fail to adequately verify r esidency. The appeals procedure must be substantially similar to that set forth in Administrative Regulation 5111, as adopted by the Mountain Empire Unified School District on February 16, 1994. Starting in 2006 -2007, the Pupil Residency Verification funding moved from a line item appropriation to a schedule in the Mandates. Please see the Mandates program page for more information. More information regarding the affected districts and funding allocation is unavailable. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $176,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 2 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 48204.5, 48204.6 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 55 Pupil Transportation: Home-to -School and Special Education Program Description: Funds reimburse eligible LEAs for the approved cost of transporting pupils to and from school. Home- to -school (HS) transportation fund s transportation for all pupils while special education (SE) transportation funds transportation for orthopedically impaired or severely disabled students. Eligibility Criteria: O nly LEAs that received funding in the prior fiscal year are eligible, including transportation JPAs. Funding Description: Funding is equal to the lesser of the prior year HS or SE entitlement or the prior year’s approved HS or SE transportation cost, respectively. Funding is contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Co nsiderations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $546,458,987. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 623,942,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 40 476 81 329 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 7.4 17.8 6.8 68.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41850- 41857 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 56 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 135 72.6 81.78 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 171 78.8 143.16 Medium (33 – 60%) 147 90.2 99.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 86.4 76.23 High (66 – 100 %) 194 93.3 83.18 High (23 – 89%) 172 92.5 79.28 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 69.00 High Low (0 – 6%) 30 88.2 105.96 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 63.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 38 97.4 68.38 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 89.82 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 47.90 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 66.80 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 72 96.0 122.95 Medium (33 – 60%) 134 98.5 87.91 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 76.25 High (66 – 100 %) 101 98.1 109.55 High (23 – 89%) 125 98.4 99.67 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 142 74.3 477.20 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 179 84.4 347.83 Medium (251 – 1,500) 157 86.3 213.62 Medium (6 – 50) 158 81.9 126.71 High (1,501 +) 177 96.2 68.07 High (50 – 2,122) 139 91.4 61.55 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 190.70 High Low (0 – 6) 35 97.2 170.03 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 24 82.8 105.65 Medium (6 – 50) 28 87.5 67.52 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 57.02 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 49.67 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 126 97.7 247.90 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 350.10 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 96 98.0 93.94 Medium (6 – 50) 99 98.0 138.97 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 84.47 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 78.71 57 General Instruction The programs included in this section support general classroom instruction. Unlike targeted revenues, funds do not support specific students based on demographic characteristics or achievement. Rather, they are typically designed to benefit all students or specific grade bands of students. 58 Charter School Categorical Block Grant Program Description: P rovides charter schools with a flexible source of unrestricted funds in addition to the general purpose base revenues. These funds are in-lieu of a number of categorical programs available to school districts. Eligibility Criteria: All charter schools except those funded through the revenue limit are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The charter school categorical block grant is allocated in the Principal Apportionment and consists of two funding components: a per ADA rate and an amount in -lieu of Economic Impact Aid (EIA). The EIA component is based on the number of economically disadvantaged students in the charter school. It is calculated by multiplying this number by the statewide average of EIA aid per disadvantaged student. In 2005-2006, the block grant per ADA rate was $281 and the in -lieu EIA rate was $125 per disadvantaged student, with a guaranteed total minimum of $5,231 per school. Starting in 2007 -2008, the per ADA rate is $500, increa sed by COLA each subsequent year. Special Considerations: Charter schools that receive funding through the charter categorical block grant are not eligible to apply separately or through their sponsoring district for the categorical programs identified in Education Code Section 47634.4(f). A list of these programs for 2008-2009 is available here. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. 2007-2008 Total Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $67,995,043. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $151,474,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 12 48 16 49 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.9 8.5 2.2 15.9 71.5 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47634.1, 47634.4 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 59 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 98.11 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 21 9.7 81.78 Medium (33 – 60%) 16 9.8 30.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 7.1 60.98 High (66 – 100 %) 12 5.8 26.61 High (23 – 89%) 16 8.6 23.03 High Low (0 – 33 %) 11 25.0 7.82 High Low (0 – 6%) 7 20.6 23.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 4.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 7 17.9 3.51 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 46.89 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 13.91 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 13.15 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 6 8.0 53.82 Medium (33 – 60%) 20 14.7 9.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 23 17.3 9.82 High (66 – 100 %) 14 13.6 4.67 High (23 – 89%) 20 15.7 5.26 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 243.49 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 7 3.3 37.23 Medium (251 – 1,500) 24 13.2 92.25 Medium (6 – 50) 25 13.0 68.08 High (1,501 +) 23 12.5 34.31 High (50 – 2,122) 16 10.5 32.92 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 22.30 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 23.04 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 25.57 Medium (6 – 50) 4 12.5 5.42 High (6,001+) 8 25.8 7.04 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 7.55 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 8 6.2 53.68 Unified Low (0 – 6) 6 7.7 66.20 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 15 15.3 24.86 Medium (6 – 50) 14 13.9 21.11 High (10,001+) 26 24.1 5.30 High (50 – 2,122) 29 18.6 5.38 60 Class Size Reduction: Grade Nine (CSR 9 ) Program Description: Provides an incentive for school districts to reduce class sizes in ninth grade English and in one other ninth grade course. This additional course must be in mathematics, science or social studies, and it must be required for graduation. Average class size cannot exceed 20.44 ADA and 22 enrolled pupils per certificated teacher. Districts that implemented the program prior to June 30, 1998 may also serve grades 10 through 12. This program was establis hed by the Morgan-Hart Class Size Reduction Act of 1989. Eligibility Criteria: Districts that meet program requirements are eligible for funding. Direct funded charter schools may apply independently; locally funded charter schools may be included in their sponsoring district’s application. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, ninth grade CSR was funded at $192 per student per course, with a maximum of two times the ninth grade enrollment if two courses are implemented. Courses that implement CSR for less than a full year are funded at the $192 rate times the proportion of the year on CSR. Grade 10 -12 CSR is funded cannot exceed the total funding received for 10 -12 CSR in 1997-1998. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $82,922,810. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 106,621,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 63 175 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 31.5 68.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52080-52090 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 61 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 37 84.1 63.17 High Low (0 – 6%) 26 76.5 77.25 Medium (33 – 60%) 18 66.7 54.54 Medium (6 – 23%) 29 74.4 59.88 High (66 – 100 %) 8 53.3 70.14 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 44.04 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 68 70.8 27.15 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 37 49.3 30.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 70 51.5 21.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 82 61.7 23.02 High (66 – 100 %) 37 35.9 17.78 High (23 – 89%) 56 44.1 18.59 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 12 46.2 77.00 High Low (0 – 6) 23 63.9 70.72 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 26 89.7 74.31 Medium (6 – 50) 24 75.0 56.68 High (6,001+) 25 80.6 56.88 High (50 – 2,122) 16 88.9 62.13 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 45 34.9 27.97 Unified Low (0 – 6) 18 23.1 27.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 63 64.3 24.92 Medium (6 – 50) 56 55.4 22.40 High (10,001+) 67 62.0 20.20 High (50 – 2,122) 101 64.7 20.80 62 Class Size Reduction: Kindergarten through Grade Three (K-3 CSR) Program Description: Provides funds to school districts and charter schools that reduce one or more classes to 20.44 ADA or fewer per certificated teacher. Per AB 1608 (Chapter 743, Statutes of 2000), small districts and charters may not exceed 22.44 ADA per class, with a district -wide 20.44 average. K-3 CSR must first be implemented in the fir st grade, followed by second grade. Once all first and second grade classes at the school have been reduced, K-3 CSR may be implemented in kindergarten or third grade. K-3 CSR funding is unrestricted; however funding is lost if program requirements are u nmet. K -3 CSR consists of two options. Option 1 reduces classes for all pupils in each classroom for the full regular school day for each grade level funded. Option 2 reduces classes for all pupils in each classroom for at least one -half of the instruc tional minutes offered per day in each grade level funded, with instruction primarily in math and reading. Eligibility Criteria: Districts that meet program requirements are eligible for funding. Direct funded charter schools may apply independently; loc ally funded charter schools may be included in their sponsoring district’s application. Funding Description: Option 1 participants are funded at $1,071 per pupil in 2007-2008. Option 2 participants are funded at $535 per pupil. Special Considerations: The 2009 Budget Act and subsequent legislation lowered the penalties for class sizes that exceed program requirements. Please see th is LAO report for more information. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,643,269,868. The total funding appropriated in 2007 - 2008 is $ 1,829,662,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 5 550 3 332 133 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 28.7 0.0 70.0 1.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52120-52128.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 63 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 418.31 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 215 99.1 409.07 Medium (33 – 60%) 161 98.8 417.78 Medium (6 – 23%) 150 97.4 412.53 High (66 – 100 %) 205 98.6 404.67 High (23 – 89%) 185 99.5 412.26 High Low (0 – 33 %) 3 6.8 5.73 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 22.69 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 2 5.1 2.17 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 95 99.0 261.79 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 73 97.3 261.50 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 283.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 270.87 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 300.96 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 298.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 186 97.4 426.30 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 209 98.6 410.40 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 417.11 Medium (6 – 50) 189 97.9 421.58 High (1,501 +) 183 99.5 410.98 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 409.23 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 22.69 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 15.86 Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 8.11 High (6,001+) 1 3.2 0.82 High (50 – 2,122) 1 5.6 0.82 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 127 98.4 278.13 Unified Low (0 – 6) 76 97.4 264.72 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 275.83 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 290.97 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 288.12 High (50 – 2,122) 155 99.4 285.68 64 Instructional Materials Funding Realignment Program Description: Pr ovides funds to school districts and COEs for the purc hase of instructional materials for each pupil in the core curriculum areas of reading-language arts, mathematics, science, and history -social science. This material must be aligned with California’s academic content standards. Funding also provides accessible materials for pupils who are visually impaired, have other disabilities, or are unable to access the general curriculum, through the Low Vision and Braille reimbursement programs. The Instructional Materials Funding Realignment Program (IMFRP) was established by AB 1781 (Ch apter 802 , Statutes of 2002). IMFRP replaces three previous funding sources for instructional materials: t he K-8 Instructional Materials Fund, the 9 -12 Instructional Materials Fund, and the K -12 Schiff -Bustamante Standards - Aligned In structional Materials Fund . Eligibility Criteria: Eligible recipients are school districts, COEs, and state special schools. Funding for charter schools is included in the charter school categorical block grant. Funding Description: Funds are allocated based on a per pupil rate. In 2005-2006, t he rate was $52.79. SELPAs apply for reimbursement for materials purchased for visually impaired students. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the Instructional Materials Block Grant. IMFRP was reauthorized by SB 733 (Chapter 304, Statutes of 2008). Please see the IMFRP website for more information. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Fu nding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $360,361,332. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 419,774,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 556 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.9 19.5 9.6 69.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60240, 60313, 60420- 4 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 65 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 185 99.5 59.16 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 59.07 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 60.74 Medium (6 – 23%) 153 99.4 60.23 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 61.89 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 61.57 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 61.95 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 61.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 62.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 62.18 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 61.91 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 62.33 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 60.53 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 60.62 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 61.85 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 61.05 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 63.66 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 63.33 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 62.85 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 60.93 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 59.85 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 59.83 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 60.88 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 61.08 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 63.12 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 61.84 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 62.02 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 62.36 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 61.98 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 61.78 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 62.50 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 63.28 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 60.97 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 61.02 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 62.56 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 62.51 66 Lottery: Proposition 20 Program Description: Allocates revenue from the lottery to school di stricts and community colleges for the purchase of instructional materials . This revenue source was established by Proposition 20, known as the Cardenas Textbook Act of 2000. It provides that , beginning in 1998 -1999, 50 percent of any growth in lottery funds for education over t he 1997-1998 base fiscal year be allocated for instructional materials. Proposition 20 funds are tracked separately from Proposition 37 general purpose lottery funds. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated on a per ADA basis in addition to the third and fourth quarter Proposition 37 apportionments. Special Considerations: Some of the Education Code restrictions regarding instructional materials are applicable. Please read the CDE Prop osition 20 memo for more information. Please see the Controller’s apportionment summary for more information. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $188,687,493. The total funding allocated in 2007 -2008 is $ 115,361,690 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 280 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.3 18.6 9.9 69.5 1.7 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60119 Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Constitution 67 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 30.05 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 30.34 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 30.32 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 30.10 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 30.62 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 30.53 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 33.32 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 32.80 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 32.89 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 32.91 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 36.83 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 35.33 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 31.54 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 30.94 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 31.84 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 31.55 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 33.32 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 33.14 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 30.96 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 30.37 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 30.31 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 30.16 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 30.38 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 30.44 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 32.03 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 32.11 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 33.90 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 32.46 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 33.47 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 34.65 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 31.18 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 31.00 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 31.67 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 30.82 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 32.62 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 32.70 68 School and Library Improvement Block Gran t (SLIBG) Program Description: Funds for the purchase of library resources and for the improvement of instruction and school environment. AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004) established the School and Library Improvement Block Grant (SLIBG) by combin ing funds from School Library Mat erials (SLM) and the School Improvement Program (SIP) into one block grant. SLM provided funds for the purchase of library materials. SIP provided funds to schools to be allocated by school site councils for the purpose of improving instruction and the s chool environment. If the LEA participated in SIP prior to January 1, 2004, SLIBG f unds can be used for any purpose of either or both of SLM and SIP, as determined by a school advisory committee. If the LEA did not participate in SIP prior to January 1, 2004, the funds received for this block grant are to be used only for SLM. Eligibility Criteria: Eligibility is limited to LEAs who participated in either or both SLM and SIP in 2 003-2004. Funding Description: Funding for each eligible LEA is limited t o the relative statewide proportion received in 2003 -2004 for SLM and SIP. This proportion will be applied to the level of funding available for this block grant in 2005 - 2006 to determine the grant award for each eligible LEA. In subsequent years, LEAs wil l receive the 2005-2006 level of funding adjusted by the annual rate of growth in statewide enrollment and COLA . The award is made contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Considerations: About 99 percent of the funding for this program is deriv ed from SIP. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $422,419,095. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $465,451,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 56 556 86 335 99 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 27.4 2.3 70.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41570- 41573 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 69 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 185 99.5 96.02 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 104.99 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 104.02 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 94.89 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 100.54 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 101.46 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 21.64 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 23.53 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 14.75 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 16.92 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 6.84 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 14.11 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 69.28 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 72.08 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 72.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 69.64 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 76.16 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 76.01 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 190 99.5 144.48 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 211 99.5 122.98 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 109.58 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 100.50 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 98.10 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 98.65 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 15.14 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 16.66 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 23.71 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 21.25 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 16.10 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 14.22 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 83.41 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 89.16 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 75.88 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 72.68 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 72.49 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 73.14 70 School Safety and Violence Prevention Act Program Description: Funds to establish programs and strategies to prevent violenc e among students in public schools. This revenue source was initiated by t he Carl Washington School Safety and Violence Prevention Act, established by AB 1113 (Chapter 51, Statutes of 1999) and AB 658 (Chapter 645, Statutes of 1999). Eligibility Criteria: LEAs serving grades eight through twelve that complete the Consolidated Applicatio n and establish school safety and violence prevention programs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated on the basis of prior year enrollment in grades eight through twelve. Special Considerations: Although funds are determin ed by enrollment in grades eight through twelve, funds may be used for violence prevention programs serving students in grades kindergarten through twelve. This program is sometimes called the School Safety Block Grant. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $89,824,541. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 100,553,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 57 485 86 334 74 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.3 8.2 22.4 66.7 1.3 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 32228 – 32228.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 71 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 150 80.6 7.78 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 195 89.9 13.98 Medium (33 – 60%) 145 89.0 8.59 Medium (6 – 23%) 131 85.1 7.28 High (66 – 100 %) 190 91.3 6.95 High (23 – 89%) 159 85.5 5.76 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 36.64 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 38.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 35.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 36.51 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 36.64 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 33.18 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 15.43 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 74 98.7 18.37 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 15.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 15.29 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 14.16 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 14.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 159 83.2 95.56 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 189 89.2 42.23 Medium (251 – 1,500) 170 93.4 16.22 Medium (6 – 50) 171 88.6 9.54 High (1,501 +) 156 84.8 4.77 High (50 – 2,122) 125 82.2 4.75 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 47.90 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 42.55 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 38.24 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 35.79 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 35.03 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 34.87 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 23.44 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 27.63 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 15.71 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 15.80 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 14.24 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 14.35 72 Tobacco Use Preventio n Education (TUPE) Program Description: Funds support health education efforts aimed at the prevention and reduction of tobacco use. There are four TUPE programs targeting different groups of students: American Indian Ed ucation Centers, Grades four through eight, Grades six through eight, and Grades nine through twelve. Funds are awarded to LEAs that propose to replicate programs that have proven to be effective . Activities may include tobacco -specific student instruction, reinforcement activities, special events, and cessation programs for students. TUPE program funds in American Indian Education Centers, grades 6 -8, and grades 9-12 are awarded through a competitive grant application process. The TUPE program in grades 4 -8 is contained in the Consolidated Application. Please see Health and Safety Code 104350-104495 for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs and state -funded American Indian Education Centers that have been certified by CDE as having a fully implemented tobacco -free policy are eligible to apply for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated from the Health Education Account in the Cigarette and Tobacco Products Surtax Fund . American Indian Edu cation Centers receive $50,000. Grades 4-8 programs receive an entitlement based on a per ADA rate in accordance to local agreement. LEAs that serve grades 6 -8 receive grants up to $90,000. LEAs that implement the grades 9 -12 program are eligible for up to $37.50 per ADA per year for a total three -year grant of $5,000,000. Special Considerations: AB 637 (Chapter 135, Statutes of 2007) eliminates the grades four through eight entitlement and revised COE oversight responsibilities beginning July 1, 2009 . Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $18,840,543. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $18,438,198. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 34 404 32 312 22 6 Percent of total funding (%) 5.7 12.5 11.8 65.9 0.1 3.9 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: SF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 73 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 133 71.5 2.10 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 139 64.1 2.14 Medium (33 – 60%) 121 74.2 2.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 117 76.0 2.21 High (66 – 100 %) 150 72.1 1.97 High (23 – 89%) 148 79.6 2.04 High Low (0 – 33 %) 21 47.7 6.30 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 9.11 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 5.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 43.6 5.19 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 7.31 High (23 – 89%) 6 46.2 6.01 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 95 99.0 2.99 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 65 86.7 2.60 Medium (33 – 60%) 128 94.1 2.94 Medium (6 – 23%) 128 96.2 2.85 High (66 – 100 %) 89 86.4 3.29 High (23 – 89%) 119 93.7 3.32 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 74 38.7 2.05 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 108 50.9 2.60 Medium (251 – 1,500) 151 83.0 2.26 Medium (6 – 50) 148 76.7 2.27 High (1,501 +) 179 97.3 2.09 High (50 – 2,122) 148 97.4 2.04 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 6 16.7 9.07 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 11 37.9 8.43 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 5.40 High (6,001+) 21 67.7 5.62 High (50 – 2,122) 11 61.1 5.98 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 110 85.3 2.43 Unified Low (0 – 6) 61 78.2 3.31 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 95 96.9 2.12 Medium (6 – 50) 98 97.0 1.98 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 3.31 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 3.27 74 Year -Round Education Grants Program Description: Funds encourage school districts to operate multitrack year -round education (MTYRE) programs. The grant pays an eli gible MTYRE school for each student housed in excess of the capacity of that school. In exchange, the district forfeits its eligibility to receive new construction funding to increase the school’s capacity. Eligibility Criteria: A district must have an enrollment of at least 5 percent over its seating capacity as a base entry requirement. Then each applicant school must operate on a MTYRE calendar and have an enrollment of at least 5 percent above its seating capacity. Funding Description: Per pupil funding amounts are determined by the percentage of students above the seating capacity of the school: the hig her the percentage of students enrolled above the seating capacity of the schools, the higher the per -pupil grant. In 2005-2006, the minimum per pupil rate was $824.50 and the maximum was $1,484.10. Special Considerations: Because of the loss of new construction eligibility and low payout (the actual grant award paid for 2004- 2005 was $0.43 on the dollar) associated with MTYRE , participation and i nterest in this program are decreasing. Future program funding is uncertain. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $88,311,999. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $97,308,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 3 0 7 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 6.5 0.0 93.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42260-42269 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 75 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 1 0.5 42.51 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 42.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.0 155.15 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.1 155.15 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 2 1.5 56.35 Medium (6 – 23%) 1 0.8 80.05 High (66 – 100 %) 5 4.9 106.85 High (23 – 89%) 6 4.7 104.35 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 2 1.0 171.00 High (1,501 +) 3 1.6 142.76 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 112.90 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 52.84 Medium (6 – 50) 3 3.0 28.27 High (10,001+) 6 5.6 104.21 High (50 – 2,122) 4 2.6 108.39 76 Special Education Programs The programs described in this section support special education programs. The largest is the AB 602 special education entitlement. LEAs receive funding through their special education local plan area (SELPA), a regional administrative unit. AB 602 (Chapter 854, Statutes of 1997) changed the basis for allocating special education funding from a formul a based on special education expenditures to a formula based on total student attendance. A SELPA’s entitlement is based on what it received in the previous year, with adjustments for growt h or decline in ADA. If ADA grows, the SELPA receives additional funding equal to its growth in ADA multiplied by a statewide rate. This formula tends to equalize funding per ADA across SELPAs. If a SELPA’s ADA declines, its base funding may be reduced. If ADA has fallen for only one year, base funding is not reduced from its level of the previous year. If it falls for two or more consecutive years, base funding is reduced in proportion to its decline in ADA. To calculate that reduction, the decline in ADA is taken to be the ADA two years previous less the ADA in the previous year. That decline is multiplied by the SELPAs base funding per ADA in the previous year. The product is the reduction in the SELPA’s base funding because of declining enrollment. Additional adjustments are made for COLA, necessary small S ELPAs, and special disabilities. AB 602 also includes separate funding for Out of Home Care (OHC), Nonpublic Schools’ (NPS) Extraordinary Costs, Low Incidence Materials and Equipment, and Program Specialist/Regionalized Services (PS/RS). This additional funding is calculated separately from base funding with varying rates and funding models. The AB 602 entitlement is met by the local special education property taxes ( Education Code 2572), local assistance from the federal government , applicable excess ERAF, and state aid. We have decomposed t he AB 602 entitlement in to five categories: base funding, the declining enrollment adjustment, the severity cost pool adjustment, the special disability adjustme nt, and all other adjustments. These categories a re identified and described separately in the following pages. The $25 million annual Mandated Cost Settlement, one-time CAHSEE Special Education Funding , ROCP Handicapped, and Mental Health Services funding are also included in the Budget Act’s Ages 3 -21 Special Education Funding, but not in the AB 602 calculation. These funding sources are also described in what foll ows. All funding to SELPAs has been allocated on a per pupil basis to member districts within a SELPA, including COEs and charters. Second page analyses only include the district and locally funded charters portion of the SELPA funding. T here are some special education programs that do not support K -12 students, such as the Infant entitlement program. These programs are located in the Special Education section following other non K -12 programs like Adult Ed ucation and Child Care. 77 AB 602: Base Funding Program Description: Funds provide the foundation for each SELPA’s revenue. Each SELPA’s base funding is its base funding in the previous year adjusted for various factors. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs are eligible for base funding. Funding Description: The current year base is calculated by taking the SELPA’s prior year base and adding the prior year supplement, prior year COLA, and prior year growth or declining ADA adjustment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,460,378,865. The total funding appropriated in 2007 - 2008 is $3,817,396,768, which includes $1,392,476,701 in local special education taxes, federal IDEA local assistance grants, and applicable excess ERAF. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.4 18.2 8.8 66.4 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.10, 2572 Funding Source: F, GF & L, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 78 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 554.36 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 537.04 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 536.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 541.20 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 540.68 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 546.62 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 551.51 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 538.65 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 539.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 544.65 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 534.40 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 549.29 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 549.80 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 529.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 548.65 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 546.42 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 593.16 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 586.93 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per s quare kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 503.01 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 484.64 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 512.77 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 528.40 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 548.01 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 551.36 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 460.89 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 482.54 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 541.02 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 547.96 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 549.18 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 554.84 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 497.19 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 469.49 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 539.74 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 517.71 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 577.29 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 578.90 79 AB 602: Declining Enrollment Adjustment Program Description: Funds represent the reduction in base funding for SELPAs with declining enrollment for two or more consecutive years . Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs with declining enrollment for two or more consecutive years are elig ible. Funding Description: If ADA has fallen for only one year, base funding is not reduced from its level of the previous year. If ADA falls for two or more consecutive years, base funding is reduced. The reduction is based on the ADA two years previou s less the ADA in the previous year. That decline is multiplied by the SELPAs base funding per ADA in the previous year. The product is the reduction in the base funding of the SELPA. The same formula is applied to necessary small SELPAs with one differ ence. The reduction in base funding is 60 percent of the reduction described above for regular SELPAs. Special Considerations: In the first year of declining enrollment, the adjustment would be positive. The tables below only include the losses due to two or more consecutive years of declines in ADA. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $-21,721,837. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $-34,404,077. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 3.8 10.2 4.6 77.8 3.6 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.15, 56213 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 80 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 71 38.2 -5.06 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 94 43.3 -6.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 63 38.7 -5.91 Medium (6 – 23%) 52 33.8 -7.22 High (66 – 100 %) 65 31.3 -6.35 High (23 – 89%) 53 28.5 -5.15 High Low (0 – 33 %) 16 36.4 -5.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 11 32.4 -4.87 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 -4.63 Medium (6 – 23%) 14 35.9 -5.39 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 -5.17 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 -4.48 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 50 52.1 -4.93 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 45 60.0 -4.43 Medium (33 – 60%) 62 45.6 -7.38 Medium (6 – 23%) 63 47.4 -5.62 High (66 – 100 %) 42 40.8 -7.93 High (23 – 89%) 46 36.2 -8.06 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 75 39.3 -6.86 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 74 34.9 -6.42 Medium (251 – 1,500) 63 34.6 -5.52 Medium (6 – 50) 70 36.3 -6.60 High (1,501 +) 61 33.2 -5.96 High (50 – 2,122) 55 36.2 -5.70 High Low (0 – 1,500) 7 26.9 -8.88 High Low (0 – 6) 14 38.9 -5.98 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 11 37.9 -4.23 Medium (6 – 50) 9 28.1 -6.88 High (6,001+) 11 35.5 -5.09 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 -2.58 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 56 43.4 -6.01 Unified Low (0 – 6) 40 51.3 -7.78 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 47 48.0 -4.27 Medium (6 – 50) 29 28.7 -4.93 High (10,001+) 51 47.2 -7.65 High (50 – 2,122) 85 54.5 -7.34 81 AB 602: Severity Cost Pool Adjustment Program Description: Funds compensate SELPAs for extraordinary costs associated with relatively rare disabilities. The AB 602 funding model includes three separate funding sources for these disabilities: Low Incidence Materials and Equipment, Out of Home Care (OHC), and Nonpublic Schools (NPS) Extraordinary Cost Pool. The Low Incidence Materials and Equipment funding source reimburses SELPAs that must purchase specialized materials and equipment. The Out -of-Home Care (OHC) funding source was implemented in fiscal year 2004-2005 to replace the former 100 percent reimbursement for NPS tuition for pupils residing in Licensed C hildren’s Institutions (LCIs) and foster family homes . This apportionment provides funding for pupils residing in group homes and six other types of facilities located within each SELPA's geographic boundary. The NPS Extraordinary Cost Pool provides reim bursement funding for SELPAs with extraordinary costs associated with single placements in specialized NPS facilities. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs serving students with severe disabilities are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding for L ow Incidence Materials and Equipment and NPS Extraordinary Costs is based on claims received. Funding for a group home is based on the number of students multipl ied by the funding rate for the home. The rates range from approximately $500 to $20,000 pe r student, depending on the home’s classification. In addition, funding for the six facility types (foster family home, foster family agency, small family home, community care facility, intermediate care facility, and skilled nursing facility) is based on the number of pupils at each facility multiplied by the funding rate for its classification. Special Considerations: The OHC funding model provides a phase-in for SELPAs entitled to more funding under the new funding model and a phase-out funding prote ction for those SELPAs who are losing funding. The phase-out percentage for fiscal year 2007-2008 is 25 percent (2nd of 5 years). Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $198,649,265. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 221,284,771. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.4 16.2 8.0 69.1 2.4 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.22, 56836.165, 56836.21 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 82 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 30.92 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 35.55 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 32.59 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 25.16 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 23.19 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 27.08 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 35.46 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 35.93 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 21.09 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 29.39 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 21.61 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 20.20 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 29.05 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 25.59 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 36.31 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 34.28 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 34.87 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 34.59 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 30.59 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 30.55 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 35.78 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 29.80 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 26.79 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 27.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 18.27 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 37.34 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 40.58 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 30.70 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 26.01 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 24.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 27.57 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 26.22 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 31.73 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 31.14 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 34.64 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 34.56 83 AB 602: Special Disability Adjustment (SDA) Program Description: Funds compensate SELPAs for unusually high incidences of certain costly disabilities. SELPAs with SDA factors greater than zero are eligible for additional funding. These factors are based on a 1997 study by the America n Institutes of Research (AIR) study of the incidence of special education disabilities. Eligibility Criteria: Only SELPAs with SDA factors greater than 0 are eligible. Funding Description: For each SELPA with an SDA factor greater than zero, one plus the factor is multiplied by the statewide target rate, an average of base funding per ADA across SELPAs in the previous year. This product, the Incidence Multiplier (IM) rate, is the SELPAs entitlement to additional funding because of its historically high incidence of certain costly disabilities. If the IM rate exceeds the SELPA’s base funding per ADA, the SELPA receives a special disabilities adjustment equal to that difference multiplied by its ADA. If the IM rate is less than the SELPA’s base funding , it is not entitled to additional funds. However, regardless of the SELPA’s per ADA funding, the SELPA’s growth and COLA funding is multiplied by the SDA factor. Special Considerations: The SDA was intended to be temporary until a new study was complete d in 2004. However, because of concerns over the accuracy of the updated report, the original SDA factors have been extended. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $79,728,593. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 81,257,606. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 7 45 9 75 185 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.1 9.6 5.2 80.5 3.6 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.155 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 84 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 12 6.5 37.98 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 4 1.8 57.71 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 6.7 46.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 19 12.3 44.56 High (66 – 100 %) 22 10.6 28.05 High (23 – 89%) 22 11.8 28.59 High Low (0 – 33 %) 4 9.1 41.83 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 19.18 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 7.4 35.99 Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 40.02 High (66 – 100 %) 3 20.0 27.31 High (23 – 89%) 3 23.1 32.62 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 26 27.1 22.22 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 11 14.7 21.63 Medium (33 – 60%) 30 22.1 24.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 34 25.6 30.53 High (66 – 100 %) 19 18.4 40.62 High (23 – 89%) 30 23.6 36.08 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 8 4.2 43.86 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 11 5.2 43.99 Medium (251 – 1,500) 8 4.4 34.62 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 50.97 High (1,501 +) 29 15.8 35.90 High (50 – 2,122) 26 17.1 34.82 High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 33.40 High Low (0 – 6) 2 5.6 33.40 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 3 9.4 48.34 High (6,001+) 7 22.6 36.94 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 31.03 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 13 10.1 34.82 Unified Low (0 – 6) 8 10.3 52.82 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 24 24.5 17.35 Medium (6 – 50) 13 12.9 31.09 High (10,001+) 38 35.2 35.79 High (50 – 2,122) 54 34.6 34.19 85 AB 602: All Other Adjustments Program Description: Funds include adjustments to base funding for f ive factors: Supplement to Base, Growth, Program Specialist/Regionalized Services (PS/RS), COLA, and CAHSEE one -time funding. Supplement funding is based on the increase in local assistance from the federal government. Because that assistance is subtracted from the base entitlement, additional assistance frees up state funds that becomes a permanent increase in the base rate the following year. Growth funding is the growth in a SELPA’s ADA multiplied a statewide rate. PS/RS funding supports specialized SE LPA-wide staff. Necessary small countywide SELPAs with fewer than 15,000 ADA are funded for a minimum of 15,000 ADA. The CAHSEE funding was used for one-time purposes, including, but not limited to assist ing students with disabilities pass the CAHSEE, pu rchasing instructional materials, or support ing other one- time expenditures for individuals with exceptional needs. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs are eligible for COLA, supplement, PS/RS funding , and CAHSEE funding. Only SELPAs with increasing ADA are eligible for growth. Funding Description: All SELPAs are apportioned supplement funding based on a statewide rate. In 2007 -2008, the supplement funding was approximately $2.40 per ADA. Growth funding is based on the statewide target, which is the sta tewide average SELPA base funding in 1997-1998, adjusted for COLA. In 2007-2008, that rate is $465.4405 per ADA. PS/RS funding is based on a SELPA rate, calculated using total 1997 -1998 funding per ADA. This rate is then multiplied by COLA each year and the current year SELPA ADA. The CAHSEE money was a one-time apportionment of $52,610,000. Of the total apportionment, 75 percent was distributed to SELPAs based on a per ADA amount of $7.46 . The remaining 15 percent was used to ensure full AB 602 fundi ng. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $306,520,137. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 245,980,912. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 57 542 84 333 350 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.4 17.5 8.7 67.2 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.15, 56836.08(d), 5 6836.24(a) Funding Source: GF Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 86 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 43.29 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 37.24 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 43.98 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 50.63 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 49.91 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 46.81 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 41.50 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 39.95 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 53.63 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 48.04 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 51.03 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 51.03 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 48.72 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 49.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 51.71 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 50.55 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 51.63 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 51.36 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 44.91 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 46.32 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 40.77 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 49.22 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 47.20 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 45.73 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 46.90 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 44.22 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 36.08 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 46.83 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 49.84 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 48.52 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 47.77 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 46.20 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 47.01 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 52.55 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 51.82 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 50.83 87 Low Incidence Support Services Funding Program Description: Funds support the purchase of specialized books, materials, and equipment as required by the IEP for each pupil with low incidence disabilities . These disabilities, as defined in the Education Code , include hearing impairments, v ision impairments, and/or severe orthopedic impairme nts. Expenditures are limited to supporting low incidence specialized services such as interpreters, note takers, readers, transcribers, and others who provide specialized services to students with low incidence disabilities. Eligibility Criteria: SELPAs that serve students with low incidence disabilities, as defined above, are eligible for funding. Funding Description: All SELPAs receive base funding plus a per pupil supplement. In 2007 -2008, SELPAs th at serve 25 or fewer students who have low incidence disabilities r eceived base funding of $2,000, plus $29.85 per student . SELPAs serving 26 or more students who have low incidence disabilities r eceived base funding of $5,000, plus $29.85 per pupil. Ten percent of the total funding is reserved for additional grants for “sparse” SELPAs. SELPAs that serve 25 or fewer students with low incidence disabilities are eligible to apply for additional funding to serve those students . T hese sparse SELPA grant f unds are not entitlements, and funding amounts may vary from year to year. Special Considerations: This program was federally funded until 2005 -2006. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,680,162. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $1,7000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 56 542 84 332 350 0 Percent of total funding (%) 10.9 17.7 8.8 60.4 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56026.5, 56836.22 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 88 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 0.25 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 0.30 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 0.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 0.24 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 0.24 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 0.28 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 0.35 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 0.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 0.23 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 0.23 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 0.24 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 74 98.7 0.29 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 0.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 0.25 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 0.24 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 0.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 0.50 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 0.59 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 0.37 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 0.27 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 0.24 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 0.23 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 0.70 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 0.46 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 0.27 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 0.24 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 0.25 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 0.24 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 0.54 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 0.74 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 0.29 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 0.23 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 0.23 89 Special Education Mandate Settlement Program Description: Funds apportioned to school districts to satisfy two rulings of the Commission on State Mandates cases regarding special education services. The cases are Riverside County Superintendent of Schools, et al., CSM -3986 and the Long Beach Unified School District, CSM -3986A. The total settlement has been divided into ten annual installments of $25 million; the final apportionment will occur in 2010 -2011. Eligibility Criteria: School districts are eligible to receive mandate settlement funds if they were part of the second P rincipal Apportionment for the 1999 -2000 fiscal year. Funding Description: The funding rate was determined by dividing $25 million by the tot al ADA, for all pupils in kindergarten through grade twelve in all school districts for the second P rincipal Apportionment for the 1999-2000 fiscal year. This count excludes attendance for ROCPs, adult education, and programs operated by COEs. Each school district's allocation equals this per pupil amount of approximately $4.51 times the district's ADA for the second principal apportionment for the 1999-2000 fiscal year. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005-2006 is $25,000,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $25,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 557 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 20.4 8.8 70.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.157 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 90 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 4.19 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 4.44 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 4.55 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 4.24 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 4.49 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 4.51 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 4.10 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 4.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 3.75 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 3.96 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 3.93 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 3.83 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 4.24 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 4.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 4.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 4.21 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 4.51 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.49 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 5.72 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 4.95 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 4.58 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 4.28 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4.37 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 4.43 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 4.40 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 4.30 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 4.14 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 3.98 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 3.88 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 3.84 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 4.61 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 4.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 4.35 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 4.27 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 4.37 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 4.38 91 Mental Health Services Program Description: Funds used to provide mental health services required by an IEP pursuant to the federal IDEA and before referring a student to a county mental health agency for services. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are apportioned to SELPAs based on an ADA rate multiplied by the total SELPA-wide ADA. In 2005-2006, that rate was $4.65690 per ADA. C onsistent with existing law, an adjustment is made for the Los Angeles Juvenile Court and Community School SELPA. Special Considerations: SB 1895 (Chapter 493, Statutes of 2004) clarified and provided accountability for mental health funding in the 2004 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $27,900,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $31,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.3 18.4 8.9 66.3 2.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56331, 56836.06- .07 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority : Budget Act 92 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 4.41 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 4.18 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 4.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 4.42 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 4.50 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 4.51 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 4.39 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 4.13 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 4.51 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 4.47 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 4.44 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 4.60 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 4.54 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 4.31 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 4.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 4.52 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 4.66 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.64 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with fun ding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 3.93 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 3.85 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 4.06 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 4.28 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4.49 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 4.51 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 3.63 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 3.85 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 4.18 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 4.43 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 4.54 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 4.58 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 3.96 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 3.68 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 4.41 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 4.26 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 4.63 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 4.64 93 Personnel Development Programs Program Description: Funds provided to SELPAs for staff development, based on the requirements of IDEA and NCLB. SELPAs have discretion as to what type of personnel development is funded as described in their local plans. However, local in-service progr ams must include a parent training component. They may also include a staff training component and a special education teacher component for special education service personnel and paraprofessionals, consistent with state certification and licensing requir ements. Funds may be used to provide training in alternative dispute resolution and the local mediation of disputes. All programs must include evaluation components. Eligibility Criteria: Only SELPAs with approved local plans are eligible. Funding Descri ption: The 2005-06 allocation is based on the number of students, ages six through twenty -one years, on an IEP. Each SELPA will receive a base amount of $5,000, plus a per pupil amount of $3.11 . Special Considerations: This program was federally funded un til 2005-2006. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,500,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $2,500,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.3 18.4 9.0 64.2 2.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56058-56059, 56195.7, 56241 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 94 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 0.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 0.43 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 0.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 0.39 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 0.39 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 0.39 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 0.40 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 0.44 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 0.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 0.40 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 0.36 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 0.38 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 0.40 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 0.43 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 0.42 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 0.40 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 0.38 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 0.39 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 0.46 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 0.47 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 0.44 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 0.42 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 0.39 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 0.39 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 0.50 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 0.48 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 0.42 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 0.40 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 0.40 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 0.39 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 0.46 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 0.59 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 0.42 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 0.42 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 0.39 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 0.39 95 R egional Occupational Center/Program (R OCP) Handicapped Program Description: Funds provided to ROCPs for students who are deaf or visually or orthopedically impaired. See the ROCP program page for more information about ROCPs. Eligibility Criteria: School districts or COEs that participate or op erate a ROCP and provides services to visually impaired, deaf, or orthopedically impaired students are eligible for funding. Funding Description: LEAs receive the lesser of their expenditures or a funding amount based on a per ADA rate for students with d isabilities. In 2007 -2008, the rates per ADA are $6,199 for visually impaired, $3,549 for deaf, and $1,964 for orthopedically impaired students. Funding is allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,281,573. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $5,279,810. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 13 0 5 15 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 10.4 0.0 9.4 80.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41881, 52314.5, 52315 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 96 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 2 4.5 1.54 High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 3 11.1 3.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 7.7 1.25 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 5.31 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 8 8.3 0.45 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 0.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 3.7 1.33 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 6.0 0.80 High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.9 3.60 High (23 – 89%) 6 4.7 3.31 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 st udents per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 1.92 High (6,001+) 5 16.1 2.93 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 3.07 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 3 3.1 0.59 Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (10,001+) 12 11.1 2.83 High (50 – 2,122) 15 9.6 2.77 97 Worka bility Program Description: Funds support comprehensive pre-employment training, employment placement and follow -up for high school studen ts in special education making the transition from school to work, independent living, and post secondary education or training. The competitively awarded grants are used to fund the excess cost of the program and complement other mandated programs, such as the vocational education Job Training Partnership Act. This program currently funds 22,000 students at 50 sites. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs must have an approved Workability I renewal application on file with CDE. Funding is for approved renewal grantees and for districts, COEs, SELPAs , ROCPs , and NPSs to provide services for special education students with IEPs. Funding Description: Funding is calculati ng by adding a base amount, a per pupil amount, and a per pupil adjustment for students with severe disabilities. This funding is then adjusted for COLA. In 2005 -2006 the base amount was $15,000 and the severe disability supplement was $50. Special C onsiderations: This program was federally funded until 2005 -2006. The Workability data does not differentiate between SELPA administrative units and COEs and districts. Therefore, we were only able to allocate ROCP Workability funding to member districts; it is unclear how all other funding to LEAs is allocated. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $38,626,987. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $39,600,685. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 42 0 45 163 0 57 Percent of total funding (%) 17.1 0.0 20.8 53.9 0.0 8.3 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56470- 56474 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 98 Targeted Programs The programs described in this section provide direct revenue to specific instructional uses or to specific groups of students. In the former category are the supplemental instruction programs that support after -school tutoring and other interventions for struggling students. In the latter category are programs like Economic Impact Aid that direct resources to schools with many economically disadvantaged students. 99 Advanced Placement (AP) Test Fee Reimbursement Program Description: Funds pay AP test fees for low-income students. Upon teacher recommendation, a low-income student who has previously taken an AP class but not the exam may also be eligible to participate. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with low -income students who are enrolled in an AP class and plan to take the end -of-co urse AP exam are eligible to participate in the program. Funding Description: Subject to fund availability, the CDE will reimburse districts for specified costs of AP test fees paid to the College Board on behalf of eligible students. LEAs are reimbursed $48 for each exam for students whose family income does not exceed 150 percent of the poverty income level, and $70 for each exam for a student whose family income exceed s 150 percent, but does not exceed 200 percent of the poverty income level. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,626,990. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $4,901,146, of which $1,793,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 2 18 55 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 1.1 14.9 83.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52240-52244 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 100 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.0 1.18 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.1 1.18 High Low (0 – 33 %) 6 13.6 0.49 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 0.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 8 29.6 1.49 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 7.7 1.53 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 6.13 High (23 – 89%) 6 46.2 5.12 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 14 14.6 0.29 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 7 9.3 0.14 Medium (33 – 60%) 17 12.5 0.77 Medium (6 – 23%) 19 14.3 0.49 High (66 – 100 %) 24 23.3 1.18 High (23 – 89%) 29 22.8 1.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 1.18 High (50 – 2,122) 2 1.3 1.18 High Low (0 – 1,500) 5 19.2 2.72 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 1.48 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 1.18 Medium (6 – 50) 7 21.9 1.36 High (6,001+) 5 16.1 2.56 High (50 – 2,122) 3 16.7 3.26 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 11 8.5 1.18 Unified Low (0 – 6) 4 5.1 0.60 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 21 21.4 0.72 Medium (6 – 50) 17 16.8 0.68 High (10,001+) 23 21.3 1.01 High (50 – 2,122) 34 21.8 1.01 101 After School Education and Safety (ASES) Program Description: Fun ds support the establishment of local after school education and enrichment programs. These programs are created through partnerships between schools and local community resources to provide literacy. The ASES Program is the result of the 2002 voter approved initiative, Proposition 49. This proposi tion expand ed and renamed the former Before and After School Learning and Safe Neighborhood Partnerships Program. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs and public agencies requesting to establish before and after school programs at public elementary, middle, and junior high schools are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Grants range from $50,000 to $75,000,000. Special Considerations: Pursuant to Education Code 8483.5, the ASES program, including regional technical assistance, is continuously appropriat ed up to $550,000,000 per year. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $108,579,270. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 539,966,370. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 35 0 66 2 7 Percent of total funding (%) 31.1 11.7 0.0 50.9 0.3 6.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8482-8484.6 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Statute 102 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 3 1.4 154.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 12 7.4 47.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 1.9 42.22 High (66 – 100 %) 23 11.1 60.48 High (23 – 89%) 29 15.6 56.11 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 11 11.5 17.87 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 37.99 Medium (33 – 60%) 35 25.7 28.42 Medium (6 – 23%) 31 23.3 21.17 High (66 – 100 %) 20 19.4 31.96 High (23 – 89%) 31 24.4 32.72 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 419.54 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 4 1.9 240.95 Medium (251 – 1,500) 6 3.3 171.65 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 57.68 High (1,501 +) 28 15.2 54.58 High (50 – 2,122) 23 15.1 55.70 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 8 6.2 89.39 Unified Low (0 – 6) 7 9.0 36.47 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 19 19.4 29.08 Medium (6 – 50) 14 13.9 50.05 High (10,001+) 39 36.1 28.65 High (50 – 2,122) 45 28.8 27.93 103 C alifornia High School Exit Exam (C AHSEE) Intensive Instruction and Services Program Description: Funds support servic es for students who have failed one or both parts of the CAHSEE . These services may individual or small group instruction ; hiring of additional teachers ; purchasing, scoring, and revie wing diagnostic assessments; counseling; designing instruction to meet specific needs of eligible pupils; teacher training to meet th e needs of eligible pupils; instruction in English-language arts and/ or mathematics , as needed by the eligible pupils t o pass those sections of the CAHSEE; and the provision of instruction and services by a public or nonpublic entity, as determined by the LEA . As a condition of receiving funds, each LE A must meet certain obligations. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with students in the current year junior and senior classes who have failed one or both parts of the CAHSEE are eligible for services. Funding may go to any LEA with eligible students, including COEs, districts, and charter schools. Funding Description: In 2007-2008, LEAs received up to $520 per eligible pupil. E ligible students are the number of students in a district in grades eleven and twelve who have not yet passed one or both parts of the CAHSEE. This information is provided by LEAs to CDE via an online form. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted ex penditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $19,797,200. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $72,752,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 37 3 62 196 41 3 Percent of total funding (%) 14.5 0.1 16.6 59.3 7.9 1.6 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37254 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 104 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 1 0.5 7.35 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 2 0.9 3.16 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 0.6 0.69 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 0.5 1.61 High (23 – 89%) 1 0.5 1.61 High Low (0 – 33 %) 29 65.9 4.98 High Low (0 – 6%) 22 64.7 6.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 85.2 7.87 Medium (6 – 23%) 29 74.4 6.57 High (66 – 100 %) 10 66.7 16.55 High (23 – 89%) 11 84.6 10.06 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 44 45.8 1.35 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 25 33.3 2.18 Medium (33 – 60%) 89 65.4 3.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 84 63.2 2.59 High (66 – 100 %) 63 61.2 4.40 High (23 – 89%) 87 68.5 3.98 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 1 0.5 1.61 Medium (6 – 50) 2 1.0 5.32 High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 3.16 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 0.69 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 10.71 High Low (0 – 6) 27 75.0 7.73 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 21 72.4 9.18 Medium (6 – 50) 21 65.6 8.29 High (6,001+) 26 83.9 7.27 High (50 – 2,122) 14 77.8 7.12 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 48 37.2 4.17 Unified Low (0 – 6) 28 35.9 3.30 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 58 59.2 3.48 Medium (6 – 50) 62 61.4 4.33 High (10,001+) 90 83.3 3.45 High (50 – 2,122) 106 67.9 3.35 105 California School Age Families Education (CalSAFE) Program Description: Funds provide academic, support, and child care services for expectant and parenting students who have not yet earned their high school diploma or its equivalent. Children of enrolled student parents are eligible for child care and development services u ntil the child reaches five years of age or is enrolled in kindergarten, whichever occurs first. Academic services consist of self-contained classrooms in COEs for student parents. This program combined and replaced the Pregnant Minors Program (PMP), the School Age Parenting and Infant Development Program (SAPID), and the Pregnant and Lactating Students Program (PALS). Eligibility Criteria: To receive funding, LEAs must have operated one of PMP, SAPID, or PALS as of October 1, 1999. New LEAs that demo nstrate an unmet need of services to expectant and parenting students may apply and become eligible for funding. Funding Description: CalSAFE funds four different types of programs. COEs operating the old Pregnant Minors Program in self -contained classr ooms receive their 1998 -1999 level of per ADA funding. The program ADA is capped. Academic services for new self -contained programs in COEs or for growth in ADA in old programs are funded at $5,742 per ADA in 2005-2006. In 2005-2006, support services we re funded at $2,530 per ADA, and child care services were funded by a complicated formula that includes the enrollment, attendance, and age of the child. Special Considerations: The following tables include funding for support and child care services; s elf-contained classroom funding appears in the county office revenue limits funding model. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $61,884,720. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $58,173,000, including self -contained classrooms. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 16 0 34 92 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 5.6 0.0 27.1 67.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 54740-54749.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 106 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 19 43.2 26.86 High Low (0 – 6%) 7 20.6 27.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 26.62 Medium (6 – 23%) 20 51.3 26.15 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 33.69 High (23 – 89%) 7 53.8 33.00 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 22 22.9 10.76 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 17.90 Medium (33 – 60%) 45 33.1 10.38 Medium (6 – 23%) 46 34.6 9.63 High (66 – 100 %) 25 24.3 6.44 High (23 – 89%) 42 33.1 7.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 66.10 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 35.62 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 12 41.4 37.38 Medium (6 – 50) 16 50.0 34.36 High (6,001+) 18 58.1 25.10 High (50 – 2,122) 10 55.6 20.37 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 2 1.6 24.13 Unified Low (0 – 6) 2 2.6 20.46 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 31 31.6 16.67 Medium (6 – 50) 26 25.7 14.67 High (10,001+) 59 54.6 7.53 High (50 – 2,122) 64 41.0 7.60 107 Community Day School Additional Funding Program Description: Funds provide for additional hours of instruction in community day schools. Community day schools serve students who have been expelled for non -statutory reasons, are habitually truant, or are otherwise deemed at high risk. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs that operate a community day school and offer instruction for longer than 4 hours are eligible. Charter schools are ineligible. Funding Description: Allocation is bas ed on fifth and sixth hour ADA and seventh and eighth hour pupil hours . District operated community day schools are funded $ 4,954.49 per ADA in the fifth and sixth hours. COE operated community day schools are funded at $ 3,759. 51 per ADA in the fifth an d sixth hour s. The hourly rate for the seventh and eighth hours of attendance is $ 4.74. Funds are allocated in the Principal Apportionment. School districts with less than 2,501 ADA may apply for a waiver to receive funding not to exceed the amount for t he necessary small high school formula for up to one teacher . This was $92,200 in 2005- 2006. Special Considerations: LEAs receive revenue limit funding for students in community day schools for 4 hours per day. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $51,599,357. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $51,999,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 16 79 42 140 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 34.1 12.5 11.0 42.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 48660- 48667 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 108 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 14 7.5 35.49 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 39 18.0 81.21 Medium (33 – 60%) 28 17.2 40.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 18 11.7 28.91 High (66 – 100 %) 37 17.8 24.93 High (23 – 89%) 22 11.8 15.13 High Low (0 – 33 %) 18 40.9 14.90 High Low (0 – 6%) 17 50.0 42.03 Medium (33 – 60%) 16 59.3 21.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 43.6 16.86 High (66 – 100 %) 8 53.3 21.97 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 14.72 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 27 28.1 8.80 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 29 38.7 66.31 Medium (33 – 60%) 61 44.9 13.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 54 40.6 11.20 High (66 – 100 %) 52 50.5 8.07 High (23 – 89%) 57 44.9 7.30 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 10 5.2 523.94 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 26 12.3 148.52 Medium (251 – 1,500) 41 22.5 109.32 Medium (6 – 50) 35 18.1 70.78 High (1,501 +) 28 15.2 13.78 High (50 – 2,122) 18 11.8 10.53 High Low (0 – 1,500) 14 53.8 126.38 High Low (0 – 6) 19 52.8 48.30 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 11 37.9 24.53 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 18.97 High (6,001+) 17 54.8 14.22 High (50 – 2,122) 8 44.4 12.61 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 61 47.3 84.70 Unified Low (0 – 6) 40 51.3 106.40 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 28 28.6 11.75 Medium (6 – 50) 39 38.6 21.37 High (10,001+) 51 47.2 6.57 High (50 – 2,122) 61 39.1 6.38 109 Economic Impact Ai d (EIA) Program Description: Funds sup port additional prog rams and services for English learners (ELs) and compensatory educ ation services for economically disadvantaged students. Use of supplemental EIA funds for ELs at the school level is administered through the Single School Plan as approved by the School Site Council and the local governing board. Typical examples include the purchase of supplemental materials and expenses that support paraprofessionals, supplemental resource teachers, and the operation of EL advisory committees. Applicable school advisory committees, such as the English Learner Advisory Committee, must also review and provide advice in the development of the Single School Plan as well as modifications to the plan. Eligibility Criteria: EIA funding is open to all districts that request pa rticipation using Part I of the annual Consolidated Application. COEs are ineligible. Charter schools’ EIA funding is part of the charter school categorical block g rant. Funding Description: Districts receive a per pupil rate multiplied by the number or EL students and Title I Formula children. Funding is then adjusted by a weighted concentration factor. In 2005 -2006 the minimum per pupil rate was equal to $244. The minimum district funding was $5,231 for districts with ten or fewer students, and $7, 852 for districts with more than ten eligible students. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $586,735,064. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $994,279,000 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 555 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 20.8 6.0 73.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 54000-54028 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 110 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 32.93 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 27.40 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 82.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 153 99.4 55.13 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 164.12 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 152.39 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 39.70 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 17.87 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 75.88 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 57.91 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 122.81 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 104.94 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 35.53 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 22.42 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 81.82 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 54.90 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 162.56 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 148.23 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 190 99.5 108.08 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 211 99.5 92.43 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 81.99 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 87.60 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 108.16 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 111.38 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 56.12 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 38.09 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 43.99 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 60.56 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 67.00 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 69.58 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 89.26 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 79.00 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 69.33 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 94.64 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 113.76 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 108.79 111 English Language Acquisition Progra m (ELAP) Program Description: Funds support services to assist English learners (EL) in grades four through eight to learn English. Funds may be used to provide intersession, before and afte r school, or summer school instruction. They may also be used for centers, tutors, mentors, special materials, or any other supplemental activity that meets the objectives of ELAP. ELAP was established by AB 1116 (Chapter 71, Statutes of 1999). Please se e the ELAP website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Any school district or COE that enrolled one or more English learners in grades four through eight in the prior school year is eligible to apply for funds. Charter schools that do not receive funding through the charter school categorical block grant m ay also apply. Funding Description: LEAs receive $100 per EL student. This award is made contingent upon the avai lability of funds. If insufficient funding is available, schools with the highest proportion of English learners are given priority. Special Considerations: A second component of ELAP provides a one-time allocation of $100 per EL reclassified to English-fluent status. However, f unding is contingent on an appropriation for this purpose, and has historically not been available. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $57,719,599. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $63,600,000 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 12 282 13 278 59 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 24.0 2.5 72.2 1.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 400-410 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 112 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 73 39.2 5.14 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 39 18.0 1.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 77 47.2 11.24 Medium (6 – 23%) 91 59.1 6.13 High (66 – 100 %) 132 63.5 19.82 High (23 – 89%) 152 81.7 19.12 High Low (0 – 33 %) 6 13.6 4.52 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 2.01 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 18.5 10.01 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 20.5 4.43 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 11.09 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 11.63 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 79 82.3 3.97 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 34 45.3 1.16 Medium (33 – 60%) 113 83.1 8.04 Medium (6 – 23%) 122 91.7 5.23 High (66 – 100 %) 86 83.5 15.74 High (23 – 89%) 122 96.1 14.69 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 33 17.3 10.98 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 52 24.5 13.37 Medium (251 – 1,500) 98 53.8 12.00 Medium (6 – 50) 104 53.9 13.17 High (1,501 +) 151 82.1 14.22 High (50 – 2,122) 126 82.9 14.26 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 0.15 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 3 10.3 3.83 Medium (6 – 50) 8 25.0 6.09 High (6,001+) 10 32.3 8.44 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 10.05 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 81 62.8 10.00 Unified Low (0 – 6) 41 52.6 6.12 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 90 91.8 7.06 Medium (6 – 50) 90 89.1 10.21 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 11.13 High (50 – 2,122) 147 94.2 10.66 113 Foster Youth Services (FYS) Program Description: Funds provide educational and support services to foster children. FYS programs establish appropriate placements and coordinate instruction, counseling, tutoring, mentoring, vocational training, emancipation services, training for independent living, and other related services. There are three distinct program components: core district FYS, countywide FYS, and juvenile detention FYS. Core district FYS programs provide services for foster youths attending school in the respective school dist ricts. Countywide FYS programs collaborate with LEAs and other providers to provide services for foster youths living in licensed foster homes . Juvenile detention FYS programs provide services for youths placed in county -operated juvenile detention facilities . The juvenile detention programs started in 2006-2007. Eligibility Criteria: Core FYS districts specified in Education Code Section 42920, COEs or consorti a of COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding for all FYS is based on the Budget Act. Countywide FYS funding is allocated based on the current year count of probation supervised foster children and child welfare supervised foster children. Juvenile detention FYS funding is allocated on a per pupil basis according to the prior year count in the Juvenile Detention Survey, with the assumption that 20 percent of all juvenile detention students are foster children. Special Considerations: Within countywide FYS, El Dorado and Alpine COEs form a consortium, as does Amador and San Jo aquin COEs. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $9,495,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $18,983,490. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 52 0 0 5 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 82.5 0.0 0.0 17.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42920-42925 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 114 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 2 2.1 9.47 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 1 0.7 5.75 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 2.3 7.91 High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.9 9.47 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.6 9.47 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (10,001+) 5 4.6 8.39 High (50 – 2,122) 5 3.2 8.39 115 Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) Program Description: Funds suppor t enrichment activities for high -achieving and underachieving students who are identified as gifted and talented. Special efforts must be made to include students from economically disadvantaged an d varying cultural ba ckgrounds. Programs may consist of special day classes, part -time groupings, and cluster groupings. GATE curricular components may include independent study, acceleration, postsecondary education, and enrichment. For all programs for GATE pupils, includin g those programs for pupils with high creative capability and talents in the performing and visual arts, each participating LEA shall concentrate part of its curriculum on providing GATE pupils with an academic component and, where appropriate, with instru ction in basic skills. Eligibility Criteria: Eligible LEAs may submit applications to CDE, which are reviewed and, if they meet the criteria identified by law, are approved by SBE . Applications may be approved for one, two, three, or five years. Charter schools are ineligible to apply. Funding Description: The funding rate is calculated by dividing the total available current year funding by state-wide prior year K -12 ADA in districts participating in GATE in the current year. That rate is then multip lied by the LEA’s prior year ADA. No district can receive less per ADA than the amount it received per ADA in the 1999-2000. Districts with fewer than 1,500 ADA cannot receive less than the greater of $2,500 or the amount received in 1998 -1999. Funds are allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $50,490,981. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $49,186,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 413 73 307 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 22.3 9.2 68.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52200- 52212 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 116 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 145 78.0 10.90 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 165 76.0 15.38 Medium (33 – 60%) 121 74.2 10.80 Medium (6 – 23%) 108 70.1 9.87 High (66 – 100 %) 147 70.7 9.51 High (23 – 89%) 140 75.3 9.14 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 8.54 High Low (0 – 6%) 27 79.4 9.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 21 77.8 8.44 Medium (6 – 23%) 34 87.2 8.38 High (66 – 100 %) 13 86.7 8.86 High (23 – 89%) 12 92.3 8.39 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 91 94.8 8.46 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 64 85.3 9.25 Medium (33 – 60%) 126 92.6 8.62 Medium (6 – 23%) 125 94.0 8.50 High (66 – 100 %) 90 87.4 8.70 High (23 – 89%) 118 92.9 8.62 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 96 50.3 64.73 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 118 55.7 32.46 Medium (251 – 1,500) 141 77.5 22.09 Medium (6 – 50) 151 78.2 12.89 High (1,501 +) 176 95.7 8.55 High (50 – 2,122) 144 94.7 8.70 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 20.00 High Low (0 – 6) 26 72.2 10.66 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 27 93.1 8.34 Medium (6 – 50) 29 90.6 8.38 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 8.27 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 8.28 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 104 80.6 11.44 Unified Low (0 – 6) 59 75.6 13.19 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 95 96.9 8.37 Medium (6 – 50) 95 94.1 8.48 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 8.53 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 8.53 117 High Priority Schools Grant Program (HPSGP) Program Description: Funds support additional resources t argeted at raising student performance in the lowest performing schools in the state . The program has funded two cohorts of schools in decile ranks one through five of the API, with priority given to schools with the lowest API scores. More information about HPSGP is available here. Eligibility Criteria: Fundin g is for existing grantees o nly. Schools ranked in deciles one through five on the 2005 base API that have not previously received funds from the HPSGP, II/USP, or Cohorts one through three of the Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) program were eligible to apply to Cohort 2. Fundin g Description: Grants are awarded on a three -year cycle. Grantees are funded at $400 per pupil using either 2000 - 2001 or 2005-2006 CBEDS enrollment, depending on the cohort year. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expend iture flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act; however, program funding expires starting in 2009 -2010. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $179,675,707. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $31,209,000, though unexpended fund s from previous years may be available. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 85 20 129 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 12.8 4.3 82.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52055.6 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 118 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 5 2.7 21.48 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 10 4.6 395.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 10 6.1 20.92 Medium (6 – 23%) 9 5.8 14.43 High (66 – 100 %) 70 33.7 63.03 High (23 – 89%) 66 35.5 58.61 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9 20.5 20.10 High Low (0 – 6%) 8 23.5 14.80 Medium (33 – 60%) 6 22.2 32.65 Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 20.18 High (66 – 100 %) 5 33.3 146.75 High (23 – 89%) 7 53.8 66.46 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 10 10.4 4.78 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 10 13.3 28.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 58 42.6 19.90 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 29.3 12.88 High (66 – 100 %) 61 59.2 80.98 High (23 – 89%) 80 63.0 69.51 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 stu dents per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 14 7.3 560.36 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 18 8.5 249.67 Medium (251 – 1,500) 17 9.3 149.47 Medium (6 – 50) 26 13.5 91.33 High (1,501 +) 54 29.3 50.44 High (50 – 2,122) 41 27.0 46.60 High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 89.66 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 32.16 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 7 24.1 14.64 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 41.59 High (6,001+) 9 29.0 43.72 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 42.25 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 31 24.0 78.75 Unified Low (0 – 6) 21 26.9 65.06 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 38 38.8 30.02 Medium (6 – 50) 40 39.6 37.28 High (10,001+) 60 55.6 59.09 High (50 – 2,122) 68 43.6 59.13 119 Immediate Intervention for Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP) Program Description: Funds support the development and implementation of an Action Plan designed to improve academic achievement, particularly in reading/language arts and mat hematics, in underperforming schools. The Action Plan identifies barriers to pupil achievement and proposes solutions, foc using on criteria adopted by SBE . The grant supported three cohorts starting in 2000 -2001. Funding for the program appears to have e nded in 2004 -2005, though deferred funding from 2002-2003 may have been allocated in 2005- 2006. The program was established by California's Public Schools Accountability Act of 1999 (Chapter 3, Statutes of 1999) . Please see the II/USP website for more information. II/USP schools have two years to make API growth targets to exit the program. Schools that fail to exit the program become state -monitored. The state-monitored portion of this program continues to be funded. Please see the State -Monitored School Program page for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Funding is for existing grantees only. Funding Description: Each of the 2001 -2002 II/USP schools was eligible to receive a $ 50,000 one-year planning grant to develop the II/USP Action Plan. After Action Plans were reviewed and approved by CDE, additional funds were awarded for implementing the Action Plan. The 2005-2006 funds represent a 20 percent reduction of 2002-2003 awards. In 2005 -2006 schools were awarded either $200 or $400 per pupil using 2000-2001 CBEDS enrollment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $7,191,800. No funding was available for II/USP in 2007 - 2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 32 12 54 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 19.5 16.8 63.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52053-52055.22 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 120 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 11.02 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 3.1 5.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 6 3.9 7.61 High (66 – 100 %) 27 13.0 5.72 High (23 – 89%) 25 13.4 5.17 High Low (0 – 33 %) 4 9.1 5.57 High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 8.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 9 23.1 8.95 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 24.23 High (23 – 89%) 3 23.1 9.56 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 5 5.2 2.56 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 2.34 Medium (33 – 60%) 24 17.6 3.24 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 12.8 3.73 High (66 – 100 %) 25 24.3 2.37 High (23 – 89%) 36 28.3 2.37 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 43.42 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 2 0.9 41.22 Medium (251 – 1,500) 2 1.1 18.36 Medium (6 – 50) 7 3.6 13.39 High (1,501 +) 29 15.8 5.54 High (50 – 2,122) 23 15.1 5.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 34.82 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 25.96 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 21.23 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 7.69 High (6,001+) 7 22.6 8.23 High (50 – 2,122) 1 5.6 9.40 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 5 3.9 11.90 Unified Low (0 – 6) 4 5.1 4.22 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 11 11.2 4.88 Medium (6 – 50) 13 12.9 4.48 High (10,001+) 38 35.2 2.46 High (50 – 2,122) 37 23.7 2.46 121 International Baccalaureate (IB) Program Description: Funds support the Internationa l Baccalaureate (IB) program in middle and high schools . The IB program is a t wo-year comprehensive and rigorous pre-university curriculum. Funding can be used to cover ongoing costs of professional development required by the program and subsidize fees for exams for eligible students. Eligibility Criteria: Public high schools an d middle schools that offer the IB Diploma Program and the IB Middle Years Program are eligible. Priority is given to hig h schools with high percentages of students from low -income families and high schools that have been awarded affiliate status from the International B accalaureate Organization . Funding Description: Each high school or middle school that offers the IB Program can receive up to $25,000 to cover ongoing costs of professional development required by the program. If funds are insufficient to fully fund all grants authorized, annual grants must first be allocated to those schools that were funded in the prior year and in the amount of the prior year's grant. Special Considerations: The federal IB Exam Fee Reimbursement program may support the payment of student exam fees for the IB program. Funds for this program were available in 2004 -2005 and 2006-2007 from Title I, Subpart G. LEAs are reimbursed $58 for each exam for students whose family income does not exceed 150 percent of the federal poverty income level or for students who qualify for FRPL. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,141,480. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $ 1,280,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 12 28 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 33.1 63.6 3.3 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52920-52922 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 122 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 7 15.9 2.07 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 6.10 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 18.5 1.33 Medium (6 – 23%) 9 23.1 1.72 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 1.32 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 12 12.5 1.26 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 6.88 Medium (33 – 60%) 10 7.4 1.20 Medium (6 – 23%) 12 9.0 0.93 High (66 – 100 %) 6 5.8 0.26 High (23 – 89%) 12 9.4 0.56 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 6.10 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 1 3.4 6.10 Medium (6 – 50) 5 15.6 1.67 High (6,001+) 11 35.5 1.59 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 1.56 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 3 2.3 10.24 Unified Low (0 – 6) 1 1.3 18.33 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 3.47 Medium (6 – 50) 1 1.0 1.77 High (10,001+) 24 22.2 0.71 High (50 – 2,122) 26 16.7 0.76 123 Nell Soto Parent Involvement Program Description: Funds support visits by teachers to the homes of their students or participation by teachers in monthly community meetings. Priority is given to low -performing schools . In 2005-2006, t he grants pa id teachers for home visits and provided resources for tra ining in conducting home visits and related community meetings. The funds may be used to defray other costs a ssociated with implementing the program. Eligibility Criteria: At least 50 percent of teachers employed at the school have voluntarily agreed to participate in either home visits or community meetings . Only LEAs tha t did not receive funding from R ounds One through Four are eligible for Round Five . Funding Description: Funding is allocated based on the number of enrolled students, ranging from $15,000 for schools with fewer than 500 students to $35,000 for schools with 1,500 or more students. Special Considerations: The Nell Soto program has gone through several iterations from its original establishment in 1999 through AB 33 (Chapter 734, Statutes of 1999) . In 2006-2007, AB 1802 (Chapter 79, Statu tes of 2006) funded the parent involvement portion through one- time funding of $15 million. It is unclear whether the funding attributed to 2005- 2006 supports actual Nell Soto activities from 2005 - 2006, since the program was not operational that year. Fi ve districts received funding in 2005-2006 totaling just $226,414. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $226,414. No funding is available for this program in 2007 - 2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 1 0 4 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 6.7 0.0 93.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 51120- 51124 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 124 Pupil Retention Block Grant (PRBG) Program Description: Funds support programs that target pupils requiring additional assistance to succeed in school. The Pup il Retention Block Grant (PRBG) was created AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004), which combined a number of existing programs. These programs include the Elementary School Intensive Reading, Intensive Algebra Instruction Academies, Continuation High School Foundation, High Risk Youth Education and Public Safety, Tenth Grade Counseling, District Opportunity Classes and Programs, Dropout Prevention and Recovery, Earl y Intervention for School Success, and At -Risk Youth for Los Angeles Unified School District . Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs that received funding in 2004-2005 are eligible for funding. The only exception is for new continuation high schools that are approved for foundation program funding. Charter schools receive PRBG funding through the charter school c ategorical block grant. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs receive the statewide proportion received in 2003 -2004 for the programs combined into the PRBG . This amount was adjusted for changes in program participation by school dist ricts in 2004-2005. In subsequent years, LEAs receive the 2005-2006 level of funding adjusted by the annual rate of growth in statewide ADA and COLA . New continuation high schools approved for foundation funding will generate additional funds. The apportionment is made contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 B udget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $86,957,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $101,754,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 43 86 328 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 15.3 6.4 16.1 62.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41505- 45108 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 125 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 7 3.8 1.23 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 6 2.8 6.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 6.7 7.92 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 5.2 3.15 High (66 – 100 %) 25 12.0 25.50 High (23 – 89%) 29 15.6 22.20 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 25.46 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 37.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 20.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 22.66 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 42.23 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 21.75 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 11.90 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 69 92.0 26.77 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 97.1 14.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 11.92 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 13.20 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 12.94 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 263.72 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 3 1.4 150.16 Medium (251 – 1,500) 7 3.8 60.48 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 22.40 High (1,501 +) 35 19.0 18.24 High (50 – 2,122) 32 21.1 18.25 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 97.10 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 78.46 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 37.04 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 20.59 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 19.31 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 17.76 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 122 94.6 61.93 Unified Low (0 – 6) 73 93.6 81.01 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 19.49 Medium (6 – 50) 99 98.0 22.29 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 9.89 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 10.31 126 Refugee Children Supplemental Assistance Program Program Description: Funds support efforts to he lp refugee students perform at grade level. The program is available to LEAs within eight specific counties. Through the grants, LEAs provide programs designed to help refugee children improve their English fluency and make progress toward grade-level pro ficiency. Such programs may include instruction in English as a second language; after -school tutorials, activities, and clubs; cognitive enrichment programs; parental outreach programs; and interpreter services. Eligibility Criteria: Only current grantees are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The funding comes to CDE through an interagency agreement with DSS. Grants are awarded to ten LEAs for five years, with a maximum grant of $150,000 in 2005-2006 and $164, 900 in 2007-2008. Special Cons iderations: The Refugee School Impact Grant was awarded to the DSS by the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. While the funding source is federal, this program’s funding counts toward the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,309,865. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 1,649,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 2 8 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 17.5 82.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 127 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 1 2.3 6.45 High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 1 2.6 6.45 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 6.26 High (23 – 89%) 1 7.7 6.26 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 3 3.1 4.39 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 2 1.5 6.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 4 3.0 4.80 High (66 – 100 %) 3 2.9 0.49 High (23 – 89%) 4 3.1 0.67 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 2 6.5 6.38 High (50 – 2,122) 2 11.1 6.38 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (10,001+) 8 7.4 1.23 High (50 – 2,122) 8 5.1 1.23 128 School Community Violence Preventio n (SCVP) Program Description: Funds support school di stricts and COEs to improve school safety and prevent school violence. The School Community Violence Prevention (SCVP) Program was created as part of AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004) . It consolidates six previously existing school violence prevention programs: Safe School Planning and Partnership; School Community Policing; Gang-Risk Intervention; Safety Plans for New Schools; School Community Violence Prevention; and Conflict Resolution . SCVP provides competitive grants of up to $500,000 for a five -year period. Approximately 10 percent of the funds will be awarded to a pplications from rura l school districts . Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs with safety and violence needs unmet by federal Title IV and state SSVP funding are eligible for funding. Applicants are required to demonstrate cooperation among school staff, law enforcement agencies , student s, parents, and community members and to provide a detailed explanation of all proposed expenditures. Funding Description: Grantees a re awarded up to $500,000 over five years. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the School Safety Consolidated Competitive Grant. Of the funds appropriated in the 2005 Budget Act, none were expended during the 2005 -2006 year. How ever, t he School Safety and Violence Prevention Training program does have 2005-2006 fiscal data. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : There were no expenditures in 2005 -2006. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $15,252,064. Education Code: 41510 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 129 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Program Description: Funds support schools in providing additional portions of fresh fruit and vegetables in the School Breakfast Program (SBP). T he California Fresh Start Program (CFSP) was established by SB 281 (Chapter 236, Statutes of 2005). Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs participating in the national School Breakfast Program or State Meals Program were eligible. Funding Description: The program reimburses participating schools 10 cents for every breakfast offering an additional serving of fruit and vegetables. Special Co nsiderations: The pilot program was designed to last one year. However, the initial appropriation exceeded claims in 2005-2006, and so the program was extended. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,060,341. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is unknown. A total of $18,200,000 was appropriated in 2005-2006, with unexpended funds reapp ropriated each year thereafter until the total amount was expended, which occurred in 2007 - 2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 3 117 24 148 12 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 14.2 6.2 78.7 0.8 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49565 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 130 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 23 12.4 0.37 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 31 14.3 0.55 Medium (33 – 60%) 43 26.4 0.92 Medium (6 – 23%) 34 22.1 0.53 High (66 – 100 %) 51 24.5 1.38 High (23 – 89%) 52 28.0 1.31 High Low (0 – 33 %) 14 31.8 0.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 0.27 Medium (33 – 60%) 6 22.2 1.16 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 28.2 0.53 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 0.67 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 1.62 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 42 43.8 0.29 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 18 24.0 0.53 Medium (33 – 60%) 63 46.3 0.78 Medium (6 – 23%) 67 50.4 0.53 High (66 – 100 %) 43 41.7 1.35 High (23 – 89%) 63 49.6 1.23 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 17 8.9 1.77 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 25 11.8 1.46 Medium (251 – 1,500) 36 19.8 1.14 Medium (6 – 50) 47 24.4 0.94 High (1,501 +) 64 34.8 1.01 High (50 – 2,122) 45 29.6 1.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 5 19.2 0.90 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 0.31 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 7 21.9 1.04 High (6,001+) 14 45.2 0.85 High (50 – 2,122) 9 50.0 0.76 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 44 34.1 0.90 Unified Low (0 – 6) 25 32.1 0.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 49 50.0 0.72 Medium (6 – 50) 44 43.6 1.05 High (10,001+) 55 50.9 1.03 High (50 – 2,122) 79 50.6 0.98 131 School Nutrition : State Meal Program Program Description: Funds sup port free or reduced price meals in public schools for needy students. State law requires all public school districts and county superintendents of schools to make available, free or at a reduced price, one nutritionally adequate meal to each needy stude nt every school day. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs with needy students are eligible for funding. Funding Description: LEAs are reimbursed at $0.2195 per pupil meal served. Special Considerations: Schools that participate in the State Meal Program may also participate in the federal National School Lunch or School Breakfast programs and receive federal reimbursement. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $89,174,853. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $104,700,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 36 473 74 331 69 836 Percent of total funding (%) 0.8 19.6 4.4 62.5 0.7 12.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49550, 49531, 49430.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 132 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 131 70.4 4.71 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 161 74.2 6.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 147 90.2 13.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 139 90.3 10.02 High (66 – 100 %) 195 93.8 24.16 High (23 – 89%) 173 93.0 21.23 High Low (0 – 33 %) 38 86.4 3.21 High Low (0 – 6%) 31 91.2 2.71 Medium (33 – 60%) 22 81.5 12.18 Medium (6 – 23%) 30 76.9 6.03 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 13.57 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 15.40 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 4.58 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 73 97.3 4.05 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 12.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 8.80 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 19.65 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 18.03 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 133 69.6 17.77 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 162 76.4 17.69 Medium (251 – 1,500) 167 91.8 15.39 Medium (6 – 50) 174 90.2 15.22 High (1,501 +) 173 94.0 16.03 High (50 – 2,122) 137 90.1 16.13 High Low (0 – 1,500) 22 84.6 8.19 High Low (0 – 6) 32 88.9 5.47 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 26 89.7 5.27 Medium (6 – 50) 25 78.1 7.30 High (6,001+) 26 83.9 8.68 High (50 – 2,122) 17 94.4 9.12 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 125 96.9 14.81 Unified Low (0 – 6) 76 97.4 13.19 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 10.85 Medium (6 – 50) 100 99.0 14.84 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 14.27 High (50 – 2,122) 155 99.4 13.65 133 Specialized Secondary Program s (SSP) Program Description: Funds help high schools initiate advanced learning programs. The programs are expected to be a model for standards -based instruction, with an in-depth study of a targeted content area or a thematic or career focus. Eligibility Criteria: Each district may submit one SSP application for a comprehensive high school that is not currently receiving SSP funds. The proposed program must be new to the school and serve students in at least two consecutive grades, nine through twelve. Charter schools that receive the categorical block grant are not eligible to apply because these schools already receive SSP funds through the categorical block grant. For high schools that currently receive S SP funds, continued funding is contingent upon progress toward full implementation or a legislated apportionment. Funding Description: Programs receive a grant between $185,000 and $285,000 over four years, pending inclusion in the annual state budget. SSP awards are determined by the phase of program implementation. A total of $4,460,000 of SSP funds are distributed to schools currently implementing programs. An estimated $1,113,000 is available for new programs. Each new program will receive $35,000 for up to 15 planning grants; or each new program will receive $70,000 to $125,000, based on school size, for up to five implementation grants. Special Considerations: Two programs that worked in collaboration with the California State University System prior to 1991 receive a legislated apportionment. Up to 15 new SSP programs are chosen annually. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,575,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $5,573,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 2 10 31 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 7.8 24.2 68.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 58800-58806 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 134 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 6,662.96 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 0.6 47.13 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 0.5 6,662.96 High (23 – 89%) 1 0.5 47.13 High Low (0 – 33 %) 7 15.9 6.55 High Low (0 – 6%) 3 8.8 13.19 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 7.4 6.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 5.43 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 4.12 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 4.94 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 11 11.5 5.85 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 12.13 Medium (33 – 60%) 13 9.6 3.71 Medium (6 – 23%) 18 13.5 4.71 High (66 – 100 %) 7 6.8 0.67 High (23 – 89%) 9 7.1 0.69 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 st udents per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 6,662.96 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 1 0.5 6,662.96 Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 1 0.5 47.13 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 47.13 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 35.66 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 31.02 Medium (6 – 50) 3 9.4 5.32 High (6,001+) 8 25.8 5.23 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 6.04 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 6 4.7 47.64 Unified Low (0 – 6) 5 6.4 55.90 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 6 6.1 11.73 Medium (6 – 50) 10 9.9 4.05 High (10,001+) 19 17.6 1.47 High (50 – 2,122) 16 10.3 1.45 135 State -Monitored Schools Program Program Description: Funds support further interventions for HPSGP and II/USP schools that fail to make significant API growth. One -time funding is provided to contract with a School Assistance and Int ervention Team (SAIT), which identifies critical areas for improving student achievement. Three years of funding is provided to implement corrective actions. The entry and exit criteria vary across the two programs. For more specific entry and exit crit eria, please see the HPSGP II/USP websites. Eligibility Criteria: Funding is for existing grantees only. The SBE identifies participating HPSGP and II/USP school s that do not meet growth requirements and are to be monitored by the state. These schools are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Districts are awarded one time funds for the SAIT contract. State -monitored elementary and/or middle schools receive $75,000 while high schools receive $100,000. Additionally, each state -monitored school receives $150 per pupil to implement corrective actions. HPSGP schools are funded for a minimum of three years or until a school exits the program. II/USP schools ar e funded for two years and an additional year if the school fails to exit after two years . Special Considerations: An in -kind match of services or school district funds, in an amount equal to one dollar for every two do llars provided, is required for SAIT . This is one-time funding to support the cost to contract with a SAIT. An in -kind match of services or school district funds, in an amount equal to the amount received, is required for Corrective Actions. If, within three years, state -monitored schools fail to exit the program, they move into the Secondary Sanctions program. This program involves more specific corrective actions and contracting a different SAIT. The state offers no continued or additional funding for schools in Secondary Sanctions. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act; however funding expires in 2009 -2010. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $9,411,274. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 10,000,000 for monitoring of HPSGP schools and $6,000,000 for monitoring of II/USP schools. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 2 2 19 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 2.4 3.4 94.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52050-52058 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 136 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 1 0.6 41.31 High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.0 8.05 High (23 – 89%) 1 0.5 2.52 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 106.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 3.7 106.51 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 97.81 High (23 – 89%) 1 7.7 97.81 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 1 1.0 12.33 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 9 6.6 13.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 4 3.0 10.71 High (66 – 100 %) 9 8.7 7.03 High (23 – 89%) 15 11.8 8.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 8.05 High (50 – 2,122) 2 1.3 8.05 High Low (0 – 1,500) 1 3.8 97.81 High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 1 3.4 106.51 Medium (6 – 50) 2 6.3 103.46 High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 1 0.8 740.96 Unified Low (0 – 6) 1 1.3 740.96 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 3 3.1 35.32 Medium (6 – 50) 1 1.0 45.10 High (10,001+) 15 13.9 7.89 High (50 – 2,122) 17 10.9 8.11 137 Supplemental Instruction: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE Remedial) Program Description: Funds support supplemental instruction for pupils in grades 7 -12 who are not demonstrating sufficient progress toward passing the CAHSEE. Instruction may be in mathematics, reading/language arts, and writing. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs must offer this program to eligible students. Charter schools may offer this program. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs were funded at a rate of $3.68 per pupil hour, while districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per pupil hour. There is no cap on the number of hours funded; however, when claims exceed the budget allocation, the allocation may be prorated. CAHSEE Remedial funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $212,204,742. . The total funding appropriated in 2007 - 2008 is $239,466,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 5 268 83 301 103 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 3.6 22.4 70.4 3.4 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37252, 42339 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 138 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 72 38.7 5.80 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 77 35.5 5.76 Medium (33 – 60%) 78 47.9 9.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 68 44.2 7.79 High (66 – 100 %) 118 56.7 12.04 High (23 – 89%) 123 66.1 11.74 High Low (0 – 33 %) 43 97.7 79.55 High Low (0 – 6%) 32 94.1 44.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 26 96.3 84.04 Medium (6 – 23%) 38 97.4 89.71 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 115.41 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 101.52 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 89 92.7 23.97 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 57 76.0 17.64 Medium (33 – 60%) 125 91.9 28.05 Medium (6 – 23%) 127 95.5 26.73 High (66 – 100 %) 87 84.5 52.29 High (23 – 89%) 117 92.1 46.79 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 39 20.4 27.12 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 66 31.1 13.31 Medium (251 – 1,500) 108 59.3 9.95 Medium (6 – 50) 109 56.5 10.31 High (1,501 +) 121 65.8 9.82 High (50 – 2,122) 93 61.2 9.71 High Low (0 – 1,500) 23 88.5 52.81 High Low (0 – 6) 33 91.7 55.44 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 65.61 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 89.04 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 90.38 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 87.40 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 102 79.1 27.09 Unified Low (0 – 6) 57 73.1 20.52 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 93 94.9 29.23 Medium (6 – 50) 93 92.1 31.90 High (10,001+) 106 98.1 39.68 High (50 – 2,122) 151 96.8 38.98 139 Supplemental Instruction: Core Academic Program Program Description: Funds support additional extracurricular academic instruction in any core academic subject, includ ing ESL, for students in grades K -12. Eligibility Criteria: Any LEA offering the program, including charter schools, may apply. Should claims surpass the budget allocation, a proration factor may be applied to ensure that all eligible LEAs receive fundi ng. Funding Description: The program has a cap on funded hours, calculated by multiplying 120 hours by 5 percent of the prior year’s K -12 enrollment. In 2004-2005, LEAs were funded at $3.68 per capped ADA, while districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per hour for up to 1,500 hours of instruction. Core Academic Program funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $92,802,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $101,384,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 432 81 313 117 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 20.8 10.8 67.2 1.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: Funding Authority: Education Code: 37253, 42239 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 140 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 139 74.7 15.55 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 143 65.9 16.46 Medium (33 – 60%) 131 80.4 17.25 Medium (6 – 23%) 124 80.5 16.58 High (66 – 100 %) 162 77.9 18.57 High (23 – 89%) 165 88.7 17.98 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 17.72 High Low (0 – 6%) 29 85.3 15.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 18.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 18.19 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 16.80 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 19.19 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 92 95.8 17.46 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 63 84.0 16.83 Medium (33 – 60%) 129 94.9 17.46 Medium (6 – 23%) 129 97.0 18.01 High (66 – 100 %) 92 89.3 13.27 High (23 – 89%) 121 95.3 13.93 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 99 51.8 39.25 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 121 57.1 23.39 Medium (251 – 1,500) 157 86.3 17.79 Medium (6 – 50) 163 84.5 17.24 High (1,501 +) 176 95.7 17.03 High (50 – 2,122) 148 97.4 17.10 High Low (0 – 1,500) 22 84.6 18.63 High Low (0 – 6) 31 86.1 16.90 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 17.16 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 17.23 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 18.16 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 18.86 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 110 85.3 18.40 Unified Low (0 – 6) 65 83.3 17.75 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 97 99.0 15.72 Medium (6 – 50) 98 97.0 17.82 High (10,001+) 106 98.1 15.45 High (50 – 2,122) 150 96.2 15.21 141 Supplemental Instruction: Low STAR Program Description: Funds support s upplemental instruction for students in grades 2 -6 who have been identified as being deficient in mathematics, reading, or writing based on Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) scores or are at risk of being retained. Eligibility Criteria: L EAs, incl uding charter schools, that offer the program are eligible for funding. Funding Description: In 2007-2008, LEAs were funded at $3.68 per pupil hour. Districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per pupil hour, up to 1,500 hours. Funded ho urs are capped, calculated by multiplying 120 hours by 5 percent of prior year K -12 enrollment. Should claims exceed budget allocation, the allocation may be prorated. Funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $20,224,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $22,101,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 307 0 239 48 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 32.5 0.0 66.5 0.9 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37252.8, 42239 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 142 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 91 48.9 6.23 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 77 35.5 5.58 Medium (33 – 60%) 90 55.2 6.53 Medium (6 – 23%) 91 59.1 6.64 High (66 – 100 %) 126 60.6 7.65 High (23 – 89%) 139 74.7 7.42 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 68 70.8 3.61 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 45 60.0 3.50 Medium (33 – 60%) 99 72.8 4.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 99 74.4 4.61 High (66 – 100 %) 72 69.9 5.59 High (23 – 89%) 95 74.8 5.11 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with fun ding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 47 24.6 8.06 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 68 32.1 7.76 Medium (251 – 1,500) 115 63.2 7.81 Medium (6 – 50) 124 64.2 7.40 High (1,501 +) 145 78.8 6.94 High (50 – 2,122) 115 75.7 6.89 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 82 63.6 5.02 Unified Low (0 – 6) 43 55.1 5.02 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 70 71.4 4.12 Medium (6 – 50) 76 75.2 5.00 High (10,001+) 87 80.6 4.90 High (50 – 2,122) 120 76.9 4.75 143 Supplemental Instruction: Retained and Recommended for Retention Program Description: Funds support additional instruction to students in grades 2 through 9 who have been recommended for retention or who have been retained. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs must offer this program to eligible students. Charter schools may offer this program. LE A policy provides the criteria to determine retention guidelines. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs were funded at a rate of $3.68 per pupil hour, while districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per pupil hour. There is no cap on the number of hours funded; however, when claims exceed the budget allocation, the allocation is prorated. This program’s funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $56,819,746. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $57,838,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 244 13 233 42 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 14.7 1.5 81.9 1.7 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37252.2, 42239 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 144 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 72 38.7 5.43 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 72 33.2 6.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 74 45.4 8.85 Medium (6 – 23%) 60 39.0 6.29 High (66 – 100 %) 98 47.1 13.92 High (23 – 89%) 112 60.2 13.12 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9 20.5 3.30 High Low (0 – 6%) 3 8.8 2.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 3 11.1 9.45 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 20.5 8.16 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 2.11 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 3.73 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 59 61.5 8.25 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 34 45.3 3.33 Medium (33 – 60%) 98 72.1 8.67 Medium (6 – 23%) 99 74.4 9.11 High (66 – 100 %) 76 73.8 18.19 High (23 – 89%) 100 78.7 16.11 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 34 17.8 32.55 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 57 26.9 14.81 Medium (251 – 1,500) 91 50.0 15.95 Medium (6 – 50) 90 46.6 12.90 High (1,501 +) 119 64.7 9.69 High (50 – 2,122) 97 63.8 9.58 High Low (0 – 1,500) 1 3.8 4.89 High Low (0 – 6) 2 5.6 7.10 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 3 10.3 6.06 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 9.83 High (6,001+) 9 29.0 6.15 High (50 – 2,122) 5 27.8 3.54 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 69 53.5 12.65 Unified Low (0 – 6) 41 52.6 10.72 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 74 75.5 10.81 Medium (6 – 50) 74 73.3 13.95 High (10,001+) 90 83.3 13.61 High (50 – 2,122) 118 75.6 13.17 145 Targeted Instruction Improvement Block Grant (TIIBG) Program Description: Funds support services provided under two previous programs: Targeted Instructional Improvement (TIIG) and Supplemental Grants (SG). SG was designed equalize categorical funding among districts, by providing aid to districts with less than the statewide average sum of revenue limits and a limited number of categorical programs. TIIG funded court -ordered desegregation and voluntary integration programs. After court -ordered desegregation obligations are met, TIIBG funding may be used on the programs or comb ination of programs listed in SG and TIIG. The two programs were combined in AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004). Eligibility Criteria: Districts must have been participating in the SG, TIIG, or both in 2003 -2004. Santa Clara and San Mateo COEs recei ve funding as part of the Tinsley court-ordered desegregation program for oversight and administration. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, district funding was calculated on the relative statewide proportion of funding received in 2003-2004. After 2005-2006, districts receive their 2005 -2006 level of funding adjusted for district revenue limit COLA and statewide ADA growth. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $976,279,984. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,075,731,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 2 285 54 204 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 7.5 4.1 88.4 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41540- 41543 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 146 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 97 52.2 60.78 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 98 45.2 54.73 Medium (33 – 60%) 84 51.5 96.99 Medium (6 – 23%) 85 55.2 63.62 High (66 – 100 %) 104 50.0 87.16 High (23 – 89%) 102 54.8 96.67 High Low (0 – 33 %) 28 63.6 83.49 High Low (0 – 6%) 17 50.0 47.17 Medium (33 – 60%) 17 63.0 51.04 Medium (6 – 23%) 28 71.8 78.79 High (66 – 100 %) 9 60.0 227.05 High (23 – 89%) 9 69.2 118.65 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 62 64.6 57.54 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 26 34.7 54.66 Medium (33 – 60%) 80 58.8 130.55 Medium (6 – 23%) 90 67.7 59.92 High (66 – 100 %) 62 60.2 409.82 High (23 – 89%) 88 69.3 365.27 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 82 42.9 70.58 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 86 40.6 55.03 Medium (251 – 1,500) 69 37.9 105.81 Medium (6 – 50) 93 48.2 80.10 High (1,501 +) 134 72.8 81.50 High (50 – 2,122) 106 69.7 84.18 High Low (0 – 1,500) 9 34.6 58.67 High Low (0 – 6) 14 38.9 27.89 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 16 55.2 49.98 Medium (6 – 50) 24 75.0 48.53 High (6,001+) 29 93.5 91.07 High (50 – 2,122) 16 88.9 124.18 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 46 35.7 55.35 Unified Low (0 – 6) 19 24.4 61.59 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 63 64.3 61.35 Medium (6 – 50) 64 63.4 36.22 High (10,001+) 95 88.0 276.68 High (50 – 2,122) 121 77.6 277.11 147 Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs The programs described in this section support professional development for teachers and administrators as well as some administrative costs related to staff and teachers. Many of these programs reimburse or provide incentive funding to districts or teachers and administrators for attending professional development. Regional programs or programs operated by the California Commission on Teaching Credentialing (CTC) are not included. Those can be found in the Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs section of the Statewide/Regional Support Services category toward the back of this manual. 148 Chief Business Officer (CBO) Training Program Program Description: Funds training of school business officers by providers approved by the state. Training and instruction must include the areas of school finance, sch ool operations, and leadership. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs are eligible to receive incentive funding to send their CBOs or CBO candidates to training given by state -qualified training providers. Priority is given to eligible CBOs and CBO training candidates from LEAs that are currently operating with a state -appointed administrator or trustee, or from LEAs that have received a negative or qualified budget certification within the past five fiscal years. Funding Description: Funds provide $3,000 per eligible training candidate for up to 350 candidates per year. The first 50 percent will be allocated upon approval of the application; the second 50 percent will be allocated upon completion of the training. Special Considerations: In 2005-2006, $1,050,000 was reappropriated from the Proposition 98 reversion account to pilot the CBO Training Program. However, the program did not become operational until 2006 -2007 and the 2005-2006 funding was reappropriated to FY06. We, therefore, do not consider the program funded in 2005-2006. The program was intended to last three years and the 2008 -2009 funding is largely funding applicants on the waiting list from 2006 -2007. Applicants must provide a provision of assurance by the LEA that the eligible training candidate has committed to provide no less than two years of continuous service to a state public school following completion of the training. Level of Funding : There were no expenditures in 2005 -2006. This program was not funded in 2007 -2008. The 2008-2009 funding is $1,000,000. Education Code: 44518- 44519.2 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 149 Math and Reading Professional Development Program Description: Funds training programs for teachers who have completed professional development in mathematics and reading/language arts . The program was established by AB 466 (Chapter 737, Statutes of 2001) and extended by SB 472 (Chapter 524, Statutes of 2006). Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with kindergarten through grade twelve teachers who provide instruction in mathematics and /or reading/language art are eligible. Additionally, teachers must hold an elementary multiple-subject or special education credential or single -subject credential in mathematics, science, English, or social science. The training must be conducted by a California Professional Development Institute approved by the Univer sity of California or a provider approved by the SBE . Funding Description: LEAs are reimbursed $1,250 for 40 hours training and $1,250 for 80 hours training , for a total of $2,500 for 120 hours of training. Special Considerations: This program is scheduled to end on July 1, 2012, unless repealed or extended by January 1, 2013. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $31,727,500. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 31,728,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 108 20 113 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.8 22.1 2.3 68.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44579.5, 99230-99242 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 150 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 9.55 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 22 10.1 13.31 Medium (33 – 60%) 34 20.9 8.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 35 22.7 10.87 High (66 – 100 %) 54 26.0 17.46 High (23 – 89%) 51 27.4 15.06 High Low (0 – 33 %) 8 18.2 4.65 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 4.07 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 2.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 28.2 3.48 High (66 – 100 %) 3 20.0 5.67 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 3.02 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 20 20.8 6.28 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 11 14.7 5.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 51 37.5 9.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 44 33.1 8.84 High (66 – 100 %) 42 40.8 12.13 High (23 – 89%) 58 45.7 11.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 19 9.9 29.70 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 20 9.4 16.82 Medium (251 – 1,500) 18 9.9 25.94 Medium (6 – 50) 43 22.3 17.06 High (1,501 +) 71 38.6 13.50 High (50 – 2,122) 45 29.6 13.06 High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 4.19 High Low (0 – 6) 6 16.7 6.02 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 6.15 Medium (6 – 50) 8 25.0 4.43 High (6,001+) 10 32.3 2.92 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 2.51 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 31 24.0 17.24 Unified Low (0 – 6) 19 24.4 9.28 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 32 32.7 11.66 Medium (6 – 50) 42 41.6 14.07 High (10,001+) 50 46.3 10.35 High (50 – 2,122) 52 33.3 10.08 151 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Incentive Award Program Description: Funds provide incentive grants to LEAs for teachers who have attained certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and are assigned to teach in high -priority schools. Eligibility Criteria: Only National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) who are assigned to teach in California's high -priority public or charter schools, kindergarten through grade twelve, are eligible. The LEAs are required to certify the NBCTs eligibility. This is a one -time $20,000 award (paid in $5,000 annual installments) for NBCTs who agree t o teach at least 50 percent of a full-time position in high- priority schools for four consecutive years. “High-priority” is defined as a school with an Academic Performance Index (API) statewide rank of 5 or lower. “Assigned to teach” may include a teacher leadership role such as peer coach or other teacher support provider as long as the position does not require an administrative credential. Funding Description: Eligible teachers generate $5,000 per year for four consecutive years . Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $5,640,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 45 24 91 8 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.4 11.9 8.0 77.3 2.3 0.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44395 Funding Source: State GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 152 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 3 1.6 1.60 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 36.67 Medium (33 – 60%) 13 8.0 2.07 Medium (6 – 23%) 10 6.5 1.47 High (66 – 100 %) 29 13.9 1.68 High (23 – 89%) 34 18.3 1.84 High Low (0 – 33 %) 8 18.2 1.97 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 24.86 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 1.02 Medium (6 – 23%) 15 38.5 1.55 High (66 – 100 %) 5 33.3 1.61 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 1.05 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 0.31 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 1.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 45 33.1 1.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 38 28.6 0.64 High (66 – 100 %) 31 30.1 2.24 High (23 – 89%) 52 40.9 2.03 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 36.67 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 1 0.5 36.67 Medium (251 – 1,500) 1 0.5 3.81 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 2.83 High (1,501 +) 43 23.4 1.77 High (50 – 2,122) 36 23.7 1.69 High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 13.25 High Low (0 – 6) 2 5.6 13.25 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 3 10.3 1.90 Medium (6 – 50) 12 37.5 1.86 High (6,001+) 19 61.3 1.33 High (50 – 2,122) 10 55.6 1.03 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 9 7.0 4.30 Unified Low (0 – 6) 5 6.4 2.73 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 18 18.4 1.10 Medium (6 – 50) 19 18.8 0.94 High (10,001+) 64 59.3 1.68 High (50 – 2,122) 67 42.9 1.72 153 Peer Assistance and Revie w (PAR) Program Description: Funds support activities to assist experienced teachers who need help developing their s ubject matter knowledge, teaching strategies, or both. Participants are teachers who have received an unsatisfactory evaluation or have been referred to the program. Teachers may al so request participation. After the needs of referred teachers have been met, funds can be used to support other professional development activities listed in Education Code Section 44506(b). Eligibility Criteria: Only districts, COEs, and district -wide charter schools that certified participation in the PAR as of fiscal year 2001-2002 are eligible for funding. Funding Description: An LEA is entitled to PAR funding equal to a teacher count multiplied by a funding rate. The count is 5 percent of the LEA’s certified classroom teachers in the prior year. The rate in 2005 -2006 was either $1,739 or $1,368 depending on when the LEA entered the program. LEAs with fewer than five certified employees are funded by a different formula. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $26,470,816. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 28,935,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 57 534 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.8 21.2 8.6 68.4 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44500-44508 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 154 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 179 96.2 4.92 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 205 94.5 5.58 Medium (33 – 60%) 156 95.7 5.02 Medium (6 – 23%) 147 95.5 4.80 High (66 – 100 %) 199 95.7 4.75 High (23 – 89%) 182 97.8 4.72 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 4.21 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 4.50 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 3.88 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 3.97 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 3.95 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 3.91 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 4.32 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 4.73 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 4.51 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 4.32 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 4.55 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.56 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 172 90.1 13.19 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 192 90.6 8.22 Medium (251 – 1,500) 178 97.8 6.00 Medium (6 – 50) 191 99.0 5.16 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4.58 High (50 – 2,122) 151 99.3 4.60 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 5.62 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 4.67 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 4.39 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 3.99 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 3.91 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 3.97 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 5.50 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 5.83 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 4.46 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 4.44 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 4.43 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 4.45 155 Principal Training Program Program Description: Funds support professional development for principals. Eligibility Criteria: Principals at school sites that receive funding for Reading First, High Priority School, or the School Assistance Intervention Team (SAID) programs are required to participate in Principal Training. Only providers approved by SBE may provide the training. Funding Description: Each recipient's total award is $3,000. Funding is disbursed in three installments, based upon completion of certain parts of the program. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the Administrator Training Program. For every $3,000 an LEA receives, it must provide $1,000 in matching funds . The federal funds associated with this program are provided for that purpose. This program is one of the pro grams granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,181,700. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,554,000, of which $5,000,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 22 65 20 98 2 0 Percent of total funding (%) 17.1 16.1 6.9 59.7 0.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44510- 44517 Funding Source: F & GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 156 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 15 8.1 0.56 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 9 4.1 0.84 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 6.7 0.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 16 10.4 0.45 High (66 – 100 %) 39 18.8 0.51 High (23 – 89%) 40 21.5 0.50 High Low (0 – 33 %) 8 18.2 0.32 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 0.77 Medium (33 – 60%) 6 22.2 0.24 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 20.5 0.37 High (66 – 100 %) 6 40.0 0.85 High (23 – 89%) 7 53.8 0.35 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 22 22.9 0.36 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 9 12.0 0.48 Medium (33 – 60%) 45 33.1 0.43 Medium (6 – 23%) 40 30.1 0.48 High (66 – 100 %) 31 30.1 0.26 High (23 – 89%) 49 38.6 0.26 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 4 2.1 18.01 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 7 3.3 2.95 Medium (251 – 1,500) 16 8.8 2.36 Medium (6 – 50) 24 12.4 1.13 High (1,501 +) 45 24.5 0.44 High (50 – 2,122) 34 22.4 0.38 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 1.96 High Low (0 – 6) 4 11.1 1.47 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 0.58 Medium (6 – 50) 10 31.3 0.43 High (6,001+) 12 38.7 0.35 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 0.29 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 18 14.0 1.55 Unified Low (0 – 6) 8 10.3 1.32 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 24 24.5 0.51 Medium (6 – 50) 28 27.7 0.56 High (10,001+) 56 51.9 0.29 High (50 – 2,122) 62 39.7 0.29 157 Professional Development Block Grant (PDBG) Program Description: Funds support professional development for teachers. The Professional Development Block Grant (PDBG) combined funding for three separate professional development programs: Instructional Time and Staff Development Reform (ITSDR), Teaching as a Priority Bl ock Grant (TAP), and Intersegmental Staff Development Programs (ISDP). Eligibility Criteria: LEAs must have participated TSDR, TAP, or ISDP in the 2003 -2004. Charter schools receive PDBG funding through the charter school categorical block grant. Fundin g Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs receive the same statewide proportion received in 2003 -04 for the ITSDR, TAP, and ISDP programs. In subsequent years, LEAs will receive their pr ior year level of funding adjusted annually by the rate of growth in statewid e ADA and COLA. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $249,320,959. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 274,718,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 52 519 85 334 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.9 20.1 8.2 69.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41530-41532 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 158 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 176 94.6 46.34 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 200 92.2 49.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 150 92.0 45.61 Medium (6 – 23%) 143 92.9 44.04 High (66 – 100 %) 193 92.8 40.76 High (23 – 89%) 176 94.6 41.80 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 37.63 High Low (0 – 6%) 33 97.1 41.72 Medium (33 – 60%) 26 96.3 34.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 33.39 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 36.93 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 40.03 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 43.36 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 48.27 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 42.60 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 40.62 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 43.16 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 44.02 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 159 83.2 61.04 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 179 84.4 51.02 Medium (251 – 1,500) 176 96.7 49.41 Medium (6 – 50) 189 97.9 43.41 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 42.64 High (50 – 2,122) 151 99.3 43.26 High Low (0 – 1,500) 25 96.2 50.70 High Low (0 – 6) 35 97.2 42.69 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 40.80 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 35.38 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 34.94 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 36.13 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 49.97 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 51.98 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 43.74 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 41.12 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 42.55 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 43.10 159 Reader Services for Legally Blind Teachers Program Description: Funds employ readers for certificated classroom teachers who are legally blind. Eligibility Criteria: The certificated classroo m teacher must be legally blind. Only LEAs and state special schools are eligible. Funding Description: LEAs submit a reimbursement claim to CDE that includes the hours (maximum of 15 per school week) and the hourly rate, excluding benefits, and the to tal annual salary for the readers. LEAs are then reimbursed from the Reader Employment Fund, contingent upon allocation to CDE from the State Budget. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,073,584. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $404,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 13 25 134 0 2 Percent of total funding (%) 5.7 13.3 6.5 70.6 0.0 3.9 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 45370, 45371, 45372 Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 160 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 4 2.2 3.29 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 3 1.4 3.41 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 3.1 3.81 Medium (6 – 23%) 4 2.6 1.87 High (66 – 100 %) 4 1.9 0.65 High (23 – 89%) 6 3.2 1.38 High Low (0 – 33 %) 15 34.1 0.34 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 0.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 8 29.6 0.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 10 25.6 0.19 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 0.11 High (23 – 89%) 6 46.2 0.44 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 36 37.5 0.33 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 18 24.0 0.32 Medium (33 – 60%) 57 41.9 0.35 Medium (6 – 23%) 59 44.4 0.39 High (66 – 100 %) 41 39.8 0.25 High (23 – 89%) 57 44.9 0.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 2 1.0 83.30 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 3 1.4 66.74 Medium (251 – 1,500) 2 1.1 36.62 Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 9 4.9 1.23 High (50 – 2,122) 10 6.6 1.38 High Low (0 – 1,500) 5 19.2 0.32 High Low (0 – 6) 7 19.4 0.22 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 10 34.5 0.60 Medium (6 – 50) 11 34.4 0.29 High (6,001+) 10 32.3 0.30 High (50 – 2,122) 7 38.9 0.39 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 39 30.2 0.47 Unified Low (0 – 6) 20 25.6 0.34 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 37 37.8 0.28 Medium (6 – 50) 38 37.6 0.21 High (10,001+) 58 53.7 0.30 High (50 – 2,122) 76 48.7 0.31 161 Teacher Dismissal Apportionment Program Description: Funds support reasonable hearing expenses for employees who are dismissed. Reasonable expenses may include payment s or obligations incurred for travel, meals, and lodging, the cost of substitute(s), t he cost of an administrative law judge, and attorney’s fees. Eligibility Criteria: Districts with dismissed or suspended teachers pursuant to Education Code 44930 and subsequent sections are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The apportionment is calculated by the Controller’s Office calculates the apportionment and paid by CDE . Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amoun t expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $48,000. Education Code: 44944 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 162 Teacher Recruitment and Retention Program Program Description: Funds support improvements in the educational culture and environment of qualifying schools. These efforts focus on recruiting and retaining highly skilled principals and highly qualified teachers as defined under NCLB. This may include assuring a safe , clean school enviro nment for teaching and learning, providing support ser vices for students and teachers, and providing time for teachers and principals to collaborate for the purpose of improving student academic outcomes . The funds may also be used for differential compensation and small group instruction. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs with school s ranked in deciles one through three on t he 2004 base API are eligible. Funding Description: LEAs are funded based on prior year enrollment in eligible schools. In 2005 -2006, LEAs received up to $50 per pupil. Special Considerations: The 2005-2006 funding comes from the Prop osition 98 reversio n account. Funding is uncertain for future years. The 2006-2007 funding was considered one time pursuant to AB 1802 (Chapter 79, Statutes of 2006) . Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $43,886,643. No funding was provided in 2007 -2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 6 126 29 155 15 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.3 17.2 7.4 74.7 0.5 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 163 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 2 1.1 1.22 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 12 5.5 11.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 14.1 6.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 15 9.7 7.31 High (66 – 100 %) 102 49.0 15.70 High (23 – 89%) 100 53.8 14.22 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9 20.5 3.87 High Low (0 – 6%) 4 11.8 2.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 14.01 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 43.6 8.67 High (66 – 100 %) 9 60.0 16.53 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 16.31 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 2.55 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 9 12.0 4.15 Medium (33 – 60%) 71 52.2 6.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 55 41.4 4.28 High (66 – 100 %) 69 67.0 15.55 High (23 – 89%) 91 71.7 14.13 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 17 8.9 24.09 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 24 11.3 17.12 Medium (251 – 1,500) 29 15.9 16.72 Medium (6 – 50) 40 20.7 15.14 High (1,501 +) 81 44.0 13.02 High (50 – 2,122) 63 41.4 12.73 High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 25.67 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 9.43 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 9 31.0 6.50 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 9.41 High (6,001+) 16 51.6 11.15 High (50 – 2,122) 9 50.0 11.91 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 39 30.2 14.72 Unified Low (0 – 6) 17 21.8 13.66 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 40 40.8 9.98 Medium (6 – 50) 53 52.5 11.44 High (10,001+) 76 70.4 11.13 High (50 – 2,122) 85 54.5 11.04 164 Vocational Programs Programs described in this section support career technical education for K -12 students. Adult educ ation programs are not included , though some of the programs included may also serve adults ; programs primarily serving adults can be found in the Adult Education section. 165 Agricultural Vocational Education Incentive Grants Program Description: Funds support programs that provide education and training for agricultural vocations. Eligibility Criteria: The LEA must be o perating an approved program. ROCPs are not eligible for funds. However, ROCP classes that are an i ntegral part of a school’s program may be counted toward funding. Funding Description: Funding to eligible schools is based on the size of the agriculture staff, s tudents enrolled in the program, and the compliance of the school site in meeting the Quality Criteria as verified and approved by the C DE Regional Supervisor of Agricultural Education. Special Considerations: Matching funds are required from non -salaried agricultural expenditures. Under certain conditions, a matching fund waiver may be obtained from the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $4,688,207. The total funding appropriated in 20 07-2008 is $ 5,201,000 COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 61 167 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 36.2 63.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52460 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 166 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 29 65.9 4.74 High Low (0 – 6%) 25 73.5 9.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 22 81.5 5.61 Medium (6 – 23%) 28 71.8 5.30 High (66 – 100 %) 10 66.7 11.86 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 3.75 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 23 24.0 1.50 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 23 30.7 9.79 Medium (33 – 60%) 81 59.6 2.12 Medium (6 – 23%) 65 48.9 1.77 High (66 – 100 %) 63 61.2 1.04 High (23 – 89%) 79 62.2 1.09 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 23 88.5 22.73 High Low (0 – 6) 34 94.4 12.85 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 23 79.3 7.69 Medium (6 – 50) 23 71.9 4.26 High (6,001+) 15 48.4 3.58 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 3.85 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 80 62.0 11.14 Unified Low (0 – 6) 48 61.5 11.44 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 42 42.9 3.10 Medium (6 – 50) 78 77.2 3.34 High (10,001+) 45 41.7 0.62 High (50 – 2,122) 41 26.3 0.55 167 Apprenticeship Program Description: Funds support supplementary instruction in loc al adult education and ROCP programs that have apprenticeship programs. In these programs, students learn a trade by working for a program sponsor. The sponsors pay wages and benefits to their apprentices during their training period. ROCPs and adult education programs provide additional instruction to support these apprenticeships. F unding is based on number of hours of instruction provided, subject to LEA -specific caps. Eligibility Criteria: School districts and COEs that particip ate in an approved apprenticeship program are eligible for funding. Charter schools are ineligible. Funding Description: Apprenticeship programs are funded on the lesser of actual or approved hours. In 2005 -2006, the hourly rate was $4.86. If an appren ticeship program operates for more hours than its approved amount, the excess hours may be funded at a lower rate if sufficient funds are available. Apprenticeship funding is allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Level of Fu nding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $17,187,259. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $18,990,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 0 6 23 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 21.9 0.0 11.0 67.1 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8152 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 168 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 3 6.8 25.22 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 0.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 7.4 12.08 Medium (6 – 23%) 2 5.1 30.88 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 19.05 High (23 – 89%) 3 23.1 13.16 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 7 7.3 18.98 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 2 2.7 99.12 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 8.1 24.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 6.0 5.74 High (66 – 100 %) 5 4.9 5.58 High (23 – 89%) 13 10.2 9.20 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 0.68 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 16.15 Medium (6 – 50) 2 6.3 30.88 High (6,001+) 4 12.9 16.56 High (50 – 2,122) 3 16.7 13.16 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 5 5.1 27.83 Medium (6 – 50) 1 1.0 7.41 High (10,001+) 18 16.7 9.55 High (50 – 2,122) 22 14.1 10.16 169 California Partnership Academies (CPA) Program Description: Funds support California Partnership Academies within comprehensive high schools. Academies integrate academic and career technical education to focus on particular careers. Please see the CPA website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only districts with comprehensive high schools are eligible to apply. Funding is l imited to applicants that have programs following the CPA model . Funding Description: CPA grant awards are determined by the program implementation level or academy student enrollment and range from $42,000 to $81,000. Most of the funding is distributed to school currently operating CPAs. Special Considerations: Le vel of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $21,018,600. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 23,490,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 28 74 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 29.4 70.6 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 54690-54696 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 170 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 11 25.0 18.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 18.34 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 19.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 15 38.5 23.67 High (66 – 100 %) 6 40.0 21.96 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 14.21 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 6.49 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 25.79 Medium (33 – 60%) 38 27.9 8.19 Medium (6 – 23%) 37 27.8 8.49 High (66 – 100 %) 21 20.4 5.47 High (23 – 89%) 36 28.3 5.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 79.00 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 32.25 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 36.07 Medium (6 – 50) 12 37.5 19.43 High (6,001+) 18 58.1 17.67 High (50 – 2,122) 11 61.1 18.72 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 5 3.9 38.77 Unified Low (0 – 6) 3 3.8 28.39 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 17 17.3 12.87 Medium (6 – 50) 17 16.8 11.28 High (10,001+) 52 48.1 5.94 High (50 – 2,122) 54 34.6 5.93 171 Regional Occupational Center/Program (ROCP) Program Description: Funds support Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROCPs) that provide career and technical education to adults and high school students 16 years of age and older. ROCPs also work in conjunction with CalWORKs to provide job training and secure employment for CalWORKs adults. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs that operate and participate in an ROCP are eligible for funding. COEs, districts, and charter school s that are part of a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) are eligible for direct funding based on a per ADA share of the total JPA ROCP funding. Funding Description: Funding is based on three revenue limits for participating ADA: a base revenue limit that exclud es CalWORKS ADA, a CalWORKS revenue limit, and an excess growth revenue limit. Excess growth is funded if the ROCP appropriation permits. COEs with excess taxes after calculating the county revenue must apply those taxes to offset state aid for the ROCP operated by the county, if any. If sufficient funding is unavailable, existing funding may be prorated. Funds are allocated in the Principal Apportionment to the administrative entity for non JPA ROCPs or to all members of a JPA. Special Consideratio ns: ROCP funding includes some funding for CalWORKs ADA, which may be serving non K-12 students. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $454,530,899. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $485,656,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 86 323 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 28.8 71.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52335-52335.6 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 172 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 232.33 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 276.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 237.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 216.60 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 227.45 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 244.68 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 93 96.9 87.38 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 67 89.3 91.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 97.1 87.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 131 98.5 84.63 High (66 – 100 %) 98 95.1 71.05 High (23 – 89%) 125 98.4 76.03 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 461.55 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 342.22 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 258.62 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 212.39 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 218.83 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 229.89 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 117 90.7 119.72 Unified Low (0 – 6) 69 88.5 125.57 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 95.57 Medium (6 – 50) 98 97.0 83.42 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 75.42 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 78.47 173 County Offices of Education Unrestricted Revenues County offices of education (COEs) have three basic functions. The first is to oversee the school districts in their county. An important part of this function is to approve the budgets adopted by districts. The second function is to provide to small districts services that larger districts typically provide themselves. These services include specialized instruc tion, health and attendance records, and guidance counseling. The third function is the schools and classes operated by COEs. These schools and classes serve special student populations such as student s in juvenile detention, students expelled from regular districts, and other students who may not be well served by regular districts. These functions are supported by a revenue limit system that is similar to that of school districts. A revenue limit entitlement for each COE is calculated based on the number of students served and a rate per student. This entitlement is met through local property taxes and state aid, just as in the case of school districts. COE revenue limits are more complicated than school district revenue limits, however, because CO Es have separate revenue limits for each of their core functions. Each limit has its own rates and ADA definitions. Furthermore, the revenue limit for special schools and classes is, in turn, composed of separate revenue limit calculations for each type of school. COEs may also offer schools and classes for special education students. These schools and classes are financed through a transfer of revenue limit funds from the districts in which students reside. In addition to these basic calculations, a COE’s revenue limit entitlement is adjusted for a number of other factors. COE’s receive funds for locally funded charter schools that they have sponsored. They also receive funds for increases in unemployment insurance rates and for several other sma ll programs. In what follows, a COE’s revenue limit entitlement is decomposed into six parts: the base revenue limit, the limit for direct services to small districts, the limit for education services, revenue for locally funded charter schools, the unemployment insurance adjustment, and all other adjustments. 174 Base Revenue Limit Program Description: Funds support the basic oversight function of COEs. Included in thi s function is the COE annual approval of school district budgets. In revenue limit calculations, this limit is called Other County School Service Fund Operations. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is b ased on a per ADA revenue limit multiplied by the sum of ADA for all districts in the county. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $267,690,769. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 175 Direct Services to Districts Program Description: Funds support regional administrative or support services for small districts. These services may include specialized instruction, health and at tendance records, and guidance counseling. Eligibility Criteria: Elementary districts with fewer than 901 ADA, high school districts with fewer than 301 ADA, and unified districts with fewer than 1,501 ADA are eligible for direct services by COEs. Funding Description: Funding is the lesser of expenditures and the calculated revenue limit per qualifying ADA in a COE. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,899,507. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 51 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 2550(a)(2), 14054(a) Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 176 Education Services Revenue Limit Program Description: Funds support a range of schools and classes serving special student populations. Included in the Special Schools and Classes revenue limit are Juvenile Court Schools, County Community Schools, Community School Students Expelled, Homeless Children, County Opportunity Schools, and Adults in County Jails. Additionally, County Community Day School, Handicapped Adults, Out of State Schools, and Specialized Secondary Schools are funded separately in the COE revenue limit. COEs may also operate special educati on classes and community schools which are financed by transfers of revenue limit funds from regular school districts. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs that operate one of more of the educational programs listed above are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Each of the Special Schools and Classes programs has a revenue limit calculation, typically based on an equalized per pupil rate or historical expenditure rate adjusted for COLA. The Homeless Child rate is the notable exception. It is based o n the revenue limit of the largest unified district in the county. Only Contra Costa, Marin, and Riverside COEs are eligible for Adults in County Jails revenue limit funding. Funding for similar COE programs in other counties is available through the Adu lts in Correctional Facilities categorical program. Out of State Schools is a reimbursement program for counties that send students to other states, typically Oregon or Nevada during the winter months. The County Office Transfer (COT), which funds COE sp ecial education services and COE community schools, is based on the revenue limit of the district in which the student resides. Special day class transfer funds are supplemented with state aid to account for the difference between district and special day class attendance rates. In most cases, COEs receive approximately 5 percent additional funding. County Community School revenues are adjusted for necessary small county community schools. Special Considerations: CalSAFE funding for self -contained class rooms for pregnant minors is also included because the Pregnant Minors Program was a COE revenue limit prior to converting to CalSAFE. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $496,092,443. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 2550.2, 1983.5, 48915(c), 1981.2, 1982(c), 2558.2, 48633, 48641, 1909 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 177 Locally Funded COE Charter Schools Adjustment Program Description: Funds provide basic support to locally funded charter schools sponsored by COEs. Locally funded charter schools receive thei r block grant through their sponsoring agency. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs with locally funded charter schools are eligible. Funding Description: The locally funded charter schools adjustment is the sum of the general purpose charter school block grant for each locally funded charter school for which a COE is the sponsoring LEA. Please see the Charter School Block Grant for more information about the funding formula for general purpose charter school block grants. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $6,457,541. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47633- 47635 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 178 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment Program Description: Funds compensate COEs for rate increases for unemployment insurance. Eligibility Criteria: Any COE funded through the revenue limit with 1975 -1976 unemployment insurance expenditures is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Actual 1975-1976 unemployment expenditures are subtracted from current year unemployment insurance expenditures, excluding those spent for charter schools funded through the general purpose block grant. That difference is then added as part of the revenue limit entitlement. Should 1975 -1976 expenditures exceed current year expenditures, the adjustment is $0. The adjustment is not subject to the deficit factor(s), but is su bject to the local revenue offset. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $7,267,425. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42241.7, 43001.8 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 179 All Other Adjustments Program Description: Funds represent a number of other adjustments to COE revenue limits. These adjustments are similar to adjustments for school districts and may be negative, like the PERS adjustment . Included are the PERS adjustment and the minimum teacher salary adjustment for teachers in COE special schools and classes. COEs also are eligible for beginning teacher salary incentive funding and teacher’s retirement board funding. These are historic adjustment s that were not folded into the revenue limits as was done in district revenue limits. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible. Funding Description: COEs are allocated funding based on historic per ADA rates or historic revenue totals. Special Considerations: The category also includes School Building Aid ( Education Code 2555) which has not been funded in recent years. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $-6,615,110. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 7 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 2558.1, 45023.1, 45023.4, 2558.6 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 180 Miscellaneous Revenue Program Description: Funds represent revenue in excess of a COE’s revenue limit entitlement. As in the case of districts, COEs may have local income in excess of their revenue limit entitlements. Should the COE ope rate a county- wide ROCP, the excess taxes are to be applied toward the ROCP entitlement to offset state aid. If the COE does not operate a ROCP or it is in its first year of excess taxes, the excess taxes are to go into a restricted account and to be used to offset the next year’s COE revenue limit entitlements. In recent years, more COEs have accumulated excess taxes. It appears that some of these COEs either did not apply their excess taxes to the ROCP or did not put the funds in a restricted account, and instead used these additional revenues in the same manner as school districts. We therefore call this miscellaneous revenue. Eligibility Criteria: COEs with local revenues in excess of their COE revenue limit entitlements are eligible. Funding Description: Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,670,252. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 5 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 181 County Offices of Education Restricted Revenues The programs described in this section typically fund administrative activities performed by COEs. 182 County Office of Education (COE) Fiscal Oversight Program Description: Funds apportioned to COEs for the increased fiscal oversight of school districts required pursuant to AB 1200 (Chapter 1213, Statutes of 1991). Funded activities include conducting reviews, examinations, and audits of districts . COEs also provide written notifications concerning the f iscal solvency of districts with disapproved budgets, qualified or negative certifications, or districts facing fiscal uncertainty. Eligibility Criteria: COEs, except for single district COE s, are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The allocation is distributed based on prior year county ADA . In 2007 -2008, p articipating counties receive a minimum of $0.414992909 per unit of ADA , but not less than $91,504, a 8.561 percent increase over 2006 -2007. Specia l Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $5,268,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 5,719,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 51 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42127.6, 42127.8 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 183 County Oversight: Williams Case Settlement Program Description: Funds support oversight activities specified in the Williams Settlement. COEs must use the funds to review, monitor, and report on the state of schools ranked in deciles one through three of the 2006 ba se API. Conditions reviewed include the following: teacher training, certification, misassignment, and vacancies; hiring and re tention practices of school districts; sufficiency of instructional materials; and conditions of facilities that pose an emergency or urgent threat to the health or safety of pupils or staff. The oversight activities also require a determ ination of the accuracy of reported data. Eligibility Criteria: Schools that ranked in deciles one through three on the 2006 API will generate oversight funds for the COEs. A list of eligible schools is available here. Funding Description: COEs will receive funding for eligible schools in the amount of $2,500 per elementary; $3,500 per junior high or middle; and $5,000 per high school. In addition, a COE may receive additional funding for sites whose enrollment exceeds a specified threshold and if the COE is responsible for visiting more than 150 sites. The minimum allocation is $10,000 per COE. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $6,892,078. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 10,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 45 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1240(c), 1242 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 184 County School Service Fund Program Description: Funds reimburse county superintenden ts of schools for travel expenses incurred in connection with cooperative county publication projects . Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible to receive funding. Funding Description: Reimbursement is provided for meeting attendees that are confirmed by the Curriculum and Instruction Steering Committee chair on the J -4A form. Special Considerations: Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $89,427. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 100,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 28 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1602, 14035, 14055 Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 185 Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE): COE Oversight and Assistance Program Description: Funds support the efforts of COEs to oversee and assist school districts in implementing Tobacco Use Prevention Programs. Please see Health and Safety Code 104350-104495 for more information. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Barring insufficient funding, COEs are awarded a minimum of $25,000. If funding exceeds the minimum, the remaining funding is allocated using a per ADA formula based on prior year ADA and total ADA in the county: $0.30 per ADA for COEs with over 550,000 A DA, $0.65 per ADA for COEs with ADA between 100,000 and 550,000, $0.90 per ADA for COEs with ADA between 50,000 and 90,000, and $1 per ADA for COEs with ADA between 25,000 and 50,000. COEs with less than 25,000 units of ADA receive an additional $25,000. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,106,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $3,106,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 186 Unemployment Insurance Management System Program Description: Funds cover the costs of administering the unemployment insurance management system for each school employer participating in the School Employees Fund. Please see Unemployment Insurance Code sections 822 and 826 for more information. Eligibility Criteria: To receive reimbursement for this program, the Unemployment Insurance Management System Report (Form J -3) must be completed and returned to the California Department of Education Funding Description: The amount of reimbursement for actual administrative costs incurr ed is two dollars ($2) per covered employee submitted, minus state administrative costs not to exceed five cents per covered employee. Adjustments are made for revisions reported for the prior year. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,653,251. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is unknown until the applications are received and processed. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1330 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 187 Other Statewide or Regional Support Program Revenues Programs described in this section are separate from others in that funding typically goes to a select number of LEAs to perform statewide or regional services. 188 Administrative and Support Services Programs described in this section fund training and technical activities. In some instances, these functions could otherwise be provided by CDE, but are instead contracted out to a COE or non LEA. The exception is the student testing programs, which often include some rei mbursement to LEAs. 189 After School Education and Safety (ASES): R egional After School Technical Assistance System Program Description: Funds support 11 regional offices providing technical assistance for LEAs with before and after school programs. The regional offices provide technical assistance to all ASES and 21st Century Community Learning Center grant ees and sites and build capacity through the region they serve to develop, implement, and sustain support for effective before and after school programs. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs that are current regional lead COEs are eligible for funding: Alameda, Butte, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mendocino, Monterey, Sacramento, San Diego, Stanislaus, Tulare, and Ventura COE s. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to each regional lead ranging from $130,814 to $652,175, determined by the base allocation for each re gion, the number of unique funded LEAs and schools in the region, the projected student enrollment at the funded schools. Special Considerations: Pursuant to Education Code 8483.5, the ASES program, including regional technical assistance, is continuously appropriated up to $550,000,000 per year. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,373,573. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 3,029,715. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 0 0 1 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 90.1 0.0 0.0 7.5 0.0 2.5 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8482-8484.6 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Statute 190 California School Information Services (CSIS) Program Description: Funds support the oversight and administration of the California School Information Services (CSIS) program, a voluntary electronic student record system. Funding supports five major functions: CSIS Operations, Project Management Services, the Statewide Student Identifiers (SSIDs) as required by NCLB and SB 1453 (Chapter 1 002, Statutes of 2002) , the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS), and independent oversight of the CSIS program by Sacramento COE. In some cases, funding is then pass ed on to LEAs for one time incentives for LEAs to join CSIS. The CSIS program office is under the administrative oversight of the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT), which is operated from the Kern C OE. Eligibility Criteria: Only Ker n and Sacramento COEs are eligible to receive funds. Funding Description: Funding is allocated by the Budget Act to Kern and Sacramento COE for the specific sub -functions of CSIS. Special Considerations: In 2005-2006 funding for operations and CALPADS came from the Educational Telecommunication Fund, while project management and oversight were funded through the General Fund. Funding is subject to the Budget Act and specific program source varies by year. Funding for administering SSIDs is included in operations; SSID funding for LEAs is discussed in the next program. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,596,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $5,241,000; of which $4,444,000 is for operations, $250,000 for project management, $397,000 for SSID maintenance, and $150,000 for oversight. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 2 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49080, 49084 Funding Source: GF & SF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 191 Education Technology: California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) Program Description: Funds support the efforts of regional lead agencies to provide assis tance in education technology. CTAP lead agencies provide a range of technology services, including staff development and technical assistance, to all school districts and county offices within each region. Each of the 11 CTAP regions contains approximately 100 or more school districts. Funding cannot be used to the exclusive benefit of the reg ional lead agency. Eligibility Criteria: COEs and districts may apply to serve as the lead for CTAP services. A district or COE must be within the region for which they are applying to serve as a regional lead. Funding Description: Funding for the 11 CTAP regions was awarded competitively in 2005 for a three -year grant period. Each region receives a $50,000 base. Ten percent of the remaining funding is distributed to the regions based upon the number of districts and COEs in the r egion. The remaining funding is distributed based upon the regions’ prior year enrollment. Awards are subject to allocation of funding in the state budget and approval by SBE. Special Considerations: Data on the districts served by each CTAP regional le ad is unavailable. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $12,994,956. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 for CTAP and SETS is $ 17,705,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 51871 Funding Source: Federal & GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 192 Education Technology: K- 12 High-Speed Network Program Description: Funds support the efforts of a lead agency to provide high -speed, high-bandwidth Internet access to COEs , districts, and schools. In 2004, the Imperial COE was selected to be this lead agency. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Imperial COE is eligible. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, SB 65 (Chapter 491, Statutes of 2005) made funding of up to $21 million of unused funds from previous appropriations available for al location to the Imperial COE to continue management and operation of the n etwork and up to $1.2 mill ion to administer and support the program. Funding is subject to budget availability and administrative adjustments. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown . The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is up to $ 15,600,000, and an additional $1,900,000 for Imperial COE’s administration and support costs. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 . . . . . *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 193 Education Technology: Statewide Education Technology Services (SETS) Program Description: Funds support the dissemination of information concerning the use and effectiveness of new educational technology. The four SETS projects include the California Learning Resource Network (CLRN), Technical Support for Education Technology in Schools (TechS ETS), the Technology Information Center for Administrative Leadership (TICAL), and EdTechProfile (ETP). More information about the specific SETS project may be found here. Eligibility Criteria: Only S an Diego, Santa Cruz, and Stanislaus COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are distributed to the contracted SETS COEs subject to funds budgeted each year. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,074,044. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 for CTAP and SETS is $17,705,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 3 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 51872(B) Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 194 Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) Program Description: Funds support various programs operating by the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) . FCMAT was established pursuant to Assembly Bill 1200 (Chapter 1213, Statutes of 1991). FCMAT assists and provides guidance to LEAs in the areas of business and financial management practices. Funding supports nine FCMAT sub -programs: COE Reimbursement for Extraordinary Costs of Audits, COE Reimbursement for Increased Oversight, Education Audit Appeals Panel, Educational Data Partnership, Regional Teams of Fiscal Experts, School District Assessment, School District Training and Site -Based Budgeting, Staff Development, and Team Responsibilities. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Kern COE is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to Kern COE for the nine FCMAT programs. Special Considerations: The funding for the two COE reimbursement sub -programs is distributed to COEs by FCMAT. Allocation data is unavailable. The funding for School District Assessment is intended to be one time pursuant to Education Code 41327.1 to assess Oakland Unified, Vallejo City Unified, and West Fresno Elementary. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $5,031,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,096,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42127.8, 41327.1 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 195 School Community Violence Preventio n (SCVP): School Safety and Violence Prevention Training Program Description: Funds supports the Kern COE to admin ister regional training on school safety and viole nce prevention planning methods on three topics: bullying, including cyber b ullying; safe school planning; and crisis response. Kern COE subcontracts the training in the 11 County Superintendents regions. Eligibility Criteria: Only Kern COE is eligible for funding. Funding Description: CDE allocates funding to Kern COE. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $201,139. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 35294-35294.9 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 196 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Training and Evaluation Program Description: Funds awarded to a COE or community college to contract with an independent evaluator to conduct a comp rehensive evaluation of the Fresh Start Pilot Program . In 2006-2007, the University of California Berkeley’s Center for Weight an d Health conducted an eval uation of the pilot in 69 diverse schools. Please see the Evaluation of the California Fresh Start Progra m Report of Findings for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only Alameda COE is eligible. Funding Description: The 2005-2006 pilot program appropriation included a provision for the use of up to $300,000 to conduct the evaluation of the program. Funding went to Alameda COE, which awarded the contract to the University of California Berkeley. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $300,000. No funding was available in 2007 -2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49565 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 197 Student Friendly Service s (SFS) Program Description: Funds provide for the development and oversight of the californiacolleges.edu website . The SFS website provides information about the college admissions process, financial aid opportunities, and career planning to st udents, parents, teachers, counselors, and administrator s. The website is sponsored by the Education Round Table. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Kern C OE is eligible for funding . Funding Description: Funds are allocated to FCMAT, operated by Kern COE, for website maintenance. Special Considerations: Neither CDE nor FCMAT may charge administrative or indirect cost against this program. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $500,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $500,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 198 Teacher Recruitment and Retention: COE Contract Program Description: Funds to contract with an outside entity for purposes of recruiting highly qualified teachers to qualifying schools. Eligibility Criteria: Only Sacramento COE is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding goes to the Sacramento COE to contract with an outside entity. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the Teacher Recruitment and Student Support. Funding appeared to be one- time. However, the 2006 -2007 Budget Act reappropriates $3,000,000 from the Prop osition 98 Reversion Account for this purpose. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,979,709. No funding was available in 2007 -2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 199 Testing: Assessment Review and Reporting Program Description: Funds support t echnical and reporting contracts, which vary from year to year depending on the needs of the program. Eligibility Criteria: Funding Description: Contracts vary year to year. In 2005-2006, $421, 282 went to San Joaquin COE, and $ 118,143.40 to CDE to disburse on technical and reporting contracts. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $539,425. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is 2,313,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 78.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 21.9 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 200 Testing: California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Program Description: Funds to reimburse districts and charter schools for the costs associated with administering the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). The CELDT is a test of English language proficiency given to students whose primary language is not English. Eligibility Criteria: Local educational agencies that administer the CELDT are eligible for funding . Funding Description: LEAs are allocated $5.00 per student tested. Special Considerations: In 2005-2006, an additional $2,227,000 was reappropriated in reversion funds for vendor startup costs. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $12,426,886. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $9,741,000, including vendor c ontracts. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 39 426 78 296 92 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.4 14.4 3.9 48.9 0.4 32.1 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 313, 60810-60812 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authori ty: Budget Act 201 Testing: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Program Description: Funds to reimburse districts and charter schools for the costs associated with administering the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). The CAHSEE is statewide exam in English-language arts and mathematics that students must pass to gradu ate from high school. Eligibility Criteria: Local educational agencies that administer the CAHSEE are eligible for funding . Funding Description: LEAs are allocated $3.00 per student tested and an additional $0.32 for each census questionnaire for grade 10 students. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $7,077,731. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is 10,945,000, which includes vendor contracts. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 42 16 79 278 66 4 Percent of total funding (%) 1.3 0.0 9.7 24.0 0.7 64.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60850 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 202 Testing: California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) Program Description: Funds reimburse the Sacramento COE, which administers the California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) . Eligible students who pass the CHSPE, an exam in English -language arts and mathematics, receive a Certificate of Proficiency, which by state law is equivalent to a high school diploma. Please see the CHSPE website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only Sacramento COE is eligible. Funding Description: Funding is disbursed to Sacramento COE for administration from fees charged to individuals taking the exam. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,020,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,144,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 48412 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 203 Testing: Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program Description: Funds reimburse districts for the costs associated with administering the STAR tests. The tests included in 2005-2006 are the California Standards Tests (CSTs), California Achievement Test, Sixth Edition Survey (CAT/6 Survey), California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA), and Aprenda 3. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs that ad minister the STAR Program tests are eligible for funding. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs received $2.52 for each pupil tested in grades two through eleven on the CST and CAT/6 Survey, $5 per pupil tested on the CAPA , $2.44 for each pupil tested in grades two through eleven on Aprenda 3, and $0.32 per pupil for whom only demo graphic data were submitted on the CST, CAT/6 Survey, or CAPA. The total funding available to LEAs in 2005 -2006 for district reimbursement was $12,049,208. Special Considerations: LEAs administering the CAPA also receive $5 per tested student from federa l Title VI funds. In 2005-2006, an additional $43,623,900 was used for contracts with test developers and vendors. That funding is not included in the analysis on the second page. Per the Budget Act of 2008, the CAT/6 Survey is no longer administer ed. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $55,673,108. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is 62,124,000, which includes vendor contracts. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 50 531 85 329 163 5 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 4.2 2.1 14.9 0.3 78.4 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60640(h) Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 204 General Instruction Programs The programs described in this section fund regional or statewide centers that support instructional activities. 205 Advancement via Individual Determination (AVID) Program Description: Funds support Advancement via In dividual Determination (AVID), an in -school academic support program for grades seven through twelve. The purpose of the program is to prepare students for college eligibility and success. AVID targets students in the academic middle who h ave the desire to go to college . AVID was deve loped in 1980 by Mary Catherine Swanson . Eligibility Criteria: Only past recipients are eligible. Funding Description: Funding is calculated based on a formula using regional data , including: the number of students within the region receiving free and reduced price meals , the regional enrollment for grades seven through twelve , the number of middle and high schools within the region , and the number of AVID schools within the region. Funding is awarded on a three-year grant cycle to the 11 AVID regional centers. Funding may then be allocated to AVID schools. Some of the funding goes to CDE for administrative support. Special Considerations: Additional fiscal data concerning the allocation of funds to school level AVID programs is unavailable. Lev el of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $9,017,663. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $7,735,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 85.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 14.3 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 206 American Indian Education Center s (AIEC) Program Description: Funds support American Indian Education Centers, which assist in improving academic achievement and lowering dropout rates among American Indi an students at all grade levels, including encouraging students to continue education beyond high school. The AIEC program was established in 1974 by SB 2264 (Chapter 1425, Statutes of 1974) . Reauthorizing legislation, SB 1710 (Chapter 880, Statutes of 2006) , became law on January 1, 2007. Eligibility Criteria: Any Tribal Group or Incorporated American Indian Association is eligible for funding. The goals of the program must meet the goals and activities as stated in the Education Code. Funding Description: Funding is award to each center by contract and is based on the indentified needs and services of the community. Please see the resources page for more information. Special Considerations: Each year, $370,000 of the total funding does not count toward the Proposition 98 guarantee. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $4,366,016. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $4,916,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 31 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 33380-33383 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 207 California Association of Student Councils Program Description: Funds support statewide student organizations authorized and sponsored by CDE in agriculture, business, home economics, and industrial education. Vocational programs and activities include conducting leadership developmen t programs for student officers, preparing instructional materials for teacher advisors , providing an opportunity for student involvement in college and university workshops, maintaining affiliation with national v ocational student organizations, and participating in vocational fairs . Please see section 19632 of the Business and Professions Code for more information. Eligibility Criteria: The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall develop a budget procedure for the disbursement of funds appropriated under this section to ensure equal treatment of participating students and to further ensure that such funds do not supplant existing money currently provided from other public sou rces. Funding Description: Funding is appropriated to CDE, which then grants funding to the California Association of Student Councils. Funding is also directly allocated to California DECA, a national care er skills organization. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called Vocational Education. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $546,998. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $547,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 2 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 208 Center for Civic Education Program Description: Funds provided to the Center for Civic Education for the purpose of implementing a middle school and junior high school civic education program. The Center for Civic Education determines which LEAs can participate and provides the LEAs with the Center's curriculum. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Center for Civic Education is eligible. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to the Center for Civic Education only. No funding is available for application by LEAs. Special Considerations: Data on participating districts is unavailable. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $250,000. The total funding appropria ted in 2007-2008 is $250,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 209 Environmental Educatio n (EE) Program Description: Funds support the California Regional Environmental Educat ion Community (CREEC) Network, a collaboration of science and environmental educators that provides information about resources for environmental education in each of the state’ s 11 regions. Eligibility Criteria: Institutions of higher education , LEAs, nonprofit organizations, other organizations or agencies are eligible to apply. Funding Description: Regions receive $20,500. Funding is contingent upon the yearly allocation from the Legislature. Spec ial Considerations: Of the total funding available, $360,000 comes from the California Environmental License Plate Fund for regional grants and $11,000 comes from the Department of Water Resources, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the Cali fornia Coastal Commission, and the State Consumer Services Agency to provide grants to LEAs. District participation in the EE programs is unavailable. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $371,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $371,000, which includes the $11,000 from State Agencies to LEAs. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 0 0 1 0 2 Percent of total funding (%) 81.5 0.0 0.0 5.3 0.0 13.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 8740 Funding Source: SF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 210 Teacher Training and Professional Development Programs The programs described in this section support regional or statewide teacher training operated by the CTC or other state agencies. 211 Alternative Certification Programs Program Description: Funds support the District Intern and University Intern teaching programs. Through these programs, teacher credential candidates receive the support and instruction that prepare them for a teaching credential, often while working as a classroom teacher. Funds also support incentive grants for districts and COEs to enhance internship programs and address the distribution of beginning teachers. Please see the CTC website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only COEs and districts participating in alternative certification programs are eligible. Funding Description: The allocation formula is unknown. Incentive grants may not exceed $2,500 per intern per year. Special Considerations: Each school district or county office of education that receives a grant shall provide matching funds from available sources in an amount equal to 50 percent of the cost of the alternative certification program. The Alternative Certification Program is operated by the CTC. Data concerning the districts and number of teacher served is unavailable. This program is also known as the Teacher Intern Program. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure fl exibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown . The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $31,723,000. Education Code: 44305, 44380- 44387 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 212 Bilingual Teacher Training (BTTP) Program Description: Funds support schools and districts in preparing teachers, kindergarten through grade twelve who already pos sess a basic credential , for CTC authorization to provide instructional services to English learners (ELs) . The training prepares teachers in the appropriate methodologies to facilitate ELs' acquisition of English and academic development. Eligibility Cr iteria: Only the 14 currently funded COEs that serve as regional training centers are eligible to apply. These regional training centers must reapply for BTTP funds on an annual basis. Funding Description: Funding of the centers is based on number of participant teachers. Grants are awarded through an application process based on prior year data for each center and evaluative criteria demonstrating the center’s ability to provide appropriate training servic es. Special Considerations: More specific data, including the districts and number of teachers served at each center, are unavailable. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,950,608. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $2,141,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 14 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52180-52186 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 213 Teacher Credentialing Block Gran t (TCBG) Program Description: Funds support the Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment (BTSA) program. The BTSA program, co- administered by CDE and the CTC , provides assessment and support for beginning teachers. The funding sponsors veteran teacher mentors and credentialing requirements for first and second year teachers. These regional programs vary in organizational design and may include individual districts, COEs, and colleges and universities. Funding also supports regional infrastructure. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs must develop and implement teacher induction programs that meet the standards adopted by CDE and CCTC. Funding Description: Funding is apportioned to BTSA administration units based on the number of eligible first and second year teacher participants. The awards are made contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Considerations: More detailed data regarding the distr ibution of BTSA participants and participating districts is unavailable and presumably varies by year. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $93,039,475. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $128,671,000, including $3,325,000 for regional infrastructure . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 28 28 11 77 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 36.3 10.2 4.6 48.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41520-41522, 44279.1 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 214 Adult Education Programs The programs described in this section fund basic and career technical education for adults who are not K -12 students . 215 Adult Education Program Description: Funds support educational opportuni ties and support services for adults. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs that offer educational programs for adults and have an established “c ap ADA ” are eligible for funding . Funding Descrip tion: Program funding is calculated by multiplying the funding rate by the cap ADA, adjusted for COLA. The cap ADA may be adjusted for growth or decline. ADA in excess of the cap may be funded at the excess ADA rate, determined by funding availability. A proration factor may be applied should funding be insufficient. The funding for Adult Education is allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $641,534,449. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $753,717,000, with an additional $8,739,000 in remedial education for CalWORKs recipients available through an interagency agreement. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 6 0 75 245 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 0.0 20.6 79.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52616, 52616.16- .19, 52616.21, 52617 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 216 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 38 86.4 222.65 High Low (0 – 6%) 28 82.4 193.30 Medium (33 – 60%) 25 92.6 200.23 Medium (6 – 23%) 35 89.7 211.62 High (66 – 100 %) 12 80.0 520.02 High (23 – 89%) 12 92.3 348.71 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 75 78.1 86.59 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 35 46.7 62.78 Medium (33 – 60%) 96 70.6 109.60 Medium (6 – 23%) 107 80.5 96.04 High (66 – 100 %) 74 71.8 175.58 High (23 – 89%) 103 81.1 165.18 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 17 65.4 82.83 High Low (0 – 6) 27 75.0 100.41 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 269.91 Medium (6 – 50) 30 93.8 196.94 High (6,001+) 30 96.8 243.14 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 306.51 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 60 46.5 62.66 Unified Low (0 – 6) 31 39.7 33.50 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 82 83.7 99.81 Medium (6 – 50) 78 77.2 59.58 High (10,001+) 103 95.4 142.31 High (50 – 2,122) 136 87.2 146.72 217 Adults in Correctional Facilities Program Description: Funds support educational services to adults in correctional facilities. Classes may be in basic education, high school diploma, or ESL and are intended to help inmates improve competence in reading, language arts, mathematics, vocational education, and self -esteem. The term "correctional facilities" includes any county jail, county industrial farm, or county or joint -county road camp. There are currently 33 jail education programs. Eligibility Cri teria: LEAs that received funding for Adults in Correctional Facilities in the prior fiscal year are eligible. Funds for new LEAs are contingent on funds made available as a result of a reduction or the elimination of an existing LEA's level of funding. Funding Description: Funding reimburses services provided in the previous year, subject to program- specific funding caps. Funding is equal to the prior year rate per ADA multiplied by the prior year funded ADA. The rate per ADA is the lesser of the rate tw o years prior increased by the prior year COLA, or 80 percent of the prior year statewide average adult education revenue limit amount. Funded ADA is the lesser of the reported prior year annual ADA or the prior year ADA cap . For LEAs with 20 or fewer A DA, the ADA cap is equal to the cap two years prior plus 20 ADA for growth. For LEAs with more than 20 ADA, the ADA cap is equal to the cap two years prior plus 2.5 percent for growth. If growth funds are insufficient, an adjustment will be made to the p er-pupil growth rates. Beginning in fiscal year 2007 -2008, funding for this program is apportioned through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Per Education Code 1909, Contra Costa, Marin, and Riverside COEs receive revenue limit funding for a similar historic program in the Special Schools and Classes COE revenue limit. This funding is not included in the analysis below. Level of Funding : The total amount expend ed in 2005-2006 is $14,282,408. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $17,771,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 0 12 14 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.6 0.0 19.5 73.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1900-1909.5, 41840- 41841.8, 46191, 52610- 52617 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 218 Community -Based English Tutorin g (CBET) Program Description: Funds support free or subsidized English language instruction to parents or other community members who pledge to provide English language tutoring to California school children with limited English proficiency. The funds may be used for direct program services, community notification processes, transportation services, and background checks related to the tutoring program. Whenever possible, LEAs should operate programs at neighborhood school sites. The adult English language instruction can be provided by schools, colleges, universities, community -based organizatio ns, or nonprofit organizations. The CBET program was established by Proposition 227 in 1998, which require all public school instruction to be conducted in English , with limited exceptions. The Proposition appropriated $50,000,000 each year for ten years from the General Fund to support the program. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with one or more ELs on the current year Annual Language Census Report (R -30) are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Fund ing is allocated based on the number of ELs enrolled in participating LEAs. In 2007 -2008, LEAs received $33.39 per EL. Special Considerations: The continuous appropriation under Proposition 227 was set to expire after 2006 -2007. SB 368 (Chapter 632, Statutes of 2006) continued CBET funding beyond FY06 subject to the Budget Act. This program is one of the programs gran ted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $49,989,140. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $50,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 245 56 268 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.3 20.6 5.9 73.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 315- 317 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute, Budget Act 219 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 52 28.0 4.63 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 23 10.6 1.63 Medium (33 – 60%) 67 41.1 9.08 Medium (6 – 23%) 68 44.2 4.79 High (66 – 100 %) 126 60.6 14.36 High (23 – 89%) 154 82.8 14.10 High Low (0 – 33 %) 26 59.1 4.69 High Low (0 – 6%) 11 32.4 1.55 Medium (33 – 60%) 19 70.4 6.58 Medium (6 – 23%) 33 84.6 5.04 High (66 – 100 %) 11 73.3 9.20 High (23 – 89%) 12 92.3 9.67 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 71 74.0 3.64 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 23 30.7 1.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 112 82.4 7.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 122 91.7 4.74 High (66 – 100 %) 85 82.5 13.62 High (23 – 89%) 123 96.9 12.78 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs wit h funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 23 12.0 12.33 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 50 23.6 9.15 Medium (251 – 1,500) 77 42.3 10.21 Medium (6 – 50) 83 43.0 9.85 High (1,501 +) 145 78.8 10.97 High (50 – 2,122) 112 73.7 11.22 High Low (0 – 1,500) 10 38.5 7.11 High Low (0 – 6) 14 38.9 3.43 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 17 58.6 4.46 Medium (6 – 50) 27 84.4 5.38 High (6,001+) 29 93.5 6.16 High (50 – 2,122) 15 83.3 6.75 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 75 58.1 8.99 Unified Low (0 – 6) 36 46.2 6.54 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 86 87.8 6.52 Medium (6 – 50) 87 86.1 8.79 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 9.78 High (50 – 2,122) 145 92.9 9.43 220 Direct Support Professional Training Program Program Description: Funds support training for people to work with indiv iduals with a developmental disability living in licensed community care facilities. DDS has over 4,400 licensed community care facilities that serve over 75 percent of people with developmental disabilities living in licensed facilities. DDS implement ed a two-year, 70-hour standardized statewide competency -based training program. Training is mandatory for employees and administrators who provide direct car e in a community care facility. In lieu of the training, a challenge test may be taken for each of the 35 hour segments. Those who pass the challenge test for either of the 35 hour training segments will not be required to take that classroom segment. Through an interagency agreement, ROCPs provide this program at no cost to enrollees and are reimbursed by DDS for the challenge test and training. Eligibility Criteria: Only ROCPs that implement the Direct Support Professional Training Program are eligible for reimbursement. Funding Descr iption: Through an interagency agreement with DDS, CDE reimburses ROCP programs that operate the program in the amount of $35 per challenge test and $300 per trainee for statewide training and certification of community care facility workers. Special Considerations: The requirement for the community care facilities direct care staff training was created by Assembly Bill 2780 (Chapter 310, Statutes of 1998). Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,164,975. The total funding appropr iated in 2007-2008 is unknown until reimbursement claims are filed. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 52 211 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 18.7 81.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 221 Child Care and Development Programs The programs described in this section support educational and child care services for children. Many of the programs support children who are not yet of school age. Much of the funding for these programs is not allocated to LEAs. 222 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 2 Program Description: Funds provide access to child care for families in California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) . The program is administered by the California Department of Social Services (DSS) and CDE . There are three different stages of CalWORKs child care . Stage 1 is administered by the DSS through county welfare departments. Stage 1 begins when a participant enters the CalWORKs grant program and engages in activities pursuant to a welfare-to -work plan. Families are referred to resource and referral agencies to assist them in finding child c are providers . Each family may be served in Stage 1 for up to six months or until the family’s work activity and child care become stable. Families can also remain in Stage 1 if there is not sufficient funding in Stages 2 and 3. State 2 is administered by CDE through its alternative payment providers (APPs). Stage 2 begins when the parent’s employment and child care arrangements are stable. Families may remain in this stage for up to 24 months after they stop receiving CalWORKs cash assistance. CalWOR Ks Stage 2 child care is the only programmatic entitlement in law. Eligibility Criteria: Only CDE contracted APPs are eligible for funding to provide services to eligible CalWORKs Stage 2 recipients. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to APPs. CalWORK providers are reimbursed for services up to a maximum rate equivalent to the 85th percentile of the rates charged by private providers in the same region (determined by a “regional market rate (RMR) survey” conducted every two years). Special Conside rations: Other requirements apply . Child care providers must meet certain conditions or requirements in order to receive payment for their services. There are certain age limits for children. These conditions may vary by county. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $123,414,213. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $474,436,000, of which $418,459,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 13 0 0 1 0 62 Percent of total funding (%) 12.5 0.0 0.0 1.9 0.0 85.6 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8350- 8359.1 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 223 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 3 Program Description: Funds provide access to child care for families in California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) . The program is administered by the California Department of Social Services (DSS) and CDE . There are three different stages of CalWORKs child care . Stage 3 is administered by CDE through its alternative payment providers (APPs) . A family can move to this stage when it has exhausted its two -year limit in Stage 1 and/or Stage 2, and for as long as the family remains otherwise eligible for child care programs. CalWORKs Stage 3 child care is a discretionary program that continues to provide child care for these families as long as funding is availabl e. Eligibility Criteria: Only CDE contracted APPs are eligible for funding to provide services to eligible CalWORKs Stage 3 recipients. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to APPs. Special Considerations: Other requirements apply. Child care providers must meet certain conditions or requirements in order to receive payment for their services. There are certain age limits for children. These conditions may vary by county. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $ 124,595,663. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $404,983,000, of which $163,032,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 14 0 0 1 0 60 Percent of total funding (%) 12.9 0.0 0.0 1.9 0.0 85.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8350- 8359.1 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 224 Alternative Payment: non CalWORKs Program Description: Funds an array of child care arrangements for low income parents who are working and/or going to school , such as in -home care, family child care, and center -based care. The alternative payment program helps families arrange child care services and makes payment for those services directly to the child care provider selected by the family. It provides child care to families who are not in C alWORKS, but whose income falls below 75 percent of the state m edian income. Parents may pay a fee for services based on a sliding scale. Eligibility Criteria: Only CDE approved APPs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to APPs. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $69,894,415. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $257,037,000, of which $112,258,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 15 0 0 1 0 72 Percent of total funding (%) 20.3 0.0 0.0 1.6 0.0 78.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8220 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 225 American Indian Early Childhood Educatio n (AIECE) Program Description: Funds support efforts to develop and test educational models that increase competence in reading, language arts, mathematics, and self -esteem for American Indian children in pre -kindergarten through grade four. The American Indian Early Childhood Education (AIECE) Program began in the 1970s. There are nine counties participating in the program for 2007 -2008. Descriptions of each program in the nine counties are available online. Eligibility Criteria: Funds are designated for schools with at least 10 percent American Indian students . Funding Description: Funding is allocated through a competitive process for three-year cycles. In 2007-2008, the minimum allocation was $50,685 and the maximum was $110,333. Special Considerations: Funding has been allocated for fiscal year 2007 -2008 through the governor's line item discretion. Funding is co ntingent upon allocation to CDE from the State Budget. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $598,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $661,997. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 1 0 6 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 14.6 10.3 0.0 75.1 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 226 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 691.77 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 0.5 691.77 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 1 1.0 27.53 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 41.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 1.5 43.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 3 2.9 21.53 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.6 17.01 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 691.77 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 1 0.5 691.77 Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 5 3.9 46.60 Unified Low (0 – 6) 3 3.8 47.67 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 10.97 Medium (6 – 50) 3 3.0 20.65 High (10,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . 227 California Child Care Initiative Program Description: Funds support initiatives to the availability of quality child care providers and programs in the state. The Initiative is conducted by local resource and refer ral agencies under contract with CDE. It implements a five -stage process to build child care capacity: assessing local supply and demand, recruiting potential licensed family child care providers, providing training in providing quality care and how to ma nage a small business effectively, providing technical assistance on licensing procedures, and providing ongoing support to help providers stay in operation. Eligibility Criteria: Only child care resource and referral agencies selected as pilot sites are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Awarded on a grant basis by CDE to eligible entities. Special Considerations: The Initiative requires that each dollar of state money awarded is matched by two dollars from other sources, including private corpo rations, the federal government, or local governments. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $244,499. The total state funding available in 2007 -2008 is $250,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8215 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 228 Campus Tax Bailout Program Description: Funds disbursed to 25 community college districts that levied special property tax rates in 1977-1978 to fund child care services . These taxes were eliminated by Propos ition 13, passed in 1978, and this program is meant to compensate the districts for the loss of those funds. Eligibility Criteria: Only community colleges that levied child care permissive override taxes in 1977 -1978 are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Special Considerations: In 2006-2007, the Campus Tax Bailout funding was transferred to the Community College budget and is no longer in the Child Development Division budget. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $6,174,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,836,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 25 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 229 Centralized Eligibility List Program Description: Funds support the maintenance of a centralized list of children eligible and waiting to enroll in subsidized and alternative payment (AP) child care programs and facilities in each county. Eligibility Criteria: Only countywide AP agencies, or the Local Planning Council for multi -AP counties, are eligible. Funding Description: Funding goes to the AP agency in each county. Where a county has more than one AP agency, payment goes to the LPC t o administer the CEL. Funding is subject to a Budget Act appropriation. Special Considerations: Funding for this program has come from federal and General Fund sources in the past. Current year funding is from the General Fund. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown . The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $7,900,000. Education Code: 8227 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 230 Community Colleges Program Program Description: Funds support 15 community college child care centers that are intended primarily to care for the children of parents enrolled in college. The centers are operated by the colleges and provide the same comprehensive services as General Child C are and Development programs. Eligibility Criteria: Only community college s with child care centers are eligible. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to community colleges that operate child care centers. Special Considerations: In 2006-2007, the Community College s Program funding was rolled into the Gener al Child Care program. At this time, many of the community college match programs have relinquished their contracts . Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,637,243. T he total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 15 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 231 General Child Care and Development Program Description: Funds support programs that provide child development services for low-income children from birth to age 13 and older children with exceptional needs. The funds target underserved communities as defined by the Local Planning Councils. Eligibility Criteria: Any agency willing to provide General Child Care and Development direct services may apply for this funding. Institutions of higher education, local educational agencies, nonprofit organizations, ot her organizations or agencies Funding Description: Funding is allocated to contracted agencies based on the maximum reimbursement rate per child days of enrollment . Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $493,534,225. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $804,649,000, of which $719,386,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 22 32 5 76 0 343 Percent of total funding (%) 5.3 3.8 0.4 32.5 0.0 58.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8240- 8244 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 232 Handicapped Program Program Description: Funds support t he severely handicapped programs located in the San Francisco Bay Area . The programs provide care and supervision, age and developmentally appropriate activities, therapy, youth guidance, and parental counseling to elig ible children and young adults from birth to 21 years of age. Recipients of these services must have an IEP or an individualized family service plan (IFSP) issued through special education programs. Eligibility Criteria: Only Bay Area severely handicapped child care agencies are eligible. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to agencies that operate the Bay Area severely handicapped programs. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,515,115. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,997,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 6 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 233 Local Planning Councils (LPC s) Program Description: Funds support l ocal child care and development planning councils (LPCs) in each of the 58 counties. The LPCs are mandated to conduct assessments of county child care needs and to prepare plans to address identified needs. These assessments must contain information on the supply and demand for child care, including the need for both subsidized and nonsubsidized care. Eligibility Criteria: Only LPCs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated by CDE to LPCs. Special Considerations: This program is primarily federally funded. State funding supports COLA. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $235,317. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,637,000; $887,000 of which are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 49 0 0 0 0 9 Percent of total funding (%) 81.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 18.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8499.3, 8499.5, 8849.7 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 234 Migrant Child Care and Development Program Description: Funds support child care programs and centers for the children of agricultural workers while their parents are at work. The centers are open for varying lengths of time during the year, depending largely on the harvest activities in the area. In addition to these center s, the budget for fiscal year 2007-2008 continues to provide for the Migrant Alternative Payment Network Program that allows eligibility and funding for services that follow migrant families as they move from place to place to find work in the Central Valley. Eligibility Criteria: Agencies implementing migrant child care and development programs are eligible for reimbursement funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to migrant child care agencies, not to exceed the maximum child care day rate. Agencies are also reimbursed for sta rtup and closedown costs. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $23,927,225. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $40,570,000; $35,159,000 of which are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 7 0 0 2 0 14 Percent of total funding (%) 36.3 0.0 0.0 3.2 0.0 60.6 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8230- 8233 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 235 Quality Improvement Fund s: Child Development Retention and Training Program Program Description: Funds support efforts to increase the quality of child care services for children from birth to 13 years old. CDE’ s Quality Improvement plan includes approximately 50 different federally funded projects . The f ederal government requires the s tate to spend a specific amount on quality improvement initiatives as a condition of receiving federal Child Care Development Funds . For more information about the specific quality improvement plan projects , please see Part 5 of the Final Child Care and Development Fund State Plan. AB 212 (Chapter 547, Statues of 2000) created the Retention and Training Program to assist counties in improving the retention and training of qualif ied employees who work with birth through five year -old children who receive State -subsidized, Title 5, child development services. Eligibility Criteria: Only LPCs are eligible. Alpine, Mariposa, and Sierra Counties do not participate in this program. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to LPCs and varies by county, based on the contract maximum reimbursable amount. The allocation formula establishes a base allocation of $10,000 for all participating LPCs ; a cap of $4,250,000 was established for Los Angeles County. Special Considerations: Assembly Bill 1285 ( Chapter 650, Statutes of 2005) allows Los Angeles County to include child development staff that work in licensed Family Child Care Home Education Networks and licensed child care centers tha t serve at least 51 percent State-subsidized children. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $15,000,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $68,969,000 for all Quality Improvement Funds; $15,000,000 of which are state funds for the Child Care Staff Retention Program. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 48 0 0 0 0 7 Percent of total funding (%) 52.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 47.8 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8279.7 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 236 Quality Improvement Funds: Child Development Training Consortiu m (CDTC) Program Description: Funds support t he Child Development Training Consortium (CDTC) , a consortium of community colleges that provides coursework for childcare workers. Eligibility Criteria: Only Yosemite Community College is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated Yosemite Community College for administration of the CDTC. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $300,085. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $68,969,000 for all Quality Improvement Funds, of which $320,000 are state funds for the CDTC. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 8279.7 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 237 Resource and Referral Program Description: Funds support programs that provide information to all parents and the community about the availability of child care in their area. The programs assist potential providers in the licensing process; provide direct servic es, including training; and coordinate community resources for the benefit of parents and local child care providers. These services are available in all 58 California counties. Eligibility Criteria: Public and private agencies that operate resource and referral programs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to resource and referral agencies in accordance with contracts. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005-2006 is $17,324,813. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $19,438,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 14 0 0 1 0 47 Percent of total funding (%) 21.3 0.0 0.0 2.5 0.0 76.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 8210- 8216 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 238 School Age Community Child Care Services (SACCC) Program Description: Funds support programs for chi ldren ages five to twelve during the hours immediately before and after the normal school day and during school vacations. These progra ms must have a minimum of 50 percent enrollment from families that can pay the full cost of care, although this requirement may be waived when the agency can demonstrate the impracticality of such a requirement. Eligibility Criteria: Institutions of higher education, LEAs , nonprofit organizations, other organizations or agencies that offer the SACCC program are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are distributed to agencies that provide contracted SACCC program services . Special Consideratio ns: This program is also called Extended Day Care or Latchkey. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $25,202,802. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $35,890,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 13 0 36 0 54 Percent of total funding (%) 4.0 8.4 0.0 33.5 0.0 54.1 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8460-8480 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 239 State Preschool Program Description: Funds support p reschool programs for three - to five -year -old children from low -income families. The programs provide educational activities, meals or snacks to children, referrals to health and social services for families, and staff development opportunities to employees. The funds will target underserved communities as defined by the Local Child Care and Development Planning Councils. Eligibility Criteria: Any agency willing to provide State Preschool direct services may apply for this funding Funding Description: Preschools are reimbursed at a maximum rate of $21.22 per student -day enrolled for 2007-2008. Special Considerations: The Budget Act of 1997 allowed state preschool program contractors the opportunity to extend their half -day programs to full -day progra ms with certain restrictions. Agencies providing full -day services continue to operate in a half -day mode as a state preschool program but must follow general child care rules and regulations for the remainder of the program day. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $311,699,986. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $441,854,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 36 112 3 137 0 192 Percent of total funding (%) 11.4 17.5 0.1 38.5 0.0 32.5 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8235- 8239 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 240 Facilities Funding The programs described in this section support funding for school maintenance and construction. Many of the programs were created through propositions and are supported through statewide bonds. Several support one -time expenditures. Because facilities funding can vary greatly year to year and because of the unavailability of district specific data, these programs are not included in the PPIC Model. The exception is the d eferred maintenance program. 241 Charter School Fa cility Grant Program Program Description: Funds provide assistance with facilities rent for charter scho ols located in low income areas. The program provides one-time funds for grants to support the costs of facilities rent incurred during the prior year. Eligibility Criteria: Charter schools are eligible to apply, but must meet certain criteria. The charter school site must be geographic ally located within the attendance area of a public elementary school in which at least 70 percent of the pupil enrollment is eligible for free and reduced price meals, or serving a pupil population that meets or exceeds 70 percent eligibility f or free and reduced price meals. Funding eligibility specifically excludes units of ADA generated through nonclassroom-based instruction, charter schools occupying existing school district or COE facilities, and charter schools receiving reasonably equivalent facilities from their chartering authority. Funding Description: C harter schools that meet the eligibility requirements may receive up to $750 per ADA to reimburse them for up to 75 percent of actual fa cilities rent. Allocations are prorated if the demand for funds from eligible charter schools were to exceed available funding. Special Considerations: Charter schools receiving funding that have exceeded their enrollment capacity must extend admissions preference to those students currently attending the charter school and to those students who reside in the elementary school attendance area in which the charter school is located. Charter schools relocating to the attendance area of an eligible elementary school must give admissions preference to the students who reside in the eligible elementary school's attendance area. Senate Bill 20 (Chapter 215, Statues of 2007) amended the Education Code to declare the intent of the Legislature that not less than $18,000,000 annually be appropriated for this program. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,639,173. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 18,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 3 3 3 4 100 0 Percent of total funding (%) 5.8 0.8 3.0 3.4 86.9 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47614.5. 47612.5 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Statute 242 Charter School Revolving Loan Fund Program Description: Funds provide low-interest loans to new charter schools to help meet purposes established in the schools' charters. The Charter School Revolving Loan Program serves California's public charter schools by providing startup and initial operating capital to assist scho ols in establishing their operations. The program was established by SB 267 (Chapter 736, Statutes of 1999). Eligibility C riteria: The Revolving Loan program is available to any charter school that is not a conversion of an existing public school, and that has not yet completed the f ull term of its initial charter. Eligible charter schools that are incorporated can apply directly for a loan. All other eligible charter schools must apply jointly with their charter -authorizing entities. Funding Description: A charter school may receive up to $250,000, and priority for funding will be given to new charter schools for initia l expenses. Interest is charged on all loans made after January 1, 2001. Repayments are deducted from apportionments made to the school or the district. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $4,750,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $8,700,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 1 0 1 24 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 4.2 0.0 4.2 91.6 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41365(a) Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 243 Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fun d (CCFRF) Program Description: Funds for child care and development agencies to acquire relocatable buildings and to renovate, repair, or improve existing buildings . Eligibility Criteria: Funding is limited to only existing contracting agencies that provide CDE -subsidized child care program services , including: General Child Care and Development , State Preschool, Migrant Child Care and Development , Extended Day, and Child Care and Development Services for Children with Specia l Needs. In addition, child care provided by CalSAFE is also eligible CCFRF participants. Applicant agencies must have a current need for facilities due to class size re duction or other displacements, program expansion , or replacement due to health and sa fety needs. Funding Description: Child care agencies may apply for up to $210,000 for each single, freestanding relocatable building and up to $70,000 maximum for each additional module added to the basic building. Eligible program costs include building expenses, architect and inspection fees, site development, and site improvement costs. CCFRF contracting agencies begin making lease repayments to the CDE 180 days after the final funding has been released. Payments are amortized over ten years without in terest. Upon full repayment, facility title transfers from the State of California to the CCFRF contracting agencies. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,002,970. The total funding appropriated in 200 7-2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 2 1 9 0 7 Percent of total funding (%) 13.8 8.2 3.0 40.3 0.0 34.7 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8278.3 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 244 Deferred Maintenanc e (DMP) Program Description: Funds assist LEAs in repair ing or replacing of major components of school buildings. These components include plumbing, heating, air conditioning, electrical systems, roofing, interior/exterior painting, and floor systems. Funds are administered by the Of fice of Public School Construction (OPSC). DMP also awards funding for extreme hardship projects. This apportionment is provided if the LEA has a critical project on the five -year plan that must be completed within one year due to health and safety reaso ns. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs, including direct funded charter schools, are eligible. To be eligible for funding, an LEA must have deposited in its deferred maintenance fund an amount equal to at least 0.5 percent of the total general funds and adult education funds budgeted by the district for the fiscal year, exclusive of any amounts budgeted for capital outlay or debt service. Funding Description: State funds match local funds on a one-to -one basis. The ma ximum state match equals 0.5 percent of di strict ADA multiplied by statewide average expenditures per ADA from general and adult education funds for LEAs of similar size and type, both for second -prior fiscal year. Up to 10 percent of funding is reserved for LEAs in cases of extreme hardship. CD E calculates a maximum state match entitlement; however, OPSC determines eligibility and actual allocation amounts for both the main program and the extreme hardship allocations. Special Considerations: DMP funding comes from the Budget Act, any excess repayment from the former State School Building Aid Program, State School Site Utilization funds, and unallocated DMP funds from the previous year. While direct funded charter schools have their maximum match entitlements calculated separately, OPSC does n ot allocate funding directly to charters, but allocates the funding to the chartering entity. Therefore, we cannot disaggregate funding apportioned to direct funded charter schools. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $283,993,990. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $277,382,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 54 551 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.2 20.0 9.6 64.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 17582- 17589 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 245 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 183 98.4 47.71 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 63.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 162 99.4 58.82 Medium (6 – 23%) 152 98.7 50.99 High (66 – 100 %) 206 99.0 45.09 High (23 – 89%) 183 98.4 44.54 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 54.57 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 73.45 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 42.20 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 43.10 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 47.92 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 45.33 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 42.39 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 50.59 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 44.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 43.30 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 47.00 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 45.66 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 187 97.9 176.53 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 208 98.1 120.26 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 95.34 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 61.46 High (1,501 +) 183 99.5 41.41 High (50 – 2,122) 150 98.7 41.65 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 158.34 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 96.45 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 52.22 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 42.53 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 43.45 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 44.47 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 74.17 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 77.00 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 47.43 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 47.56 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 43.21 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 43.89 246 Emergency Repair Account, Williams Settlement Program Description: Funds support grants and reimburse ments to LEAs for the cost of repairing or replacing existing building systems or structural components that are broken or not functioning properly and that pose a health and safety threat to students and staff at eligible school sites. The Emergency Repair Program was established by SB 6 (Chapter 899, Statutes of 2004) as part of the Williams Settlement. Funds will be made available annually through the Budget Act and the program will operate until $800 million has been allocated. Eligibility Criteria: Districts with schools constructed prior to January 1, 2000, and that are in deciles one, two, or three on the 2006 API are eligible for funding. A list of eligible schools may be found here. Funding Description: Eligible districts are reimbursed by the Office of Public School Construction (OPSC). Special Considerations: In 2005-2006, $ 196,024,000 was allocated to the OPSC. OPSC is not required to track the fiscal year funding for specific projects. Early in the program, funding was oversubscribed and so the 2005 -2006 allocation lasted for projects beyond that fiscal year. The funding analysis below is OPSC’s best estimate of FY 2005-2 006 funded projects. Exact district specific reimbursement data is unavailable. Level of Funding : The 2007-2008 appropriation was $100,000,000. To date, $764,947,539.55 has been allocated through reimbursement or grant or is currently under OPSC rev iew for pending projects. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 69 17 99 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 16.3 12.8 70.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 17592.71- 17592.72 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 247 School Facility Program Program Description: Funds support the construction and renovation of school buildings. The School Facility Program is operated by the State Allocation Board (SAB). There are many subprograms including: New Construction Grants, Modernization Grants, Charter School Facility Grant Program, Critically Overcrowded Schools, Joint -Use Program, Career Technical Education Facilities, Overcrowding Relief Grant, High Performance Incentive Grant, Small High School Program, Seismic Mitigation, Labor Compliance Program Grant, Facility Hardship Grant, and Financial Hardship Grant. Most of the programs were created by Proposition 1A, Proposition 47, Proposition 55, or Proposition 1D. Please see an overview of the programs provided by the SAB. Eligibility Criteria: Eligibility varies by program. Please refer to specific program description in the SAB overview. Funding Description: Most programs are grants from funds made available to the SAB through the proceeds from sales of State General Obligation Bonds, the state General Fund. Many of the programs require district matches. Special Considerations: Funding data is typically unavailable in usable format. T wo other SAB programs, the State Relocatable Classroom Program and School Facilities Needs Assessment Grant Prog ram may have been operational and provided funding in 2005 -2006. However, funding data is unavailable. Level of Funding : The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is unknown. As of February 25, 2009, there was $5,345,700,000 available to all School Facility Programs. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act, Statute 248 School Nutrition: S chool Breakfast and Summer School Start -Ups Program Description: Funds support the initiation or expansion of School Breakfast and Summer Food Service programs. School Breakfast programs serve students in kindergarten through grade twelve . Summer Food Service programs serve children and youth eighteen years of age and under during school breaks. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs m ay apply for one or both types of grants; however, only one type of grant may be awarded per school site. T o qualify for School Breakfast grants, at least 20 percent of enrolled students at the school site must be approved for free or reduced -price meals. To receive Summer Food grants, the site must be eligible for Summer Food Service. Funding Description: Grants are awarded up to $15,000 per school site. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,002,713. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 1,017,000 COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 4 0 12 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 9.1 0.0 90.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49550.3 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 249 Small School District and County Office of Education Bus Replacement Program Description: Funds support small districts and COEs in upgrading school buses to co mply with 1992 federal safety st andards. When allocating funding, the first priority is for the purchase of new school buses to replace existing vehicles . The second priority is for reconditioning existing school buses. Any remaining funds will be available for the purchase of new school buses to increase the fleet owned by the district or COE . Eligibility Criteria: Only districts and COEs with an average daily attendan ce of fewer than 2,501 students are eligible. Funding Description: Of the total available funding for the first priority, 75 percent is allocated based upon the “excess age” of the bus, derived from vehicle age, mileage, and type. The remaining 25 percent is allocated based upon the condition of the vehicles to be replaced. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $4,220,995. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 5,772,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 3 25 4 22 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 3.0 45.0 7.7 44.4 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42290-42293, 42301.1, 42303 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 250 Special Education Programs The programs described in this section support statewide or non K -12 special education programs. 251 Early Start Early Intervention Grants Program Description: Funds support services for infants and toddlers with low incidence disabilities. In 1986, the federal government authorized grants to stat es to plan and implement early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families. State legislation enables California to participate in the IDEA program. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs serving infants and toddlers with solely low incidence disabilities are eligible to apply. LEAs apply through their SELPA. Funding Description: The CDE receives funds from the Department of Developmenta l Services for local assistance. Funding for each SELPA is determined by the number o f additional children with low incidence disabilities, the additional required services, required procedures, and regionalized services and administration. In 2005-2006, each child with low incidence disabilities was funded at a base of $9,535 with an additional $1,221 for additional required services. In 2005-2006, SELPAs received $20,000 for required procedures and $5,000 for regionalized services. Special Considerations: Once IDEA grants are fully allocated, additional state general funds are allocated to eligible programs that demonstrate that they have incurred excess costs . More information is available here. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $15,652,263. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $14,159,516, plus $1,596,729 for excess costs. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 553 84 334 344 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.0 18.2 8.6 65.2 2.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 252 Infant Funding Program Description: Funds support early education programs for individuals with exceptional needs who are younger than three years of age. There are three types of classroom settings for infants, including Special Day Class (SDC), Resource Specialist Program (RSP), and Designated Instruction and Service (DIS). Eligibility Criteria: Only SELPAs who have historically received state funding for the infant program are eligible recipients. No new participants are allowed. Funding Description: The entitlement for the infant program equals the number of infants served multiplied by the base rate of the type of classroom setting in which the infant is served. This sum is increased by the cost of an aide for each type of class. The base rates and aide costs vary across SELPAs and LEAs. Should insufficient funding exist, Infant Funding may be prorated. Funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $61,122,685. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $70,948,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 51 500 74 293 299 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.6 26.6 11.4 53.0 2.4 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56425-56432 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 253 Ravenswood Monitoring Program Description: Funds support a court -monitored program to remedy deficiencies in services for students with disabilities in the Ravenswood elementary district. This program results from a 2001 settlement in the Emma C . v. Elaine Eastin (C96 -4179TEH) case, a class action lawsuit on behalf of students with disabilities in the Ravenswood district of East Palo Alto. The settlement calls for a court -appointed monitor to supervise the implementation of a detailed corrective action plan. Eligibility Criteria: Only the U.S. District Court clerk is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding goes to the U.S. District Court, Northern District of California clerk for court monitoring purposes. Special Considerations: This settlement was federally funded until 2005 -2006. As of November 2007, the court requires continued CDE involvement and funding. Please see this court document for more information. Leve l of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,477,057. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,480,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: State GF Funding Authority: Budget Act 254 State Staff Training Program Description: Funds support staff development for special education personnel . Eligibility Criteria: Funding Description: In 2005-2006, funding went to Sonoma State University. Special Considerations: This program was federally funded until 2005 -2006. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,116,221. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,117,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 255 Local Revenue Approximately 8 percent of all district revenues come from local sources other than the property tax. These revenue sources are not included in a district’s or COE’s revenue limit calculations. 256 Leases, Rentals, Interest and Other Capital Proceeds Program Description: Funds in this category derive from interest on the various funds of districts and COEs and from the leasing of school facilities. Also included are increases and decreases in the fair value of investments. Eligibility Criteria: Funding Description: Special Considerations: Leases, rentals, interest and other capital proceeds revenue are only reported in SACS, object codes 8629, 8650, 8660, and 8662. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,284,913,418. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 556 86 334 31 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.2 17.6 11.6 66.6 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 257 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 261.63 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 252.46 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 210.85 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 210.37 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 144.97 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 172.58 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 297.91 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 255.87 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 231.63 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 285.77 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 251.24 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 227.98 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 228.99 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 240.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 190.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 188.86 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 217.21 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 222.98 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 292.93 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 211.73 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 216.15 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 183.26 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 191.18 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 198.10 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 231.63 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 165.49 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 249.76 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 252.13 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 271.30 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 298.91 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 169.85 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 163.53 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 201.55 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 154.80 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 215.38 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 221.45 258 Other Fees and Taxes Program Description: Funds include community redevelopment revenue not subject to the revenue limit , Mello-Roose tax receipts, and mitigation/developer fees. Eligibility Criteria: Funding Description: Special Considerations: Other fees and taxes are only reported in SACS, object codes 8622, 8625, 8681, and 8689. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,560,476,584. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 47 462 83 305 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 9.5 17.2 9.8 63.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 259 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 158 84.9 296.69 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 170 78.3 278.13 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 81.0 221.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 125 81.2 311.72 High (66 – 100 %) 174 83.7 203.43 High (23 – 89%) 169 90.9 184.15 High Low (0 – 33 %) 42 95.5 223.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 31 91.2 327.89 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 340.68 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 315.61 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 259.14 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 145.71 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 91 94.8 252.20 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 56 74.7 265.04 Medium (33 – 60%) 123 90.4 324.52 Medium (6 – 23%) 126 94.7 299.84 High (66 – 100 %) 91 88.3 193.14 High (23 – 89%) 123 96.9 215.45 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 109 57.1 294.46 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 142 67.0 338.75 Medium (251 – 1,500) 172 94.5 230.15 Medium (6 – 50) 173 89.6 355.30 High (1,501 +) 183 99.5 235.14 High (50 – 2,122) 149 98.0 195.68 High Low (0 – 1,500) 24 92.3 322.55 High Low (0 – 6) 35 97.2 303.13 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 331.97 Medium (6 – 50) 30 93.8 405.16 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 261.41 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 161.15 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 101 78.3 361.43 Unified Low (0 – 6) 53 67.9 386.07 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 97 99.0 306.95 Medium (6 – 50) 100 99.0 432.14 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 233.49 High (50 – 2,122) 152 97.4 217.40 260 Parcel Taxes Program Description: Funds in this category are receipts from parcel taxes levied by LEAs. A parcel tax is a fixed amount per parcel of property, not a percentage of the value of the property. It must be approved by two -thirds of the voters within the district. The law does not specifically limit how the tax proceeds may be spent, but the school board can impose any limits it wants to in the ballot measure. Any rate changes or renewals are subje ct to the two-thirds vote criteria. Eligibility Criteria: Funding Description: Special Considerations: Parcel tax revenue is reported in SACS, object code 8621. From 1983 through 2006, districts have held 416 parcel tax electi ons. Of those elections, 211 won the necessary two -thirds vote, and another 144 achieved a majority vote. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $232,822,491. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 48 10 40 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 24.6 15.4 60.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 261 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 37 19.9 789.71 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 29 13.4 942.40 Medium (33 – 60%) 8 4.9 262.98 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 7.1 274.34 High (66 – 100 %) 3 1.4 259.95 High (23 – 89%) 8 4.3 322.51 High Low (0 – 33 %) 10 22.7 540.57 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 806.03 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 311.54 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 21 21.9 345.08 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 8 10.7 291.39 Medium (33 – 60%) 14 10.3 243.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 20 15.0 373.10 High (66 – 100 %) 5 4.9 220.39 High (23 – 89%) 12 9.4 203.71 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 6 3.1 840.71 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 5 2.4 468.45 Medium (251 – 1,500) 18 9.9 794.79 Medium (6 – 50) 17 8.8 516.77 High (1,501 +) 24 13.0 576.47 High (50 – 2,122) 26 17.1 631.88 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 230.30 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 6 20.7 842.58 Medium (6 – 50) 5 15.6 911.70 High (6,001+) 4 12.9 376.14 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 376.14 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 7 5.4 822.25 Unified Low (0 – 6) 3 3.8 308.52 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 15 15.3 488.38 Medium (6 – 50) 7 6.9 303.83 High (10,001+) 18 16.7 207.55 High (50 – 2,122) 30 19.2 270.89 262 All Other Local Revenue Program Description: Funds in this category include the sale of equipment and supplies, the sale of publications, library fines, contributions, gifts, and reimbursement for practice teaching. Eligibility Criteria: Funding Descript ion: Special Considerations: All other local revenue is reported in SACS, object codes 8631, 8632, 8639, and 8699. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,449,131,914. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 553 86 335 32 0 Percent of total funding (%) 9.1 21.4 8.5 60.6 0.3 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 263 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 381.82 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 433.29 Medium (33 – 60%) 161 98.8 259.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 152 98.7 220.07 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 200.14 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 249.36 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 281.17 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 401.35 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 164.67 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 211.28 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 152.85 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 118.68 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 341.77 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 468.81 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 225.45 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 261.28 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 143.39 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 162.29 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 189 99.0 328.19 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 211 99.5 204.56 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 324.81 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 264.08 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 260.35 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 272.90 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 473.69 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 313.68 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 342.00 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 266.64 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 184.14 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 163.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 333.38 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 274.62 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 229.88 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 196.17 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 209.15 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 219.01 264 Federal Revenue Approximately 9 percent of all district revenues are from federal sources. The largest two sources are the child nutrition programs and Title I, Part A, which supports schools with large percentages of low income students. In the district analyses the child nutrition t otals exclude funding children in child care centers. The same is true for the “ All Other Federal” category ; it excludes funding for adult education. 265 Federal Child Nutrition Programs Program Description: Funds support meal program operating in more than 97,700 public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions throughout the United States. Through this program, low -cost or free meals are served to more than 27 million children daily. The School Nutrition Programs consist of the following program types: National School Lunch, School Breakfast, Special Milk, Meal Supplements, and Summer Seamless Feeding Option (sometimes called the Summer Food Service Program) . For more information, please see the US Department of Agriculture website. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs operating one or more of the federal nutrition pr ograms are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Once approved to participate in the School Nutrition Programs, each sponsor must submit a monthly Claim for Reimbursement to receive payment for meals served. In 2005-2006, meals were reimbursed betwe en $0.63 and $2.34 per snack or meal depending on whether it was free or reduced -price and other eligibility criteria. Special Considerations: Reimbursement funding for the Child and Adult Care Food Program is not included in this analysis. It falls in the All Other Federal Funds category. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,434,994,642. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 35 489 76 333 68 1,553 Percent of total funding (%) 1.4 18.7 4.0 59.2 0.7 16.1 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Apportionment Funding Authority: 266 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 145 78.0 76.35 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 175 80.6 97.19 Medium (33 – 60%) 148 90.8 205.08 Medium (6 – 23%) 140 90.9 157.36 High (66 – 100 %) 195 93.8 359.14 High (23 – 89%) 173 93.0 317.05 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 44.79 High Low (0 – 6%) 31 91.2 40.35 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 85.2 163.46 Medium (6 – 23%) 32 82.1 79.58 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 197.44 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 220.43 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 95 99.0 73.08 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 74 98.7 64.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 188.90 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 133.43 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 289.07 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 266.27 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 138 72.3 255.19 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 166 78.3 261.17 Medium (251 – 1,500) 173 95.1 222.85 Medium (6 – 50) 181 93.8 226.31 High (1,501 +) 177 96.2 240.62 High (50 – 2,122) 141 92.8 241.65 High Low (0 – 1,500) 22 84.6 116.67 High Low (0 – 6) 32 88.9 78.64 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 26 89.7 77.33 Medium (6 – 50) 26 81.3 98.40 High (6,001+) 28 90.3 116.99 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 124.93 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 127 98.4 216.13 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 194.98 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 161.72 Medium (6 – 50) 100 99.0 219.22 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 212.43 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 203.32 267 Title I Program Description: Funds provided to LEAs and schools with high numbers or high percentages of poor children to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards. Federal funds are currently allocated through four statutory formulas that are based primarily on census poverty estimates and the cost of education in each state. Basic Grants provide funds to LEAs in which the number of children counted in the formula is at least 10 and exceeds 2 percent of an L EA's school- age population. Concentration Grants flow to LEAs where the number of formula children exceeds 6,500 or 15 percent of the total school -age population. Targeted Grants are weighted versions of the Basic and Concentration Grants so that LEAs with higher numbers or higher percentages of po or children receive more funds. Education Finance Incentive Grants (EFIGs) distri bute funds to states based on the share of per capita income spent on education and the degree to which education expenditures among LEAs within the state are equalized. EFIG funds are allocated using a weighted formula similar to Targeted Grants. Eli gibility Criteria: Schools and LEAs that meet each formula requirement are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Federal funds are allocated through the four formula grants as described above. Special Considerations: Unless a participating school is operating a schoolwide program, the school must focus Title I services on children who are failing, or most at risk of failing, to meet state academic standards. Schools in which poor children make up at least 40 percent of enrollment are eligible to use Title I funds for schoolwide programs that serve all children in the school. LEAs also must use Title I funds to provide academic enrichment services to eligible children enrolled in private schools. Only Title I, Part A is included in the analysis below. Other Title I programs, like Neglected and Delinquent Children and Reading First, are included in the All Other Federal Funds page. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,712,731,075. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 41 513 85 331 185 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.3 17.9 5.3 73.9 1.6 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Apportionment Funding Authority: ESEA 268 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 154 82.8 74.62 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 190 87.6 127.14 Medium (33 – 60%) 158 96.9 200.17 Medium (6 – 23%) 144 93.5 168.94 High (66 – 100 %) 201 96.6 424.50 High (23 – 89%) 179 96.2 355.78 High Low (0 – 33 %) 43 97.7 91.62 High Low (0 – 6%) 33 97.1 85.49 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 206.33 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 154.41 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 341.98 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 237.53 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 93 96.9 83.34 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 71 94.7 101.12 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 216.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 147.85 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 509.75 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 443.23 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 155 81.2 435.51 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 182 85.8 357.79 Medium (251 – 1,500) 178 97.8 281.56 Medium (6 – 50) 185 95.9 264.81 High (1,501 +) 180 97.8 265.16 High (50 – 2,122) 146 96.1 265.82 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 218.06 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 162.03 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 153.00 Medium (6 – 50) 31 96.9 169.70 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 163.90 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 159.71 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 269.03 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 276.86 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 96 98.0 177.44 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 269.85 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 342.41 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 323.61 269 All Other Federal Funds Program Description: Funds include federal revenue in all programs except federal child nutrition program and Title 1. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are eligible, subject to specific program criteria. Funding Description: Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,525,216,691. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 555 86 335 248 760 Percent of total funding (%) 12.5 7.8 5.8 65.9 0.5 7.5 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F Funding Authority: 270 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 49.63 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 215 99.1 59.60 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 133.45 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 92.83 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 248.54 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 224.82 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 199.21 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 181.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 252.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 225.65 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 364.05 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 302.65 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 196.60 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 191.72 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 302.05 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 245.35 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 529.77 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 481.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 190 99.5 134.85 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 211 99.5 136.61 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 130.41 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 138.31 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 165.99 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 170.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 256.68 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 213.11 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 265.39 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 228.52 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 230.25 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 249.38 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 316.35 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 283.28 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 277.53 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 357.88 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 397.97 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 382.48 271 Appendix 1 : Funding Terminology The following defines the acronyms and terminology used throughout the manual when describing funding sources, authorities, and allocations. Funding Source: F Federal GF State General Fund L Local SF State Special Fund Apportionment Primarily used when fundi ng is distributed to LEAs based o n a statutory formula, including reimbursements. Contract Legally binding agreement between CDE and another entity, public or private, or the provision of goods or services. Grant Award of financial assistance for a specified time frame. Some grants are awarded based on a competition, and others are allocated according to a formula. CDE uses grants to distribute funds if LEAs or other entities are the direct beneficiaries of the funding. Funding Authority: Budget Ac t Funding is subject to annual appropriation from the Budget Act. Constitution Funding provisions are in the California State Constitution . This may include propositions that amend the State Constitution. Special Legislation Funding is subject to special legislation. This does not include deferrals. Typically this means that a new program is created with a determined funding source. Statute Funding is determined by statute. This includes continuous appropriations, such as revenue limits, and propos itions, such as the After School Education and Safety (ASES) program. Other Important Terms: Actual ADA Current year ADA attending school. It can be different from funded ADA. Allocation A distribution of funds. Allotment The approved division of an amount (usually of an appropriation) to be expended for a particular purpose during a specified time period. An allotment is generally authorized on a line item expenditure basis by program or organization. 272 Appropriation Authorization for a specific agen cy to make expenditures or incur liabilities from a specific fund for a specific purpose. It is usually limited in amount and period of time during which the expenditure is to be incurred. For example, appropriations made by the Budget Act are available for encumbrance for one year, unless otherwise specified. Appropriations made by other legislation are available for encumbrance for three years, unless otherwise specified, and appropriations stating “ without regard to fiscal year” shall be available fro m year to year until expended. Legislation or the California Constitution can provide continuous appropriations, and the voters can also make appropriations. Chapter The reference assigned by the Secretary of State to an enacted bill, numbered sequentia lly in order of enactment each calendar year. The enacted bill is then referred to by this "chapter" number and the year in which it became law. For example, Chapter 1, Statutes of 1997, would refer to the first bill enacted in 1997. Continuous Appropri ation Constitutional or statutory expenditure authorization which is renewed each year without further legislative action. The amount available may be a specific, recurring sum each year; all or a specified portion of the proceeds of specified revenues w hich have been dedicated permanently to a certain purpose; or it may be whatever amount is designated for the purpose as determined by formula, e.g., school apportionments. COLA Cost of Living Adjustmen t. Increases provided in state -funded programs that include periodic adjustments . Can be predetermined in state law (statutory), or established at optional levels (discretionary) by the Administration and the Legislature each year through the budget process. Entitlement Amount of funds that an applicant should receive under a statutory formula. The actual amount of funding apportioned may be less than the entitlement if insufficient funds are available. Funded ADA In most entitlement calculations, funded ADA is the greater of prior year and current year ADA. When ADA changes from year to year, there can be a difference between actual and funded ADA. General Fund For legal basis accounting and budgeting purposes, the predominant fund for financing state government programs, used to account for revenues which are not specifically designated to be accounted for by any other fund. The primary sources of revenue for the General Fund are the personal income tax, sales tax, and corporation taxes. The major uses of the General Fund are education (K-12 and higher education), health and human service programs and correctional programs. Proposition 98 An initiative passed in November 1988, and amended in June 1990, that provides a minimum funding guarantee for school districts, community college districts, and other state agencies that provide direct elementary 273 and secondary instructional programs for kindergarten through grade 14 beginning with fiscal year 1988 -89. The term is also used to refer to any expenditure that fulfills the guarantee. Reappropriation The extension of an appropriation’s availability for encumbrance and/or expenditure beyond its set termination date and/or for a new purpose. Reappropriations are typically authorized by statute for one year at a time but may be for some greater or lesser period. Reimbursement Payment for costs already incurred in the provision of services. Reversion The return of the unused portion of an appropriation to the fund from which the appropriation was made, normally two years (four years for federal funds) after the last day of an appropriation’s availability period. The Budget Act often provides for the reversion of unused portions of appropriations when such reversion is to be made prior to the statutory limit. Special Fund For legal basis budgeting purp oses, funds created by statute, or administratively per Government Code Section 13306, used to budget and account for taxes, licenses, and fees that are restricted by law for particular activities of the government. Statute A written law enacted by the Legislature and signed by the Governor (or a vetoed bill overridden by a two -thirds vote of both houses), usually referred to by its chapter number and the year in which it is enacted. Statutes that modify a state code are "codified" into the respective C ode (e.g., Government Code, Health and Safety Code). 274 Appendix 2: Funding Authority Budget Act Line Items The table below summarizes the 2005-2006 programs with their 2007-2008 budget line numbers, including schedules and provisions and the amount appropriated in the Budget Act. The 2007 -2008 program amounts are taken from the 2007-2008 Final Budget Summary, which includes mo st trailer bills and vetoes. Additionally, this table includes SB 80 (Chapter 174, Statutes of 2007), which appropriates the deferrals from the 2007 Budget Act, and SB 20 (Chapter 215, Statutes of 2007), which appropriates funds to the Charter School Faci lities Grant program. Where programs that existed in 2005 -2006 are no longer in existence or were one-time funding, the budget references and amounts are for 2005-2006. The Budget Lines are footnoted to represent this. All other 2005 -2006 amounts do not necessarily match the Budget Line reference. All 2005-2006 amounts are the appropriations from the 2005-2006 Final Budget Summary and subsequent trailer bills, and do not reflect actual spending or any future year reversions. Some programs, particularly in child care and development, include federal funds that cannot be distinguished from state fund s by specific program in the Budget Act. Those programs are starred. Similarly, most programs’ Level of Funding level includes any growth or COLA adjustments; child care and development as well as some special education programs appear to be the exception. A more specif ic CDE- produced version of the 2007 -2008 child care budget can be found here, which distinguishes federal and state funding and includes all reappropriations, COLA, and growth. Program Function Program No. Budget Line (2007 unless noted) Prop 98 Amount (2005- 2006) Amount (2007- 2008) Adult Education 10.50.010.001 6110- 156-0001(1) Yes $ 602,054,000 $ 707,821,000 Adult Education CalWORKs remedial education 10.50.010.008 6110- 156-0001(2) Yes $ 8,739,000 $ 8,739,000 Adult Education Deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(6) Yes $ 45,896,000 $ 45,896,000 Adults in Correctional Facilities 10.50.010.002 6110- 158-0001 Yes $ 15,322,000 $ 17,771,000 Advanced Placement Fee Waiver Program 20.70 6110-240-0001(2) Yes $ 1,627,000 $ 1,793,000 Advancement via Individual Determination 20.60.100 6110- 130-0001 No $ 9,035,000 $ 9,035,000 Agricultural Career Technical Education 10.70 6110-167-0001 Yes $4,711,000 $ 5,201,000 Alternative Certification 10.20.001 6360- 101-0001 Yes $ 31,723,000 Alternative Payment Program‡CalWORKs Stage 2 30.10.020.011 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(e) Yes $ 410,910,000 $ 388,780,000 Alternative Payment Program CalWORKs Stage 2 Reappropriations 6110-494 $ 60,262,000 $ 40,526,000 Alternative Payment Program‡ CalWORKs Stage 3 30.10.020.012 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(f) Yes $ 331,357,000 $ 288,074,000 Alternative Payment Program CalWORKs Stage 3 Reappropriations 6110-494, 1- 3 6 9• $ 27,181,000 ‡ Includes federal funds 275 Program Function Program No. Budget Line (2007 unless noted) Prop 98 Amount (2005- 2006) Amount (2007- 2008) Alternative Payment Program‡ Non CalWORKs 30.10.020.007 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(d) Yes $ 205,976,000 $ 243,536,000 American Indian Early Childhood Education 10.30.051 6110- 150-0001 Yes $ 662,000 American Indian Education Center 10.30.050 6110- 151-0001 Yes $ 4,100,000 $ 4,540,000 American Indian Education Center 10.30.050 6110- 152-0001 No $ 376,000 $ 376,000 Apprenticeship Education 10.10.001.005 6110- 103-0001 Yes $ 10,972,000 $ 12,763,000 Apprenticeship Education Deferral 10.10.001.005 Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(1) Yes $ 6,227,000 $ 6,227,000 Arts and Music Block Grant 20.15 6110-265-0001 Yes Not in existence $ 109,757,000 Bilingual Teacher Training 20.60.070 6110- 193-0001(1) Yes $ 1,951,000 $ 2,149,000 CAHSEE Intensive Instruction and Services 6110-204-0001 Yes $ 20,000,000 $ 72,752,000 California Association of Student Councils 6110-117-0001 No $ 514, 000 $ 514,000 California Association of Student Councils 20.60.106 6110- 242-0001 Yes $ 33,000 $ 33,000 California Child Care Initiative 30.10.020.106 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(k) Yes $ 250,000 $ 250,000 California Partnership Academies 10.70.070 6110- 166-0001 Yes $ 22,999,000 $ 23,490,000 CalSAFE Academic and Support Services 20.60.220 6110- 198-0001(1) Yes $ 15,385,140 $ 16,951,490 CalSAFE Child Care 30.10.020 6110- 198-0001(3) Yes $ 24,509,250 $ 26,998,880 CalSAFE Nonconverting COE programs 20.60.221 6110- 198-0001(2) Yes $ 13,101,610 $ 14,444,630 Campus Tax Bailout 30.10.020.009 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(h)• Yes $ 5,923,000 Community Colleges Budget Center for Civic Education 6110-208-0001 Yes $ 250 000 $ 250,000 Centralized Eligibility List 30.10.020.911 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(m) Yes $ 7,900,000 $ 7,900,000 Certificated Staff Mentoring Program 6110-267-0001 Yes Not in existence $ 11,707,000 Charter School Facility Grant Ch. 215(2007), Sec. 3 $ 9,000,000 $ 18,000,000 Charter School Categorical Block Grant 20.60.036 6100- 211-0001 Yes $ 62,158,000 $ 145,527,000 Charter School Categorical Block Grant Deferral 20.60.036 Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(8) Yes $ 5,947,000 $ 5,947,000 Chief Business Officer Training 6110- 485(4) •; 6110 - 491(2)†Yes $ 1,050,000 Not funded Child CareℓCOLA 30.10.020.908 6110- 196-0001(3) Yes $ 54,644,000 $ 69,689,000 Child Careℓ Growth 30.10.020.909 6110- 196-0001(4) Yes $ 29,860,000 $ 14,539,000 • FY05 • FY05 † FY06 ℓ Distributed across programs 276 Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fund CalWORKs Stage 2 6110-101-0620, 1 No $ 12,312,000 Program Function Program No. Budget Line (2007 unless noted) Prop 98 Amount (2005- 2006) Amount (2007- 2008) Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fund CalWORKs Stage 3 6110-101-0620, 2 No $ 5,401,000 Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fund One -time renovations and repairs 6110-196-0001, 12 Yes Up to $ 5,000,000 Class Size Reduction Grade Nine 10.26 6110-232-0001 Yes $ 110,185,000 $ 106,621,000 Class Size Reduction Grades K-3 10.25 6110-234-0001 Yes $ 1,676,185,000 $ 1,829,662,000 COE Fiscal Oversight 10.10.002 6110- 107-0001(1) Yes $ 5,268,000 $ 5,719,000 COE Oversight Williams Settlement 20.30.010 6110- 266-0001 Yes $ 10,000,000 Community Colleges Program 30.10.020.002 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(b)• Yes $ 3,294,000 General Child Care & Development Community Day School Additional Funding 10.10.021 6110- 190-0001 Yes $ 42,215,000 $ 47,248,000 Community Day School Additional Funding Deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(7) Yes $ 4,751,000 $ 4,751,000 Community-Based English Tutoring 6110-227-0001 Yes $ 50,000,000 Cross-Cultural Assessments Training 6110-161-0001(1), 17 Yes $ 200,000 $ 200,000 CSIS Administration/Operations 20.90.001.020 6110- 140-0001(2) Yes $ 3,297,000 $ 4,444,000 CSIS FCMAT Project Management 10.10.012 6110- 107-0001(3) Yes $ 250,000 $ 250,000 CSIS Project Oversight 20.90.001.030 6110-140-0001(3) Yes $ 150,000 CSIS Second Cohort Funding 6110-101-0349, 3• No $ 1,000,000 CSIS SSID Maintenance 20.90 6110-101-0349 No $ 397,000 CSIS SSID Maintenance to LEAs 6110-101-0349, 2 No $ 907,000 $ 828,000 Deferred Maintenance 10.10 6110-188-0001 Yes $ 267,909,000 $ 161,903,000 Deferred Maintenance One-time backfill 6110-485(12) Yes $ 115,479,000 Early Start Early Intervention Grants‡ 6110-161-0001(3) Yes $ 14,395,000 $ 14,395,000 Economic Impact Aid 10.30.070.001 6110- 128-0001 Yes $ 586,865,000 $ 994,279,000 Education Technology CTAP and SETS 20.10.025 6110- 181-0001 Yes $ 16,069,000 $ 17,705,000 Emergency Repair Account Reappropriation 6110-485(1) Yes $ 183,508,000 $ 100,000,000 English Language Acquisition Program 20.10.006 6110- 125-0001(2) Yes $ 57,720,000 $ 63,600,000 Environmental Education 20.10.055 6110- 181-0140(1) No $ 360,000 $ 548,000 FCMAT COE Extraordinary Audit Costs 10.10.015 6110-107-0001(5), 7(b)&8 Yes $ 900,000 $900,000 FCMAT COE Oversight 10.10.015 6110- 107-0001(5), 7(a)&8 Yes $ 150,000 $ 150,000 FCMAT District Training and Budgeting 10.10.016 6110- 107-0001(6), 10(b) Yes $ 343,000 $ 343,000 FCMAT Education Audit Appeals Panel 10.10.013 6110- 107-0001(4), 6 Yes $ 55,000 $ 55,000 FCMAT Educational Data Partnership 10.10.005 6110- 107-0001(2), 4(c) Yes $ 418,000 ‡ Includes federal funds 277 FCMAT Regional Fiscal Experts 10.10.005 6110- 107-0001(2), 4(b) Yes $ 250,000 $ 250,000 FCMAT School District Assessments 6110-485(11) Yes $ 385,000 FCMAT Staff Development 10.10.016 6110- 107-0001(6), 10(a) Yes $ 854,000 $ 854,000 Program Function Program No. Budget Line (2007 unless noted) Prop 98 Amount (2005- 2006) Amount (2007- 2008) FCMAT Team Responsibilities 10.10.005 6110- 107-0001(2), 4(a) Yes $ 2,061,000 $ 2,741,000 Foster Youth Services 20.40.060 6110- 119-0001 Yes $ 9,495,000 $ 18,992,000 General Child Care & Development‡ 30.10.020.001 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(a) Yes $ 633,594,000 $ 762,383,000 Gifted and Talented Education 10.80.010 6110- 124-0001 Yes $ 46,197,000 $ 51,340,000 Gifted and Talented Education Deferral 10.80.010 Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(5) Yes $ 4,294,000 $ 4,294,000 Handicapped Program 30.10.020.096 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(j) Yes $ 1,618,000 $ 1,892,000 High Priority Schools Grant Program 20.60.030.034 6110- 123-0001(1), 1 Yes $ 228,689,000 $ 31,209,000 Immediate Intervention for Underperforming Schools 6110-123-0001(1)• Yes $ 7,519,000 Not in existence Infant Funding 10.60.050.080 6110- 161-0001(2) Yes $ 77,989,000 $ 70,948,000 Instructional Materials Block Grant 20.20.020.005 6110- 189-0001 Yes $ 360,966,000 $ 419,774,000 International Baccalaureate Diploma 10.80.030 6110- 240-0001(1) Yes $ 1,162,000 $ 1,280,000 K-12 High Speed Network 20.20.030 6110- 180-0001 Yes Up to $ 15,600,000 K-12 High Speed Network 6110-485(9) Yes $ 21,025,000 $ 1,900,000 Local Planning Councils‡ 30.10.020.920 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(n) Yes $ 5,750,000 $ 6,349,000 Low Incidence Support Services 6110-161-0001(1), 15 Yes $ 1,700,000 $ 1,700,000 Mandates 6110-295-0001 Yes $ 40,000 $ 38,000 Mandates Reappropriations 6110-485(10)†Yes $ 18,726,000 Math & Reading Professional Development 20.60.260 6110- 137-0001 Yes $ 31,728,000 $ 56,728,000 Mental Health Services 6110-161-0001(1), 18 Yes $ 31,000,000 $ 31,000,000 Migrant Day Care‡ 30.10.020.004 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(c) Yes $ 33,746,000 $ 38,439,000 National Board Certification Incentives 20.60.140 6110- 195-0001 Yes $ 7,535,000 $ 6,000,000 Oral Health Assessments 6110-268-0001 Yes Not in existence $ 4,400,000 Peer Assistance and Review 20.60.060 6110- 193-0001(2) Yes $ 27,318,000 $ 30,101,000 Personnel Development State Staff Training 6110-161-0001(1), 16 Yes $ 1,117,000 $ 1,117,000 Personnel Development 6110-161-0001, 22 Yes $ 2,500,000 $ 2,500,000 Physical Education Teacher Incentives 20.11 6110-260-0001 Yes Not in existence $ 41,812,000 Principal Training Program 20.60.270 6110- 144-0001 Yes $ 5,000,000 $ 5,000,000 Professional Development Block Grant 6110-245-0001 Yes $ 249,321,000 $ 274,718,000 Pupil Residency Verification 6110-139-0001• Yes $ 176,000 Mandates Pupil Retention Block Grant 6110-243-0001 Yes $ 86,957,000 $ 97,461,000 † FY06 278 Pupil Retention Block Grant Deferral Chapter 73, Sec 31(a)(2)(c)• Yes $ 26,726,000 Pupil Transportation 10.10.006 6110- 111-0001(1) Yes $ 511,225,000 $ 222,239,000 Pupil Transportation 10.10.006 6110- 111-0046 No $ 99,120,000 Program Function Program No. Budget Line (2007 unless noted) Prop 98 Amount (2005- 2006) Amount (2007- 2008) Pupil Transportation 6110-485(14) Yes $ 250,000,000 Pupil Transportation Deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(4) Yes $ 52,583,000 $ 52,583,000 Quality Improvement Funds Retention and Training Program 30.10.020.901 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(l), 4(g) Yes $ 15,000,000 $ 15,000,000 Quality Improvement Funds Training Consortium (CDTC) 30.10.020.901 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(l), 4(d) Yes $ 320,000 $ 320,000 Ravenswood Monitoring 6110-161-0001, 21 Yes $ 1,480,000 $ 1,480,000 Reader Services for Legally Blind Teachers 20.60.110 6110- 193-0001(3) Yes $ 366,000 $ 404,000 Refugee Children School Grant‡ 10.40.030.004 6110- 125-0001(1) Yes $ 1,649,000 Resource and Referral 30.10.020.008 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(g) Yes $ 16,844,000 $ 18,596,000 ROCP 10.10.004 6110- 105-0001 (1) Yes $ 388,361,000 $ 453,343,000 ROCP Deferral 10.10.004 Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(3) Yes $ 39,630,000 $ 39,630,000 ROCP Handicapped 6110-161-0001(1), 4 Yes $ 4,612,000 $ 5,051,000 School Age Community Child Care Services 30.10.020.015 6110- 196-0001(1.5)(i) Yes $ 30,238,000 $ 34,005,000 School & Library Improvement Block Grant 6110-247-0001 Yes $ 422,421,000 $ 465,451,000 School Nutrition Fresh Start Pilot Program [FY05] 6110- 485(9)•Yes $ 18,200,000 Up to $ 18,200,000 School Nutrition School Breakfast & Summer Grants 30.20.010 6110- 201-0001 Yes $ 1,017,000 $ 1,017,000 School Nutrition State Meals Program 30.20.010 6110- 203-0001 (1) Yes $ 85,605,000 $ 123,623,000 School Nutrition State Meals Program 30.20.010 6110- 202-0001 No $ 10,986,000 $ 12,163,000 School Safety Block Grant 20.60.020.011 6110- 228-0001 Yes $ 52,537,000 $ 61,883,000 School Safety Block Grant Deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(9) Yes $ 38,720,000 $ 38,720,000 School Community Violence Prevention 6110-248-0001 Yes $ 16,381,000 $ 18,050,000 School Community Violence Prevention COE Regional Training 6110-248-0001, 3 Yes Up to $ 400,000 Small District Bus Replacement 10.10.008 6110- 111-0001(2) Yes $ 4,946,000 $ 5,772,000 Special Education CAHSEE one-time funding 6110-161-0001(1), 24• Yes $ 52,610,000 Special Education 10.60.050.003 6110- 161-0001(1) Yes $ 2,692,889,000 $ 3,005,835,000 Specialized Secondary Programs 20.40.090 6110- 122-0001 Yes $ 5,573,000 $ 6,155,000 State Preschool 30.10.010 6110- 196-0001(1) Yes $ 325,377,000 $ 413,644,000 State-Monitored Schools Program HPSGP 20.60.030.034 6110- 123-0001(1), 1 Yes $ 10,000,000 $ 10,000,000 State-Monitored Schools Program II/USP 20.60.030.036 6110- 123-0001(2), 2 Yes $ 3,001,000 $ 6,000,000 • FY05 279 Student Friendly Services 20.80.001 6110- 140-0001(1) Yes $ 500,000 $ 500,000 Supplemental Instruction CAHSEE 10.10.011.008 6110- 104-0001(1) Yes $ 165,222,600 $ 188,405,000 Supplemental Instruction CAHSEE deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(2) Yes $ 51,061,000 $ 51,061,000 Supplemental Instruction Core Academic 10.10.011.011 6110-104-0001(4) Yes $ 70,766,000 $ 79,348,000 Supplemental Instruction Core Academic deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(2) Yes $ 22,036,000 $ 22,036,000 Program Function Program No. Budget Line (2007 unless noted) Prop 98 Amount (2005- 2006) Amount (2007- 2008) Supplemental Instruction Low STAR 10.10.011.010 6110- 104-0001(3) Yes $ 15,061,000 $ 17,411,000 Supplemental Instruction Low STAR deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(2) Yes $ 4,690,000 $ 4,690,000 Supplemental Instruction Retained deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(2) Yes $ 12,330,000 $ 12,330,000 Supplemental Instruction Retained 10.10.011.009 6110- 104-0001(2) Yes $ 39,908,400 $ 45,508,000 Supplemental School Counseling 6110-108-0001 Yes Not in existence $ 209,060,000 Targeted Instructional Improvement Block Grant 6110-246-0001 Yes $ 876,162,000 $ 975,613,000 Targeted Instructional Improvement Block Grant Deferral Ch. 174(2007), Sec. 38(10) Yes $ 100,118,000 $ 100,118,000 Teacher Credentialing Block Grant 6110-244-0001 Yes $ 87,850,000 $ 125,346,000 Teacher Credentialing Block Grant 06-07 reappropriation for 05 -06 6110-485(4)†Yes $ 9,555,000 Teacher Credentialing Block Grant Regional Infrastructure 6110-224-0001, 1 Yes $ 3,325,000 Teacher Dismissal Apportionment 10.10.090.002 6110- 209-0001 Yes $ 43,000 $ 48,000 Teacher Recruitment and Retention 6110-485(10), 3•Yes $ 46,500,000 Not in existence Teacher Recruitment and Retention COE Contract 6110-485(10), 3(e) • Yes $ 3,000,000 Not in existence Testing Assessment Review and Reporting 20.70.030.005 6110-113-0001(1) Yes $ 2,313,000 $ 2,313,000 Testing CELDT 20.70.030.007 6110- 113-0001(3) Yes $ 11,437,000 $ 9,741,000 Testing CELDT Start Ups 6110-485(6)• Yes $ 2,227,000 Testing CAHSEE 20.70.030.008 6110- 113-0001(4) Yes $ 6,761,000 $ 10,945,000 Testing CHSPE 20.70.030.015 6110- 113-0001(5) Yes $ 1,020,000 $ 1,144,000 Testing STAR 20.70.030.006 6110- 113-0001(2) Yes $ 63,946,000 $ 62,124,000 Testing STAR test development 6110-113-0001(6)• Yes $ 1,407,000 Tobacco Use Prevention Education 20.10.045 6110-102-0231 No $ 18,998,000 $ 18,998,000 Tobacco Use Prevention Education COE oversight 20.10.045 6110- 101-0231 No $ 3,106,000 $ 3,106,000 Workabilitiy 6110-161-0001(1), 3 Yes $ 8,842,000 $ 9,684,000 Workability 6110-161-0001(1), 14 Yes $ 29,478,000 $ 29,478,000 Year-Round School Grants 10.10.950.002 6110- 244-0001 Yes $ 88,312,000 $ 97,308,000 † FY06 • FY05 280 Appendix 3 : Sources of Data The following table summarizes source of data for each program. The sources are coded as follows: CalSTARS is the state accounting system used internally at CDE; CDE represents private or publicly available excel files, typically from the program offices or fiscal unit; CO represents the Controller’s Office or Office of Public School Construction ; CRL are county office funding bac kfiles ; CSBG represents charter school block grant funding backfiles; DRL represents the district revenue limi t entitlement f unding backfiles; PAS is the Principal Apportionment Summary; ROCP is the ROCP funding backfile; SACS is the Standardized Account Code Structure; and, SELPA are the AB 602 entitlement funding backfiles. Manual Section Program Source District Revenue Limit Entitlement Base Revenue Limit DRL Declining Enrollment Adjustment DRL Necessary Small School Adjustment DRL Locally Funded Charter Schools Adjustment DRL Unemployment Insurance Adjustment DRL All Other Revenue Limit Adjustments DRL Charter School General Purpose Block Grant Charter School General Purpose Block Grant CSBG Other Unrestricted State Funding Lottery, Unrestricted CO Excess Taxes and Federal In -Lieu Property Taxes Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment PAS Excess Taxes DRL Federal Impact Aid SACS Miscellaneous Funds DRL Forest Reserves Funds SACS District Restricted: Administrative and Support Programs CSIS: Statwide Student Identifier Maintenance Reimbursement CalSTARS Mandates CO Pupil Residency Verification CalSTARS Pupil Transportation CDE District Restricted: General Instruction Programs Charter School Categorical Block Grant PAS Class Size Reduction, Grade 9 CalSTARS Class Size Reduction, K -3 CalSTARS Instructional Materials Funding Realignment CDE Lottery, Restricted CO School and Library Improvement Block Grant CDE School Safety and Violence Prevention Act CDE Tobacco Use Prevention Education CalSTARS Year-Round Education Grants CDE District Restricted: Special Education Programs AB 602: Base Funding SELPA AB 602: Declining Enrollment Adjustment SELPA AB 602: Severity Cost Pool Adjusment SELPA AB 602: Special Disability Adjustment SELPA AB 602: All Other Adjustments SELPA CAHSEE One -Time Funding CDE 281 Low Incidence Funding CalSTARS Special Education Mandate Settlement CDE Mental Health Services CDE Personnel Development CDE ROCP Handicapped PAS Workability CalSTARS District Restricted: Targeted Programs Advanced Placement Test Fee Reimbursement CalSTARS After School Edcuation and Safety CalSTARS CAHSEE Intensive Instructional Services CalSTARS California School Age Families Education CDE Community Day Schools Additional Funding PAS Economic Impact Aid CDE English Language Acquisition CDE Foster Youth Services CalSTARS Gifted and Talented Education PAS High Priority Schools Grant Program CalSTARS Immediate Intervention for Underperforming Schools Program CalSTARS International Baccalaureate Program CalSTARS Nell Soto Parent Involvement CalSTARS Pupil Retention Block Grant CDE Refugee Children Supplemental Assistance Program CalSTARS School Community Violence Prevention School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program CalSTARS School Nutrition: State Meal Program CDE Specialized Secondary Programs CDE State Monitored Schools CalSTARS Supplemental Instruction: CAHSEE PAS Supplemental Instruction: Core Academic PAS Supplemental Instruction: Low STAR PAS Supplemental Instruction: Retained or Recommended for Retention PAS Targeted Instructional Improvement Block Grant CDE District Restricted: Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs Math and Reading Professional Development CalSTARS National Board for Professional Teacher Standards Incentive Awards CalSTARS Peer Assistance and Review CDE Principal Training Program CalSTARS Professional Development Block Grant CDE Reader Services for Blind Teachers CalSTARS Teacher Dismissal Apportionments Teacher Recruitment and Retention CalSTARS District Restricted: Vocational Programs Agricultural Vocational Education Incentive Grants CalSTARS Apprenticeship PAS Partneship Academies CalSTARS Regional Occupational Centers/Programs ROCP County Office of Education Revenue Limit Entitlement Base Revenue Limit CRL Direct Services to Districts CRL Education Services Revenue Limit CRL Locally Funded Charter Schools Adjustment CRL Unemployment Insurance Adjustment CRL All Other Revenue Limit Adjustments CRL 282 Miscellaneous Revenue CRL County Office of Education Restricted Revenues COE Fiscal Oversight CalSTARS COE Oversight: Williams CDE County School Service Fund CalSTARS Tobacco Use Prevention Education: Oversight and Assistance CalSTARS Unemployment Insurance Management System CalSTARS Other Statewide or Regional Support: Administrative and Support Services After School Education and Safety: Regional Technical Assistance CalSTARS CSIS CalSTARS Education Technology: CTAP CalSTARS Education Technology: K -12 High Speed Network CalSTARS Education Technology: SETS CalSTARS FCMAT CalSTARS School Community Violence Prevention: Training CalSTARS School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Training and Evaluation CalSTARS Student Friendly Services CalSTARS Teacher Recruitment and Retention: COE Contract CalSTARS Testing: Assessment Review and Reporting CalSTARS Testing: CELDT CalSTARS Testing: CAHSEE CalSTARS Testing: CHSPE CalSTARS Testing: STAR CalSTARS Other Statewide or Regional Support: General Instruction Programs Advancement via Individual Determination CalSTARS American Indian Education Centers CalSTARS California Association for Student Councils CalSTARS Center for Civic Education CalSTARS Environmental Education CalSTARS Other Statewide or Regional Support: Teacher Training and Professional Development Programs Alternative Certification Bilingual Teacher Training CalSTARS CBO Training Teacher Credentialing Block Grant CDE Adult Education Programs Adult Education PAS Adults in Correctional Facilities CalSTARS Community -Based English Tutoring CalSTARS Direct Support Professional Training Program CalSTARS Child Care and Development Programs American Indian Early Childhood Education CalSTARS AP: CalWORKS Stage 2 CalSTARS AP: CalWORKS Stage 3 CalSTARS AP: non CALWORKS CalSTARS California Child Care Initiative CalSTARS Campus Tax Bailout CalSTARS Centralized Eligiblity List Community Colleges Program CalSTARS General Child Care and Development CalSTARS Handicapped Program CalSTARS Local Planning Councils CalSTARS Migrant Child Care and Development CalSTARS QIF: Child Development Retention and Training CalSTARS QIF: Child Development Training Consortium CalSTARS Resource and Referral CalSTARS 283 School Age Community Child Care Services CalSTARS State Preschool CalSTARS Facilities Funding Charter School Facility Grant Program CDE Charter School Revolving Loan Fund CalSTARS Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fund CalSTARS Deferred Maintenance CO Emergency Repair Account, Williams CO School Facility Program School Nutrition: School Breakfast and Summer School Start Ups CalSTARS Small District and COE Bus Replacement CDE Special Education Programs Early Start Early Intervention Grants CalSTARS Infant Funding CDE Ravenswood Monitoring CalSTARS State Staff Training CalSTARS Local Revenue Leases, Rentals, Interest and Other Capital Proceeds SACS Other Fees and Taxes SACS Parcel Taxes SACS All other Local Revenue SACS Federal Revenue Federal Child Nutrition Programs CalSTARS Title I CalSTARS All Other Federal Revenue CalSTARS 284 Appendix 4: Categorical Flex ibility The following programs were granted flexibility by the 2009 Budget Act. This list of programs is based on an LAO handout at a Budget Subcommittee 2 on Education Finance meeting on March 17, 2009. The table also lists the program’s title used in this manu al, the section, and whether this program is included in the PPIC model. The LAO has identified 42 programs; this number is larger when using PPIC program definitions instead of the Budget Act ’s. Fourteen are not in the PPIC model because they were not in existence in 2005 -2006, do not go to districts, or are regional or statewide programs. LAO Title PPIC Programs Manual Section In Model Summer School Programs (104) All supplemental instruction programs Targeted Programs Yes ROC/Ps (105) Vocational Programs Yes Grade 7-12 Counseling (108) Not in existence in 2005 -2006 No Specialized Secondary Program Grants (122) Targeted Programs Yes Public School Accountability Act (123) High Priority Schools Targeted Programs Yes II/USP Targeted Programs Yes State-Monitored Schools Targeted Programs Yes Gifted and Talented (124) Targeted Programs Yes Prof. Development Institutes for Math and English (137) Math & Reading Professional Development Teacher Support & Professional Development Yes Principal Training (144) Teacher Support & Professional Development Yes American Indian Early Education Programs (150) Child Care and Development Yes Indian Education Centers (151) Statewide/Regional: General Instruction Yes Adult Education (156) Adult Education Yes Educational Technology (181) Statewide/Regional: Administrative No Deferred Maintenance (188) Facilities Yes Instructional Materials Block Grant (189) General Instruction Yes Community Day School (190) Targeted Programs Yes Staff Development (193) Peer Assessment and Review Teacher Support & Professional Development Yes Reader Services for Legally Blind Teachers Teacher Support & Professional Development Yes Bilingual Teacher Training Statewide/Regional: Teachers No National Board Certification (195) Teacher Support & Professional Development Yes California School Age Families Ed. Program (198) CalSAFE Targeted Programs Yes COE Special Schools and Classes COE Unrestricted Revenues Yes California High School Exit Exam (204) Targeted Programs Yes Civic Education (208) Statewide/Regional: General Instruction No Teacher Dismissal Apportionments (209) Teacher Support & Professional Development No Charter Schools Block Grant (211) General Instruction Yes Community Based English Tutoring (227) Adult Education Yes 285 LAO Title PPIC Programs Manual Section In Model School Safety Block Grant (228) General Instruction Yes High School Class Size Reduction (232) General Instruction Yes Advanced Placement Grant Programs (240) AP Test Fee Reimbursement Targeted Programs Yes International Baccalaureate Targeted Programs Yes Student Leadership/CA Assoc. of Student Councils (242) Statewide/Regional: General Instruction No Pupil Retention Block Grant (243) Targeted Programs Yes Teacher Credentialing Block Grant (244) Statewide/Regional: Teachers No Professional Development Block Grant (245) Teacher Support & Professional Development Yes Targeted Instructional Improvement Block Grant (246) Targeted Programs Yes School and Library Improvement Block Grant (247) General Instruction Yes School Safety Competitive Grant (248) Targeted Programs No Physical Education Block Grant (260) Not in existence in 2005 -2006 No Arts and Music Block Grant (265) Not in existence in 2005 -2006 No County Offices of Education: Williams (266) COE Restricted Revenues No Certificated Staff Mentoring (267) Not in existence in 2005 -2006 No Oral Health Assessments (268) Not in existence in 2005 -2006 No Alternative Credentialing (6360- 101) Statewide/Regional: Teachers No 286 Appendix 5 : Statewide Summary Charts The following charts summarize 2005-2006 revenues . Data tables follow each chart with the total revenue amounts. The first chart shows the percent of total statewide revenues in each category as defined by this manual. Some of the categories have been collapsed as shown in the table that follows the pie chart. The majority of revenues are unrestricted district and charter school funds, including excess taxes. The second chart summarizes the same data, though limited to school districts. The third chart shows the percent of total statewide revenues going to each entity type. These entity categories are the same as used in the tables that appear on the program pages in this manual, though district types have been collapsed into one distric t category. The vast majority of revenues go to districts. While the number of programs that fund n on LEAs may be large, non LEAs receive just 2 percent of all funds. The fourth chart shows the percent of district revenues by funding source. In this ta ble, revenue limit entitlements have been broken down by local revenue and state aid, with property taxes falling into the local revenues category and the state aid portion shown in the General Fund category. The federal portion of the AB 602 special educ ation entitlement is similarly included in the federal funds category, with the rest of the entitlement in the General Fund category. Finally, non Proposition 98 programs are included in the special fund category with lottery revenues. The f ifth chart summarizes district revenue types. The two bars show the composition of district revenues with and without categorical flexibility. The categorical flexibility, using 2005 -2006 revenues, shifts approximately $4.5 billion of restricted categorical program revenues to unrestricted revenues. This shift represents approximately 8.5 p ercent of all district revenues. The LAO’s calculated flexibility total amounts to $4,876,300,000 for 2008-2009 and just under $4.6 billion for 2009-2010. Th e difference between our simulation and LAO’s calculation is due to current programs that were not in existence in 2005 -2006 and revenues that go to entities other than districts, such as the Center for Civic Education, which are excluded from our simulation. The final tabl e analyzes the district total funding by district characteristics. This table uses only revenues found in the PPIC model and not all revenues contained in this manual. The districts characteristics are the same as used in the page two tables for each cat egorical program in the model: districts quantiles based on the proportion of poor and EL students, district size, and district density. Total district funding ranges from $6,665 to $39,052 per pupil in 2005-2006, with a median of $8,793 and mean of $9,087 per pupil. 287 Category Total Revenue ($) Includes District & Charter, Unrestricted 31,590,588,162 Revenue limit entitlement, charter school block grant, excess taxes, federal in -lieu taxes Lottery, Unrestricted 841,786,825 Administrative 798,244,209 General Instruction 2,962,632,731 Special Education 4,122,543,762 Targeted 2,687,982,402 Teacher Support 359,301,201 Vocational 497,424,966 County Offices of Education 806,845,163 Revenue limit entitlement, COE restricted revenues Statewide or Regional Support 299,323,982 Regional and statewide programs, non K-12 Special Education Adult Education 707,970,969 Child Care 1,216,297,600 Facilities 489,083,934 Local Revenue 4,527,344,428 Federal Revenue 5,672,942,357 Total 57,580,282,691 288 Category Total Revenue ($) Includes Revenue Limit Entitlement 30,494,994,610 Excess Taxes 386,773,569 Excess taxes, federal in -lieu taxes Lottery 809,042,573 Unrestricted Administrative 748,763,318 General 2,881,582,755 Special Education 3,817,486,645 Targeted 2,547,764,151 Teacher Support 351,063,869 Vocational 493,661,769 Other 957,322,964 Adult Education, American Indian Early Childhood, Community -Based English Tutoring, Deferred Maintenance Local 4,187,426,600 Federal 4,659,830,873 Total 52,335,713,696 289 Entity Total Revenue ($) County Offices of Education 2,092,984,206 Districts 53,312,079,011 Charter Schools, Direct Funded 956,073,225 Non LEAs 1,219,145,895 Total 57,580,282,337 290 Category Total Revenues ($) Includes General Fund 30,090,451,594 State aid portion of the revenue limit entitlement, all other program revenues Local 15,482,991,593 All local revenue, local portion of the revenue limit entitlement, excess taxes, local portion of the AB 602 entitlement Special Funds 1,079,724,493 Lottery (restricted and unrestricted), TUPE, CSIS SSID maintenance, ASES Federal 5,682,545,958 All federal revenue, federal portion of the AB 602 entitlement, federal in- lieu property taxes Total $52,335,713,637 291 Category Total Revenues, No Flexibility ($) Includes Total Revenues, With Flexibility ($) Includes Unrestricted 31,690,810,818 Revenue limit entitlement, excess taxes, federal in- lieu taxes, lottery funds 36,129,721,152 Revenue limit entitlement, excess taxes, federal in -lieu taxes, lottery funds, and all restricted programs not listed below Restricted 11,797,645,425 Administrative, general, special education, targeted, teacher support, and other programs 7,358,734,955 Special Education, CSIS SSID maintenance, mandates, pupil transportation, K-3 CSR, restricted lottery, TUPE, Year -Round Schools, ASES, EIA, ELAP, FYS, Refugee, School Nutrition, Teacher Recruitment and Retention, AgVoc Grants, Apprenticeship, CPA Local 4,659,830,873 4,659,830,873 Federal 4,187,426,600 4,187,426,600 Total 52,335,713,716 52,335,713,580 292 Total District Fun ding by District Characteristics Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) 5 th Percentile ($/ADA) 95th Percentile ($/ADA) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) 5th Percentile ($/ADA) 95th Percentile ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 8,172 7,177 10,303 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 8,748 7,220 13,088 Medium (33 – 60%) 8,341 7,365 9,720 Medium (6 – 23%) 8,022 7,179 9,039 High (66 – 100 %) 8,681 7,730 9,813 High (23 – 89%) 8,590 7,433 9,720 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9,496 8,011 12,631 High Low (0 – 6%) 9,801 8,515 12,631 Medium (33 – 60%) 9,434 9,039 10,446 Medium (6 – 23%) 9,489 8,011 12,009 High (66 – 100 %) 10,370 9,306 10,916 High (23 – 89%) 9,550 9,039 10,808 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 8,344 7,427 10,235 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 8,883 7,628 12,023 Medium (33 – 60%) 8,823 8,076 11,038 Medium (6 – 23%) 8,446 7,504 9,704 High (66 – 100 %) 9,949 8,416 10,971 High (23 – 89%) 9,726 8,269 10,971 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) 5 th Percentile ($/ADA) 95th Percentile ($/ADA) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) 5th Percentile ($/ADA) 95th Percentile ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 10,364 7,369 15,972 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 9,264 7,624 13,561 Medium (251 – 1,500) 8,902 7,304 13,088 Medium (6 – 50) 8,630 7,390 9,965 High (1,501 +) 8,358 7,237 9,642 High (50 – 2,122) 8,349 7,237 9,705 High Low (0 – 1,500) 11,698 8,540 21,416 High Low (0 – 6) 9,563 8,248 11,739 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 10,008 8,749 12,631 Medium (6 – 50) 9,640 8,011 12,700 High (6,001+) 9,369 8,511 10,808 High (50 – 2,122) 9,488 8,511 10,808 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 10,091 7,978 14,568 Unified Low (0 – 6) 10,321 8,059 15,637 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 8,651 7,628 9,787 Medium (6 – 50) 8,931 7,958 10,302 High (10,001+) 9,259 7,759 10,971 High (50 – 2,122) 9,218 7,743 10,971 293 Appendix 6: Frequently Asked Questions This list is designed to answer some general questions about the data or interpretation of data in this manual and in the PPIC School Finance Model 4 . If you have any additional questions, please contact the authors at schoolfinance@ppic.org. Q. Why is the data so old? A. In g eneral, agencies and districts have three years to expend or encumber any funding received. During the three years, CDE audits and revises the data. In order to have the most accurate and complete data, we wait until the annual third revision and certification of the data. Q. What is the diff erence between this and what Ed -Data produces? A. Ed-Data uses data from SACS, the district accounting data system. Our data compiles data from many sources, but relies heavily on the state accounting data system CalSTARS and the Principal Apportionment. These data have been audited and certified . Q. Why is there a difference between the 2005 -2006 appropriation and the amount expended? A. In general, departments and districts have 3 years to expend the total appropriation. Funds may also be encumbered or reverted to the Proposition 98 reversion account. Q. Is the ADA used the funded or actual ADA? A. Neither. Our ADA represents the total ADA served by the district in district -operated schools in 2005 - 2006. District ADA includes locally funded charter school actual ADA and excludes actual ADA in the county office tran sfer. Phantom ADA is also excluded. COE ADA includes locally funded COE charter schools and actual ADA in the county office transfer. Charter ADA is actual ADA in direct funded charter schools. Our total ADA for 2005-2006 is 6,193,670. Q. Why does the PPIC manual have so many more categorical programs than what is typically counted? A. Many sources use the Budget Act to count the number of categorical programs , using item numbers as the unit to define a program. These definitions do not always match the programs as defined by CDE on their website. Similarly, there exist programs outside of the Budget Act funded on continuous appropriation or through special funds, such as the Lottery revenues. We take into account all of these different definitions of programs. As a general rule, we define programs by the recipient and function. Funds supporting district activities are separate from funds with the same name that support COE administration or technical assistance of those activities, for example. Q. Previous PPIC wor k and Ed-Data show that COEs typically have about $5 billion in revenues . Why does this manual show only approximately $ 2 billion? A. In SACS and other studies, funding for regional programs, such as SELPAs or ROCPs, is typically attributed to the admini strative unit, often a COE. In this manual and in the PPIC model, we allocate that funding to all members on a per ADA basis. Since COEs serve relatively few students, they are attributed considerably fewer revenues in this manual than are actually depos ited into their accounts. 4 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org 294 Q. How much does California spend on K-12 Education? A. That depends on what revenues you count. Our data counts $57,580,282,769 in total revenues for 2005-2006. This includes federal and local revenues, programs that serve non K -12 students, but excludes known revenues for which we have no data, such as the teacher dismissal apportionment, alternative certification, and school facilities. Q. How much does California spend per pupil and how does it compare to other states? A. Again, that depends on what revenues you count. If we divide the total fundi ng identified in 2005- 2006 by the total ADA for 2005-2006, we arrive at $9,297 per pupil, though many of those revenues fund programs that serve non K -12 students. Several other sources annually track states’ per pupil spending, using various definitions of revenues or expenditures and pupil counts. Please see the National Center for Education Statistics or Education Week for those estimates and rankings. Q. Why are there so many districts with missing d emographic data (12 FRPL and 80 EL)? A. The FRPL data come from the Free and Reduced Price Meals Program dataset, available here; the EL data come from the annual Language Census, available here. For some schools in the files, data was missing for unknown reasons. Q. Why are the statewide and district revenue totals different in each chart? A. It is rounding error from when w e collapse the categories. Q. How do I get a copy of the PPIC School Finance Model? A. Send an email to schoolfinance@ppic.org Q. What is the difference between the data in the model and this manual? A. The model only uses funding that goes to districts for services provided to K -12 students. Only programs in the district unrestricted and restricted revenue sections are included i n the model. Approximately $4 billion are excluded. 295 R eferences California Department of Finance, “2005 -06 Final Budget Summary,” 2005, available at www.dof.ca.gov/budget/historical/2005-06/. California Department of Finance, “2006 -07 Final Budget Summary,” 2006, available at www.dof.ca.gov/budget/historical/2006 -07/. California Department of Finance, “2007 -08 Final Budget Summary,” 2007, available at www.dof.ca.gov/budget/historical/2007-08/. California Department of Finance, “2008-09 Final Budget Summary,” 2008, ava ilable at www.dof.ca.gov/budget/historical/2008 -09/. California Department of Finance, “Summary Docu ment for the 2009 Budget Act,” 2009, available at www.dof.ca.gov/budget/historical/2009-10/. Goldfinger, Paul M. and Bob Blattner, Revenues and Revenue Limits, School Services of California, Inc., California, 2005. Goldfinger, Paul M. and Jannelle Kubinec, Revenues and Revenue Limit s, School Services of California, Inc., California, 2008. Legislative Analyst’s Office, “2009 -10 Budget Analysis Series: Proposition 98 Education Programs,” 2009, available at www.l ao.ca.gov/analysis_2009/education/ed_anl09.pdf. Legislative Analyst’s Office, “ Overview of February 2009 Proposition 98 Budget Package,” 2009, available at www.lao.ca.gov/handouts/education/2009/Overview_Feb_2009_Prop_98_03_17_09.pdf. Sonstelie, Jon, Brunner, Eric, and Kenneth Ardon, For Better or For Worse? School Finance Reform in California , Public Policy Institute of California, Calfornia, 2000. 296 About the Authors MARGARET WESTON Margaret Weston is a research associate at PPIC, based in PPIC's Sacramento Center. Before joining PPIC, she taught high school English in Baltimore City p ublic schools through Teach for America. She has also interned in Chicago public sc hools, Baltimore C ity public schools' SchoolStat Division, Michigan Governor Granholm's public policy division, and the Canadian Parliament. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Michigan, an M.A. in teaching from Johns Hopkins University, and an M.P.P. from th e University of Michigan. JON SONSTELIE Jon Sonstelie is a professor of economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests include several areas in public finance and urban economics, including the effect of public school quality on private school enrollment, the incidence of the property tax, the demand for public school spending, the economics of rationing by waiting, and the effect of transportation innovations on resid ential locations. He was previously a research fellow at Resources for the Future. He holds a B.A. from Washington State University and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. HEATHER ROSE Heather Rose is an adjunct fellow at PPIC and an Assistance Professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Davis. Previously, she was a research fellow at PPIC. She specializes in the economics of education. She has published work on school fi nance, college affirmative action policies, and the relationship between high school curriculum, test scores, and subsequent earnings. Her current research projects focus on school finance reform in California as well as school board politics and teacher sa laries. She holds a B.A. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, San Diego. 297 Related PPIC Publications Gordon, Tracy M., Calleja Alderete , Jaime, Murphy, Patrick J., Sonstelie, Jon, and Ping Zhang, Fiscal Realities: Budget Tradeoffs in California Government. Public Policy Institute of California, 2007. Rose, Heather, Sengupta, Ria, Sonstelie, Jon, and Ray Reinhard, Funding Formulas for California Schools: Simulations and Supporting Data. Public Policy Institute of California, Occasional Paper, 2008. Reinhard, Ray, Rose, Heather, Sengupta, Ria, and Jon Sonstelie, Funding Formulas for California Schools II: An Analysis of a Proposal by the Governor’s Committee on Education Excellence. Public P olicy Institute of California, Occasional Paper, 2008. Sonstelie , Jon and Peter Richardson, eds., School Finance and California’s Master Plan for Education. Public Policy Institute of California , 2001, pp.103–123 and 155–186. PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA Board of Directors Walter B. Hewlett, Chair Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Mark Baldassare President and Chief Executive Officer Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce John E. Bryson Retired Chairman and CEO Edison International Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Educa tion State of California Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Ki Suh Park Design and Managing Partner Gruen Associates Constance L. Rice Co -Director The Advancement Project Thomas C. Sutton Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Pacific Life Insurance Company Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Emeritus Great Valley Center PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, California 94111 p hone: 415. 291.4400 f ax: 415. 291.4401 PPIC SACRAMENTO CENTER Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 p hone: 916.440.1120 f ax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(102) "

R 609MWR

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(83) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/california-school-finance-revenue-manual/r_609mwr/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8721) ["ID"]=> int(8721) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:40:10" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4016) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(8) "R 609MWR" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "r_609mwr" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "R_609MWR.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "2732545" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(530029) "California School Finance Revenue Manual Margaret Weston Jon Sonstelie Heather Rose Supported with funding from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation June 2009 4 Table of Contents Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 11 Overview of Fundin g ................................................................................................................................... 12 Data Sources and Method .......................................................................................................................... 13 Organiza tion ................................................................................................................................................ 15 Categorical Flexibility: The 2009 Budget Act .............................................................................................. 17 Glossary of Acronyms ................................................................................................................................. 18 School District and Charter School Unrestricted Revenues ........................................................................ 22 Revenue Limit Entitlement ..................................................................................................................... 23 Base Revenue Limit ............................................................................................................................. 24 Declining Enrollment Adjustment ....................................................................................................... 26 Necessary Small School (NSS) Adjustment ......................................................................................... 28 Locally Funded Charter Schools Adjustment ...................................................................................... 30 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment ............................................................................................... 32 All Other Revenue Limit Adjustments ................................................................................................. 34 Charter School General Purpose Block Grant ......................................................................................... 36 Charter School Block Grant ................................................................................................................. 37 Other Unrestricted State Funding ........................................................................................................... 38 Lottery: Proposition 37 ....................................................................................................................... 39 Excess Taxes and Federal In -Lieu Property Taxes ................................................................................... 41 Excess Taxes ........................................................................................................................................ 42 Federal Impact Aid .............................................................................................................................. 44 Forest Reserve Funds .......................................................................................................................... 46 School District and Charter School Restricted Revenues ............................................................................ 48 Administrative and Support Programs .................................................................................................... 49 California School Information Services (CSIS): Statewide Student Identifier Maintenance Reimbursement .................................................................................................................................. 50 Mandates ............................................................................................................................................ 52 Pupil Residency Verification ................................................................................................................ 54 5 Pupil Transportation: Home-to -School and Special Education ........................................................... 55 General Instruction ................................................................................................................................. 57 Charter School Categorical Block Grant .............................................................................................. 58 Class Size Reduction: Grade Nine (CSR 9) .......................................................................................... 60 Class Size Reduction: Kindergarten through Grade Three (K-3 CSR) .................................................. 62 Instructional Materials Funding Realignment ..................................................................................... 64 Lottery: Proposition 20 ....................................................................................................................... 66 School a nd Library Improvement Block Grant (SLIBG) ....................................................................... 68 School Safety and Violence Prevention Act ........................................................................................ 70 Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE) ........................................................................................ 72 Year -Round Education Grants ............................................................................................................. 74 Special Education Programs .................................................................................................................... 76 AB 602: Base Funding .......................................................................................................................... 77 AB 602: Declining Enrollment Adjustment ......................................................................................... 79 AB 602: Severity Cost Pool Adjustment .............................................................................................. 81 AB 602: Special Disability Adjustment (SDA) ...................................................................................... 83 AB 602: All Other Adjustments ........................................................................................................... 85 Low Incidence Support Services Funding ............................................................................................ 87 Special Education Mandate Settlement .............................................................................................. 89 Mental Health Services ....................................................................................................................... 91 Personnel Development Programs ..................................................................................................... 93 Regional Occupational Center/Program (ROCP) Hand icapped .......................................................... 95 Workability .......................................................................................................................................... 97 Targeted Programs .................................................................................................................................. 98 Advanced Place ment (AP) Test Fee Reimbursement ......................................................................... 99 After School Education and Safety (ASES) ........................................................................................ 101 California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Intensive Instruction and Services ............................... 103 California School Age Families Education (CalSAFE) ......................................................................... 105 Community Day School Additional Funding ..................................................................................... 107 Economic Impact Aid (EIA) ................................................................................................................ 109 English Language Acquisition Program (ELAP) .................................................................................. 111 Foster Youth Services (FYS) ............................................................................................................... 113 6 Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) ............................................................................................. 115 High Priority Schools Grant Program (HPSGP) .................................................................................. 117 Immediate Intervention for Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP) ........................................ 119 International Baccalaureate (IB) ....................................................................................................... 121 Nell Soto Parent Involvement ........................................................................................................... 123 Pupil Retention Block Grant (PRBG).................................................................................................. 124 Refugee Children Supplemental Assistance Program ....................................................................... 126 School Community Violence Prevention (SCVP) ............................................................................... 128 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program ...................................................................................... 129 School Nutrition: State Meal Program .............................................................................................. 131 Specialized Secondary Programs (SSP) ............................................................................................. 133 State -Monitored Schools Program ................................................................................................... 135 Supplemental Instruction: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE Remedial) ............................ 137 Supplemental Instruction: Core Academic Program ........................................................................ 139 Supplemental Instruction: Low STAR ............................................................................................... 141 Supplemental Instruction: Retained and Recommended for Retention ......................................... 143 Targeted Instruction Improvement Block Grant (TIIBG) ................................................................... 145 Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs ................................................................. 147 Chief Business Officer (CBO) Training Program ................................................................................ 148 Math and Reading Professional Development ................................................................................. 149 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Incentive Award ............................................ 151 Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) .................................................................................................... 153 Principal Training Program ................................................................................................................ 155 Professional Development Block Grant (PDBG) ................................................................................ 157 Reader Services for Legally Blind Teachers ....................................................................................... 159 Teacher Dismissal Apportionment .................................................................................................... 161 Teacher Recruitment and Retention Program .................................................................................. 162 Vocational Programs ............................................................................................................................. 164 Agricultural Vocational Education Incentive Grants ......................................................................... 165 Apprenticeship .................................................................................................................................. 167 California Partn ership Academies (CPA) ........................................................................................... 169 Regional Occupational Center/Program (ROCP) ............................................................................... 171 7 County Offices of Education Unrestricted Revenues ................................................................................ 173 Base Revenue Limit ........................................................................................................................... 174 Direct Services to Districts ................................................................................................................ 175 Ed ucation Services Revenue Limit .................................................................................................... 176 Locally Funded COE Charter Schools Adjustment ............................................................................. 177 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment ............................................................................................. 178 All Other Adjustments ....................................................................................................................... 179 Miscellane ous Revenue .................................................................................................................... 180 County Offices of Education Restricted Revenues .................................................................................... 181 County Office of Education (COE) Fiscal Oversight ........................................................................... 182 County Oversight: Williams Case Settlement ................................................................................... 183 County School Service Fund .............................................................................................................. 184 Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE): COE Oversight and Assistance .................................... 185 Unemployment Insurance Management System ............................................................................. 186 Other Statewide or Regional Support Program Revenues ....................................................................... 187 Administrative and Support Services .................................................................................................... 188 After School Education and Safety (ASES): Regional After School Techni cal Assistance System ..... 189 California School Information Services (CSIS) ................................................................................... 190 Education Technology: California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) ........................................ 191 Education Technology: K- 12 High-Speed Network .......................................................................... 192 Education Technology: Statewide Education Technology Services (SETS) ....................................... 193 Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) ................................................................ 194 School Community Violence Prevention (SCVP): School Safety and Violence Prevention Training . 195 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Training and Evaluation ............................................... 196 Student Friendly Services (SFS) ......................................................................................................... 197 Teacher Recruitment and Retention: COE Contract ......................................................................... 198 Testing: Assessment Review and Reporting .................................................................................... 199 Testing: California English Language Development Test (CELDT) .................................................... 200 Testing: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) ........................................................................ 201 Testing: California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) .............................................................. 202 Testing: Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) ....................................................................... 203 8 General Instruction Programs ............................................................................................................... 204 Ad vancement via Individual Determination (AVID) .......................................................................... 205 American Indian Education Centers (AIEC) ....................................................................................... 206 California Association of Student Councils ....................................................................................... 207 Center for Civic Education ................................................................................................................. 208 Envi ronmental Education (EE) .......................................................................................................... 209 Teacher Training and Professional Development Programs ................................................................. 210 Alternative Certification Programs ................................................................................................... 211 Bilingual Teacher Training (BTTP) ..................................................................................................... 212 Teacher Credentialing Block Grant (TCBG) ....................................................................................... 213 Adult Education Programs ........................................................................................................................ 214 Adult Education ................................................................................................................................. 215 Adults in Correctional Facilities ......................................................................................................... 217 Community -Based English Tutoring (CBET) ...................................................................................... 218 Direct Support Professional Training Program ................................................................................. 220 Child Care and Development Programs .................................................................................................... 221 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 2 ......................................................................................... 222 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 3 ......................................................................................... 223 Alternative Payment: non CalWORKs .............................................................................................. 224 American Indian Early Childhood Education (AIECE) ........................................................................ 225 California Child Care Initiative ........................................................................................................... 227 Campus Tax Bailout ........................................................................................................................... 228 Centralized Eligibility List .................................................................................................................. 229 Community Colleges Program .......................................................................................................... 230 General Child Care and Development ............................................................................................... 231 Handicapped Program ...................................................................................................................... 232 Local Planning Councils (LPCs) .......................................................................................................... 233 Migrant Child Care and Development .............................................................................................. 234 Quality Improvement Funds: Child Development Retention and Training Program........................ 235 Quality Improvement Funds: Child Development Training Consortium (CDTC) .............................. 236 Resource and Referral ....................................................................................................................... 237 9 School Age Community Child Care Services (SACCC) ........................................................................ 238 State Preschool ................................................................................................................................. 239 Facilities Funding ....................................................................................................................................... 240 Charter School Facility Grant Program ............................................................................................. 241 Charter School Revolving Loan Fund ................................................................................................ 242 Child Care Facilities Revolving Loan Fund (CCFRF) ............................................................................ 243 Deferred Maintenance (DMP) .......................................................................................................... 244 Emergency Repair Account, Williams Settlement ............................................................................ 246 School Facility Program ..................................................................................................................... 247 School Nutrition: School Breakfast and Summer School Start -Ups .................................................. 248 Small School District and County Office of Education Bus Replacement ......................................... 249 Special Education Programs ...................................................................................................................... 250 Early Start Early Intervention Grants ................................................................................................ 251 Infant Funding ................................................................................................................................... 252 Ravenswood Monitoring ................................................................................................................... 253 State Staff Training ............................................................................................................................ 254 Local Revenue ........................................................................................................................................... 255 Leases, Rentals, I nterest and Other Capital Proceeds ...................................................................... 256 Other Fees and Taxes ........................................................................................................................ 258 Parcel Taxes ...................................................................................................................................... 260 All Other Local Revenue .................................................................................................................... 262 Federal Revenue ....................................................................................................................................... 264 Federal Child Nutrition Programs ..................................................................................................... 265 Title I ................................................................................................................................................. 267 All Other Federal Funds .................................................................................................................... 269 Appendix 1: Funding Terminology ............................................................................................................ 271 Appendix 2: Funding Authority Budget Act Line Items ............................................................................ 274 Appendix 3: Sources of Data .................................................................................................................... 280 Appendix 4: Categorical Flexibility ........................................................................................................... 284 Appendix 5: Statewide Summary Charts ................................................................................................. 286 10 Appendix 6: Frequently Asked Questions ................................................................................................ 293 References ................................................................................................................................................ 295 About the Authors .................................................................................................................................... 296 Related PPIC Publications ......................................................................................................................... 297 11 Introduction Revenue flows to California’s public schools through many different channels. The complexity of that funding system has led to calls for more simplicity and transparenc y, but the complexity itself is an obstacle to reform. The purpose of this manual is to help overcome that obstacle. The manual briefly describes each source of revenue for California public schools and provides basic statistics on how that source distri butes revenue among school districts, county offices of education, charter schools, and other non -profit organizations. The descriptions and statistics are for 2005 -2006, the latest year for which complete information on each program was available. This manual is meant to accompany the PPIC School Finance Model1 , which details how much revenue each school district received from each revenue source in 2005 -2006. The model also allows users to compare the distribution of revenue under the current system with the distribution under alternative systems that they specify. By developing the model and writing this manual, we intend to facilitate a more open and informed discussion of school finance policy. The complexity of California’s system has tended to make those discussions the province of a few experts, an unfortunate situation for such an important public service. Moreover, even experts suffer from a lack of information about how re venue is distributed in the current system. In that vacuum, school finance policy is too often based on a few anecdotes rather than the broad empirical perspective necessary to represent the wide variety of California’s public schools. We believe our model and manual can be useful to both those who wish to play a more active role in the school finance discussion and to those who are already at the center of that discussion. 1 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org 12 Overview of Funding California’s charter schools, districts, and county offices of education are financed through a combination of local, state, and federal dollars. There are two main types of funds: unrestricted funds that may be spent on any legitimate purpose and restricted funds that may have eligibility requirements or expenditure restrictions. School districts and county offices receive most of the unrestricted funds through California’s revenue limit system, which combines local property taxes and state aid to achieve revenue targets specified by the Legislature. Charter schools receive most of their unrestricted revenue through their general purpose block grant, which mimics the revenue limit system. These sources constitute approximately 60 percent of the funding received by school districts. Charters, districts, and county offices may also be eligible for a number of state categorical programs. These programs vary in their purpose, funding, and scope. In general, each categorical program has specific eligibility crite ria, and its funding is restricted to specific expenditures. Many of these revenue sources are related, making any count of sources somewhat arbitrary. However, using broad definitions, the state had at least 60 of these revenue sources in 2005 -2006. These sources account for about 25 percent of the revenue received by school districts and about 30 percent of the state’s expenditure s on K -12 education. Some categorical program revenues come from special funds, such as the lottery. These special funds provide less than 2 percent of all funding to school districts, county offices, and charter schools. The federal government also provides revenue to school districts, county offices, and charter schools through a number of categorical programs. Additional ly, some state programs involve federal funds. In total, California schools receive approximately 9 percent of their funding from the federal government. Finally, some school districts benefit from other sources of local funds, such as parcel taxes. Other local funds account for approximately 8 percent of all revenues to districts. This manual focuses on state revenues and does not provide details on specific federal and local sources of revenues. 13 Data Sources and Method The data included in this man ual are from a variety of sources, most of which are publicly available. The majority of revenues are allocated through the principal apportionment administered by the California Department of Education (CDE). The biggest revenue source in the principal apportionment is the state aid portion of revenue limits for districts and county offices. The CDE provided us with the principal apportionment data for 2005 -2006. The CDE also provided us with data from CalSTARS, the department’s intern al accounting system. The system tracks Budget Act appropriations as well as transfers across agencies and special funds. For revenue sources not in the principal apportionment, we first turned to CalSTARS. In a number of cases, CalSTARS shows the funding recipient of a program as a division within the CDE. In those cases, we relied on the apportionment files in the Finance and Grants section of CDE’s website. Some restricted revenues are allocated by other state age ncies, such as the Controller’s Office or the Office of Public School Construction. These revenues include lottery funds (Controller’s Office) and deferred maintenance (Office of Public School Construction). For these programs, we contacted the respectiv e office to get data. In some instances, we were unable to obtain allocations to school districts, county offices, or charter schools. These cases are noted in the Special Considerations section of the program descriptions. Finally, for federal and local revenue we were not able to obtain through other sources, we rely on the Standardized Account Code Structure (SACS) 2005 -2006 dataset. SACS is a compilation of unaudited accounting data provided by school districts and county offices. A complete list of each revenue’s data source is available in Appendix 3: Sources of Data. The data are all for 2005-2006, the latest audited and certified data available from CDE. In some instances, funding for activities completed in 2005 -2006 is appropriated in later years or appropriations in 2005-2006 fund activities completed in other years. We have attempted to compile all revenues that are for activities completed in 2005 -2006. The PPIC School Finance Model 2 includ es the 978 districts that receive funding. Locally funded charter schools are rolled up to their sponsoring district. However, some revenue is allocated to consortia of districts and county offices. Examples include the 73 regional occupation centers an d programs (ROCPs) , the 120 special education local plan areas (SELPAs) , a food service joint powers authority (JPA), and 8 transportation JPAs. We do not include these entities as separate organizations; rather, we prorate their total funding to their members based on the number of students each had. The following descr iptions of each revenue source contain a table describing the allocation of revenue from that source across four broad classes of organizations. The first class is the 978 school districts, including their locally funded charters, the second is the 58 county offices, and the third is the 356 direct funded charter schools. The fourth is a category or organizations not usually consider to be local education agencies (LEAs). The non -LEAs include the State Special Schools, California Youth Authorities (CYAs) , American Indian Education Centers and tribal councils, community colleges and other 2 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org 14 institutions of higher education, child care contractors, CDE program divisions, local governments, and other state agencies. There are approximately 2,250 non -LEAs included in our data. Determining what constitutes a program or revenue source can be quite subjective. In some instances a Budget Act line item may contain several schedules each considered different programs. This is the case for the Child Care and Develo pment programs, where Budget Item 196 funds 13 programs in two schedules. Our categorization of revenue sources was guided by our main goal, which is to describe the revenue of California’s K -12 school districts and charter schools. For revenue sources that flow mostly to school districts and charter schools, we tended to represent the various schedules of Budget Act items as separate revenue sources. On the other hand, for revenue sources that flow mostly to LEAs that are not school districts or charte r schools, we tended to combine those schedules and represent the item itself as one program In addition, COE oversight or administrative components of programs can appear in the Budget Act as a separate appropriation, a provision of an appropriation, or not at all. The Tobacco Use Prevention Education program’s oversight component receives a separate appropriation, while the School Safety Competitive Block Grant’s training component is included as a provision of the appropriation. To be consistent, wher e administrative, training, or oversight activities are specifically mentioned in the Budget Act, we consider them a separate revenue source or program. Where the Budget Act does not include such language, as in the case with testing contracts, we keep th at funding in the program’s total. The Special Considerations or Level of Funding sections of the program descriptions include language about these administrative or separate components of the overall funding. In describing the allocation of funds in a p rogram, we often provide statistics on dollars per pupil for districts of a certain type. The number of pupils is based on average daily attendance (ADA). The apportionment formulas use many different measures of ADA depending on the program or purpose. Our measure is current year (2005-2006) actual ADA in schools operated by the district. This includes the ADA in locally funded charters and necessary small schools, but it excludes district students who are transferred to schools operated by the county offices of education. Unlike the measure of ADA used in the revenue limit calculations, we use ADA in the current year not the highest of the current and previous year, a condition protecting districts with declining enrollment. Finally, in some cases, demographic data was missing. Twelve of the 978 districts had missing free and reduced price lunch data and 80 of the 978 districts have missing English learner (EL) counts. We treated all missing data as zero. Therefore, we may be underestimating the number and percentage of English learners and disadvantaged students for some districts. More data and methods information may be available in Appendix 6: Frequently Asked Questions. 15 Organization Each revenue source has be en categorized according to its beneficiary and type of revenue. The first section lists and explains the unrestricted general purpose district and charter school revenues. These include the district revenue limit entitlement and the charter school block grant. The second section continues with district and charter school restricted revenues. The subsequent two sections list unrestricted and restricted revenues for COEs. The final section lists other programs and revenues that are included in the Budget Act under K -12 programs but that are statewide or regional services available to all LEAs or that do not support K-12 students. Within each section, revenues are characterized by broad category. We attempt to categorize each revenue or program into one of the following categories: administrative and support services, adult education, child care and development, facilities, general instruction, special education, targeted programs, teacher and professional development programs, and vocational programs. Each revenue source has at least one page. The first page describes the purpose or intent of the program and the types of activities funded by the program; any eligibility criteria; the funding allocation formula, including 2005 -2006 rates when available ; any special considerations; and the total funding available under the program for 2005-2006 and 2007 -2008, if available. The first page also includes a box in the upper right -hand corner with any relevant Education Code sections, the funding source, and the funding authority. Appendix 1: Funding Terminology defines the codes used in this box. For all programs funded through an appropriation by the Budget Act, the hyperlinked Budget Act in the box takes you to Budget Act line numbers for 2005-2006 and 2007-2008. These may also be found in Appendix 2: Funding Authority Budget Act Line Items. Finally, the first page includes a table with overview statistics, including the number of en tities getting funding and the percentage of the total funding going to those entities, by entity type. The second page analyzes the funding formula by breaking down per pupil funding across important groups. For each program, with some exceptions, the t ables show mean per pupil funding among district groups receiving program funding across four different categories: the proportion of low -income students, the proportion of English learners, district size and type, and district enrollment density (enrollm ent divided by land area). Districts are categorized by type and quantile. The first column lists the total number of districts within the type -quantile receiving funding . The second column lists the percentage receiving funding. The final column shows the average district per pupil funding within the type-quantile. For poverty, English learners, and enrollment density, the quantiles were created based on all districts in the state. District size quantiles were created within district types to be roughly evenly distributed within the district type. Quantile membership may change by measure. For example, a district may have a high concentration of low -income students, have very few English learners (EL), be of a medium size, and be geographically dense. Thus it could be in the high poverty, low EL, medium size, and medium density quantiles. Finally, to be clear, the tables show the mean per pupil funding for districts that receive funding within each group and not the funding per EL or poor student within a district. District poverty concentration is measured by the percentage of students in the district on free and/or reduced price lunch and ranges from zero to 100 percent. English learner concentration is measured by the percentage of students in the district that are identified as English learners and ranges from zero to 16 89 percent. Enrollment density is measured by the district’s enrollment per square kilometer and ranges from zero to 2,122 students per square ki lometer. District size is measured by average daily attendance (ADA) and ranges from 4.32 to 644,928.25. Demographic data for COEs and direct funded charter schools was inconsistent and largely unavailable. Therefore, second page analys es exclude COEs a nd direct funded charters. Revenues for non K-12 programs, including all Child Care and Development programs and those listed in the Other Statewide or Regional Support Service Program Revenues and subsequent sections do not have second page analyses. Finally, Appendix 5: Statewide Summary Charts provides statewide summaries of total funding and district -only funding. 17 Categorical Flexibility: The 2009 Budget Act The 2009 Budget Act granted expenditure flexibility for 42 state revenue programs. The total funding now considered flexible is $4,876,300,000 for 2008-2009 and $4,595,567,000 for 2009-2010, approximately 10.9 and 9.5 percent of the total Proposition 98 K -12 budget s, respectively. The selected programs vary in purpose and funding formula. Please see Appendix 4 : Categorical Flexibility for the list of programs granted expenditure flexibility. This information is current as of the February passage of the 2009 Budget Act. 18 Glossary of Acronyms AB Assembly Bill ADA Average daily attendance. Defined as the total days of student attendance divided by the total days of instruction. Revenue limits and many categorical programs use ADA as a per pupil funding unit. ADA is typically lower than enrollment. AP Advanced Placement. A program that offers high school students the opportunity to complete college -level courses and earn colleg e credit for them. College credit is earned by achieving typically a three or better out of five on the AP exam for a given course. API Academic Performance Index. The API is a measure of school performance, which ranges from 200 to 1000, that summarizes a school’s performance over a number of indicators, currently consisting of results from statewide tests that are based on the standards for what California students are expected to learn in every grade. See the CDE website for more information. APP Alternative Payment program. Part of the Child Care and Development programs. AYP Adequate yearly progress. A series of measures under NCLB that determine the annual academic performance of schools, districts, and the state. BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs. CAHSEE California High School Exit Exam. A state exam that California public high school students must p ass in order to graduate. CalWORKs California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids. A welfare program that gives cash aid and services to eligible needy California families. The program is operated locally by county welfare departments. CBEDS California Basic Educational Data System . This system houses enrollment. CDE California Department of Education, the state agency that oversees K -12 education. Please see the CDE website for more information. CDS County district school code. Unique identifier for each entity in the state. County codes are two digits and range from 01 to 58. District codes are five digits long; school codes are seven digits long. COE and districts’ school codes are 0000000. COE County office of education. All of California’s 58 counties have one as they are required by California’s Constitution. In some counties there may several sites serving regions of the county. COEs serve special populations in their schools, such truants and pregnant minors, as well as provide regional administrative services. 19 COLA Cost of living adjustment . An increase in funding for schools from the state or federal government due to inflation. In California, it is based on the Implicit Price Deflator for State and Local Government Purchases of Goods and Services. CSIS California School Information Services . Please see the CSIS website for more information. CTC California Commission on Teacher Credentialing . Please see the CTC website for more information. DSS California Department of Social Services . Please see the DSS website for more information. EL English learner. A student whose native language is something other than English. These students may be enrolled in many English language acquisition programs, including English as a Second Language (ESL) or bilingual education. The number or proportion of E L students in a school or district is frequently used as a measure of that school or district’s disadvantage and may determine eligibility for additional funding . ERAF Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund. After the passage of Prop osition 13, the State shifted the property tax allocation away from local governments to LEAs. Please see this summary by the California State Association of Counties. ESEA Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The principal federal law affecting K-12 education. NCLB reauthorized ESEA in 2002. FRPL Free and/or Reduced Price Lunch. The National School Lunch Program provides free or reduced price breakf ast and/or lunch to low income students, defined as 130% or 185% of the federal poverty line, respectively. The number or proportion of students participating in the program is typically used as a poverty measure for schools and districts. In some cases it’s used to determine a school or district’s eligibility for funding aimed at helping lower -income students. FY Fiscal year. July 1 of the first year to June 30 of the following year. IDEA Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Federal law that guarantees children with exceptional needs a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment, determined on an individual basis. IEP Individualized education program. A written plan developed by the parents and the school special education team that specifies the student’s achievement goals and method to obtain these goals. IDEA requires that all students receiving special education services have an IEP. JPA Joint powers agreement. An agreement among LEAs to sha re services or responsibilities governed by a board made up of representatives from the LEAs. Most JPAs are ROCPs or in transportation. 20 LCI Licensed children’s institution. Students with severe disabilities may be enrolled in these types of institutions should the d istrict or COE be unable to support the educational or health needs of the student. LEA Local education agency. A public board or other authority within a state that maintains administrative control of public elementary or secondary schools . For the purposes of this paper and model, only the 1,409 COEs, districts, and direct funded charter schools are considered LEAs. NCLB The No Child Left Behind Act. The controversial 2002 reauthorization of the ESEA that adds many new provisions in the areas of asse ssment, accountability, and teacher quality. It is set for reauthorization soon. NPS Nonpublic school. Students with severe disabilities may be enrolled in these types of institutions should the district or COE be unable to support the educational or health needs of the student. OPSC Office of Public School Construction, a division of the State Allocation Board that typically allocates facilities funding. Please see the OPSC website for more information. PI Program Improvement. One of the consequences under NCLB. Schools and districts that receive federal Title I funds enter PI when they fail to make AYP after two consecutive years. For each year that a school or district remains in PI, the interventions and policies for that school or district become increasingly stringent, ranging from school choice to a state takeover. ROCP Regional occupational center/program. A center or program established by a school, district, group of d istricts, or COE to provide training for entry -level jobs, job-related counseling and skills upgrading for students aged 16 and older and adults in CalWORKS. SB Senate Bill SBE California State Board of Education. SBE is the governing and policy -making body of CDE. SBE sets K -12 education policy in the areas of standards, instructional materials, assessment, and accountability. The SBE adopts textbooks for grades K-8, adopts regulations to implement legislation, and ha s authority to grant waivers of the Education Code . There are 11 SBE members, all appointed by the Governor. Please see the SBE website for more information. SELPA Special education local plan area. A regional adm inistrative unit responsible for special education services. SELPAs may be a single large district, a group of districts, or an entire county. SELPAs may include charter schools. Districts, charters, and COEs are not bound by geography when joining a SE LPA. SSID Statewide student identifiers, a unique identifier for each student in the longitudinal CALPADS data system. 21 STAR California’s standardized testing and reporting program. A statewide testing system with three elements the California Standards Tests, based on state’s academic content standards; California Achievement Tests, Sixth Edition Survey, a nationally normed, standardized, multiple- choice, basic skills test give only to third and seventh graders; and Aprenda 3, a norm-referenced test adm inistered to Spanish-speaking ELs who have been in school in the US fewer than twelve months. Williams 2004 Eliezer Williams, et al. v. State of California, et al. case settlement. The Williams case was filed as a class action suit in 2000 on the basis th at public school students were not provided with equal access to instructional materials, safe and decent school facilities, and qualified teachers. 22 School District and Charter School Unrestricted Revenues The majority of funding to districts and charter schools are unrestricted, general purpose revenues designed to support classroom instruction and school operation. These include the district revenue limit entitlement and the charter school general purpose block grant. Additionally, districts an d direct funded charter schools may have other unrestricted revenues, such as excess local property taxes or in -lieu federal property taxes. Finally, we count the Proposition 37 lottery revenues as unrestricted because, unlike the Proposition 20 lottery r evenues, there are few restrictions on expenditures. 23 Revenue Limit Entitlement Most unrestricted revenue received by school districts comes through the revenue limit system. This system combines two sources of revenue. The first is property tax revenue from parcels within a district’s boundaries. The second is state aid, which makes up the difference between a district’s revenue limit entitlement and its property tax revenue. If a district’s property tax revenue exceeds its entitlement, the excess is re tained by the school district and no state aid is provided. These districts are referred to as “basic aid” or “excess tax” districts. The starting point for each district’s entitlement is its base revenue limit, a dollar amount per student in average daily attendance (ADA). This limit is modified according to several factors to arrive at the district’s revenue limit entitlement per student. To demonstrate the role of these factors, this manual represents the revenue limit entitlement of districts as the sum of six components. The first component is a district’s base revenue limit. The remaining five components explain the difference between a district’s revenue limit entitlement per ADA and its base revenue limit. In actuality, these components a re not separate revenue streams for school districts. In the pages that follow, however, we represent each component as if it were a separate revenue stream. The funding descripti ons for each component describe how we define the component. The sum of al l six components is a district’s revenue limit entitlement. In that sense, the manual merely decomposes a district’s entitlement into six parts. 24 Base Revenue Limit Program Description: Funds provide the foundation for a district’s revenue limit entitlement. Ignoring various modifications and complications, a district’s entitlement is its base revenue limit multiplied by the average daily attendance (ADA) of i ts students. Eligibility Criteria: All districts, including all -charter districts, are eligible. Funding Description: Base revenue limits are based on historical per pupil expenditures in 197 2-197 3 and have been updated each year. For each district, the base revenue limit is calculated by taking the sum of the prior year’s base revenue limit, any equalization aid or miscellaneous funding authorized by the Legislature, and an inflation adjustment. The adjustment starts with the average base revenue limits in the prior year by district type . This average is then multiplied by the annual percentage change in the Implicit Price Deflator for State and Local Government Purchases of Goods and Services for the United States. The result, a do llar amount per ADA, is the inflation adjustment added to each district’s base revenue limit from the prior year. This result is multiplied by a deficit factor , which we then call the base revenue limit . It is this base revenue limit that is described in the tables below. In defining the revenue limit adjustments that follow, the baseline is a situation in which a district’s entitlement is its deficited base revenue limit multiplied by the ADA of students in both regular and locally funded charter school s. Special Considerations: SB 813 (Chapter 498, Statutes 1983) folded in the longer day and year incentives into the base revenue limit. The additions each district previously received from these incentives were added to its base revenue limit. SB 727 (Chapter 855, Statutes 1997) made similar changes when the state changed the way in which attendance was calculated. That legislation increased the base revenue limit of districts that would have seen a reduction in revenue limit funds because of the n ew attendance rules. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $29,853,477,360. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 557 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 19.1 11.1 69.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42238 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 25 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 4,919.89 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 4,966.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 4,965.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 4,947.45 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 4,935.35 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 4,926.24 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 5,910.15 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 5,908.65 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 5,946.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 5,943.98 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 5,975.73 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 5,917.69 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 5,162.68 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 5,248.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 5,138.13 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 5,149.67 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 5,151.47 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 5,139.63 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 5,198.85 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 5,032.45 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 4,949.38 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 4,941.93 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4,932.03 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 4,931.99 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 6,067.38 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 5,953.26 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 5,922.12 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 5,920.25 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 5,927.51 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 5,936.29 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 5,339.85 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 5,323.77 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 5,174.70 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 5,175.76 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 5,135.95 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 5,141.51 26 Declining Enrollment Adjustment Program Description: Funds supplement the revenue limit entitlement of districts with declining enrollment. A district’s baseline entitlement is its deficited base revenue limit multiplied by its current ADA. If a district’s ADA has fallen, its ADA in the prior year is used to calculate its revenue limit entitlement. This adjustment is intended to shield districts with declining enrollment from large revenue declines. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs funded through the revenue limit are eligible if current year ADA is les s than prior year ADA. Funding Description: The declining enrollment adjustment is calculated in the following way. First, calculate the difference in the district’s prior year and current year ADA. Then, multiply this difference by the district’s defic ited base revenue limit. The adjustment is this difference divided by the district’s ADA. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $402,351,057. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 308 38 199 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 23.0 2.7 74.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42238.5 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 27 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 102 54.8 112.52 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 109 50.2 152.10 Medium (33 – 60%) 90 55.2 114.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 83 53.9 121.66 High (66 – 100 %) 116 55.8 149.76 High (23 – 89%) 116 62.4 130.85 High Low (0 – 33 %) 24 54.5 82.56 High Low (0 – 6%) 19 55.9 124.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 10 37.0 29.99 Medium (6 – 23%) 14 35.9 72.76 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 53.84 High (23 – 89%) 5 38.5 21.15 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 52 54.2 84.73 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 50 66.7 121.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 84 61.8 99.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 73 54.9 84.38 High (66 – 100 %) 63 61.2 119.81 High (23 – 89%) 76 59.8 116.73 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with fun ding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 83 43.5 355.56 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 97 45.8 222.84 Medium (251 – 1,500) 113 62.1 192.07 Medium (6 – 50) 119 61.7 161.69 High (1,501 +) 112 60.9 120.45 High (50 – 2,122) 92 60.5 118.79 High Low (0 – 1,500) 16 61.5 146.22 High Low (0 – 6) 23 63.9 116.96 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 13 44.8 108.01 Medium (6 – 50) 11 34.4 69.66 High (6,001+) 9 29.0 38.82 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 19.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 86 66.7 153.27 Unified Low (0 – 6) 53 67.9 207.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 48 49.0 97.25 Medium (6 – 50) 54 53.5 83.98 High (10,001+) 65 60.2 107.79 High (50 – 2,122) 92 59.0 108.57 28 Necessary Small School (NSS) Adjustment Program Description: Funds augment a district’s revenue limit entitlement to offset the additional costs of operating small schools. For districts with eligible schools, a separate revenue limit entitlement is calculated for the students in those schools. Eligibility Criteria: Districts must have fewer than 2,501 ADA and have an elementary school with fewer than 96 ADA and/or a high school with fewer than 286 ADA and meet the criteria of having a “necessary” small school per Education Code 42280. Funding Description: The revenue limit entitlement for students in necessary small schools is calculated using a hybrid formula based on current year staffing or the lesser of prior year staffing and ADA. In 2005 -2006, the funding ranged from $108,975 to $435,900 for elementa ry schools and $176,920 to $1,454,700 for high schools. A deficit factor is then applied to this entitlement to yield the revenue limit entitlement of students in necessary small schools. The NSS adjustment is defined in the following way. First, comp ute the difference between the revenue limit entitlement of students in necessary small schools and the entitlement those students would have generated with the deficited base revenue limit of their district. Then, divide that difference by the district’s ADA . Special Considerations: Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $37,704,192. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 68 6 69 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 11.8 8.3 79.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42280 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 29 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 233.69 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 50 23.0 463.35 Medium (33 – 60%) 20 12.3 706.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 13 8.4 517.21 High (66 – 100 %) 29 13.9 454.48 High (23 – 89%) 6 3.2 168.91 High Low (0 – 33 %) 3 6.8 974.12 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 1,092.22 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 3.7 1,183.71 Medium (6 – 23%) 1 2.6 2,289.29 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 2,384.17 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 7 7.3 363.91 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 33 44.0 721.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 30 22.1 553.87 Medium (6 – 23%) 19 14.3 360.28 High (66 – 100 %) 32 31.1 350.67 High (23 – 89%) 17 13.4 223.85 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 60 31.4 1,430.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 60 28.3 750.42 Medium (251 – 1,500) 7 3.8 142.27 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 110.00 High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 31.50 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 7,772.43 High Low (0 – 1,500) 6 23.1 1,158.69 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 1,106.26 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 2,526.95 High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 67 51.9 608.37 Unified Low (0 – 6) 57 73.1 693.72 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 13.43 Medium (6 – 50) 10 9.9 103.31 High (10,001+) 1 0.9 31.63 High (50 – 2,122) 2 1.3 531.69 30 Locally Funded Charter Schools Adjustment Program Description: Funds provided to school districts for students in locally funded charter schools, charter schools in which state revenue flows through the district that chartered the school. School dis tricts receive the general purpose charter school block grant for students in these schools, but do not receive revenue limit funds for them. Please see the Charter School Block Grant for more information about the f unding formula for general purpose charter school block grants. Eligibility Criteria: All districts with locally funded charter schools are eligible. Funding Description: The locally funded charter schools adjustment is defined in the following way. Fir st, calculate the difference between the charter school block grant a district receives and the entitlement it would have received if the students in those schools had been funded by the district’s base revenue limit. Then, divide that difference by the A DA of the district’s regular and locally funded charter schools. Special Considerations: The locally funded charter schools adjustment is negative when a locally funded charter school’s general purpose block grant is less than the district’s base revenu e limit. Level of Funding : The total funding allocated in 2007-2008 is $3,443,532. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 40 9 28 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 27.2 -39.8 112.6 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47633- 47635 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 31 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 -28.17 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 21 9.7 -51.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 16 9.8 14.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 7.1 30.92 High (66 – 100 %) 12 5.8 15.63 High (23 – 89%) 16 8.6 16.08 High Low (0 – 33 %) 11 25.0 -7.33 High Low (0 – 6%) 7 20.6 -20.61 Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 -1.03 Medium (6 – 23%) 7 17.9 -2.37 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 -61.60 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 -14.63 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 10.44 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 6 8.0 -17.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 20 14.7 2.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 23 17.3 8.46 High (66 – 100 %) 14 13.6 0.89 High (23 – 89%) 20 15.7 0.70 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 135.24 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 7 3.3 6.97 Medium (251 – 1,500) 24 13.2 61.10 Medium (6 – 50) 25 13.0 -27.63 High (1,501 +) 23 12.5 -1.16 High (50 – 2,122) 16 10.5 18.45 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 0.15 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 -17.64 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 -23.28 Medium (6 – 50) 4 12.5 -6.16 High (6,001+) 8 25.8 -6.81 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 -7.25 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 8 6.2 -40.71 Unified Low (0 – 6) 6 7.7 -60.96 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 15 15.3 9.00 Medium (6 – 50) 14 13.9 4.74 High (10,001+) 26 24.1 2.27 High (50 – 2,122) 29 18.6 2.53 32 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment Program Description: Funds reimburse districts for an increase in costs due to rate increases for unemployment insurance since 1975-1976. Eligibility Criteria: Any LEA funded through the revenue limit with 1975 -1976 unemployment insurance expenditures is eligible for funding. Funding Description: A district’s 1975-1976 unemployment insurance expenditures are subtracted from its current year expenditures, excluding those spent for charter schools funded through the general purpose block grant. If that dif ference is positive, a deficit factor is applied and the result is added to the district’s revenue limit entitlement The unemployment insurance adjustment is this addition divided by the district’s current ADA. Special Considerations: Level of Fundi ng: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $135,234,983. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 554 86 334 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 19.1 9.8 71.1 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42241.7, 43001.8 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 33 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 21.99 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 22.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 22.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 152 98.7 21.31 High (66 – 100 %) 207 99.5 22.56 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 22.88 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 24.04 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 24.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 23.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 23.18 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 24.28 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 24.67 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 21.84 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 22.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 22.80 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 21.88 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 25.54 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 25.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 189 99.0 24.07 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 210 99.1 22.53 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 21.87 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 21.83 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 22.35 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 22.46 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 24.04 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 22.67 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 24.08 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 22.96 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 23.71 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 24.71 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 24.52 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 25.38 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 22.51 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 22.50 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 23.97 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 23.93 34 All Other Revenue Limit Adjustments Program Description: Funds in this category are the net result of modifications to the base revenue limit in addition to the five adjustments enumerated above. The adjustments can be characterized as incenti ves, special funding, and accounting issues. Incentive adjustments include the Basic Aid Choice /Court-Ordered Voluntary Pupil transfer, Beginning Teacher Salary Incentive, Charter School Block Grant offset , Class Size Penalties, and Longer Day/Year Pena lty. The Basic Aid Choice transfer compensates basic aid districts for the costs of non -resident students, students who do not generate increases in revenue limit entitlements in a basic aid district. Strictly speaking, it is not part of the revenue limi t system. However, it acts as a revenue limit entitlement for non -resident students in basic aid districts. Special funding includes Meals for Needy Pupils and the Spe cial Revenue Limits Adjustment. Meals for Needy Pupils funding is only available to districts that, prior to Proposition 13 in 1978, levied special property tax rates to fund meal programs for low -income students. The Special Revenue Limits Adjustment includes special funding for seven districts per Education Code sections 46610, 42285.1, 42283.1, and AB 552 (Chapter 1076, Statutes of 1991). The remaining modifications deal with technical accounting issues or the continuation of one -time savings attempted by the state. They are the All Charter District Revenue Limit Adjustment, County O ffice Transfer, Gain/Loss from Interdistrict Attendance Agreements, Miscellaneous Revenue Limit Adjustment, PERS Adjustment, PERS Safety Adjustment, and Reduction for Excess ROCP Reserves. Some of these, such as PERS, are negative. Eligibility Criteria: Varies by LEA. Funding Description: The net effect of these modifications is calculated in the following way. The revenue limit entitlement of the district is calculated with and without the modifications. The difference is then divided by district ADA. Special Considerations: AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004) folded the Continuation High School revenue limit adjustment into the Pupil Retention Block Grant. It provides extra funding for necessary small con tinuation high schools. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $62,783,583. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 233 40 134 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 20.3 55.0 24.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 35 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 -4.11 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 14.79 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 28.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 23.12 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 11.50 High (23 – 89%) 184 98.9 3.73 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 -6.10 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 -4.64 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 135.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 91.71 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 97.08 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 37.55 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 -5.90 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 -8.03 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 11.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 5.27 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 3.68 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 189 99.0 41.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 210 99.1 27.22 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 16.20 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 14.79 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 9.85 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 9.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 1,168.95 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 47.60 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 11.48 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 99.24 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 24.86 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 32.80 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 61.82 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 51.73 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 3.84 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 13.94 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 0.91 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 1.05 36 Charter School General Purpose Block Grant The charter school general purpose block grant is the equivalent of revenue limit funding for charter schools. However, unlike the revenue limit entitlement, all charter schools receive the same per pupil funding based on the statewide average revenue limit e ntitlement for specific grade bands. Charter schools may be locally or direct funded. A locally funded charter school receives its funding through its sponsoring district. A direct funded charter school receives its funding directly from the state. Ple ase see the California Charter Schools Act of 1992, as amended by AB 2030 (Chapter 757, Statutes of 2006) and CDE’s website for more information about California charter schools. For the purposes of this manual, all locally funded charter school funding has been aggregated up to the district level. Th e following analysis is only for the 356 direct funded charters in existence in 2005 -2006. 37 Charter School Block Grant Program Description: Funds provide the bulk of unrestricted revenue for charter schools. The entitlement is met by local revenue and state General Fund aid. It is an alternative funding formula to the revenue limit entitlement for regular district schools. Eligibility Criteria: All charter schools are eligible for block grant funding. Funding Description: Funding is based on the statewide average of revenue limit funding for selected grade bands. All K-5 ADA in charter schools generates funding, based on the statewide average of revenue limit funding per ADA for elementary districts per ADA . Funding for grades 6-8 charter ADA is based on the equivalent statewide average of unified districts. Charter high school funding is based on the statewide average for high school districts. The entitlement is met by in-lieu property taxes from districts and by stat e aid. Special Considerations: All-charter districts may choose between revenue limit and block grant funding. Of the eight all -charter districts in 2005 -2006, seven chose revenue limit funding over block grant funding. Level of Funding : The total amoun t expended in 2005 -2006 is $698,812,731. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 347 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47633- 47635 Funding Source : L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 38 Other Unrestricted State Funding The only revenue source in this category is the Proposition 37 lottery funds. 39 Lotter y: Proposition 37 Program Description: Funds support most district activities with the exception of the acquisition of real property, the construction of facilities, the financing of research, or any other non-instructional purpose. In November 1984, California’s voters passed Proposition 37, the Calif ornia State Lottery Act. Proposition 37 requires that at least 34 percent o f the total lottery revenues is allocated to LEAs for the benefit of public educa tion. Proposition 37 lottery funds are essentially unrestricted, and are referred to as general purpose lottery funds as opposed to Pro position 20 instructional materials lottery funds. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are allocated on a per ADA basis quarterly by the Controller’s Office. Special Considerations: Please see the Controller’s apportionment summary for more information. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $841,786,825. The total funding allocated in 2007 -2008 is $ 761,197,651 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 280 0 Percent of total funding (%) 2.2 18.3 9.7 68.1 1.7 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Constitution 40 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 131.41 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 132.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 132.61 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 131.67 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 133.94 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 133.55 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 145.72 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 143.48 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 143.86 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 143.94 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 161.10 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 154.52 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 137.97 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 135.32 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 139.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 138.01 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 145.75 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 144.95 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with fun ding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 135.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 132.83 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 132.59 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 131.90 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 132.86 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 133.16 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 140.11 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 140.43 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 148.28 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 141.96 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 146.38 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 151.57 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 136.38 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 135.57 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 138.53 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 134.81 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 142.67 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 143.05 41 Excess Taxes and Federal In -Lieu Property Taxes Districts have excess taxes when their local property tax receipts exceed their revenue limit entitlement. Two other types of unrestricted revenues are added to excess taxes in the PPIC model. These include the Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment and Miscellaneous Funds. The Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment provides additional revenues to excess tax dis tricts with charter schools that accept nonresident students. Miscellaneous Funds are in -lieu taxes or royalties from mineral reserves. The second type of revenue included in this section is federal in-lieu property taxes. COEs, districts, and charter s chools are eligible for funding. The state cannot collect property taxes from land owned by the federal government. The government has two major programs that allocate in -lieu property taxes to affected districts, Federal Impact Aid and Forest Reserve Funds. These programs compensate districts whose geographic boundaries include military bases, American Indian lands, and national forests. 42 Excess Taxes Program Description: Funds are local proper ty tax receipts in excess of a district’s revenue limit entitlement and related revenue that is not counted as local revenue in a districts revenue limit entitlement. These funds are unrestricted revenue that can be used at the district’s discretion. E ligibility Criteria: An LEA must have local property tax revenues in excess of their calculated general purpose revenue limit entitlement. Funding Description: The state aid a district receives is its revenue limit entitlement minus its local revenue. Local revenue is property tax revenue, timber yield taxes, community redevelopment funds, and excess revenue augmentation funds (ERAF). In addition, 50 percent of royalties, bonuses, and certain types of in -lieu taxes are included in local revenue. Local revenue in excess of the revenue limit entitlement is referred to as excess taxes. Districts keep these excess taxes and use them for any purpose. Districts in this position are referred to as “basic aid” or “excess tax” districts. Several related reve nue streams are included with excess taxes in this manual and the PPIC School Finance Model 3 . One stream is the 50 percent of royalties, bonuses, and in -lieu taxes that are not counted as local revenue in revenue limit calculations. Another stream is the Basic Aid Supplement Charter School Adjustment , which partially compensate basi c aid districts for additional cost s of serving non -resident students in their charter schools . The funding equals 70 percent of the sending district's revenue limit per ADA , multiplied by the ADA of its students who attend the charter schoo l. Special Considerations: Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $268,491,975. The total funding available in 2007-2008 is $353,653,631. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 108 31 69 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 28.5 28.2 43.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. 3 To request a copy of the model, please email schoolfinance@ppic.org Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 43 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 46 24.7 988.33 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 42 19.4 1,536.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 14.1 166.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 24 15.6 402.00 High (66 – 100 %) 39 18.8 53.83 High (23 – 89%) 42 22.6 76.05 High Low (0 – 33 %) 16 36.4 807.98 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 1,039.65 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 0.19 Medium (6 – 23%) 14 35.9 551.13 High (66 – 100 %) 6 40.0 38.55 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 0.31 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 16 16.7 338.38 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 10 13.3 2,421.11 Medium (33 – 60%) 25 18.4 198.60 Medium (6 – 23%) 25 18.8 110.64 High (66 – 100 %) 28 27.2 2.50 High (23 – 89%) 34 26.8 41.62 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 33 17.3 3,216.64 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 35 16.5 1,476.52 Medium (251 – 1,500) 38 20.9 1,299.87 Medium (6 – 50) 37 19.2 574.54 High (1,501 +) 37 20.1 205.69 High (50 – 2,122) 36 23.7 254.08 High Low (0 – 1,500) 6 23.1 654.67 High Low (0 – 6) 9 25.0 260.79 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 13 44.8 872.63 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 436.60 High (6,001+) 12 38.7 227.77 High (50 – 2,122) 7 38.9 279.40 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 34 26.4 1,107.41 Unified Low (0 – 6) 20 25.6 1,380.33 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 19 19.4 109.30 Medium (6 – 50) 25 24.8 124.67 High (10,001+) 16 14.8 44.84 High (50 – 2,122) 24 15.4 58.61 44 Federal Impact Aid Program Description: Funds compensate school districts for a portion of the property tax revenue they have lost because of tax -exempt federal ownership of property, including American Indian lands, military bases, and low -rent housing projects. Federal Impact Ai d dates back to 1950. It is now Title VIII of ESEA. There are three types of funding available to affected districts: Basic Support Payments (BSP), Payments for Children with Disabilities (PCD), and Construction Grants (CG). Eligibility Criteria: T o be eligible, a school district must demonstrate that the Federal Government has acquired, since 1938, real property with an assessed valuation of at least 10 percent of all real property in the district at the time of acquisition. For BSP, districts mus t have at least 400 ADA or 3 percent of their ADA connected to federal property. Districts with federally connected students eligible for services under IDEA also receive additional funding through PCD. Districts that educate high percentages of students living on American Indian lands or children of members of the uniformed services are also eligible for CGs. Funding Description: Most of the funding is for BCP and is allocated based on an annual count of federally connected students. Similarly, PCD fun ding is allocated based on an annual count of federally connected special education students. CG funding is awarded by application to eligible districts and is related to the number of eligible children they educate. Special Considerations: BSP is unrestricted revenue; PCD funds must be used on services for the federally connected special education students. CG funds are used for facility maintenance and construction. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $95,738,977. The total funding available in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 36 6 42 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 22.1 2.8 74.9 0.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Apportionment Funding Authority: ESEA 45 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 9 4.8 44.29 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 13 6.0 819.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 12 7.4 534.53 Medium (6 – 23%) 10 6.5 80.31 High (66 – 100 %) 15 7.2 54.04 High (23 – 89%) 13 7.0 155.97 High Low (0 – 33 %) 1 2.3 663.20 High Low (0 – 6%) 4 11.8 263.64 Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 356.03 Medium (6 – 23%) 2 5.1 538.17 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 228.16 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 9 9.4 177.59 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 18 24.0 922.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 21 15.4 313.49 Medium (6 – 23%) 13 9.8 62.85 High (66 – 100 %) 12 11.7 125.90 High (23 – 89%) 11 8.7 128.12 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 14 7.3 551.47 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 14 6.6 416.13 Medium (251 – 1,500) 7 3.8 1,122.31 Medium (6 – 50) 14 7.3 680.25 High (1,501 +) 15 8.2 179.38 High (50 – 2,122) 8 5.3 25.83 High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 339.37 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 465.86 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 403.09 Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 184.37 High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 23 17.8 1,472.28 Unified Low (0 – 6) 20 25.6 964.33 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 9 9.2 264.39 Medium (6 – 50) 11 10.9 221.98 High (10,001+) 10 9.3 87.31 High (50 – 2,122) 11 7.1 118.31 46 Forest Reserve Funds Program Description: Funds compensate school districts for the loss in property tax revenue from tax-exempt national forests. The1908 legislation establishing this funding source requires 25 percent of the revenues derived from the National Forest System to be given to counties in which the lands are situated for the equal benefit of public schools and roads. Districts may use this funding as unrestricted general funds. Eligibility Criteria: COEs and districts are eligible for funding if they are geographically situated on federal forest reserves. Funding Description: Funding is apportioned to counties in proportion to the area of the forest reserve in the county as a percentage of total reserves in the state. The county apportions 50 perc ent for county schools and 50 percen t for county roads . Special Considerations: Since th e mid-1908s, the revenue from federal forest reserves has declined for several reasons, including a long term decline in timber sales. In 2000, the federal government repl aced the declining revenue with stable, but short term, funding under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self- Determination Act. The Act expired in 2006, but was extended until 2007. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $32,519,870. The total funding available in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 37 158 30 94 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 29.8 22.3 11.1 36.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Apportionment Funding Authority: 47 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 43 23.1 39.31 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 118 54.4 106.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 67 41.1 101.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 27 17.5 29.90 High (66 – 100 %) 48 23.1 39.86 High (23 – 89%) 13 7.0 3.13 High Low (0 – 33 %) 17 38.6 18.27 High Low (0 – 6%) 19 55.9 96.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 25.16 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 28.2 1.52 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 108.24 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 17 17.7 18.88 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 39 52.0 107.61 Medium (33 – 60%) 46 33.8 28.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 29.3 11.74 High (66 – 100 %) 31 30.1 4.44 High (23 – 89%) 16 12.6 1.43 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 79 41.4 332.34 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 103 48.6 162.04 Medium (251 – 1,500) 62 34.1 98.58 Medium (6 – 50) 47 24.4 57.82 High (1,501 +) 17 9.2 10.59 High (50 – 2,122) 8 5.3 3.83 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 219.19 High Low (0 – 6) 22 61.1 90.24 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 39.34 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 4.85 High (6,001+) 7 22.6 3.64 High (50 – 2,122) 2 11.1 0.65 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 59 45.7 163.63 Unified Low (0 – 6) 49 62.8 187.15 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 21 21.4 17.04 Medium (6 – 50) 32 31.7 11.24 High (10,001+) 14 13.0 0.47 High (50 – 2,122) 13 8.3 0.45 48 S chool District and Charter School Restricted Revenues Revenue programs in this category are restricted to specific uses or are allocated to school districts based on specific characteristics of their schools or students. 49 Administrative and Support Programs The revenue programs in this category compensate school districts for specific administrative activities in LEAs. These programs do not directly support student instruction. 50 California School Information Services (CSIS): Statewide Student Identifier Maintenance Reimbursement Program Description: Funding supports LEAs to assign and maintain individ ual student identifiers to all their students, kindergarten through grade twelve, enrolled in California public and charter schools. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs that have not received funding to participate in the CSIS State Reporting program will receive an apportionment from CDE for the maintenance of t hese identifiers. Funding Description: LEAs do not h ave to apply for reimbursement. LEAs not currently participating in the CSIS program are reimbursed for maintenance of student identifiers at a rate of $0.25 per student annually based on their verified CBEDS enrollment counts. In 2005-2006, this program was funded by the Educational Telecommunication Fund. Special Considerations: Progra m funding source varies by year. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005-2006 is $748,613. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 828,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 36 375 55 183 134 1 Percent of total funding (%) 1.6 20.8 13.0 62.4 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60900(e)(3) Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authorit y: Budget Act 51 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 128 68.8 0.26 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 164 75.6 0.26 Medium (33 – 60%) 123 75.5 0.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 102 66.2 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 124 59.6 0.26 High (23 – 89%) 109 58.6 0.26 High Low (0 – 33 %) 26 59.1 0.27 High Low (0 – 6%) 20 58.8 0.27 Medium (33 – 60%) 19 70.4 0.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 27 69.2 0.27 High (66 – 100 %) 10 66.7 0.27 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 0.27 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 55 57.3 0.26 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 42 56.0 0.26 Medium (33 – 60%) 77 56.6 0.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 72 54.1 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 51 49.5 0.27 High (23 – 89%) 69 54.3 0.27 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 147 77.0 0.26 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 167 78.8 0.26 Medium (251 – 1,500) 127 69.8 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 119 61.7 0.26 High (1,501 +) 101 54.9 0.26 High (50 – 2,122) 89 58.6 0.26 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 0.27 High Low (0 – 6) 22 61.1 0.27 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 22 75.9 0.27 Medium (6 – 50) 23 71.9 0.27 High (6,001+) 18 58.1 0.27 High (50 – 2,122) 10 55.6 0.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 77 59.7 0.27 Unified Low (0 – 6) 44 56.4 0.27 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 53 54.1 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 60 59.4 0.27 High (10,001+) 53 49.1 0.26 High (50 – 2,122) 79 50.6 0.26 52 Mandates Program Description: Funds reimburse schools districts for the costs of new programs or increased levels of service mandated by state government. The state is required to rei mburse districts for such costs because of Proposition 4 in 1979. Claims for reimbursement are heard by the Commission on State Mandates. The Commission has currently approved 42 of these claims. Approved mandates vary from health care activities, such as scoliosis screening, to background checks to collective bargaining and other administrative activities. B eginning in 2002 -2003, the state has deferred payment on these mandates by approving $1,000 per m andate, even though the claims submitted far excee d that amount. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are required to comply with mandates and are eligible for funding through reimbursement. Funding Description: LEAs submit claim s and are reimbursed, often the following year . Special Considerations: On Nove mber 21, 2007, the CSBA’s Education Legal Alliance, along with several COEs, filed suit against the State of California challenging its authority to defer state mandate payments to public schools . On December 8, 2008, the court ruled in their favor. In r esponse to the ruling, the Governor’s 2009-2010 Budget suspends all but three K-14 mandates. LEAs will not be required to perform the mandated activities or file reimbursement claims, thus eliminating the state’s fiscal liability. The State has appealed the ruling; thus the future of mandate funding is uncertain. Please see the LAO report on mandates and advised reform for more information. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $250,860,604. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $38,000 plus any additional appropriations in future years. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 53 433 82 322 2 0 Percent of total funding (%) 3.4 13.0 16.1 67.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 53 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 148 79.6 28.83 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 148 68.2 32.99 Medium (33 – 60%) 124 76.1 29.98 Medium (6 – 23%) 123 79.9 27.21 High (66 – 100 %) 161 77.4 28.61 High (23 – 89%) 162 87.1 28.95 High Low (0 – 33 %) 41 93.2 80.94 High Low (0 – 6%) 32 94.1 47.94 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 58.87 Medium (6 – 23%) 37 94.9 75.24 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 88.00 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 83.46 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 42.60 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 66 88.0 41.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 97.1 39.86 Medium (6 – 23%) 130 97.7 40.78 High (66 – 100 %) 96 93.2 43.04 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 42.68 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 80 41.9 60.49 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 117 55.2 41.43 Medium (251 – 1,500) 171 94.0 36.21 Medium (6 – 50) 167 86.5 30.91 High (1,501 +) 182 98.9 27.87 High (50 – 2,122) 149 98.0 27.93 High Low (0 – 1,500) 23 88.5 75.22 High Low (0 – 6) 34 94.4 67.48 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 63.73 Medium (6 – 50) 30 93.8 62.73 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 74.28 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 81.78 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 116 89.9 53.44 Unified Low (0 – 6) 65 83.3 52.23 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 39.50 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 30.56 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 41.79 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 43.41 54 Pupil Residency Verification Program Description: Funds support the efforts of school districts to verify the residency status of their students. Eligibility Criteria: E ligible school districts are adjacent to the international border in Imperial and San Diego counties only. Funding Description: The apportionment for t he two affected counties is based on a proportionate share of the 1995 -1996 base year appropriation. The appropriation is adjusted annually in the Budget Act to reflect annual changes in ADA in the school districts adjacent to the international border in e ach county as appropriate. Special Considerations: The County Superintendents of Schools in Imperial and San Diego counties must not allocate funds to any school district that has not adopted an appeals procedure for pupils who fail to adequately verify r esidency. The appeals procedure must be substantially similar to that set forth in Administrative Regulation 5111, as adopted by the Mountain Empire Unified School District on February 16, 1994. Starting in 2006 -2007, the Pupil Residency Verification funding moved from a line item appropriation to a schedule in the Mandates. Please see the Mandates program page for more information. More information regarding the affected districts and funding allocation is unavailable. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $176,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 2 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 48204.5, 48204.6 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 55 Pupil Transportation: Home-to -School and Special Education Program Description: Funds reimburse eligible LEAs for the approved cost of transporting pupils to and from school. Home- to -school (HS) transportation fund s transportation for all pupils while special education (SE) transportation funds transportation for orthopedically impaired or severely disabled students. Eligibility Criteria: O nly LEAs that received funding in the prior fiscal year are eligible, including transportation JPAs. Funding Description: Funding is equal to the lesser of the prior year HS or SE entitlement or the prior year’s approved HS or SE transportation cost, respectively. Funding is contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Co nsiderations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $546,458,987. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 623,942,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 40 476 81 329 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 7.4 17.8 6.8 68.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41850- 41857 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 56 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 135 72.6 81.78 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 171 78.8 143.16 Medium (33 – 60%) 147 90.2 99.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 86.4 76.23 High (66 – 100 %) 194 93.3 83.18 High (23 – 89%) 172 92.5 79.28 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 69.00 High Low (0 – 6%) 30 88.2 105.96 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 63.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 38 97.4 68.38 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 89.82 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 47.90 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 66.80 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 72 96.0 122.95 Medium (33 – 60%) 134 98.5 87.91 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 76.25 High (66 – 100 %) 101 98.1 109.55 High (23 – 89%) 125 98.4 99.67 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 142 74.3 477.20 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 179 84.4 347.83 Medium (251 – 1,500) 157 86.3 213.62 Medium (6 – 50) 158 81.9 126.71 High (1,501 +) 177 96.2 68.07 High (50 – 2,122) 139 91.4 61.55 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 190.70 High Low (0 – 6) 35 97.2 170.03 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 24 82.8 105.65 Medium (6 – 50) 28 87.5 67.52 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 57.02 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 49.67 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 126 97.7 247.90 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 350.10 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 96 98.0 93.94 Medium (6 – 50) 99 98.0 138.97 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 84.47 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 78.71 57 General Instruction The programs included in this section support general classroom instruction. Unlike targeted revenues, funds do not support specific students based on demographic characteristics or achievement. Rather, they are typically designed to benefit all students or specific grade bands of students. 58 Charter School Categorical Block Grant Program Description: P rovides charter schools with a flexible source of unrestricted funds in addition to the general purpose base revenues. These funds are in-lieu of a number of categorical programs available to school districts. Eligibility Criteria: All charter schools except those funded through the revenue limit are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The charter school categorical block grant is allocated in the Principal Apportionment and consists of two funding components: a per ADA rate and an amount in -lieu of Economic Impact Aid (EIA). The EIA component is based on the number of economically disadvantaged students in the charter school. It is calculated by multiplying this number by the statewide average of EIA aid per disadvantaged student. In 2005-2006, the block grant per ADA rate was $281 and the in -lieu EIA rate was $125 per disadvantaged student, with a guaranteed total minimum of $5,231 per school. Starting in 2007 -2008, the per ADA rate is $500, increa sed by COLA each subsequent year. Special Considerations: Charter schools that receive funding through the charter categorical block grant are not eligible to apply separately or through their sponsoring district for the categorical programs identified in Education Code Section 47634.4(f). A list of these programs for 2008-2009 is available here. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. 2007-2008 Total Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $67,995,043. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $151,474,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 12 48 16 49 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.9 8.5 2.2 15.9 71.5 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47634.1, 47634.4 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 59 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 98.11 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 21 9.7 81.78 Medium (33 – 60%) 16 9.8 30.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 7.1 60.98 High (66 – 100 %) 12 5.8 26.61 High (23 – 89%) 16 8.6 23.03 High Low (0 – 33 %) 11 25.0 7.82 High Low (0 – 6%) 7 20.6 23.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 4.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 7 17.9 3.51 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 46.89 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 13.91 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 13.15 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 6 8.0 53.82 Medium (33 – 60%) 20 14.7 9.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 23 17.3 9.82 High (66 – 100 %) 14 13.6 4.67 High (23 – 89%) 20 15.7 5.26 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 243.49 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 7 3.3 37.23 Medium (251 – 1,500) 24 13.2 92.25 Medium (6 – 50) 25 13.0 68.08 High (1,501 +) 23 12.5 34.31 High (50 – 2,122) 16 10.5 32.92 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 22.30 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 23.04 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 25.57 Medium (6 – 50) 4 12.5 5.42 High (6,001+) 8 25.8 7.04 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 7.55 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 8 6.2 53.68 Unified Low (0 – 6) 6 7.7 66.20 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 15 15.3 24.86 Medium (6 – 50) 14 13.9 21.11 High (10,001+) 26 24.1 5.30 High (50 – 2,122) 29 18.6 5.38 60 Class Size Reduction: Grade Nine (CSR 9 ) Program Description: Provides an incentive for school districts to reduce class sizes in ninth grade English and in one other ninth grade course. This additional course must be in mathematics, science or social studies, and it must be required for graduation. Average class size cannot exceed 20.44 ADA and 22 enrolled pupils per certificated teacher. Districts that implemented the program prior to June 30, 1998 may also serve grades 10 through 12. This program was establis hed by the Morgan-Hart Class Size Reduction Act of 1989. Eligibility Criteria: Districts that meet program requirements are eligible for funding. Direct funded charter schools may apply independently; locally funded charter schools may be included in their sponsoring district’s application. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, ninth grade CSR was funded at $192 per student per course, with a maximum of two times the ninth grade enrollment if two courses are implemented. Courses that implement CSR for less than a full year are funded at the $192 rate times the proportion of the year on CSR. Grade 10 -12 CSR is funded cannot exceed the total funding received for 10 -12 CSR in 1997-1998. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $82,922,810. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 106,621,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 63 175 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 31.5 68.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52080-52090 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 61 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 37 84.1 63.17 High Low (0 – 6%) 26 76.5 77.25 Medium (33 – 60%) 18 66.7 54.54 Medium (6 – 23%) 29 74.4 59.88 High (66 – 100 %) 8 53.3 70.14 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 44.04 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 68 70.8 27.15 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 37 49.3 30.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 70 51.5 21.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 82 61.7 23.02 High (66 – 100 %) 37 35.9 17.78 High (23 – 89%) 56 44.1 18.59 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 12 46.2 77.00 High Low (0 – 6) 23 63.9 70.72 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 26 89.7 74.31 Medium (6 – 50) 24 75.0 56.68 High (6,001+) 25 80.6 56.88 High (50 – 2,122) 16 88.9 62.13 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 45 34.9 27.97 Unified Low (0 – 6) 18 23.1 27.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 63 64.3 24.92 Medium (6 – 50) 56 55.4 22.40 High (10,001+) 67 62.0 20.20 High (50 – 2,122) 101 64.7 20.80 62 Class Size Reduction: Kindergarten through Grade Three (K-3 CSR) Program Description: Provides funds to school districts and charter schools that reduce one or more classes to 20.44 ADA or fewer per certificated teacher. Per AB 1608 (Chapter 743, Statutes of 2000), small districts and charters may not exceed 22.44 ADA per class, with a district -wide 20.44 average. K-3 CSR must first be implemented in the fir st grade, followed by second grade. Once all first and second grade classes at the school have been reduced, K-3 CSR may be implemented in kindergarten or third grade. K-3 CSR funding is unrestricted; however funding is lost if program requirements are u nmet. K -3 CSR consists of two options. Option 1 reduces classes for all pupils in each classroom for the full regular school day for each grade level funded. Option 2 reduces classes for all pupils in each classroom for at least one -half of the instruc tional minutes offered per day in each grade level funded, with instruction primarily in math and reading. Eligibility Criteria: Districts that meet program requirements are eligible for funding. Direct funded charter schools may apply independently; loc ally funded charter schools may be included in their sponsoring district’s application. Funding Description: Option 1 participants are funded at $1,071 per pupil in 2007-2008. Option 2 participants are funded at $535 per pupil. Special Considerations: The 2009 Budget Act and subsequent legislation lowered the penalties for class sizes that exceed program requirements. Please see th is LAO report for more information. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,643,269,868. The total funding appropriated in 2007 - 2008 is $ 1,829,662,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 5 550 3 332 133 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 28.7 0.0 70.0 1.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52120-52128.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 63 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 418.31 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 215 99.1 409.07 Medium (33 – 60%) 161 98.8 417.78 Medium (6 – 23%) 150 97.4 412.53 High (66 – 100 %) 205 98.6 404.67 High (23 – 89%) 185 99.5 412.26 High Low (0 – 33 %) 3 6.8 5.73 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 22.69 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 2 5.1 2.17 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 95 99.0 261.79 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 73 97.3 261.50 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 283.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 270.87 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 300.96 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 298.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 186 97.4 426.30 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 209 98.6 410.40 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 417.11 Medium (6 – 50) 189 97.9 421.58 High (1,501 +) 183 99.5 410.98 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 409.23 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 22.69 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 15.86 Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 8.11 High (6,001+) 1 3.2 0.82 High (50 – 2,122) 1 5.6 0.82 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 127 98.4 278.13 Unified Low (0 – 6) 76 97.4 264.72 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 275.83 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 290.97 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 288.12 High (50 – 2,122) 155 99.4 285.68 64 Instructional Materials Funding Realignment Program Description: Pr ovides funds to school districts and COEs for the purc hase of instructional materials for each pupil in the core curriculum areas of reading-language arts, mathematics, science, and history -social science. This material must be aligned with California’s academic content standards. Funding also provides accessible materials for pupils who are visually impaired, have other disabilities, or are unable to access the general curriculum, through the Low Vision and Braille reimbursement programs. The Instructional Materials Funding Realignment Program (IMFRP) was established by AB 1781 (Ch apter 802 , Statutes of 2002). IMFRP replaces three previous funding sources for instructional materials: t he K-8 Instructional Materials Fund, the 9 -12 Instructional Materials Fund, and the K -12 Schiff -Bustamante Standards - Aligned In structional Materials Fund . Eligibility Criteria: Eligible recipients are school districts, COEs, and state special schools. Funding for charter schools is included in the charter school categorical block grant. Funding Description: Funds are allocated based on a per pupil rate. In 2005-2006, t he rate was $52.79. SELPAs apply for reimbursement for materials purchased for visually impaired students. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the Instructional Materials Block Grant. IMFRP was reauthorized by SB 733 (Chapter 304, Statutes of 2008). Please see the IMFRP website for more information. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Fu nding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $360,361,332. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 419,774,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 556 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.9 19.5 9.6 69.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60240, 60313, 60420- 4 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 65 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 185 99.5 59.16 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 59.07 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 60.74 Medium (6 – 23%) 153 99.4 60.23 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 61.89 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 61.57 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 61.95 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 61.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 62.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 62.18 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 61.91 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 62.33 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 60.53 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 60.62 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 61.85 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 61.05 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 63.66 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 63.33 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 62.85 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 60.93 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 59.85 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 59.83 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 60.88 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 61.08 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 63.12 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 61.84 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 62.02 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 62.36 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 61.98 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 61.78 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 62.50 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 63.28 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 60.97 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 61.02 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 62.56 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 62.51 66 Lottery: Proposition 20 Program Description: Allocates revenue from the lottery to school di stricts and community colleges for the purchase of instructional materials . This revenue source was established by Proposition 20, known as the Cardenas Textbook Act of 2000. It provides that , beginning in 1998 -1999, 50 percent of any growth in lottery funds for education over t he 1997-1998 base fiscal year be allocated for instructional materials. Proposition 20 funds are tracked separately from Proposition 37 general purpose lottery funds. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated on a per ADA basis in addition to the third and fourth quarter Proposition 37 apportionments. Special Considerations: Some of the Education Code restrictions regarding instructional materials are applicable. Please read the CDE Prop osition 20 memo for more information. Please see the Controller’s apportionment summary for more information. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $188,687,493. The total funding allocated in 2007 -2008 is $ 115,361,690 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 280 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.3 18.6 9.9 69.5 1.7 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60119 Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Constitution 67 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 30.05 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 30.34 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 30.32 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 30.10 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 30.62 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 30.53 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 33.32 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 32.80 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 32.89 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 32.91 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 36.83 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 35.33 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 31.54 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 30.94 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 31.84 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 31.55 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 33.32 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 33.14 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 30.96 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 30.37 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 30.31 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 30.16 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 30.38 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 30.44 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 32.03 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 32.11 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 33.90 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 32.46 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 33.47 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 34.65 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 31.18 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 31.00 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 31.67 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 30.82 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 32.62 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 32.70 68 School and Library Improvement Block Gran t (SLIBG) Program Description: Funds for the purchase of library resources and for the improvement of instruction and school environment. AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004) established the School and Library Improvement Block Grant (SLIBG) by combin ing funds from School Library Mat erials (SLM) and the School Improvement Program (SIP) into one block grant. SLM provided funds for the purchase of library materials. SIP provided funds to schools to be allocated by school site councils for the purpose of improving instruction and the s chool environment. If the LEA participated in SIP prior to January 1, 2004, SLIBG f unds can be used for any purpose of either or both of SLM and SIP, as determined by a school advisory committee. If the LEA did not participate in SIP prior to January 1, 2004, the funds received for this block grant are to be used only for SLM. Eligibility Criteria: Eligibility is limited to LEAs who participated in either or both SLM and SIP in 2 003-2004. Funding Description: Funding for each eligible LEA is limited t o the relative statewide proportion received in 2003 -2004 for SLM and SIP. This proportion will be applied to the level of funding available for this block grant in 2005 - 2006 to determine the grant award for each eligible LEA. In subsequent years, LEAs wil l receive the 2005-2006 level of funding adjusted by the annual rate of growth in statewide enrollment and COLA . The award is made contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Considerations: About 99 percent of the funding for this program is deriv ed from SIP. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $422,419,095. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $465,451,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 56 556 86 335 99 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 27.4 2.3 70.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41570- 41573 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 69 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 185 99.5 96.02 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 104.99 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 104.02 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 94.89 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 100.54 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 101.46 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 21.64 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 23.53 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 14.75 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 16.92 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 6.84 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 14.11 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 69.28 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 72.08 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 72.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 69.64 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 76.16 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 76.01 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 190 99.5 144.48 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 211 99.5 122.98 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 109.58 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 100.50 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 98.10 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 98.65 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 15.14 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 16.66 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 23.71 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 21.25 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 16.10 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 14.22 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 83.41 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 89.16 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 75.88 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 72.68 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 72.49 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 73.14 70 School Safety and Violence Prevention Act Program Description: Funds to establish programs and strategies to prevent violenc e among students in public schools. This revenue source was initiated by t he Carl Washington School Safety and Violence Prevention Act, established by AB 1113 (Chapter 51, Statutes of 1999) and AB 658 (Chapter 645, Statutes of 1999). Eligibility Criteria: LEAs serving grades eight through twelve that complete the Consolidated Applicatio n and establish school safety and violence prevention programs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated on the basis of prior year enrollment in grades eight through twelve. Special Considerations: Although funds are determin ed by enrollment in grades eight through twelve, funds may be used for violence prevention programs serving students in grades kindergarten through twelve. This program is sometimes called the School Safety Block Grant. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $89,824,541. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 100,553,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 57 485 86 334 74 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.3 8.2 22.4 66.7 1.3 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 32228 – 32228.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 71 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 150 80.6 7.78 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 195 89.9 13.98 Medium (33 – 60%) 145 89.0 8.59 Medium (6 – 23%) 131 85.1 7.28 High (66 – 100 %) 190 91.3 6.95 High (23 – 89%) 159 85.5 5.76 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 36.64 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 38.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 35.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 36.51 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 36.64 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 33.18 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 15.43 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 74 98.7 18.37 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 15.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 15.29 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 14.16 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 14.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 159 83.2 95.56 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 189 89.2 42.23 Medium (251 – 1,500) 170 93.4 16.22 Medium (6 – 50) 171 88.6 9.54 High (1,501 +) 156 84.8 4.77 High (50 – 2,122) 125 82.2 4.75 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 47.90 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 42.55 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 38.24 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 35.79 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 35.03 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 34.87 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 23.44 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 27.63 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 15.71 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 15.80 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 14.24 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 14.35 72 Tobacco Use Preventio n Education (TUPE) Program Description: Funds support health education efforts aimed at the prevention and reduction of tobacco use. There are four TUPE programs targeting different groups of students: American Indian Ed ucation Centers, Grades four through eight, Grades six through eight, and Grades nine through twelve. Funds are awarded to LEAs that propose to replicate programs that have proven to be effective . Activities may include tobacco -specific student instruction, reinforcement activities, special events, and cessation programs for students. TUPE program funds in American Indian Education Centers, grades 6 -8, and grades 9-12 are awarded through a competitive grant application process. The TUPE program in grades 4 -8 is contained in the Consolidated Application. Please see Health and Safety Code 104350-104495 for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs and state -funded American Indian Education Centers that have been certified by CDE as having a fully implemented tobacco -free policy are eligible to apply for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated from the Health Education Account in the Cigarette and Tobacco Products Surtax Fund . American Indian Edu cation Centers receive $50,000. Grades 4-8 programs receive an entitlement based on a per ADA rate in accordance to local agreement. LEAs that serve grades 6 -8 receive grants up to $90,000. LEAs that implement the grades 9 -12 program are eligible for up to $37.50 per ADA per year for a total three -year grant of $5,000,000. Special Considerations: AB 637 (Chapter 135, Statutes of 2007) eliminates the grades four through eight entitlement and revised COE oversight responsibilities beginning July 1, 2009 . Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $18,840,543. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $18,438,198. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 34 404 32 312 22 6 Percent of total funding (%) 5.7 12.5 11.8 65.9 0.1 3.9 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: SF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 73 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 133 71.5 2.10 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 139 64.1 2.14 Medium (33 – 60%) 121 74.2 2.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 117 76.0 2.21 High (66 – 100 %) 150 72.1 1.97 High (23 – 89%) 148 79.6 2.04 High Low (0 – 33 %) 21 47.7 6.30 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 9.11 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 5.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 43.6 5.19 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 7.31 High (23 – 89%) 6 46.2 6.01 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 95 99.0 2.99 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 65 86.7 2.60 Medium (33 – 60%) 128 94.1 2.94 Medium (6 – 23%) 128 96.2 2.85 High (66 – 100 %) 89 86.4 3.29 High (23 – 89%) 119 93.7 3.32 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 74 38.7 2.05 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 108 50.9 2.60 Medium (251 – 1,500) 151 83.0 2.26 Medium (6 – 50) 148 76.7 2.27 High (1,501 +) 179 97.3 2.09 High (50 – 2,122) 148 97.4 2.04 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 6 16.7 9.07 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 11 37.9 8.43 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 5.40 High (6,001+) 21 67.7 5.62 High (50 – 2,122) 11 61.1 5.98 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 110 85.3 2.43 Unified Low (0 – 6) 61 78.2 3.31 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 95 96.9 2.12 Medium (6 – 50) 98 97.0 1.98 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 3.31 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 3.27 74 Year -Round Education Grants Program Description: Funds encourage school districts to operate multitrack year -round education (MTYRE) programs. The grant pays an eli gible MTYRE school for each student housed in excess of the capacity of that school. In exchange, the district forfeits its eligibility to receive new construction funding to increase the school’s capacity. Eligibility Criteria: A district must have an enrollment of at least 5 percent over its seating capacity as a base entry requirement. Then each applicant school must operate on a MTYRE calendar and have an enrollment of at least 5 percent above its seating capacity. Funding Description: Per pupil funding amounts are determined by the percentage of students above the seating capacity of the school: the hig her the percentage of students enrolled above the seating capacity of the schools, the higher the per -pupil grant. In 2005-2006, the minimum per pupil rate was $824.50 and the maximum was $1,484.10. Special Considerations: Because of the loss of new construction eligibility and low payout (the actual grant award paid for 2004- 2005 was $0.43 on the dollar) associated with MTYRE , participation and i nterest in this program are decreasing. Future program funding is uncertain. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $88,311,999. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $97,308,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 3 0 7 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 6.5 0.0 93.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42260-42269 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 75 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 1 0.5 42.51 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 42.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.0 155.15 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.1 155.15 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 2 1.5 56.35 Medium (6 – 23%) 1 0.8 80.05 High (66 – 100 %) 5 4.9 106.85 High (23 – 89%) 6 4.7 104.35 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 2 1.0 171.00 High (1,501 +) 3 1.6 142.76 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 112.90 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 52.84 Medium (6 – 50) 3 3.0 28.27 High (10,001+) 6 5.6 104.21 High (50 – 2,122) 4 2.6 108.39 76 Special Education Programs The programs described in this section support special education programs. The largest is the AB 602 special education entitlement. LEAs receive funding through their special education local plan area (SELPA), a regional administrative unit. AB 602 (Chapter 854, Statutes of 1997) changed the basis for allocating special education funding from a formul a based on special education expenditures to a formula based on total student attendance. A SELPA’s entitlement is based on what it received in the previous year, with adjustments for growt h or decline in ADA. If ADA grows, the SELPA receives additional funding equal to its growth in ADA multiplied by a statewide rate. This formula tends to equalize funding per ADA across SELPAs. If a SELPA’s ADA declines, its base funding may be reduced. If ADA has fallen for only one year, base funding is not reduced from its level of the previous year. If it falls for two or more consecutive years, base funding is reduced in proportion to its decline in ADA. To calculate that reduction, the decline in ADA is taken to be the ADA two years previous less the ADA in the previous year. That decline is multiplied by the SELPAs base funding per ADA in the previous year. The product is the reduction in the SELPA’s base funding because of declining enrollment. Additional adjustments are made for COLA, necessary small S ELPAs, and special disabilities. AB 602 also includes separate funding for Out of Home Care (OHC), Nonpublic Schools’ (NPS) Extraordinary Costs, Low Incidence Materials and Equipment, and Program Specialist/Regionalized Services (PS/RS). This additional funding is calculated separately from base funding with varying rates and funding models. The AB 602 entitlement is met by the local special education property taxes ( Education Code 2572), local assistance from the federal government , applicable excess ERAF, and state aid. We have decomposed t he AB 602 entitlement in to five categories: base funding, the declining enrollment adjustment, the severity cost pool adjustment, the special disability adjustme nt, and all other adjustments. These categories a re identified and described separately in the following pages. The $25 million annual Mandated Cost Settlement, one-time CAHSEE Special Education Funding , ROCP Handicapped, and Mental Health Services funding are also included in the Budget Act’s Ages 3 -21 Special Education Funding, but not in the AB 602 calculation. These funding sources are also described in what foll ows. All funding to SELPAs has been allocated on a per pupil basis to member districts within a SELPA, including COEs and charters. Second page analyses only include the district and locally funded charters portion of the SELPA funding. T here are some special education programs that do not support K -12 students, such as the Infant entitlement program. These programs are located in the Special Education section following other non K -12 programs like Adult Ed ucation and Child Care. 77 AB 602: Base Funding Program Description: Funds provide the foundation for each SELPA’s revenue. Each SELPA’s base funding is its base funding in the previous year adjusted for various factors. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs are eligible for base funding. Funding Description: The current year base is calculated by taking the SELPA’s prior year base and adding the prior year supplement, prior year COLA, and prior year growth or declining ADA adjustment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,460,378,865. The total funding appropriated in 2007 - 2008 is $3,817,396,768, which includes $1,392,476,701 in local special education taxes, federal IDEA local assistance grants, and applicable excess ERAF. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.4 18.2 8.8 66.4 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.10, 2572 Funding Source: F, GF & L, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 78 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 554.36 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 537.04 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 536.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 541.20 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 540.68 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 546.62 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 551.51 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 538.65 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 539.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 544.65 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 534.40 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 549.29 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 549.80 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 529.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 548.65 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 546.42 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 593.16 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 586.93 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per s quare kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 503.01 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 484.64 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 512.77 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 528.40 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 548.01 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 551.36 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 460.89 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 482.54 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 541.02 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 547.96 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 549.18 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 554.84 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 497.19 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 469.49 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 539.74 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 517.71 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 577.29 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 578.90 79 AB 602: Declining Enrollment Adjustment Program Description: Funds represent the reduction in base funding for SELPAs with declining enrollment for two or more consecutive years . Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs with declining enrollment for two or more consecutive years are elig ible. Funding Description: If ADA has fallen for only one year, base funding is not reduced from its level of the previous year. If ADA falls for two or more consecutive years, base funding is reduced. The reduction is based on the ADA two years previou s less the ADA in the previous year. That decline is multiplied by the SELPAs base funding per ADA in the previous year. The product is the reduction in the base funding of the SELPA. The same formula is applied to necessary small SELPAs with one differ ence. The reduction in base funding is 60 percent of the reduction described above for regular SELPAs. Special Considerations: In the first year of declining enrollment, the adjustment would be positive. The tables below only include the losses due to two or more consecutive years of declines in ADA. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $-21,721,837. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $-34,404,077. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 3.8 10.2 4.6 77.8 3.6 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.15, 56213 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 80 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 71 38.2 -5.06 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 94 43.3 -6.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 63 38.7 -5.91 Medium (6 – 23%) 52 33.8 -7.22 High (66 – 100 %) 65 31.3 -6.35 High (23 – 89%) 53 28.5 -5.15 High Low (0 – 33 %) 16 36.4 -5.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 11 32.4 -4.87 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 -4.63 Medium (6 – 23%) 14 35.9 -5.39 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 -5.17 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 -4.48 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 50 52.1 -4.93 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 45 60.0 -4.43 Medium (33 – 60%) 62 45.6 -7.38 Medium (6 – 23%) 63 47.4 -5.62 High (66 – 100 %) 42 40.8 -7.93 High (23 – 89%) 46 36.2 -8.06 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 75 39.3 -6.86 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 74 34.9 -6.42 Medium (251 – 1,500) 63 34.6 -5.52 Medium (6 – 50) 70 36.3 -6.60 High (1,501 +) 61 33.2 -5.96 High (50 – 2,122) 55 36.2 -5.70 High Low (0 – 1,500) 7 26.9 -8.88 High Low (0 – 6) 14 38.9 -5.98 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 11 37.9 -4.23 Medium (6 – 50) 9 28.1 -6.88 High (6,001+) 11 35.5 -5.09 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 -2.58 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 56 43.4 -6.01 Unified Low (0 – 6) 40 51.3 -7.78 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 47 48.0 -4.27 Medium (6 – 50) 29 28.7 -4.93 High (10,001+) 51 47.2 -7.65 High (50 – 2,122) 85 54.5 -7.34 81 AB 602: Severity Cost Pool Adjustment Program Description: Funds compensate SELPAs for extraordinary costs associated with relatively rare disabilities. The AB 602 funding model includes three separate funding sources for these disabilities: Low Incidence Materials and Equipment, Out of Home Care (OHC), and Nonpublic Schools (NPS) Extraordinary Cost Pool. The Low Incidence Materials and Equipment funding source reimburses SELPAs that must purchase specialized materials and equipment. The Out -of-Home Care (OHC) funding source was implemented in fiscal year 2004-2005 to replace the former 100 percent reimbursement for NPS tuition for pupils residing in Licensed C hildren’s Institutions (LCIs) and foster family homes . This apportionment provides funding for pupils residing in group homes and six other types of facilities located within each SELPA's geographic boundary. The NPS Extraordinary Cost Pool provides reim bursement funding for SELPAs with extraordinary costs associated with single placements in specialized NPS facilities. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs serving students with severe disabilities are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding for L ow Incidence Materials and Equipment and NPS Extraordinary Costs is based on claims received. Funding for a group home is based on the number of students multipl ied by the funding rate for the home. The rates range from approximately $500 to $20,000 pe r student, depending on the home’s classification. In addition, funding for the six facility types (foster family home, foster family agency, small family home, community care facility, intermediate care facility, and skilled nursing facility) is based on the number of pupils at each facility multiplied by the funding rate for its classification. Special Considerations: The OHC funding model provides a phase-in for SELPAs entitled to more funding under the new funding model and a phase-out funding prote ction for those SELPAs who are losing funding. The phase-out percentage for fiscal year 2007-2008 is 25 percent (2nd of 5 years). Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $198,649,265. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 221,284,771. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.4 16.2 8.0 69.1 2.4 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.22, 56836.165, 56836.21 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 82 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 30.92 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 35.55 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 32.59 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 25.16 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 23.19 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 27.08 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 35.46 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 35.93 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 21.09 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 29.39 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 21.61 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 20.20 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 29.05 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 25.59 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 36.31 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 34.28 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 34.87 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 34.59 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 30.59 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 30.55 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 35.78 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 29.80 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 26.79 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 27.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 18.27 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 37.34 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 40.58 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 30.70 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 26.01 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 24.27 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 27.57 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 26.22 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 31.73 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 31.14 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 34.64 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 34.56 83 AB 602: Special Disability Adjustment (SDA) Program Description: Funds compensate SELPAs for unusually high incidences of certain costly disabilities. SELPAs with SDA factors greater than zero are eligible for additional funding. These factors are based on a 1997 study by the America n Institutes of Research (AIR) study of the incidence of special education disabilities. Eligibility Criteria: Only SELPAs with SDA factors greater than 0 are eligible. Funding Description: For each SELPA with an SDA factor greater than zero, one plus the factor is multiplied by the statewide target rate, an average of base funding per ADA across SELPAs in the previous year. This product, the Incidence Multiplier (IM) rate, is the SELPAs entitlement to additional funding because of its historically high incidence of certain costly disabilities. If the IM rate exceeds the SELPA’s base funding per ADA, the SELPA receives a special disabilities adjustment equal to that difference multiplied by its ADA. If the IM rate is less than the SELPA’s base funding , it is not entitled to additional funds. However, regardless of the SELPA’s per ADA funding, the SELPA’s growth and COLA funding is multiplied by the SDA factor. Special Considerations: The SDA was intended to be temporary until a new study was complete d in 2004. However, because of concerns over the accuracy of the updated report, the original SDA factors have been extended. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $79,728,593. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 81,257,606. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 7 45 9 75 185 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.1 9.6 5.2 80.5 3.6 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.155 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 84 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 12 6.5 37.98 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 4 1.8 57.71 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 6.7 46.21 Medium (6 – 23%) 19 12.3 44.56 High (66 – 100 %) 22 10.6 28.05 High (23 – 89%) 22 11.8 28.59 High Low (0 – 33 %) 4 9.1 41.83 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 19.18 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 7.4 35.99 Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 40.02 High (66 – 100 %) 3 20.0 27.31 High (23 – 89%) 3 23.1 32.62 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 26 27.1 22.22 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 11 14.7 21.63 Medium (33 – 60%) 30 22.1 24.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 34 25.6 30.53 High (66 – 100 %) 19 18.4 40.62 High (23 – 89%) 30 23.6 36.08 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 8 4.2 43.86 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 11 5.2 43.99 Medium (251 – 1,500) 8 4.4 34.62 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 50.97 High (1,501 +) 29 15.8 35.90 High (50 – 2,122) 26 17.1 34.82 High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 33.40 High Low (0 – 6) 2 5.6 33.40 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 3 9.4 48.34 High (6,001+) 7 22.6 36.94 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 31.03 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 13 10.1 34.82 Unified Low (0 – 6) 8 10.3 52.82 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 24 24.5 17.35 Medium (6 – 50) 13 12.9 31.09 High (10,001+) 38 35.2 35.79 High (50 – 2,122) 54 34.6 34.19 85 AB 602: All Other Adjustments Program Description: Funds include adjustments to base funding for f ive factors: Supplement to Base, Growth, Program Specialist/Regionalized Services (PS/RS), COLA, and CAHSEE one -time funding. Supplement funding is based on the increase in local assistance from the federal government. Because that assistance is subtracted from the base entitlement, additional assistance frees up state funds that becomes a permanent increase in the base rate the following year. Growth funding is the growth in a SELPA’s ADA multiplied a statewide rate. PS/RS funding supports specialized SE LPA-wide staff. Necessary small countywide SELPAs with fewer than 15,000 ADA are funded for a minimum of 15,000 ADA. The CAHSEE funding was used for one-time purposes, including, but not limited to assist ing students with disabilities pass the CAHSEE, pu rchasing instructional materials, or support ing other one- time expenditures for individuals with exceptional needs. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs are eligible for COLA, supplement, PS/RS funding , and CAHSEE funding. Only SELPAs with increasing ADA are eligible for growth. Funding Description: All SELPAs are apportioned supplement funding based on a statewide rate. In 2007 -2008, the supplement funding was approximately $2.40 per ADA. Growth funding is based on the statewide target, which is the sta tewide average SELPA base funding in 1997-1998, adjusted for COLA. In 2007-2008, that rate is $465.4405 per ADA. PS/RS funding is based on a SELPA rate, calculated using total 1997 -1998 funding per ADA. This rate is then multiplied by COLA each year and the current year SELPA ADA. The CAHSEE money was a one-time apportionment of $52,610,000. Of the total apportionment, 75 percent was distributed to SELPAs based on a per ADA amount of $7.46 . The remaining 15 percent was used to ensure full AB 602 fundi ng. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $306,520,137. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 245,980,912. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 57 542 84 333 350 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.4 17.5 8.7 67.2 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.15, 56836.08(d), 5 6836.24(a) Funding Source: GF Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 86 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 43.29 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 37.24 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 43.98 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 50.63 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 49.91 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 46.81 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 41.50 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 39.95 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 53.63 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 48.04 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 51.03 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 51.03 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 48.72 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 49.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 51.71 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 50.55 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 51.63 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 51.36 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 44.91 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 46.32 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 40.77 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 49.22 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 47.20 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 45.73 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 46.90 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 44.22 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 36.08 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 46.83 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 49.84 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 48.52 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 47.77 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 46.20 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 47.01 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 52.55 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 51.82 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 50.83 87 Low Incidence Support Services Funding Program Description: Funds support the purchase of specialized books, materials, and equipment as required by the IEP for each pupil with low incidence disabilities . These disabilities, as defined in the Education Code , include hearing impairments, v ision impairments, and/or severe orthopedic impairme nts. Expenditures are limited to supporting low incidence specialized services such as interpreters, note takers, readers, transcribers, and others who provide specialized services to students with low incidence disabilities. Eligibility Criteria: SELPAs that serve students with low incidence disabilities, as defined above, are eligible for funding. Funding Description: All SELPAs receive base funding plus a per pupil supplement. In 2007 -2008, SELPAs th at serve 25 or fewer students who have low incidence disabilities r eceived base funding of $2,000, plus $29.85 per student . SELPAs serving 26 or more students who have low incidence disabilities r eceived base funding of $5,000, plus $29.85 per pupil. Ten percent of the total funding is reserved for additional grants for “sparse” SELPAs. SELPAs that serve 25 or fewer students with low incidence disabilities are eligible to apply for additional funding to serve those students . T hese sparse SELPA grant f unds are not entitlements, and funding amounts may vary from year to year. Special Considerations: This program was federally funded until 2005 -2006. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,680,162. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $1,7000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 56 542 84 332 350 0 Percent of total funding (%) 10.9 17.7 8.8 60.4 2.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56026.5, 56836.22 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 88 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 0.25 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 0.30 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 0.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 0.24 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 0.24 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 0.28 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 0.35 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 0.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 0.26 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 0.23 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 0.23 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 0.24 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 74 98.7 0.29 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 0.27 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 0.25 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 0.24 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 0.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 0.50 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 0.59 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 0.37 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 0.27 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 0.24 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 0.23 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 0.70 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 0.46 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 0.27 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 0.24 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 0.25 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 0.24 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 0.54 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 0.74 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 0.29 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 0.23 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 0.23 89 Special Education Mandate Settlement Program Description: Funds apportioned to school districts to satisfy two rulings of the Commission on State Mandates cases regarding special education services. The cases are Riverside County Superintendent of Schools, et al., CSM -3986 and the Long Beach Unified School District, CSM -3986A. The total settlement has been divided into ten annual installments of $25 million; the final apportionment will occur in 2010 -2011. Eligibility Criteria: School districts are eligible to receive mandate settlement funds if they were part of the second P rincipal Apportionment for the 1999 -2000 fiscal year. Funding Description: The funding rate was determined by dividing $25 million by the tot al ADA, for all pupils in kindergarten through grade twelve in all school districts for the second P rincipal Apportionment for the 1999-2000 fiscal year. This count excludes attendance for ROCPs, adult education, and programs operated by COEs. Each school district's allocation equals this per pupil amount of approximately $4.51 times the district's ADA for the second principal apportionment for the 1999-2000 fiscal year. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005-2006 is $25,000,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $25,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 557 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 20.4 8.8 70.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56836.157 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 90 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 4.19 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 4.44 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 4.55 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 4.24 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 4.49 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 4.51 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 4.10 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 4.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 3.75 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 3.96 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 3.93 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 3.83 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 4.24 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 4.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 4.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 4.21 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 4.51 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.49 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 5.72 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 4.95 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 4.58 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 4.28 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4.37 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 4.43 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 4.40 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 4.30 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 4.14 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 3.98 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 3.88 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 3.84 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 4.61 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 4.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 4.35 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 4.27 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 4.37 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 4.38 91 Mental Health Services Program Description: Funds used to provide mental health services required by an IEP pursuant to the federal IDEA and before referring a student to a county mental health agency for services. Eligibility Criteria: All SELPAs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are apportioned to SELPAs based on an ADA rate multiplied by the total SELPA-wide ADA. In 2005-2006, that rate was $4.65690 per ADA. C onsistent with existing law, an adjustment is made for the Los Angeles Juvenile Court and Community School SELPA. Special Considerations: SB 1895 (Chapter 493, Statutes of 2004) clarified and provided accountability for mental health funding in the 2004 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $27,900,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $31,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 4.3 18.4 8.9 66.3 2.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56331, 56836.06- .07 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority : Budget Act 92 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 4.41 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 4.18 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 4.34 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 4.42 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 4.50 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 4.51 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 4.39 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 4.13 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 4.51 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 4.47 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 4.44 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 4.60 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 4.54 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 4.31 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 4.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 4.52 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 4.66 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.64 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with fun ding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 3.93 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 3.85 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 4.06 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 4.28 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4.49 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 4.51 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 3.63 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 3.85 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 4.18 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 4.43 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 4.54 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 4.58 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 3.96 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 3.68 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 4.41 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 4.26 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 4.63 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 4.64 93 Personnel Development Programs Program Description: Funds provided to SELPAs for staff development, based on the requirements of IDEA and NCLB. SELPAs have discretion as to what type of personnel development is funded as described in their local plans. However, local in-service progr ams must include a parent training component. They may also include a staff training component and a special education teacher component for special education service personnel and paraprofessionals, consistent with state certification and licensing requir ements. Funds may be used to provide training in alternative dispute resolution and the local mediation of disputes. All programs must include evaluation components. Eligibility Criteria: Only SELPAs with approved local plans are eligible. Funding Descri ption: The 2005-06 allocation is based on the number of students, ages six through twenty -one years, on an IEP. Each SELPA will receive a base amount of $5,000, plus a per pupil amount of $3.11 . Special Considerations: This program was federally funded un til 2005-2006. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,500,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $2,500,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 557 86 335 351 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.3 18.4 9.0 64.2 2.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56058-56059, 56195.7, 56241 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 94 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 186 100.0 0.40 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 217 100.0 0.43 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 0.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 154 100.0 0.39 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 0.39 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 0.39 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 0.40 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 0.44 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 0.41 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 0.40 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 0.36 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 0.38 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 0.40 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 0.43 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 0.42 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 0.40 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 0.38 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 0.39 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 191 100.0 0.46 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 212 100.0 0.47 Medium (251 – 1,500) 182 100.0 0.44 Medium (6 – 50) 193 100.0 0.42 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 0.39 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 0.39 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 0.50 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 0.48 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 0.42 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 0.40 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 0.40 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 0.39 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 0.46 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 0.59 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 0.42 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 0.42 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 0.39 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 0.39 95 R egional Occupational Center/Program (R OCP) Handicapped Program Description: Funds provided to ROCPs for students who are deaf or visually or orthopedically impaired. See the ROCP program page for more information about ROCPs. Eligibility Criteria: School districts or COEs that participate or op erate a ROCP and provides services to visually impaired, deaf, or orthopedically impaired students are eligible for funding. Funding Description: LEAs receive the lesser of their expenditures or a funding amount based on a per ADA rate for students with d isabilities. In 2007 -2008, the rates per ADA are $6,199 for visually impaired, $3,549 for deaf, and $1,964 for orthopedically impaired students. Funding is allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,281,573. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $5,279,810. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 13 0 5 15 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 10.4 0.0 9.4 80.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41881, 52314.5, 52315 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 96 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 2 4.5 1.54 High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 3 11.1 3.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 7.7 1.25 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 5.31 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 8 8.3 0.45 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 0.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 3.7 1.33 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 6.0 0.80 High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.9 3.60 High (23 – 89%) 6 4.7 3.31 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 st udents per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 1 3.1 1.92 High (6,001+) 5 16.1 2.93 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 3.07 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 3 3.1 0.59 Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (10,001+) 12 11.1 2.83 High (50 – 2,122) 15 9.6 2.77 97 Worka bility Program Description: Funds support comprehensive pre-employment training, employment placement and follow -up for high school studen ts in special education making the transition from school to work, independent living, and post secondary education or training. The competitively awarded grants are used to fund the excess cost of the program and complement other mandated programs, such as the vocational education Job Training Partnership Act. This program currently funds 22,000 students at 50 sites. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs must have an approved Workability I renewal application on file with CDE. Funding is for approved renewal grantees and for districts, COEs, SELPAs , ROCPs , and NPSs to provide services for special education students with IEPs. Funding Description: Funding is calculati ng by adding a base amount, a per pupil amount, and a per pupil adjustment for students with severe disabilities. This funding is then adjusted for COLA. In 2005 -2006 the base amount was $15,000 and the severe disability supplement was $50. Special C onsiderations: This program was federally funded until 2005 -2006. The Workability data does not differentiate between SELPA administrative units and COEs and districts. Therefore, we were only able to allocate ROCP Workability funding to member districts; it is unclear how all other funding to LEAs is allocated. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $38,626,987. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $39,600,685. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 42 0 45 163 0 57 Percent of total funding (%) 17.1 0.0 20.8 53.9 0.0 8.3 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 56470- 56474 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 98 Targeted Programs The programs described in this section provide direct revenue to specific instructional uses or to specific groups of students. In the former category are the supplemental instruction programs that support after -school tutoring and other interventions for struggling students. In the latter category are programs like Economic Impact Aid that direct resources to schools with many economically disadvantaged students. 99 Advanced Placement (AP) Test Fee Reimbursement Program Description: Funds pay AP test fees for low-income students. Upon teacher recommendation, a low-income student who has previously taken an AP class but not the exam may also be eligible to participate. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with low -income students who are enrolled in an AP class and plan to take the end -of-co urse AP exam are eligible to participate in the program. Funding Description: Subject to fund availability, the CDE will reimburse districts for specified costs of AP test fees paid to the College Board on behalf of eligible students. LEAs are reimbursed $48 for each exam for students whose family income does not exceed 150 percent of the poverty income level, and $70 for each exam for a student whose family income exceed s 150 percent, but does not exceed 200 percent of the poverty income level. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,626,990. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $4,901,146, of which $1,793,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 2 18 55 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 1.1 14.9 83.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52240-52244 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 100 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.0 1.18 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.1 1.18 High Low (0 – 33 %) 6 13.6 0.49 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 0.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 8 29.6 1.49 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 7.7 1.53 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 6.13 High (23 – 89%) 6 46.2 5.12 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 14 14.6 0.29 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 7 9.3 0.14 Medium (33 – 60%) 17 12.5 0.77 Medium (6 – 23%) 19 14.3 0.49 High (66 – 100 %) 24 23.3 1.18 High (23 – 89%) 29 22.8 1.16 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 1.18 High (50 – 2,122) 2 1.3 1.18 High Low (0 – 1,500) 5 19.2 2.72 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 1.48 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 1.18 Medium (6 – 50) 7 21.9 1.36 High (6,001+) 5 16.1 2.56 High (50 – 2,122) 3 16.7 3.26 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 11 8.5 1.18 Unified Low (0 – 6) 4 5.1 0.60 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 21 21.4 0.72 Medium (6 – 50) 17 16.8 0.68 High (10,001+) 23 21.3 1.01 High (50 – 2,122) 34 21.8 1.01 101 After School Education and Safety (ASES) Program Description: Fun ds support the establishment of local after school education and enrichment programs. These programs are created through partnerships between schools and local community resources to provide literacy. The ASES Program is the result of the 2002 voter approved initiative, Proposition 49. This proposi tion expand ed and renamed the former Before and After School Learning and Safe Neighborhood Partnerships Program. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs and public agencies requesting to establish before and after school programs at public elementary, middle, and junior high schools are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Grants range from $50,000 to $75,000,000. Special Considerations: Pursuant to Education Code 8483.5, the ASES program, including regional technical assistance, is continuously appropriat ed up to $550,000,000 per year. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $108,579,270. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 539,966,370. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 35 0 66 2 7 Percent of total funding (%) 31.1 11.7 0.0 50.9 0.3 6.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8482-8484.6 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Statute 102 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 3 1.4 154.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 12 7.4 47.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 1.9 42.22 High (66 – 100 %) 23 11.1 60.48 High (23 – 89%) 29 15.6 56.11 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 11 11.5 17.87 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 37.99 Medium (33 – 60%) 35 25.7 28.42 Medium (6 – 23%) 31 23.3 21.17 High (66 – 100 %) 20 19.4 31.96 High (23 – 89%) 31 24.4 32.72 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 419.54 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 4 1.9 240.95 Medium (251 – 1,500) 6 3.3 171.65 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 57.68 High (1,501 +) 28 15.2 54.58 High (50 – 2,122) 23 15.1 55.70 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 8 6.2 89.39 Unified Low (0 – 6) 7 9.0 36.47 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 19 19.4 29.08 Medium (6 – 50) 14 13.9 50.05 High (10,001+) 39 36.1 28.65 High (50 – 2,122) 45 28.8 27.93 103 C alifornia High School Exit Exam (C AHSEE) Intensive Instruction and Services Program Description: Funds support servic es for students who have failed one or both parts of the CAHSEE . These services may individual or small group instruction ; hiring of additional teachers ; purchasing, scoring, and revie wing diagnostic assessments; counseling; designing instruction to meet specific needs of eligible pupils; teacher training to meet th e needs of eligible pupils; instruction in English-language arts and/ or mathematics , as needed by the eligible pupils t o pass those sections of the CAHSEE; and the provision of instruction and services by a public or nonpublic entity, as determined by the LEA . As a condition of receiving funds, each LE A must meet certain obligations. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with students in the current year junior and senior classes who have failed one or both parts of the CAHSEE are eligible for services. Funding may go to any LEA with eligible students, including COEs, districts, and charter schools. Funding Description: In 2007-2008, LEAs received up to $520 per eligible pupil. E ligible students are the number of students in a district in grades eleven and twelve who have not yet passed one or both parts of the CAHSEE. This information is provided by LEAs to CDE via an online form. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted ex penditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $19,797,200. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $72,752,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 37 3 62 196 41 3 Percent of total funding (%) 14.5 0.1 16.6 59.3 7.9 1.6 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37254 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 104 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 1 0.5 7.35 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 2 0.9 3.16 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 0.6 0.69 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 0.5 1.61 High (23 – 89%) 1 0.5 1.61 High Low (0 – 33 %) 29 65.9 4.98 High Low (0 – 6%) 22 64.7 6.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 85.2 7.87 Medium (6 – 23%) 29 74.4 6.57 High (66 – 100 %) 10 66.7 16.55 High (23 – 89%) 11 84.6 10.06 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 44 45.8 1.35 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 25 33.3 2.18 Medium (33 – 60%) 89 65.4 3.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 84 63.2 2.59 High (66 – 100 %) 63 61.2 4.40 High (23 – 89%) 87 68.5 3.98 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 1 0.5 1.61 Medium (6 – 50) 2 1.0 5.32 High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 3.16 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 0.69 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 10.71 High Low (0 – 6) 27 75.0 7.73 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 21 72.4 9.18 Medium (6 – 50) 21 65.6 8.29 High (6,001+) 26 83.9 7.27 High (50 – 2,122) 14 77.8 7.12 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 48 37.2 4.17 Unified Low (0 – 6) 28 35.9 3.30 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 58 59.2 3.48 Medium (6 – 50) 62 61.4 4.33 High (10,001+) 90 83.3 3.45 High (50 – 2,122) 106 67.9 3.35 105 California School Age Families Education (CalSAFE) Program Description: Funds provide academic, support, and child care services for expectant and parenting students who have not yet earned their high school diploma or its equivalent. Children of enrolled student parents are eligible for child care and development services u ntil the child reaches five years of age or is enrolled in kindergarten, whichever occurs first. Academic services consist of self-contained classrooms in COEs for student parents. This program combined and replaced the Pregnant Minors Program (PMP), the School Age Parenting and Infant Development Program (SAPID), and the Pregnant and Lactating Students Program (PALS). Eligibility Criteria: To receive funding, LEAs must have operated one of PMP, SAPID, or PALS as of October 1, 1999. New LEAs that demo nstrate an unmet need of services to expectant and parenting students may apply and become eligible for funding. Funding Description: CalSAFE funds four different types of programs. COEs operating the old Pregnant Minors Program in self -contained classr ooms receive their 1998 -1999 level of per ADA funding. The program ADA is capped. Academic services for new self -contained programs in COEs or for growth in ADA in old programs are funded at $5,742 per ADA in 2005-2006. In 2005-2006, support services we re funded at $2,530 per ADA, and child care services were funded by a complicated formula that includes the enrollment, attendance, and age of the child. Special Considerations: The following tables include funding for support and child care services; s elf-contained classroom funding appears in the county office revenue limits funding model. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $61,884,720. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $58,173,000, including self -contained classrooms. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 16 0 34 92 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 5.6 0.0 27.1 67.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 54740-54749.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 106 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 19 43.2 26.86 High Low (0 – 6%) 7 20.6 27.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 26.62 Medium (6 – 23%) 20 51.3 26.15 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 33.69 High (23 – 89%) 7 53.8 33.00 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 22 22.9 10.76 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 17.90 Medium (33 – 60%) 45 33.1 10.38 Medium (6 – 23%) 46 34.6 9.63 High (66 – 100 %) 25 24.3 6.44 High (23 – 89%) 42 33.1 7.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 66.10 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 35.62 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 12 41.4 37.38 Medium (6 – 50) 16 50.0 34.36 High (6,001+) 18 58.1 25.10 High (50 – 2,122) 10 55.6 20.37 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 2 1.6 24.13 Unified Low (0 – 6) 2 2.6 20.46 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 31 31.6 16.67 Medium (6 – 50) 26 25.7 14.67 High (10,001+) 59 54.6 7.53 High (50 – 2,122) 64 41.0 7.60 107 Community Day School Additional Funding Program Description: Funds provide for additional hours of instruction in community day schools. Community day schools serve students who have been expelled for non -statutory reasons, are habitually truant, or are otherwise deemed at high risk. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs that operate a community day school and offer instruction for longer than 4 hours are eligible. Charter schools are ineligible. Funding Description: Allocation is bas ed on fifth and sixth hour ADA and seventh and eighth hour pupil hours . District operated community day schools are funded $ 4,954.49 per ADA in the fifth and sixth hours. COE operated community day schools are funded at $ 3,759. 51 per ADA in the fifth an d sixth hour s. The hourly rate for the seventh and eighth hours of attendance is $ 4.74. Funds are allocated in the Principal Apportionment. School districts with less than 2,501 ADA may apply for a waiver to receive funding not to exceed the amount for t he necessary small high school formula for up to one teacher . This was $92,200 in 2005- 2006. Special Considerations: LEAs receive revenue limit funding for students in community day schools for 4 hours per day. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $51,599,357. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $51,999,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 16 79 42 140 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 34.1 12.5 11.0 42.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 48660- 48667 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 108 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 14 7.5 35.49 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 39 18.0 81.21 Medium (33 – 60%) 28 17.2 40.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 18 11.7 28.91 High (66 – 100 %) 37 17.8 24.93 High (23 – 89%) 22 11.8 15.13 High Low (0 – 33 %) 18 40.9 14.90 High Low (0 – 6%) 17 50.0 42.03 Medium (33 – 60%) 16 59.3 21.48 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 43.6 16.86 High (66 – 100 %) 8 53.3 21.97 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 14.72 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 27 28.1 8.80 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 29 38.7 66.31 Medium (33 – 60%) 61 44.9 13.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 54 40.6 11.20 High (66 – 100 %) 52 50.5 8.07 High (23 – 89%) 57 44.9 7.30 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 10 5.2 523.94 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 26 12.3 148.52 Medium (251 – 1,500) 41 22.5 109.32 Medium (6 – 50) 35 18.1 70.78 High (1,501 +) 28 15.2 13.78 High (50 – 2,122) 18 11.8 10.53 High Low (0 – 1,500) 14 53.8 126.38 High Low (0 – 6) 19 52.8 48.30 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 11 37.9 24.53 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 18.97 High (6,001+) 17 54.8 14.22 High (50 – 2,122) 8 44.4 12.61 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 61 47.3 84.70 Unified Low (0 – 6) 40 51.3 106.40 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 28 28.6 11.75 Medium (6 – 50) 39 38.6 21.37 High (10,001+) 51 47.2 6.57 High (50 – 2,122) 61 39.1 6.38 109 Economic Impact Ai d (EIA) Program Description: Funds sup port additional prog rams and services for English learners (ELs) and compensatory educ ation services for economically disadvantaged students. Use of supplemental EIA funds for ELs at the school level is administered through the Single School Plan as approved by the School Site Council and the local governing board. Typical examples include the purchase of supplemental materials and expenses that support paraprofessionals, supplemental resource teachers, and the operation of EL advisory committees. Applicable school advisory committees, such as the English Learner Advisory Committee, must also review and provide advice in the development of the Single School Plan as well as modifications to the plan. Eligibility Criteria: EIA funding is open to all districts that request pa rticipation using Part I of the annual Consolidated Application. COEs are ineligible. Charter schools’ EIA funding is part of the charter school categorical block g rant. Funding Description: Districts receive a per pupil rate multiplied by the number or EL students and Title I Formula children. Funding is then adjusted by a weighted concentration factor. In 2005 -2006 the minimum per pupil rate was equal to $244. The minimum district funding was $5,231 for districts with ten or fewer students, and $7, 852 for districts with more than ten eligible students. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $586,735,064. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $994,279,000 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 555 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 20.8 6.0 73.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 54000-54028 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 110 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 184 98.9 32.93 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 216 99.5 27.40 Medium (33 – 60%) 163 100.0 82.26 Medium (6 – 23%) 153 99.4 55.13 High (66 – 100 %) 208 100.0 164.12 High (23 – 89%) 186 100.0 152.39 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 39.70 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 17.87 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 75.88 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 57.91 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 122.81 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 104.94 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 35.53 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 22.42 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 81.82 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 54.90 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 162.56 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 148.23 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 190 99.5 108.08 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 211 99.5 92.43 Medium (251 – 1,500) 181 99.5 81.99 Medium (6 – 50) 192 99.5 87.60 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 108.16 High (50 – 2,122) 152 100.0 111.38 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 56.12 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 38.09 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 43.99 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 60.56 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 67.00 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 69.58 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 89.26 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 79.00 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 69.33 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 94.64 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 113.76 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 108.79 111 English Language Acquisition Progra m (ELAP) Program Description: Funds support services to assist English learners (EL) in grades four through eight to learn English. Funds may be used to provide intersession, before and afte r school, or summer school instruction. They may also be used for centers, tutors, mentors, special materials, or any other supplemental activity that meets the objectives of ELAP. ELAP was established by AB 1116 (Chapter 71, Statutes of 1999). Please se e the ELAP website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Any school district or COE that enrolled one or more English learners in grades four through eight in the prior school year is eligible to apply for funds. Charter schools that do not receive funding through the charter school categorical block grant m ay also apply. Funding Description: LEAs receive $100 per EL student. This award is made contingent upon the avai lability of funds. If insufficient funding is available, schools with the highest proportion of English learners are given priority. Special Considerations: A second component of ELAP provides a one-time allocation of $100 per EL reclassified to English-fluent status. However, f unding is contingent on an appropriation for this purpose, and has historically not been available. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $57,719,599. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $63,600,000 . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 12 282 13 278 59 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 24.0 2.5 72.2 1.1 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 400-410 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 112 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 73 39.2 5.14 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 39 18.0 1.74 Medium (33 – 60%) 77 47.2 11.24 Medium (6 – 23%) 91 59.1 6.13 High (66 – 100 %) 132 63.5 19.82 High (23 – 89%) 152 81.7 19.12 High Low (0 – 33 %) 6 13.6 4.52 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 2.01 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 18.5 10.01 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 20.5 4.43 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 11.09 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 11.63 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 79 82.3 3.97 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 34 45.3 1.16 Medium (33 – 60%) 113 83.1 8.04 Medium (6 – 23%) 122 91.7 5.23 High (66 – 100 %) 86 83.5 15.74 High (23 – 89%) 122 96.1 14.69 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 33 17.3 10.98 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 52 24.5 13.37 Medium (251 – 1,500) 98 53.8 12.00 Medium (6 – 50) 104 53.9 13.17 High (1,501 +) 151 82.1 14.22 High (50 – 2,122) 126 82.9 14.26 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 0.15 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 3 10.3 3.83 Medium (6 – 50) 8 25.0 6.09 High (6,001+) 10 32.3 8.44 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 10.05 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 81 62.8 10.00 Unified Low (0 – 6) 41 52.6 6.12 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 90 91.8 7.06 Medium (6 – 50) 90 89.1 10.21 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 11.13 High (50 – 2,122) 147 94.2 10.66 113 Foster Youth Services (FYS) Program Description: Funds provide educational and support services to foster children. FYS programs establish appropriate placements and coordinate instruction, counseling, tutoring, mentoring, vocational training, emancipation services, training for independent living, and other related services. There are three distinct program components: core district FYS, countywide FYS, and juvenile detention FYS. Core district FYS programs provide services for foster youths attending school in the respective school dist ricts. Countywide FYS programs collaborate with LEAs and other providers to provide services for foster youths living in licensed foster homes . Juvenile detention FYS programs provide services for youths placed in county -operated juvenile detention facilities . The juvenile detention programs started in 2006-2007. Eligibility Criteria: Core FYS districts specified in Education Code Section 42920, COEs or consorti a of COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding for all FYS is based on the Budget Act. Countywide FYS funding is allocated based on the current year count of probation supervised foster children and child welfare supervised foster children. Juvenile detention FYS funding is allocated on a per pupil basis according to the prior year count in the Juvenile Detention Survey, with the assumption that 20 percent of all juvenile detention students are foster children. Special Considerations: Within countywide FYS, El Dorado and Alpine COEs form a consortium, as does Amador and San Jo aquin COEs. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $9,495,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $18,983,490. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 52 0 0 5 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 82.5 0.0 0.0 17.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42920-42925 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 114 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 2 2.1 9.47 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 1 0.7 5.75 Medium (6 – 23%) 3 2.3 7.91 High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.9 9.47 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.6 9.47 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (10,001+) 5 4.6 8.39 High (50 – 2,122) 5 3.2 8.39 115 Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) Program Description: Funds suppor t enrichment activities for high -achieving and underachieving students who are identified as gifted and talented. Special efforts must be made to include students from economically disadvantaged an d varying cultural ba ckgrounds. Programs may consist of special day classes, part -time groupings, and cluster groupings. GATE curricular components may include independent study, acceleration, postsecondary education, and enrichment. For all programs for GATE pupils, includin g those programs for pupils with high creative capability and talents in the performing and visual arts, each participating LEA shall concentrate part of its curriculum on providing GATE pupils with an academic component and, where appropriate, with instru ction in basic skills. Eligibility Criteria: Eligible LEAs may submit applications to CDE, which are reviewed and, if they meet the criteria identified by law, are approved by SBE . Applications may be approved for one, two, three, or five years. Charter schools are ineligible to apply. Funding Description: The funding rate is calculated by dividing the total available current year funding by state-wide prior year K -12 ADA in districts participating in GATE in the current year. That rate is then multip lied by the LEA’s prior year ADA. No district can receive less per ADA than the amount it received per ADA in the 1999-2000. Districts with fewer than 1,500 ADA cannot receive less than the greater of $2,500 or the amount received in 1998 -1999. Funds are allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $50,490,981. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $49,186,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 413 73 307 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 22.3 9.2 68.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52200- 52212 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 116 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 145 78.0 10.90 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 165 76.0 15.38 Medium (33 – 60%) 121 74.2 10.80 Medium (6 – 23%) 108 70.1 9.87 High (66 – 100 %) 147 70.7 9.51 High (23 – 89%) 140 75.3 9.14 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 8.54 High Low (0 – 6%) 27 79.4 9.28 Medium (33 – 60%) 21 77.8 8.44 Medium (6 – 23%) 34 87.2 8.38 High (66 – 100 %) 13 86.7 8.86 High (23 – 89%) 12 92.3 8.39 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 91 94.8 8.46 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 64 85.3 9.25 Medium (33 – 60%) 126 92.6 8.62 Medium (6 – 23%) 125 94.0 8.50 High (66 – 100 %) 90 87.4 8.70 High (23 – 89%) 118 92.9 8.62 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 96 50.3 64.73 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 118 55.7 32.46 Medium (251 – 1,500) 141 77.5 22.09 Medium (6 – 50) 151 78.2 12.89 High (1,501 +) 176 95.7 8.55 High (50 – 2,122) 144 94.7 8.70 High Low (0 – 1,500) 15 57.7 20.00 High Low (0 – 6) 26 72.2 10.66 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 27 93.1 8.34 Medium (6 – 50) 29 90.6 8.38 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 8.27 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 8.28 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 104 80.6 11.44 Unified Low (0 – 6) 59 75.6 13.19 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 95 96.9 8.37 Medium (6 – 50) 95 94.1 8.48 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 8.53 High (50 – 2,122) 153 98.1 8.53 117 High Priority Schools Grant Program (HPSGP) Program Description: Funds support additional resources t argeted at raising student performance in the lowest performing schools in the state . The program has funded two cohorts of schools in decile ranks one through five of the API, with priority given to schools with the lowest API scores. More information about HPSGP is available here. Eligibility Criteria: Fundin g is for existing grantees o nly. Schools ranked in deciles one through five on the 2005 base API that have not previously received funds from the HPSGP, II/USP, or Cohorts one through three of the Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) program were eligible to apply to Cohort 2. Fundin g Description: Grants are awarded on a three -year cycle. Grantees are funded at $400 per pupil using either 2000 - 2001 or 2005-2006 CBEDS enrollment, depending on the cohort year. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expend iture flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act; however, program funding expires starting in 2009 -2010. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $179,675,707. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $31,209,000, though unexpended fund s from previous years may be available. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 85 20 129 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 12.8 4.3 82.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52055.6 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 118 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 5 2.7 21.48 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 10 4.6 395.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 10 6.1 20.92 Medium (6 – 23%) 9 5.8 14.43 High (66 – 100 %) 70 33.7 63.03 High (23 – 89%) 66 35.5 58.61 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9 20.5 20.10 High Low (0 – 6%) 8 23.5 14.80 Medium (33 – 60%) 6 22.2 32.65 Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 20.18 High (66 – 100 %) 5 33.3 146.75 High (23 – 89%) 7 53.8 66.46 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 10 10.4 4.78 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 10 13.3 28.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 58 42.6 19.90 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 29.3 12.88 High (66 – 100 %) 61 59.2 80.98 High (23 – 89%) 80 63.0 69.51 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 stu dents per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 14 7.3 560.36 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 18 8.5 249.67 Medium (251 – 1,500) 17 9.3 149.47 Medium (6 – 50) 26 13.5 91.33 High (1,501 +) 54 29.3 50.44 High (50 – 2,122) 41 27.0 46.60 High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 89.66 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 32.16 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 7 24.1 14.64 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 41.59 High (6,001+) 9 29.0 43.72 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 42.25 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 31 24.0 78.75 Unified Low (0 – 6) 21 26.9 65.06 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 38 38.8 30.02 Medium (6 – 50) 40 39.6 37.28 High (10,001+) 60 55.6 59.09 High (50 – 2,122) 68 43.6 59.13 119 Immediate Intervention for Underperforming Schools Program (II/USP) Program Description: Funds support the development and implementation of an Action Plan designed to improve academic achievement, particularly in reading/language arts and mat hematics, in underperforming schools. The Action Plan identifies barriers to pupil achievement and proposes solutions, foc using on criteria adopted by SBE . The grant supported three cohorts starting in 2000 -2001. Funding for the program appears to have e nded in 2004 -2005, though deferred funding from 2002-2003 may have been allocated in 2005- 2006. The program was established by California's Public Schools Accountability Act of 1999 (Chapter 3, Statutes of 1999) . Please see the II/USP website for more information. II/USP schools have two years to make API growth targets to exit the program. Schools that fail to exit the program become state -monitored. The state-monitored portion of this program continues to be funded. Please see the State -Monitored School Program page for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Funding is for existing grantees only. Funding Description: Each of the 2001 -2002 II/USP schools was eligible to receive a $ 50,000 one-year planning grant to develop the II/USP Action Plan. After Action Plans were reviewed and approved by CDE, additional funds were awarded for implementing the Action Plan. The 2005-2006 funds represent a 20 percent reduction of 2002-2003 awards. In 2005 -2006 schools were awarded either $200 or $400 per pupil using 2000-2001 CBEDS enrollment. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $7,191,800. No funding was available for II/USP in 2007 - 2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 32 12 54 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 19.5 16.8 63.7 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52053-52055.22 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 120 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 11.02 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 3.1 5.30 Medium (6 – 23%) 6 3.9 7.61 High (66 – 100 %) 27 13.0 5.72 High (23 – 89%) 25 13.4 5.17 High Low (0 – 33 %) 4 9.1 5.57 High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 4 14.8 8.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 9 23.1 8.95 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 24.23 High (23 – 89%) 3 23.1 9.56 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 5 5.2 2.56 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 2.34 Medium (33 – 60%) 24 17.6 3.24 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 12.8 3.73 High (66 – 100 %) 25 24.3 2.37 High (23 – 89%) 36 28.3 2.37 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 43.42 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 2 0.9 41.22 Medium (251 – 1,500) 2 1.1 18.36 Medium (6 – 50) 7 3.6 13.39 High (1,501 +) 29 15.8 5.54 High (50 – 2,122) 23 15.1 5.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 34.82 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 25.96 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 21.23 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 7.69 High (6,001+) 7 22.6 8.23 High (50 – 2,122) 1 5.6 9.40 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 5 3.9 11.90 Unified Low (0 – 6) 4 5.1 4.22 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 11 11.2 4.88 Medium (6 – 50) 13 12.9 4.48 High (10,001+) 38 35.2 2.46 High (50 – 2,122) 37 23.7 2.46 121 International Baccalaureate (IB) Program Description: Funds support the Internationa l Baccalaureate (IB) program in middle and high schools . The IB program is a t wo-year comprehensive and rigorous pre-university curriculum. Funding can be used to cover ongoing costs of professional development required by the program and subsidize fees for exams for eligible students. Eligibility Criteria: Public high schools an d middle schools that offer the IB Diploma Program and the IB Middle Years Program are eligible. Priority is given to hig h schools with high percentages of students from low -income families and high schools that have been awarded affiliate status from the International B accalaureate Organization . Funding Description: Each high school or middle school that offers the IB Program can receive up to $25,000 to cover ongoing costs of professional development required by the program. If funds are insufficient to fully fund all grants authorized, annual grants must first be allocated to those schools that were funded in the prior year and in the amount of the prior year's grant. Special Considerations: The federal IB Exam Fee Reimbursement program may support the payment of student exam fees for the IB program. Funds for this program were available in 2004 -2005 and 2006-2007 from Title I, Subpart G. LEAs are reimbursed $58 for each exam for students whose family income does not exceed 150 percent of the federal poverty income level or for students who qualify for FRPL. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,141,480. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $ 1,280,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 12 28 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 33.1 63.6 3.3 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52920-52922 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 122 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 7 15.9 2.07 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 6.10 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 18.5 1.33 Medium (6 – 23%) 9 23.1 1.72 High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 1.32 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 12 12.5 1.26 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 6.88 Medium (33 – 60%) 10 7.4 1.20 Medium (6 – 23%) 12 9.0 0.93 High (66 – 100 %) 6 5.8 0.26 High (23 – 89%) 12 9.4 0.56 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 6.10 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 1 3.4 6.10 Medium (6 – 50) 5 15.6 1.67 High (6,001+) 11 35.5 1.59 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 1.56 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 3 2.3 10.24 Unified Low (0 – 6) 1 1.3 18.33 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 3.47 Medium (6 – 50) 1 1.0 1.77 High (10,001+) 24 22.2 0.71 High (50 – 2,122) 26 16.7 0.76 123 Nell Soto Parent Involvement Program Description: Funds support visits by teachers to the homes of their students or participation by teachers in monthly community meetings. Priority is given to low -performing schools . In 2005-2006, t he grants pa id teachers for home visits and provided resources for tra ining in conducting home visits and related community meetings. The funds may be used to defray other costs a ssociated with implementing the program. Eligibility Criteria: At least 50 percent of teachers employed at the school have voluntarily agreed to participate in either home visits or community meetings . Only LEAs tha t did not receive funding from R ounds One through Four are eligible for Round Five . Funding Description: Funding is allocated based on the number of enrolled students, ranging from $15,000 for schools with fewer than 500 students to $35,000 for schools with 1,500 or more students. Special Considerations: The Nell Soto program has gone through several iterations from its original establishment in 1999 through AB 33 (Chapter 734, Statutes of 1999) . In 2006-2007, AB 1802 (Chapter 79, Statu tes of 2006) funded the parent involvement portion through one- time funding of $15 million. It is unclear whether the funding attributed to 2005- 2006 supports actual Nell Soto activities from 2005 - 2006, since the program was not operational that year. Fi ve districts received funding in 2005-2006 totaling just $226,414. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $226,414. No funding is available for this program in 2007 - 2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 1 0 4 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 6.7 0.0 93.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 51120- 51124 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 124 Pupil Retention Block Grant (PRBG) Program Description: Funds support programs that target pupils requiring additional assistance to succeed in school. The Pup il Retention Block Grant (PRBG) was created AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004), which combined a number of existing programs. These programs include the Elementary School Intensive Reading, Intensive Algebra Instruction Academies, Continuation High School Foundation, High Risk Youth Education and Public Safety, Tenth Grade Counseling, District Opportunity Classes and Programs, Dropout Prevention and Recovery, Earl y Intervention for School Success, and At -Risk Youth for Los Angeles Unified School District . Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs that received funding in 2004-2005 are eligible for funding. The only exception is for new continuation high schools that are approved for foundation program funding. Charter schools receive PRBG funding through the charter school c ategorical block grant. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs receive the statewide proportion received in 2003 -2004 for the programs combined into the PRBG . This amount was adjusted for changes in program participation by school dist ricts in 2004-2005. In subsequent years, LEAs receive the 2005-2006 level of funding adjusted by the annual rate of growth in statewide ADA and COLA . New continuation high schools approved for foundation funding will generate additional funds. The apportionment is made contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 B udget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $86,957,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $101,754,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 43 86 328 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 15.3 6.4 16.1 62.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41505- 45108 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 125 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 7 3.8 1.23 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 6 2.8 6.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 6.7 7.92 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 5.2 3.15 High (66 – 100 %) 25 12.0 25.50 High (23 – 89%) 29 15.6 22.20 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 25.46 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 37.57 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 20.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 22.66 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 42.23 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 21.75 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 11.90 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 69 92.0 26.77 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 97.1 14.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 11.92 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 13.20 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 12.94 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 263.72 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 3 1.4 150.16 Medium (251 – 1,500) 7 3.8 60.48 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 22.40 High (1,501 +) 35 19.0 18.24 High (50 – 2,122) 32 21.1 18.25 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 97.10 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 78.46 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 37.04 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 20.59 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 19.31 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 17.76 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 122 94.6 61.93 Unified Low (0 – 6) 73 93.6 81.01 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 19.49 Medium (6 – 50) 99 98.0 22.29 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 9.89 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 10.31 126 Refugee Children Supplemental Assistance Program Program Description: Funds support efforts to he lp refugee students perform at grade level. The program is available to LEAs within eight specific counties. Through the grants, LEAs provide programs designed to help refugee children improve their English fluency and make progress toward grade-level pro ficiency. Such programs may include instruction in English as a second language; after -school tutorials, activities, and clubs; cognitive enrichment programs; parental outreach programs; and interpreter services. Eligibility Criteria: Only current grantees are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The funding comes to CDE through an interagency agreement with DSS. Grants are awarded to ten LEAs for five years, with a maximum grant of $150,000 in 2005-2006 and $164, 900 in 2007-2008. Special Cons iderations: The Refugee School Impact Grant was awarded to the DSS by the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. While the funding source is federal, this program’s funding counts toward the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,309,865. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 1,649,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 2 8 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 17.5 82.5 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: F, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 127 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 1 2.3 6.45 High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 1 2.6 6.45 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 6.26 High (23 – 89%) 1 7.7 6.26 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 3 3.1 4.39 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 2 1.5 6.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 4 3.0 4.80 High (66 – 100 %) 3 2.9 0.49 High (23 – 89%) 4 3.1 0.67 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 2 6.5 6.38 High (50 – 2,122) 2 11.1 6.38 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (10,001+) 8 7.4 1.23 High (50 – 2,122) 8 5.1 1.23 128 School Community Violence Preventio n (SCVP) Program Description: Funds support school di stricts and COEs to improve school safety and prevent school violence. The School Community Violence Prevention (SCVP) Program was created as part of AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004) . It consolidates six previously existing school violence prevention programs: Safe School Planning and Partnership; School Community Policing; Gang-Risk Intervention; Safety Plans for New Schools; School Community Violence Prevention; and Conflict Resolution . SCVP provides competitive grants of up to $500,000 for a five -year period. Approximately 10 percent of the funds will be awarded to a pplications from rura l school districts . Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs with safety and violence needs unmet by federal Title IV and state SSVP funding are eligible for funding. Applicants are required to demonstrate cooperation among school staff, law enforcement agencies , student s, parents, and community members and to provide a detailed explanation of all proposed expenditures. Funding Description: Grantees a re awarded up to $500,000 over five years. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the School Safety Consolidated Competitive Grant. Of the funds appropriated in the 2005 Budget Act, none were expended during the 2005 -2006 year. How ever, t he School Safety and Violence Prevention Training program does have 2005-2006 fiscal data. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : There were no expenditures in 2005 -2006. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $15,252,064. Education Code: 41510 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 129 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Program Description: Funds support schools in providing additional portions of fresh fruit and vegetables in the School Breakfast Program (SBP). T he California Fresh Start Program (CFSP) was established by SB 281 (Chapter 236, Statutes of 2005). Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs participating in the national School Breakfast Program or State Meals Program were eligible. Funding Description: The program reimburses participating schools 10 cents for every breakfast offering an additional serving of fruit and vegetables. Special Co nsiderations: The pilot program was designed to last one year. However, the initial appropriation exceeded claims in 2005-2006, and so the program was extended. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,060,341. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is unknown. A total of $18,200,000 was appropriated in 2005-2006, with unexpended funds reapp ropriated each year thereafter until the total amount was expended, which occurred in 2007 - 2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 3 117 24 148 12 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 14.2 6.2 78.7 0.8 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49565 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 130 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 23 12.4 0.37 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 31 14.3 0.55 Medium (33 – 60%) 43 26.4 0.92 Medium (6 – 23%) 34 22.1 0.53 High (66 – 100 %) 51 24.5 1.38 High (23 – 89%) 52 28.0 1.31 High Low (0 – 33 %) 14 31.8 0.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 0.27 Medium (33 – 60%) 6 22.2 1.16 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 28.2 0.53 High (66 – 100 %) 4 26.7 0.67 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 1.62 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 42 43.8 0.29 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 18 24.0 0.53 Medium (33 – 60%) 63 46.3 0.78 Medium (6 – 23%) 67 50.4 0.53 High (66 – 100 %) 43 41.7 1.35 High (23 – 89%) 63 49.6 1.23 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 17 8.9 1.77 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 25 11.8 1.46 Medium (251 – 1,500) 36 19.8 1.14 Medium (6 – 50) 47 24.4 0.94 High (1,501 +) 64 34.8 1.01 High (50 – 2,122) 45 29.6 1.03 High Low (0 – 1,500) 5 19.2 0.90 High Low (0 – 6) 8 22.2 0.31 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 0.26 Medium (6 – 50) 7 21.9 1.04 High (6,001+) 14 45.2 0.85 High (50 – 2,122) 9 50.0 0.76 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 44 34.1 0.90 Unified Low (0 – 6) 25 32.1 0.91 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 49 50.0 0.72 Medium (6 – 50) 44 43.6 1.05 High (10,001+) 55 50.9 1.03 High (50 – 2,122) 79 50.6 0.98 131 School Nutrition : State Meal Program Program Description: Funds sup port free or reduced price meals in public schools for needy students. State law requires all public school districts and county superintendents of schools to make available, free or at a reduced price, one nutritionally adequate meal to each needy stude nt every school day. Eligibility Criteria: All LEAs with needy students are eligible for funding. Funding Description: LEAs are reimbursed at $0.2195 per pupil meal served. Special Considerations: Schools that participate in the State Meal Program may also participate in the federal National School Lunch or School Breakfast programs and receive federal reimbursement. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $89,174,853. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $104,700,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 36 473 74 331 69 836 Percent of total funding (%) 0.8 19.6 4.4 62.5 0.7 12.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49550, 49531, 49430.5 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 132 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 131 70.4 4.71 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 161 74.2 6.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 147 90.2 13.36 Medium (6 – 23%) 139 90.3 10.02 High (66 – 100 %) 195 93.8 24.16 High (23 – 89%) 173 93.0 21.23 High Low (0 – 33 %) 38 86.4 3.21 High Low (0 – 6%) 31 91.2 2.71 Medium (33 – 60%) 22 81.5 12.18 Medium (6 – 23%) 30 76.9 6.03 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 13.57 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 15.40 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 94 97.9 4.58 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 73 97.3 4.05 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 12.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 132 99.2 8.80 High (66 – 100 %) 102 99.0 19.65 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 18.03 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 133 69.6 17.77 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 162 76.4 17.69 Medium (251 – 1,500) 167 91.8 15.39 Medium (6 – 50) 174 90.2 15.22 High (1,501 +) 173 94.0 16.03 High (50 – 2,122) 137 90.1 16.13 High Low (0 – 1,500) 22 84.6 8.19 High Low (0 – 6) 32 88.9 5.47 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 26 89.7 5.27 Medium (6 – 50) 25 78.1 7.30 High (6,001+) 26 83.9 8.68 High (50 – 2,122) 17 94.4 9.12 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 125 96.9 14.81 Unified Low (0 – 6) 76 97.4 13.19 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 10.85 Medium (6 – 50) 100 99.0 14.84 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 14.27 High (50 – 2,122) 155 99.4 13.65 133 Specialized Secondary Program s (SSP) Program Description: Funds help high schools initiate advanced learning programs. The programs are expected to be a model for standards -based instruction, with an in-depth study of a targeted content area or a thematic or career focus. Eligibility Criteria: Each district may submit one SSP application for a comprehensive high school that is not currently receiving SSP funds. The proposed program must be new to the school and serve students in at least two consecutive grades, nine through twelve. Charter schools that receive the categorical block grant are not eligible to apply because these schools already receive SSP funds through the categorical block grant. For high schools that currently receive S SP funds, continued funding is contingent upon progress toward full implementation or a legislated apportionment. Funding Description: Programs receive a grant between $185,000 and $285,000 over four years, pending inclusion in the annual state budget. SSP awards are determined by the phase of program implementation. A total of $4,460,000 of SSP funds are distributed to schools currently implementing programs. An estimated $1,113,000 is available for new programs. Each new program will receive $35,000 for up to 15 planning grants; or each new program will receive $70,000 to $125,000, based on school size, for up to five implementation grants. Special Considerations: Two programs that worked in collaboration with the California State University System prior to 1991 receive a legislated apportionment. Up to 15 new SSP programs are chosen annually. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,575,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $5,573,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 2 10 31 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 7.8 24.2 68.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 58800-58806 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 134 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 6,662.96 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 0.6 47.13 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 0.5 6,662.96 High (23 – 89%) 1 0.5 47.13 High Low (0 – 33 %) 7 15.9 6.55 High Low (0 – 6%) 3 8.8 13.19 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 7.4 6.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 5 12.8 5.43 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 4.12 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 4.94 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 11 11.5 5.85 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 12.13 Medium (33 – 60%) 13 9.6 3.71 Medium (6 – 23%) 18 13.5 4.71 High (66 – 100 %) 7 6.8 0.67 High (23 – 89%) 9 7.1 0.69 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 st udents per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 6,662.96 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 1 0.5 6,662.96 Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 1 0.5 47.13 High (50 – 2,122) 1 0.7 47.13 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 35.66 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 31.02 Medium (6 – 50) 3 9.4 5.32 High (6,001+) 8 25.8 5.23 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 6.04 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 6 4.7 47.64 Unified Low (0 – 6) 5 6.4 55.90 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 6 6.1 11.73 Medium (6 – 50) 10 9.9 4.05 High (10,001+) 19 17.6 1.47 High (50 – 2,122) 16 10.3 1.45 135 State -Monitored Schools Program Program Description: Funds support further interventions for HPSGP and II/USP schools that fail to make significant API growth. One -time funding is provided to contract with a School Assistance and Int ervention Team (SAIT), which identifies critical areas for improving student achievement. Three years of funding is provided to implement corrective actions. The entry and exit criteria vary across the two programs. For more specific entry and exit crit eria, please see the HPSGP II/USP websites. Eligibility Criteria: Funding is for existing grantees only. The SBE identifies participating HPSGP and II/USP school s that do not meet growth requirements and are to be monitored by the state. These schools are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Districts are awarded one time funds for the SAIT contract. State -monitored elementary and/or middle schools receive $75,000 while high schools receive $100,000. Additionally, each state -monitored school receives $150 per pupil to implement corrective actions. HPSGP schools are funded for a minimum of three years or until a school exits the program. II/USP schools ar e funded for two years and an additional year if the school fails to exit after two years . Special Considerations: An in -kind match of services or school district funds, in an amount equal to one dollar for every two do llars provided, is required for SAIT . This is one-time funding to support the cost to contract with a SAIT. An in -kind match of services or school district funds, in an amount equal to the amount received, is required for Corrective Actions. If, within three years, state -monitored schools fail to exit the program, they move into the Secondary Sanctions program. This program involves more specific corrective actions and contracting a different SAIT. The state offers no continued or additional funding for schools in Secondary Sanctions. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act; however funding expires in 2009 -2010. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $9,411,274. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 10,000,000 for monitoring of HPSGP schools and $6,000,000 for monitoring of II/USP schools. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 2 2 19 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 2.4 3.4 94.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52050-52058 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 136 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 1 0.6 41.31 High (66 – 100 %) 2 1.0 8.05 High (23 – 89%) 1 0.5 2.52 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 106.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 1 3.7 106.51 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 97.81 High (23 – 89%) 1 7.7 97.81 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 1 1.0 12.33 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 9 6.6 13.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 4 3.0 10.71 High (66 – 100 %) 9 8.7 7.03 High (23 – 89%) 15 11.8 8.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 2 1.1 8.05 High (50 – 2,122) 2 1.3 8.05 High Low (0 – 1,500) 1 3.8 97.81 High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 1 3.4 106.51 Medium (6 – 50) 2 6.3 103.46 High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 1 0.8 740.96 Unified Low (0 – 6) 1 1.3 740.96 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 3 3.1 35.32 Medium (6 – 50) 1 1.0 45.10 High (10,001+) 15 13.9 7.89 High (50 – 2,122) 17 10.9 8.11 137 Supplemental Instruction: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE Remedial) Program Description: Funds support supplemental instruction for pupils in grades 7 -12 who are not demonstrating sufficient progress toward passing the CAHSEE. Instruction may be in mathematics, reading/language arts, and writing. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs must offer this program to eligible students. Charter schools may offer this program. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs were funded at a rate of $3.68 per pupil hour, while districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per pupil hour. There is no cap on the number of hours funded; however, when claims exceed the budget allocation, the allocation may be prorated. CAHSEE Remedial funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $212,204,742. . The total funding appropriated in 2007 - 2008 is $239,466,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 5 268 83 301 103 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 3.6 22.4 70.4 3.4 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37252, 42339 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 138 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 72 38.7 5.80 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 77 35.5 5.76 Medium (33 – 60%) 78 47.9 9.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 68 44.2 7.79 High (66 – 100 %) 118 56.7 12.04 High (23 – 89%) 123 66.1 11.74 High Low (0 – 33 %) 43 97.7 79.55 High Low (0 – 6%) 32 94.1 44.47 Medium (33 – 60%) 26 96.3 84.04 Medium (6 – 23%) 38 97.4 89.71 High (66 – 100 %) 14 93.3 115.41 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 101.52 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 89 92.7 23.97 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 57 76.0 17.64 Medium (33 – 60%) 125 91.9 28.05 Medium (6 – 23%) 127 95.5 26.73 High (66 – 100 %) 87 84.5 52.29 High (23 – 89%) 117 92.1 46.79 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 studen ts per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 39 20.4 27.12 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 66 31.1 13.31 Medium (251 – 1,500) 108 59.3 9.95 Medium (6 – 50) 109 56.5 10.31 High (1,501 +) 121 65.8 9.82 High (50 – 2,122) 93 61.2 9.71 High Low (0 – 1,500) 23 88.5 52.81 High Low (0 – 6) 33 91.7 55.44 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 65.61 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 89.04 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 90.38 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 87.40 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 102 79.1 27.09 Unified Low (0 – 6) 57 73.1 20.52 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 93 94.9 29.23 Medium (6 – 50) 93 92.1 31.90 High (10,001+) 106 98.1 39.68 High (50 – 2,122) 151 96.8 38.98 139 Supplemental Instruction: Core Academic Program Program Description: Funds support additional extracurricular academic instruction in any core academic subject, includ ing ESL, for students in grades K -12. Eligibility Criteria: Any LEA offering the program, including charter schools, may apply. Should claims surpass the budget allocation, a proration factor may be applied to ensure that all eligible LEAs receive fundi ng. Funding Description: The program has a cap on funded hours, calculated by multiplying 120 hours by 5 percent of the prior year’s K -12 enrollment. In 2004-2005, LEAs were funded at $3.68 per capped ADA, while districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per hour for up to 1,500 hours of instruction. Core Academic Program funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $92,802,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $101,384,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 432 81 313 117 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 20.8 10.8 67.2 1.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: Funding Authority: Education Code: 37253, 42239 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 140 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 139 74.7 15.55 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 143 65.9 16.46 Medium (33 – 60%) 131 80.4 17.25 Medium (6 – 23%) 124 80.5 16.58 High (66 – 100 %) 162 77.9 18.57 High (23 – 89%) 165 88.7 17.98 High Low (0 – 33 %) 39 88.6 17.72 High Low (0 – 6%) 29 85.3 15.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 18.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 18.19 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 16.80 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 19.19 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 92 95.8 17.46 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 63 84.0 16.83 Medium (33 – 60%) 129 94.9 17.46 Medium (6 – 23%) 129 97.0 18.01 High (66 – 100 %) 92 89.3 13.27 High (23 – 89%) 121 95.3 13.93 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (% ) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 99 51.8 39.25 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 121 57.1 23.39 Medium (251 – 1,500) 157 86.3 17.79 Medium (6 – 50) 163 84.5 17.24 High (1,501 +) 176 95.7 17.03 High (50 – 2,122) 148 97.4 17.10 High Low (0 – 1,500) 22 84.6 18.63 High Low (0 – 6) 31 86.1 16.90 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 17.16 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 17.23 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 18.16 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 18.86 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 110 85.3 18.40 Unified Low (0 – 6) 65 83.3 17.75 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 97 99.0 15.72 Medium (6 – 50) 98 97.0 17.82 High (10,001+) 106 98.1 15.45 High (50 – 2,122) 150 96.2 15.21 141 Supplemental Instruction: Low STAR Program Description: Funds support s upplemental instruction for students in grades 2 -6 who have been identified as being deficient in mathematics, reading, or writing based on Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) scores or are at risk of being retained. Eligibility Criteria: L EAs, incl uding charter schools, that offer the program are eligible for funding. Funding Description: In 2007-2008, LEAs were funded at $3.68 per pupil hour. Districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per pupil hour, up to 1,500 hours. Funded ho urs are capped, calculated by multiplying 120 hours by 5 percent of prior year K -12 enrollment. Should claims exceed budget allocation, the allocation may be prorated. Funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $20,224,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $22,101,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 307 0 239 48 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 32.5 0.0 66.5 0.9 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37252.8, 42239 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 142 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 91 48.9 6.23 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 77 35.5 5.58 Medium (33 – 60%) 90 55.2 6.53 Medium (6 – 23%) 91 59.1 6.64 High (66 – 100 %) 126 60.6 7.65 High (23 – 89%) 139 74.7 7.42 High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 68 70.8 3.61 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 45 60.0 3.50 Medium (33 – 60%) 99 72.8 4.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 99 74.4 4.61 High (66 – 100 %) 72 69.9 5.59 High (23 – 89%) 95 74.8 5.11 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with fun ding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 47 24.6 8.06 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 68 32.1 7.76 Medium (251 – 1,500) 115 63.2 7.81 Medium (6 – 50) 124 64.2 7.40 High (1,501 +) 145 78.8 6.94 High (50 – 2,122) 115 75.7 6.89 High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 82 63.6 5.02 Unified Low (0 – 6) 43 55.1 5.02 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 70 71.4 4.12 Medium (6 – 50) 76 75.2 5.00 High (10,001+) 87 80.6 4.90 High (50 – 2,122) 120 76.9 4.75 143 Supplemental Instruction: Retained and Recommended for Retention Program Description: Funds support additional instruction to students in grades 2 through 9 who have been recommended for retention or who have been retained. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs must offer this program to eligible students. Charter schools may offer this program. LE A policy provides the criteria to determine retention guidelines. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs were funded at a rate of $3.68 per pupil hour, while districts with fewer than 500 students were funded at $5.25 per pupil hour. There is no cap on the number of hours funded; however, when claims exceed the budget allocation, the allocation is prorated. This program’s funding is allocated through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $56,819,746. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $57,838,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 244 13 233 42 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 14.7 1.5 81.9 1.7 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 37252.2, 42239 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 144 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 72 38.7 5.43 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 72 33.2 6.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 74 45.4 8.85 Medium (6 – 23%) 60 39.0 6.29 High (66 – 100 %) 98 47.1 13.92 High (23 – 89%) 112 60.2 13.12 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9 20.5 3.30 High Low (0 – 6%) 3 8.8 2.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 3 11.1 9.45 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 20.5 8.16 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 2.11 High (23 – 89%) 2 15.4 3.73 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 59 61.5 8.25 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 34 45.3 3.33 Medium (33 – 60%) 98 72.1 8.67 Medium (6 – 23%) 99 74.4 9.11 High (66 – 100 %) 76 73.8 18.19 High (23 – 89%) 100 78.7 16.11 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 34 17.8 32.55 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 57 26.9 14.81 Medium (251 – 1,500) 91 50.0 15.95 Medium (6 – 50) 90 46.6 12.90 High (1,501 +) 119 64.7 9.69 High (50 – 2,122) 97 63.8 9.58 High Low (0 – 1,500) 1 3.8 4.89 High Low (0 – 6) 2 5.6 7.10 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 3 10.3 6.06 Medium (6 – 50) 6 18.8 9.83 High (6,001+) 9 29.0 6.15 High (50 – 2,122) 5 27.8 3.54 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 69 53.5 12.65 Unified Low (0 – 6) 41 52.6 10.72 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 74 75.5 10.81 Medium (6 – 50) 74 73.3 13.95 High (10,001+) 90 83.3 13.61 High (50 – 2,122) 118 75.6 13.17 145 Targeted Instruction Improvement Block Grant (TIIBG) Program Description: Funds support services provided under two previous programs: Targeted Instructional Improvement (TIIG) and Supplemental Grants (SG). SG was designed equalize categorical funding among districts, by providing aid to districts with less than the statewide average sum of revenue limits and a limited number of categorical programs. TIIG funded court -ordered desegregation and voluntary integration programs. After court -ordered desegregation obligations are met, TIIBG funding may be used on the programs or comb ination of programs listed in SG and TIIG. The two programs were combined in AB 825 (Chapter 871, Statutes of 2004). Eligibility Criteria: Districts must have been participating in the SG, TIIG, or both in 2003 -2004. Santa Clara and San Mateo COEs recei ve funding as part of the Tinsley court-ordered desegregation program for oversight and administration. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, district funding was calculated on the relative statewide proportion of funding received in 2003-2004. After 2005-2006, districts receive their 2005 -2006 level of funding adjusted for district revenue limit COLA and statewide ADA growth. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $976,279,984. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,075,731,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 2 285 54 204 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 7.5 4.1 88.4 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41540- 41543 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 146 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 97 52.2 60.78 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 98 45.2 54.73 Medium (33 – 60%) 84 51.5 96.99 Medium (6 – 23%) 85 55.2 63.62 High (66 – 100 %) 104 50.0 87.16 High (23 – 89%) 102 54.8 96.67 High Low (0 – 33 %) 28 63.6 83.49 High Low (0 – 6%) 17 50.0 47.17 Medium (33 – 60%) 17 63.0 51.04 Medium (6 – 23%) 28 71.8 78.79 High (66 – 100 %) 9 60.0 227.05 High (23 – 89%) 9 69.2 118.65 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 62 64.6 57.54 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 26 34.7 54.66 Medium (33 – 60%) 80 58.8 130.55 Medium (6 – 23%) 90 67.7 59.92 High (66 – 100 %) 62 60.2 409.82 High (23 – 89%) 88 69.3 365.27 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 82 42.9 70.58 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 86 40.6 55.03 Medium (251 – 1,500) 69 37.9 105.81 Medium (6 – 50) 93 48.2 80.10 High (1,501 +) 134 72.8 81.50 High (50 – 2,122) 106 69.7 84.18 High Low (0 – 1,500) 9 34.6 58.67 High Low (0 – 6) 14 38.9 27.89 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 16 55.2 49.98 Medium (6 – 50) 24 75.0 48.53 High (6,001+) 29 93.5 91.07 High (50 – 2,122) 16 88.9 124.18 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 46 35.7 55.35 Unified Low (0 – 6) 19 24.4 61.59 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 63 64.3 61.35 Medium (6 – 50) 64 63.4 36.22 High (10,001+) 95 88.0 276.68 High (50 – 2,122) 121 77.6 277.11 147 Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs The programs described in this section support professional development for teachers and administrators as well as some administrative costs related to staff and teachers. Many of these programs reimburse or provide incentive funding to districts or teachers and administrators for attending professional development. Regional programs or programs operated by the California Commission on Teaching Credentialing (CTC) are not included. Those can be found in the Teacher Support and Professional Development Programs section of the Statewide/Regional Support Services category toward the back of this manual. 148 Chief Business Officer (CBO) Training Program Program Description: Funds training of school business officers by providers approved by the state. Training and instruction must include the areas of school finance, sch ool operations, and leadership. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs are eligible to receive incentive funding to send their CBOs or CBO candidates to training given by state -qualified training providers. Priority is given to eligible CBOs and CBO training candidates from LEAs that are currently operating with a state -appointed administrator or trustee, or from LEAs that have received a negative or qualified budget certification within the past five fiscal years. Funding Description: Funds provide $3,000 per eligible training candidate for up to 350 candidates per year. The first 50 percent will be allocated upon approval of the application; the second 50 percent will be allocated upon completion of the training. Special Considerations: In 2005-2006, $1,050,000 was reappropriated from the Proposition 98 reversion account to pilot the CBO Training Program. However, the program did not become operational until 2006 -2007 and the 2005-2006 funding was reappropriated to FY06. We, therefore, do not consider the program funded in 2005-2006. The program was intended to last three years and the 2008 -2009 funding is largely funding applicants on the waiting list from 2006 -2007. Applicants must provide a provision of assurance by the LEA that the eligible training candidate has committed to provide no less than two years of continuous service to a state public school following completion of the training. Level of Funding : There were no expenditures in 2005 -2006. This program was not funded in 2007 -2008. The 2008-2009 funding is $1,000,000. Education Code: 44518- 44519.2 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 149 Math and Reading Professional Development Program Description: Funds training programs for teachers who have completed professional development in mathematics and reading/language arts . The program was established by AB 466 (Chapter 737, Statutes of 2001) and extended by SB 472 (Chapter 524, Statutes of 2006). Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with kindergarten through grade twelve teachers who provide instruction in mathematics and /or reading/language art are eligible. Additionally, teachers must hold an elementary multiple-subject or special education credential or single -subject credential in mathematics, science, English, or social science. The training must be conducted by a California Professional Development Institute approved by the Univer sity of California or a provider approved by the SBE . Funding Description: LEAs are reimbursed $1,250 for 40 hours training and $1,250 for 80 hours training , for a total of $2,500 for 120 hours of training. Special Considerations: This program is scheduled to end on July 1, 2012, unless repealed or extended by January 1, 2013. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $31,727,500. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 31,728,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 108 20 113 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.8 22.1 2.3 68.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44579.5, 99230-99242 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 150 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 20 10.8 9.55 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 22 10.1 13.31 Medium (33 – 60%) 34 20.9 8.06 Medium (6 – 23%) 35 22.7 10.87 High (66 – 100 %) 54 26.0 17.46 High (23 – 89%) 51 27.4 15.06 High Low (0 – 33 %) 8 18.2 4.65 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 4.07 Medium (33 – 60%) 9 33.3 2.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 11 28.2 3.48 High (66 – 100 %) 3 20.0 5.67 High (23 – 89%) 4 30.8 3.02 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 20 20.8 6.28 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 11 14.7 5.23 Medium (33 – 60%) 51 37.5 9.79 Medium (6 – 23%) 44 33.1 8.84 High (66 – 100 %) 42 40.8 12.13 High (23 – 89%) 58 45.7 11.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 19 9.9 29.70 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 20 9.4 16.82 Medium (251 – 1,500) 18 9.9 25.94 Medium (6 – 50) 43 22.3 17.06 High (1,501 +) 71 38.6 13.50 High (50 – 2,122) 45 29.6 13.06 High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 4.19 High Low (0 – 6) 6 16.7 6.02 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 6.15 Medium (6 – 50) 8 25.0 4.43 High (6,001+) 10 32.3 2.92 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 2.51 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 31 24.0 17.24 Unified Low (0 – 6) 19 24.4 9.28 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 32 32.7 11.66 Medium (6 – 50) 42 41.6 14.07 High (10,001+) 50 46.3 10.35 High (50 – 2,122) 52 33.3 10.08 151 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Incentive Award Program Description: Funds provide incentive grants to LEAs for teachers who have attained certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and are assigned to teach in high -priority schools. Eligibility Criteria: Only National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) who are assigned to teach in California's high -priority public or charter schools, kindergarten through grade twelve, are eligible. The LEAs are required to certify the NBCTs eligibility. This is a one -time $20,000 award (paid in $5,000 annual installments) for NBCTs who agree t o teach at least 50 percent of a full-time position in high- priority schools for four consecutive years. “High-priority” is defined as a school with an Academic Performance Index (API) statewide rank of 5 or lower. “Assigned to teach” may include a teacher leadership role such as peer coach or other teacher support provider as long as the position does not require an administrative credential. Funding Description: Eligible teachers generate $5,000 per year for four consecutive years . Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $5,640,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 45 24 91 8 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.4 11.9 8.0 77.3 2.3 0.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44395 Funding Source: State GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 152 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 3 1.6 1.60 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 36.67 Medium (33 – 60%) 13 8.0 2.07 Medium (6 – 23%) 10 6.5 1.47 High (66 – 100 %) 29 13.9 1.68 High (23 – 89%) 34 18.3 1.84 High Low (0 – 33 %) 8 18.2 1.97 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 24.86 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 1.02 Medium (6 – 23%) 15 38.5 1.55 High (66 – 100 %) 5 33.3 1.61 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 1.05 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 0.31 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 1.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 45 33.1 1.11 Medium (6 – 23%) 38 28.6 0.64 High (66 – 100 %) 31 30.1 2.24 High (23 – 89%) 52 40.9 2.03 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 36.67 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 1 0.5 36.67 Medium (251 – 1,500) 1 0.5 3.81 Medium (6 – 50) 8 4.1 2.83 High (1,501 +) 43 23.4 1.77 High (50 – 2,122) 36 23.7 1.69 High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 13.25 High Low (0 – 6) 2 5.6 13.25 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 3 10.3 1.90 Medium (6 – 50) 12 37.5 1.86 High (6,001+) 19 61.3 1.33 High (50 – 2,122) 10 55.6 1.03 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 9 7.0 4.30 Unified Low (0 – 6) 5 6.4 2.73 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 18 18.4 1.10 Medium (6 – 50) 19 18.8 0.94 High (10,001+) 64 59.3 1.68 High (50 – 2,122) 67 42.9 1.72 153 Peer Assistance and Revie w (PAR) Program Description: Funds support activities to assist experienced teachers who need help developing their s ubject matter knowledge, teaching strategies, or both. Participants are teachers who have received an unsatisfactory evaluation or have been referred to the program. Teachers may al so request participation. After the needs of referred teachers have been met, funds can be used to support other professional development activities listed in Education Code Section 44506(b). Eligibility Criteria: Only districts, COEs, and district -wide charter schools that certified participation in the PAR as of fiscal year 2001-2002 are eligible for funding. Funding Description: An LEA is entitled to PAR funding equal to a teacher count multiplied by a funding rate. The count is 5 percent of the LEA’s certified classroom teachers in the prior year. The rate in 2005 -2006 was either $1,739 or $1,368 depending on when the LEA entered the program. LEAs with fewer than five certified employees are funded by a different formula. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $26,470,816. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 28,935,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 57 534 86 335 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.8 21.2 8.6 68.4 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44500-44508 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 154 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 179 96.2 4.92 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 205 94.5 5.58 Medium (33 – 60%) 156 95.7 5.02 Medium (6 – 23%) 147 95.5 4.80 High (66 – 100 %) 199 95.7 4.75 High (23 – 89%) 182 97.8 4.72 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 4.21 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 4.50 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 3.88 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 3.97 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 3.95 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 3.91 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 4.32 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 4.73 Medium (33 – 60%) 136 100.0 4.51 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 4.32 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 4.55 High (23 – 89%) 127 100.0 4.56 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 172 90.1 13.19 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 192 90.6 8.22 Medium (251 – 1,500) 178 97.8 6.00 Medium (6 – 50) 191 99.0 5.16 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 4.58 High (50 – 2,122) 151 99.3 4.60 High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 5.62 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 4.67 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 4.39 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 3.99 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 3.91 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 3.97 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 129 100.0 5.50 Unified Low (0 – 6) 78 100.0 5.83 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 4.46 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 4.44 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 4.43 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 4.45 155 Principal Training Program Program Description: Funds support professional development for principals. Eligibility Criteria: Principals at school sites that receive funding for Reading First, High Priority School, or the School Assistance Intervention Team (SAID) programs are required to participate in Principal Training. Only providers approved by SBE may provide the training. Funding Description: Each recipient's total award is $3,000. Funding is disbursed in three installments, based upon completion of certain parts of the program. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the Administrator Training Program. For every $3,000 an LEA receives, it must provide $1,000 in matching funds . The federal funds associated with this program are provided for that purpose. This program is one of the pro grams granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,181,700. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,554,000, of which $5,000,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 22 65 20 98 2 0 Percent of total funding (%) 17.1 16.1 6.9 59.7 0.2 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 44510- 44517 Funding Source: F & GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 156 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 15 8.1 0.56 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 9 4.1 0.84 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 6.7 0.47 Medium (6 – 23%) 16 10.4 0.45 High (66 – 100 %) 39 18.8 0.51 High (23 – 89%) 40 21.5 0.50 High Low (0 – 33 %) 8 18.2 0.32 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 0.77 Medium (33 – 60%) 6 22.2 0.24 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 20.5 0.37 High (66 – 100 %) 6 40.0 0.85 High (23 – 89%) 7 53.8 0.35 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 22 22.9 0.36 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 9 12.0 0.48 Medium (33 – 60%) 45 33.1 0.43 Medium (6 – 23%) 40 30.1 0.48 High (66 – 100 %) 31 30.1 0.26 High (23 – 89%) 49 38.6 0.26 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 4 2.1 18.01 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 7 3.3 2.95 Medium (251 – 1,500) 16 8.8 2.36 Medium (6 – 50) 24 12.4 1.13 High (1,501 +) 45 24.5 0.44 High (50 – 2,122) 34 22.4 0.38 High Low (0 – 1,500) 3 11.5 1.96 High Low (0 – 6) 4 11.1 1.47 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 5 17.2 0.58 Medium (6 – 50) 10 31.3 0.43 High (6,001+) 12 38.7 0.35 High (50 – 2,122) 6 33.3 0.29 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 18 14.0 1.55 Unified Low (0 – 6) 8 10.3 1.32 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 24 24.5 0.51 Medium (6 – 50) 28 27.7 0.56 High (10,001+) 56 51.9 0.29 High (50 – 2,122) 62 39.7 0.29 157 Professional Development Block Grant (PDBG) Program Description: Funds support professional development for teachers. The Professional Development Block Grant (PDBG) combined funding for three separate professional development programs: Instructional Time and Staff Development Reform (ITSDR), Teaching as a Priority Bl ock Grant (TAP), and Intersegmental Staff Development Programs (ISDP). Eligibility Criteria: LEAs must have participated TSDR, TAP, or ISDP in the 2003 -2004. Charter schools receive PDBG funding through the charter school categorical block grant. Fundin g Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs receive the same statewide proportion received in 2003 -04 for the ITSDR, TAP, and ISDP programs. In subsequent years, LEAs will receive their pr ior year level of funding adjusted annually by the rate of growth in statewid e ADA and COLA. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $249,320,959. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 274,718,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 52 519 85 334 1 0 Percent of total funding (%) 1.9 20.1 8.2 69.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41530-41532 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 158 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 176 94.6 46.34 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 200 92.2 49.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 150 92.0 45.61 Medium (6 – 23%) 143 92.9 44.04 High (66 – 100 %) 193 92.8 40.76 High (23 – 89%) 176 94.6 41.80 High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 37.63 High Low (0 – 6%) 33 97.1 41.72 Medium (33 – 60%) 26 96.3 34.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 33.39 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 36.93 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 40.03 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 96 100.0 43.36 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 75 100.0 48.27 Medium (33 – 60%) 135 99.3 42.60 Medium (6 – 23%) 133 100.0 40.62 High (66 – 100 %) 103 100.0 43.16 High (23 – 89%) 126 99.2 44.02 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 159 83.2 61.04 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 179 84.4 51.02 Medium (251 – 1,500) 176 96.7 49.41 Medium (6 – 50) 189 97.9 43.41 High (1,501 +) 184 100.0 42.64 High (50 – 2,122) 151 99.3 43.26 High Low (0 – 1,500) 25 96.2 50.70 High Low (0 – 6) 35 97.2 42.69 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 40.80 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 35.38 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 34.94 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 36.13 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 128 99.2 49.97 Unified Low (0 – 6) 77 98.7 51.98 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 43.74 Medium (6 – 50) 101 100.0 41.12 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 42.55 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 43.10 159 Reader Services for Legally Blind Teachers Program Description: Funds employ readers for certificated classroom teachers who are legally blind. Eligibility Criteria: The certificated classroo m teacher must be legally blind. Only LEAs and state special schools are eligible. Funding Description: LEAs submit a reimbursement claim to CDE that includes the hours (maximum of 15 per school week) and the hourly rate, excluding benefits, and the to tal annual salary for the readers. LEAs are then reimbursed from the Reader Employment Fund, contingent upon allocation to CDE from the State Budget. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,073,584. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $404,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 13 25 134 0 2 Percent of total funding (%) 5.7 13.3 6.5 70.6 0.0 3.9 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 45370, 45371, 45372 Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 160 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 4 2.2 3.29 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 3 1.4 3.41 Medium (33 – 60%) 5 3.1 3.81 Medium (6 – 23%) 4 2.6 1.87 High (66 – 100 %) 4 1.9 0.65 High (23 – 89%) 6 3.2 1.38 High Low (0 – 33 %) 15 34.1 0.34 High Low (0 – 6%) 9 26.5 0.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 8 29.6 0.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 10 25.6 0.19 High (66 – 100 %) 2 13.3 0.11 High (23 – 89%) 6 46.2 0.44 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 36 37.5 0.33 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 18 24.0 0.32 Medium (33 – 60%) 57 41.9 0.35 Medium (6 – 23%) 59 44.4 0.39 High (66 – 100 %) 41 39.8 0.25 High (23 – 89%) 57 44.9 0.25 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 2 1.0 83.30 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 3 1.4 66.74 Medium (251 – 1,500) 2 1.1 36.62 Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 9 4.9 1.23 High (50 – 2,122) 10 6.6 1.38 High Low (0 – 1,500) 5 19.2 0.32 High Low (0 – 6) 7 19.4 0.22 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 10 34.5 0.60 Medium (6 – 50) 11 34.4 0.29 High (6,001+) 10 32.3 0.30 High (50 – 2,122) 7 38.9 0.39 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 39 30.2 0.47 Unified Low (0 – 6) 20 25.6 0.34 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 37 37.8 0.28 Medium (6 – 50) 38 37.6 0.21 High (10,001+) 58 53.7 0.30 High (50 – 2,122) 76 48.7 0.31 161 Teacher Dismissal Apportionment Program Description: Funds support reasonable hearing expenses for employees who are dismissed. Reasonable expenses may include payment s or obligations incurred for travel, meals, and lodging, the cost of substitute(s), t he cost of an administrative law judge, and attorney’s fees. Eligibility Criteria: Districts with dismissed or suspended teachers pursuant to Education Code 44930 and subsequent sections are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The apportionment is calculated by the Controller’s Office calculates the apportionment and paid by CDE . Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amoun t expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $48,000. Education Code: 44944 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 162 Teacher Recruitment and Retention Program Program Description: Funds support improvements in the educational culture and environment of qualifying schools. These efforts focus on recruiting and retaining highly skilled principals and highly qualified teachers as defined under NCLB. This may include assuring a safe , clean school enviro nment for teaching and learning, providing support ser vices for students and teachers, and providing time for teachers and principals to collaborate for the purpose of improving student academic outcomes . The funds may also be used for differential compensation and small group instruction. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs with school s ranked in deciles one through three on t he 2004 base API are eligible. Funding Description: LEAs are funded based on prior year enrollment in eligible schools. In 2005 -2006, LEAs received up to $50 per pupil. Special Considerations: The 2005-2006 funding comes from the Prop osition 98 reversio n account. Funding is uncertain for future years. The 2006-2007 funding was considered one time pursuant to AB 1802 (Chapter 79, Statutes of 2006) . Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $43,886,643. No funding was provided in 2007 -2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 6 126 29 155 15 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.3 17.2 7.4 74.7 0.5 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 163 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 2 1.1 1.22 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 12 5.5 11.06 Medium (33 – 60%) 23 14.1 6.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 15 9.7 7.31 High (66 – 100 %) 102 49.0 15.70 High (23 – 89%) 100 53.8 14.22 High Low (0 – 33 %) 9 20.5 3.87 High Low (0 – 6%) 4 11.8 2.52 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 14.01 Medium (6 – 23%) 17 43.6 8.67 High (66 – 100 %) 9 60.0 16.53 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 16.31 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 2.55 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 9 12.0 4.15 Medium (33 – 60%) 71 52.2 6.64 Medium (6 – 23%) 55 41.4 4.28 High (66 – 100 %) 69 67.0 15.55 High (23 – 89%) 91 71.7 14.13 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 17 8.9 24.09 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 24 11.3 17.12 Medium (251 – 1,500) 29 15.9 16.72 Medium (6 – 50) 40 20.7 15.14 High (1,501 +) 81 44.0 13.02 High (50 – 2,122) 63 41.4 12.73 High Low (0 – 1,500) 4 15.4 25.67 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 9.43 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 9 31.0 6.50 Medium (6 – 50) 15 46.9 9.41 High (6,001+) 16 51.6 11.15 High (50 – 2,122) 9 50.0 11.91 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 39 30.2 14.72 Unified Low (0 – 6) 17 21.8 13.66 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 40 40.8 9.98 Medium (6 – 50) 53 52.5 11.44 High (10,001+) 76 70.4 11.13 High (50 – 2,122) 85 54.5 11.04 164 Vocational Programs Programs described in this section support career technical education for K -12 students. Adult educ ation programs are not included , though some of the programs included may also serve adults ; programs primarily serving adults can be found in the Adult Education section. 165 Agricultural Vocational Education Incentive Grants Program Description: Funds support programs that provide education and training for agricultural vocations. Eligibility Criteria: The LEA must be o perating an approved program. ROCPs are not eligible for funds. However, ROCP classes that are an i ntegral part of a school’s program may be counted toward funding. Funding Description: Funding to eligible schools is based on the size of the agriculture staff, s tudents enrolled in the program, and the compliance of the school site in meeting the Quality Criteria as verified and approved by the C DE Regional Supervisor of Agricultural Education. Special Considerations: Matching funds are required from non -salaried agricultural expenditures. Under certain conditions, a matching fund waiver may be obtained from the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $4,688,207. The total funding appropriated in 20 07-2008 is $ 5,201,000 COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 61 167 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 36.2 63.8 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52460 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 166 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 29 65.9 4.74 High Low (0 – 6%) 25 73.5 9.00 Medium (33 – 60%) 22 81.5 5.61 Medium (6 – 23%) 28 71.8 5.30 High (66 – 100 %) 10 66.7 11.86 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 3.75 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 23 24.0 1.50 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 23 30.7 9.79 Medium (33 – 60%) 81 59.6 2.12 Medium (6 – 23%) 65 48.9 1.77 High (66 – 100 %) 63 61.2 1.04 High (23 – 89%) 79 62.2 1.09 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 23 88.5 22.73 High Low (0 – 6) 34 94.4 12.85 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 23 79.3 7.69 Medium (6 – 50) 23 71.9 4.26 High (6,001+) 15 48.4 3.58 High (50 – 2,122) 4 22.2 3.85 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 80 62.0 11.14 Unified Low (0 – 6) 48 61.5 11.44 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 42 42.9 3.10 Medium (6 – 50) 78 77.2 3.34 High (10,001+) 45 41.7 0.62 High (50 – 2,122) 41 26.3 0.55 167 Apprenticeship Program Description: Funds support supplementary instruction in loc al adult education and ROCP programs that have apprenticeship programs. In these programs, students learn a trade by working for a program sponsor. The sponsors pay wages and benefits to their apprentices during their training period. ROCPs and adult education programs provide additional instruction to support these apprenticeships. F unding is based on number of hours of instruction provided, subject to LEA -specific caps. Eligibility Criteria: School districts and COEs that particip ate in an approved apprenticeship program are eligible for funding. Charter schools are ineligible. Funding Description: Apprenticeship programs are funded on the lesser of actual or approved hours. In 2005 -2006, the hourly rate was $4.86. If an appren ticeship program operates for more hours than its approved amount, the excess hours may be funded at a lower rate if sufficient funds are available. Apprenticeship funding is allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Level of Fu nding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $17,187,259. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $18,990,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 0 6 23 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 21.9 0.0 11.0 67.1 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8152 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 168 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 3 6.8 25.22 High Low (0 – 6%) 1 2.9 0.68 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 7.4 12.08 Medium (6 – 23%) 2 5.1 30.88 High (66 – 100 %) 1 6.7 19.05 High (23 – 89%) 3 23.1 13.16 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 7 7.3 18.98 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 2 2.7 99.12 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 8.1 24.14 Medium (6 – 23%) 8 6.0 5.74 High (66 – 100 %) 5 4.9 5.58 High (23 – 89%) 13 10.2 9.20 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 1 2.8 0.68 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 2 6.9 16.15 Medium (6 – 50) 2 6.3 30.88 High (6,001+) 4 12.9 16.56 High (50 – 2,122) 3 16.7 13.16 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 5 5.1 27.83 Medium (6 – 50) 1 1.0 7.41 High (10,001+) 18 16.7 9.55 High (50 – 2,122) 22 14.1 10.16 169 California Partnership Academies (CPA) Program Description: Funds support California Partnership Academies within comprehensive high schools. Academies integrate academic and career technical education to focus on particular careers. Please see the CPA website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only districts with comprehensive high schools are eligible to apply. Funding is l imited to applicants that have programs following the CPA model . Funding Description: CPA grant awards are determined by the program implementation level or academy student enrollment and range from $42,000 to $81,000. Most of the funding is distributed to school currently operating CPAs. Special Considerations: Le vel of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $21,018,600. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 23,490,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 28 74 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 29.4 70.6 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 54690-54696 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 170 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 11 25.0 18.35 High Low (0 – 6%) 5 14.7 18.34 Medium (33 – 60%) 11 40.7 19.95 Medium (6 – 23%) 15 38.5 23.67 High (66 – 100 %) 6 40.0 21.96 High (23 – 89%) 8 61.5 14.21 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 15 15.6 6.49 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 1 1.3 25.79 Medium (33 – 60%) 38 27.9 8.19 Medium (6 – 23%) 37 27.8 8.49 High (66 – 100 %) 21 20.4 5.47 High (23 – 89%) 36 28.3 5.50 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 2 7.7 79.00 High Low (0 – 6) 5 13.9 32.25 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 8 27.6 36.07 Medium (6 – 50) 12 37.5 19.43 High (6,001+) 18 58.1 17.67 High (50 – 2,122) 11 61.1 18.72 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 5 3.9 38.77 Unified Low (0 – 6) 3 3.8 28.39 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 17 17.3 12.87 Medium (6 – 50) 17 16.8 11.28 High (10,001+) 52 48.1 5.94 High (50 – 2,122) 54 34.6 5.93 171 Regional Occupational Center/Program (ROCP) Program Description: Funds support Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROCPs) that provide career and technical education to adults and high school students 16 years of age and older. ROCPs also work in conjunction with CalWORKs to provide job training and secure employment for CalWORKs adults. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs that operate and participate in an ROCP are eligible for funding. COEs, districts, and charter school s that are part of a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) are eligible for direct funding based on a per ADA share of the total JPA ROCP funding. Funding Description: Funding is based on three revenue limits for participating ADA: a base revenue limit that exclud es CalWORKS ADA, a CalWORKS revenue limit, and an excess growth revenue limit. Excess growth is funded if the ROCP appropriation permits. COEs with excess taxes after calculating the county revenue must apply those taxes to offset state aid for the ROCP operated by the county, if any. If sufficient funding is unavailable, existing funding may be prorated. Funds are allocated in the Principal Apportionment to the administrative entity for non JPA ROCPs or to all members of a JPA. Special Consideratio ns: ROCP funding includes some funding for CalWORKs ADA, which may be serving non K-12 students. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $454,530,899. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $485,656,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 86 323 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 28.8 71.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52335-52335.6 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 172 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 44 100.0 232.33 High Low (0 – 6%) 34 100.0 276.70 Medium (33 – 60%) 27 100.0 237.40 Medium (6 – 23%) 39 100.0 216.60 High (66 – 100 %) 15 100.0 227.45 High (23 – 89%) 13 100.0 244.68 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 93 96.9 87.38 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 67 89.3 91.51 Medium (33 – 60%) 132 97.1 87.22 Medium (6 – 23%) 131 98.5 84.63 High (66 – 100 %) 98 95.1 71.05 High (23 – 89%) 125 98.4 76.03 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 26 100.0 461.55 High Low (0 – 6) 36 100.0 342.22 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 29 100.0 258.62 Medium (6 – 50) 32 100.0 212.39 High (6,001+) 31 100.0 218.83 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 229.89 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 117 90.7 119.72 Unified Low (0 – 6) 69 88.5 125.57 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 98 100.0 95.57 Medium (6 – 50) 98 97.0 83.42 High (10,001+) 108 100.0 75.42 High (50 – 2,122) 156 100.0 78.47 173 County Offices of Education Unrestricted Revenues County offices of education (COEs) have three basic functions. The first is to oversee the school districts in their county. An important part of this function is to approve the budgets adopted by districts. The second function is to provide to small districts services that larger districts typically provide themselves. These services include specialized instruc tion, health and attendance records, and guidance counseling. The third function is the schools and classes operated by COEs. These schools and classes serve special student populations such as student s in juvenile detention, students expelled from regular districts, and other students who may not be well served by regular districts. These functions are supported by a revenue limit system that is similar to that of school districts. A revenue limit entitlement for each COE is calculated based on the number of students served and a rate per student. This entitlement is met through local property taxes and state aid, just as in the case of school districts. COE revenue limits are more complicated than school district revenue limits, however, because CO Es have separate revenue limits for each of their core functions. Each limit has its own rates and ADA definitions. Furthermore, the revenue limit for special schools and classes is, in turn, composed of separate revenue limit calculations for each type of school. COEs may also offer schools and classes for special education students. These schools and classes are financed through a transfer of revenue limit funds from the districts in which students reside. In addition to these basic calculations, a COE’s revenue limit entitlement is adjusted for a number of other factors. COE’s receive funds for locally funded charter schools that they have sponsored. They also receive funds for increases in unemployment insurance rates and for several other sma ll programs. In what follows, a COE’s revenue limit entitlement is decomposed into six parts: the base revenue limit, the limit for direct services to small districts, the limit for education services, revenue for locally funded charter schools, the unemployment insurance adjustment, and all other adjustments. 174 Base Revenue Limit Program Description: Funds support the basic oversight function of COEs. Included in thi s function is the COE annual approval of school district budgets. In revenue limit calculations, this limit is called Other County School Service Fund Operations. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is b ased on a per ADA revenue limit multiplied by the sum of ADA for all districts in the county. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $267,690,769. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 175 Direct Services to Districts Program Description: Funds support regional administrative or support services for small districts. These services may include specialized instruction, health and at tendance records, and guidance counseling. Eligibility Criteria: Elementary districts with fewer than 901 ADA, high school districts with fewer than 301 ADA, and unified districts with fewer than 1,501 ADA are eligible for direct services by COEs. Funding Description: Funding is the lesser of expenditures and the calculated revenue limit per qualifying ADA in a COE. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,899,507. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 51 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 2550(a)(2), 14054(a) Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 176 Education Services Revenue Limit Program Description: Funds support a range of schools and classes serving special student populations. Included in the Special Schools and Classes revenue limit are Juvenile Court Schools, County Community Schools, Community School Students Expelled, Homeless Children, County Opportunity Schools, and Adults in County Jails. Additionally, County Community Day School, Handicapped Adults, Out of State Schools, and Specialized Secondary Schools are funded separately in the COE revenue limit. COEs may also operate special educati on classes and community schools which are financed by transfers of revenue limit funds from regular school districts. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs that operate one of more of the educational programs listed above are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Each of the Special Schools and Classes programs has a revenue limit calculation, typically based on an equalized per pupil rate or historical expenditure rate adjusted for COLA. The Homeless Child rate is the notable exception. It is based o n the revenue limit of the largest unified district in the county. Only Contra Costa, Marin, and Riverside COEs are eligible for Adults in County Jails revenue limit funding. Funding for similar COE programs in other counties is available through the Adu lts in Correctional Facilities categorical program. Out of State Schools is a reimbursement program for counties that send students to other states, typically Oregon or Nevada during the winter months. The County Office Transfer (COT), which funds COE sp ecial education services and COE community schools, is based on the revenue limit of the district in which the student resides. Special day class transfer funds are supplemented with state aid to account for the difference between district and special day class attendance rates. In most cases, COEs receive approximately 5 percent additional funding. County Community School revenues are adjusted for necessary small county community schools. Special Considerations: CalSAFE funding for self -contained class rooms for pregnant minors is also included because the Pregnant Minors Program was a COE revenue limit prior to converting to CalSAFE. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $496,092,443. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 2550.2, 1983.5, 48915(c), 1981.2, 1982(c), 2558.2, 48633, 48641, 1909 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 177 Locally Funded COE Charter Schools Adjustment Program Description: Funds provide basic support to locally funded charter schools sponsored by COEs. Locally funded charter schools receive thei r block grant through their sponsoring agency. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs with locally funded charter schools are eligible. Funding Description: The locally funded charter schools adjustment is the sum of the general purpose charter school block grant for each locally funded charter school for which a COE is the sponsoring LEA. Please see the Charter School Block Grant for more information about the funding formula for general purpose charter school block grants. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $6,457,541. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 47633- 47635 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 178 Unemployment Insurance Adjustment Program Description: Funds compensate COEs for rate increases for unemployment insurance. Eligibility Criteria: Any COE funded through the revenue limit with 1975 -1976 unemployment insurance expenditures is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Actual 1975-1976 unemployment expenditures are subtracted from current year unemployment insurance expenditures, excluding those spent for charter schools funded through the general purpose block grant. That difference is then added as part of the revenue limit entitlement. Should 1975 -1976 expenditures exceed current year expenditures, the adjustment is $0. The adjustment is not subject to the deficit factor(s), but is su bject to the local revenue offset. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $7,267,425. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42241.7, 43001.8 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 179 All Other Adjustments Program Description: Funds represent a number of other adjustments to COE revenue limits. These adjustments are similar to adjustments for school districts and may be negative, like the PERS adjustment . Included are the PERS adjustment and the minimum teacher salary adjustment for teachers in COE special schools and classes. COEs also are eligible for beginning teacher salary incentive funding and teacher’s retirement board funding. These are historic adjustment s that were not folded into the revenue limits as was done in district revenue limits. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible. Funding Description: COEs are allocated funding based on historic per ADA rates or historic revenue totals. Special Considerations: The category also includes School Building Aid ( Education Code 2555) which has not been funded in recent years. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $-6,615,110. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 7 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 2558.1, 45023.1, 45023.4, 2558.6 Funding Source: L & GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 180 Miscellaneous Revenue Program Description: Funds represent revenue in excess of a COE’s revenue limit entitlement. As in the case of districts, COEs may have local income in excess of their revenue limit entitlements. Should the COE ope rate a county- wide ROCP, the excess taxes are to be applied toward the ROCP entitlement to offset state aid. If the COE does not operate a ROCP or it is in its first year of excess taxes, the excess taxes are to go into a restricted account and to be used to offset the next year’s COE revenue limit entitlements. In recent years, more COEs have accumulated excess taxes. It appears that some of these COEs either did not apply their excess taxes to the ROCP or did not put the funds in a restricted account, and instead used these additional revenues in the same manner as school districts. We therefore call this miscellaneous revenue. Eligibility Criteria: COEs with local revenues in excess of their COE revenue limit entitlements are eligible. Funding Description: Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,670,252. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 5 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: L Funding Authority: 181 County Offices of Education Restricted Revenues The programs described in this section typically fund administrative activities performed by COEs. 182 County Office of Education (COE) Fiscal Oversight Program Description: Funds apportioned to COEs for the increased fiscal oversight of school districts required pursuant to AB 1200 (Chapter 1213, Statutes of 1991). Funded activities include conducting reviews, examinations, and audits of districts . COEs also provide written notifications concerning the f iscal solvency of districts with disapproved budgets, qualified or negative certifications, or districts facing fiscal uncertainty. Eligibility Criteria: COEs, except for single district COE s, are eligible for funding. Funding Description: The allocation is distributed based on prior year county ADA . In 2007 -2008, p articipating counties receive a minimum of $0.414992909 per unit of ADA , but not less than $91,504, a 8.561 percent increase over 2006 -2007. Specia l Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $5,268,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 5,719,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 51 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42127.6, 42127.8 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 183 County Oversight: Williams Case Settlement Program Description: Funds support oversight activities specified in the Williams Settlement. COEs must use the funds to review, monitor, and report on the state of schools ranked in deciles one through three of the 2006 ba se API. Conditions reviewed include the following: teacher training, certification, misassignment, and vacancies; hiring and re tention practices of school districts; sufficiency of instructional materials; and conditions of facilities that pose an emergency or urgent threat to the health or safety of pupils or staff. The oversight activities also require a determ ination of the accuracy of reported data. Eligibility Criteria: Schools that ranked in deciles one through three on the 2006 API will generate oversight funds for the COEs. A list of eligible schools is available here. Funding Description: COEs will receive funding for eligible schools in the amount of $2,500 per elementary; $3,500 per junior high or middle; and $5,000 per high school. In addition, a COE may receive additional funding for sites whose enrollment exceeds a specified threshold and if the COE is responsible for visiting more than 150 sites. The minimum allocation is $10,000 per COE. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $6,892,078. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 10,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 45 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1240(c), 1242 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 184 County School Service Fund Program Description: Funds reimburse county superintenden ts of schools for travel expenses incurred in connection with cooperative county publication projects . Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible to receive funding. Funding Description: Reimbursement is provided for meeting attendees that are confirmed by the Curriculum and Instruction Steering Committee chair on the J -4A form. Special Considerations: Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $89,427. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 100,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 28 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1602, 14035, 14055 Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 185 Tobacco Use Prevention Education (TUPE): COE Oversight and Assistance Program Description: Funds support the efforts of COEs to oversee and assist school districts in implementing Tobacco Use Prevention Programs. Please see Health and Safety Code 104350-104495 for more information. Eligibility Criteria: All COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Barring insufficient funding, COEs are awarded a minimum of $25,000. If funding exceeds the minimum, the remaining funding is allocated using a per ADA formula based on prior year ADA and total ADA in the county: $0.30 per ADA for COEs with over 550,000 A DA, $0.65 per ADA for COEs with ADA between 100,000 and 550,000, $0.90 per ADA for COEs with ADA between 50,000 and 90,000, and $1 per ADA for COEs with ADA between 25,000 and 50,000. COEs with less than 25,000 units of ADA receive an additional $25,000. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,106,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $3,106,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: SF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 186 Unemployment Insurance Management System Program Description: Funds cover the costs of administering the unemployment insurance management system for each school employer participating in the School Employees Fund. Please see Unemployment Insurance Code sections 822 and 826 for more information. Eligibility Criteria: To receive reimbursement for this program, the Unemployment Insurance Management System Report (Form J -3) must be completed and returned to the California Department of Education Funding Description: The amount of reimbursement for actual administrative costs incurr ed is two dollars ($2) per covered employee submitted, minus state administrative costs not to exceed five cents per covered employee. Adjustments are made for revisions reported for the prior year. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,653,251. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is unknown until the applications are received and processed. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 58 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1330 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute 187 Other Statewide or Regional Support Program Revenues Programs described in this section are separate from others in that funding typically goes to a select number of LEAs to perform statewide or regional services. 188 Administrative and Support Services Programs described in this section fund training and technical activities. In some instances, these functions could otherwise be provided by CDE, but are instead contracted out to a COE or non LEA. The exception is the student testing programs, which often include some rei mbursement to LEAs. 189 After School Education and Safety (ASES): R egional After School Technical Assistance System Program Description: Funds support 11 regional offices providing technical assistance for LEAs with before and after school programs. The regional offices provide technical assistance to all ASES and 21st Century Community Learning Center grant ees and sites and build capacity through the region they serve to develop, implement, and sustain support for effective before and after school programs. Eligibility Criteria: Only LEAs that are current regional lead COEs are eligible for funding: Alameda, Butte, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mendocino, Monterey, Sacramento, San Diego, Stanislaus, Tulare, and Ventura COE s. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to each regional lead ranging from $130,814 to $652,175, determined by the base allocation for each re gion, the number of unique funded LEAs and schools in the region, the projected student enrollment at the funded schools. Special Considerations: Pursuant to Education Code 8483.5, the ASES program, including regional technical assistance, is continuously appropriated up to $550,000,000 per year. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,373,573. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $ 3,029,715. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 0 0 1 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 90.1 0.0 0.0 7.5 0.0 2.5 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8482-8484.6 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Statute 190 California School Information Services (CSIS) Program Description: Funds support the oversight and administration of the California School Information Services (CSIS) program, a voluntary electronic student record system. Funding supports five major functions: CSIS Operations, Project Management Services, the Statewide Student Identifiers (SSIDs) as required by NCLB and SB 1453 (Chapter 1 002, Statutes of 2002) , the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS), and independent oversight of the CSIS program by Sacramento COE. In some cases, funding is then pass ed on to LEAs for one time incentives for LEAs to join CSIS. The CSIS program office is under the administrative oversight of the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT), which is operated from the Kern C OE. Eligibility Criteria: Only Ker n and Sacramento COEs are eligible to receive funds. Funding Description: Funding is allocated by the Budget Act to Kern and Sacramento COE for the specific sub -functions of CSIS. Special Considerations: In 2005-2006 funding for operations and CALPADS came from the Educational Telecommunication Fund, while project management and oversight were funded through the General Fund. Funding is subject to the Budget Act and specific program source varies by year. Funding for administering SSIDs is included in operations; SSID funding for LEAs is discussed in the next program. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $8,596,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $5,241,000; of which $4,444,000 is for operations, $250,000 for project management, $397,000 for SSID maintenance, and $150,000 for oversight. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 2 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49080, 49084 Funding Source: GF & SF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 191 Education Technology: California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) Program Description: Funds support the efforts of regional lead agencies to provide assis tance in education technology. CTAP lead agencies provide a range of technology services, including staff development and technical assistance, to all school districts and county offices within each region. Each of the 11 CTAP regions contains approximately 100 or more school districts. Funding cannot be used to the exclusive benefit of the reg ional lead agency. Eligibility Criteria: COEs and districts may apply to serve as the lead for CTAP services. A district or COE must be within the region for which they are applying to serve as a regional lead. Funding Description: Funding for the 11 CTAP regions was awarded competitively in 2005 for a three -year grant period. Each region receives a $50,000 base. Ten percent of the remaining funding is distributed to the regions based upon the number of districts and COEs in the r egion. The remaining funding is distributed based upon the regions’ prior year enrollment. Awards are subject to allocation of funding in the state budget and approval by SBE. Special Considerations: Data on the districts served by each CTAP regional le ad is unavailable. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $12,994,956. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 for CTAP and SETS is $ 17,705,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 51871 Funding Source: Federal & GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 192 Education Technology: K- 12 High-Speed Network Program Description: Funds support the efforts of a lead agency to provide high -speed, high-bandwidth Internet access to COEs , districts, and schools. In 2004, the Imperial COE was selected to be this lead agency. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Imperial COE is eligible. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, SB 65 (Chapter 491, Statutes of 2005) made funding of up to $21 million of unused funds from previous appropriations available for al location to the Imperial COE to continue management and operation of the n etwork and up to $1.2 mill ion to administer and support the program. Funding is subject to budget availability and administrative adjustments. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown . The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is up to $ 15,600,000, and an additional $1,900,000 for Imperial COE’s administration and support costs. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 . . . . . *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 193 Education Technology: Statewide Education Technology Services (SETS) Program Description: Funds support the dissemination of information concerning the use and effectiveness of new educational technology. The four SETS projects include the California Learning Resource Network (CLRN), Technical Support for Education Technology in Schools (TechS ETS), the Technology Information Center for Administrative Leadership (TICAL), and EdTechProfile (ETP). More information about the specific SETS project may be found here. Eligibility Criteria: Only S an Diego, Santa Cruz, and Stanislaus COEs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funds are distributed to the contracted SETS COEs subject to funds budgeted each year. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $3,074,044. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 for CTAP and SETS is $17,705,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 3 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 51872(B) Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 194 Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) Program Description: Funds support various programs operating by the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) . FCMAT was established pursuant to Assembly Bill 1200 (Chapter 1213, Statutes of 1991). FCMAT assists and provides guidance to LEAs in the areas of business and financial management practices. Funding supports nine FCMAT sub -programs: COE Reimbursement for Extraordinary Costs of Audits, COE Reimbursement for Increased Oversight, Education Audit Appeals Panel, Educational Data Partnership, Regional Teams of Fiscal Experts, School District Assessment, School District Training and Site -Based Budgeting, Staff Development, and Team Responsibilities. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Kern COE is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to Kern COE for the nine FCMAT programs. Special Considerations: The funding for the two COE reimbursement sub -programs is distributed to COEs by FCMAT. Allocation data is unavailable. The funding for School District Assessment is intended to be one time pursuant to Education Code 41327.1 to assess Oakland Unified, Vallejo City Unified, and West Fresno Elementary. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $5,031,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $6,096,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 42127.8, 41327.1 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 195 School Community Violence Preventio n (SCVP): School Safety and Violence Prevention Training Program Description: Funds supports the Kern COE to admin ister regional training on school safety and viole nce prevention planning methods on three topics: bullying, including cyber b ullying; safe school planning; and crisis response. Kern COE subcontracts the training in the 11 County Superintendents regions. Eligibility Criteria: Only Kern COE is eligible for funding. Funding Description: CDE allocates funding to Kern COE. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $201,139. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is unknown. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 35294-35294.9 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 196 School Nutrition: Fresh Start Pilot Program Training and Evaluation Program Description: Funds awarded to a COE or community college to contract with an independent evaluator to conduct a comp rehensive evaluation of the Fresh Start Pilot Program . In 2006-2007, the University of California Berkeley’s Center for Weight an d Health conducted an eval uation of the pilot in 69 diverse schools. Please see the Evaluation of the California Fresh Start Progra m Report of Findings for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only Alameda COE is eligible. Funding Description: The 2005-2006 pilot program appropriation included a provision for the use of up to $300,000 to conduct the evaluation of the program. Funding went to Alameda COE, which awarded the contract to the University of California Berkeley. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $300,000. No funding was available in 2007 -2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 49565 Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 197 Student Friendly Service s (SFS) Program Description: Funds provide for the development and oversight of the californiacolleges.edu website . The SFS website provides information about the college admissions process, financial aid opportunities, and career planning to st udents, parents, teachers, counselors, and administrator s. The website is sponsored by the Education Round Table. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Kern C OE is eligible for funding . Funding Description: Funds are allocated to FCMAT, operated by Kern COE, for website maintenance. Special Considerations: Neither CDE nor FCMAT may charge administrative or indirect cost against this program. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $500,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $500,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 198 Teacher Recruitment and Retention: COE Contract Program Description: Funds to contract with an outside entity for purposes of recruiting highly qualified teachers to qualifying schools. Eligibility Criteria: Only Sacramento COE is eligible for funding. Funding Description: Funding goes to the Sacramento COE to contract with an outside entity. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called the Teacher Recruitment and Student Support. Funding appeared to be one- time. However, the 2006 -2007 Budget Act reappropriates $3,000,000 from the Prop osition 98 Reversion Account for this purpose. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,979,709. No funding was available in 2007 -2008. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 199 Testing: Assessment Review and Reporting Program Description: Funds support t echnical and reporting contracts, which vary from year to year depending on the needs of the program. Eligibility Criteria: Funding Description: Contracts vary year to year. In 2005-2006, $421, 282 went to San Joaquin COE, and $ 118,143.40 to CDE to disburse on technical and reporting contracts. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $539,425. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is 2,313,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 78.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 21.9 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 200 Testing: California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Program Description: Funds to reimburse districts and charter schools for the costs associated with administering the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). The CELDT is a test of English language proficiency given to students whose primary language is not English. Eligibility Criteria: Local educational agencies that administer the CELDT are eligible for funding . Funding Description: LEAs are allocated $5.00 per student tested. Special Considerations: In 2005-2006, an additional $2,227,000 was reappropriated in reversion funds for vendor startup costs. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $12,426,886. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $9,741,000, including vendor c ontracts. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 39 426 78 296 92 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.4 14.4 3.9 48.9 0.4 32.1 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 313, 60810-60812 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authori ty: Budget Act 201 Testing: California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Program Description: Funds to reimburse districts and charter schools for the costs associated with administering the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). The CAHSEE is statewide exam in English-language arts and mathematics that students must pass to gradu ate from high school. Eligibility Criteria: Local educational agencies that administer the CAHSEE are eligible for funding . Funding Description: LEAs are allocated $3.00 per student tested and an additional $0.32 for each census questionnaire for grade 10 students. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $7,077,731. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is 10,945,000, which includes vendor contracts. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 42 16 79 278 66 4 Percent of total funding (%) 1.3 0.0 9.7 24.0 0.7 64.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60850 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 202 Testing: California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) Program Description: Funds reimburse the Sacramento COE, which administers the California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) . Eligible students who pass the CHSPE, an exam in English -language arts and mathematics, receive a Certificate of Proficiency, which by state law is equivalent to a high school diploma. Please see the CHSPE website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only Sacramento COE is eligible. Funding Description: Funding is disbursed to Sacramento COE for administration from fees charged to individuals taking the exam. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,020,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $1,144,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 48412 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 203 Testing: Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program Description: Funds reimburse districts for the costs associated with administering the STAR tests. The tests included in 2005-2006 are the California Standards Tests (CSTs), California Achievement Test, Sixth Edition Survey (CAT/6 Survey), California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA), and Aprenda 3. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs that ad minister the STAR Program tests are eligible for funding. Funding Description: In 2005-2006, LEAs received $2.52 for each pupil tested in grades two through eleven on the CST and CAT/6 Survey, $5 per pupil tested on the CAPA , $2.44 for each pupil tested in grades two through eleven on Aprenda 3, and $0.32 per pupil for whom only demo graphic data were submitted on the CST, CAT/6 Survey, or CAPA. The total funding available to LEAs in 2005 -2006 for district reimbursement was $12,049,208. Special Considerations: LEAs administering the CAPA also receive $5 per tested student from federa l Title VI funds. In 2005-2006, an additional $43,623,900 was used for contracts with test developers and vendors. That funding is not included in the analysis on the second page. Per the Budget Act of 2008, the CAT/6 Survey is no longer administer ed. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $55,673,108. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is 62,124,000, which includes vendor contracts. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 50 531 85 329 163 5 Percent of total funding (%) 0.2 4.2 2.1 14.9 0.3 78.4 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 60640(h) Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 204 General Instruction Programs The programs described in this section fund regional or statewide centers that support instructional activities. 205 Advancement via Individual Determination (AVID) Program Description: Funds support Advancement via In dividual Determination (AVID), an in -school academic support program for grades seven through twelve. The purpose of the program is to prepare students for college eligibility and success. AVID targets students in the academic middle who h ave the desire to go to college . AVID was deve loped in 1980 by Mary Catherine Swanson . Eligibility Criteria: Only past recipients are eligible. Funding Description: Funding is calculated based on a formula using regional data , including: the number of students within the region receiving free and reduced price meals , the regional enrollment for grades seven through twelve , the number of middle and high schools within the region , and the number of AVID schools within the region. Funding is awarded on a three-year grant cycle to the 11 AVID regional centers. Funding may then be allocated to AVID schools. Some of the funding goes to CDE for administrative support. Special Considerations: Additional fiscal data concerning the allocation of funds to school level AVID programs is unavailable. Lev el of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $9,017,663. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $7,735,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 11 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 85.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 14.3 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 206 American Indian Education Center s (AIEC) Program Description: Funds support American Indian Education Centers, which assist in improving academic achievement and lowering dropout rates among American Indi an students at all grade levels, including encouraging students to continue education beyond high school. The AIEC program was established in 1974 by SB 2264 (Chapter 1425, Statutes of 1974) . Reauthorizing legislation, SB 1710 (Chapter 880, Statutes of 2006) , became law on January 1, 2007. Eligibility Criteria: Any Tribal Group or Incorporated American Indian Association is eligible for funding. The goals of the program must meet the goals and activities as stated in the Education Code. Funding Description: Funding is award to each center by contract and is based on the indentified needs and services of the community. Please see the resources page for more information. Special Considerations: Each year, $370,000 of the total funding does not count toward the Proposition 98 guarantee. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $4,366,016. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $4,916,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 31 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 33380-33383 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 207 California Association of Student Councils Program Description: Funds support statewide student organizations authorized and sponsored by CDE in agriculture, business, home economics, and industrial education. Vocational programs and activities include conducting leadership developmen t programs for student officers, preparing instructional materials for teacher advisors , providing an opportunity for student involvement in college and university workshops, maintaining affiliation with national v ocational student organizations, and participating in vocational fairs . Please see section 19632 of the Business and Professions Code for more information. Eligibility Criteria: The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall develop a budget procedure for the disbursement of funds appropriated under this section to ensure equal treatment of participating students and to further ensure that such funds do not supplant existing money currently provided from other public sou rces. Funding Description: Funding is appropriated to CDE, which then grants funding to the California Association of Student Councils. Funding is also directly allocated to California DECA, a national care er skills organization. Special Considerations: This program is sometimes called Vocational Education. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $546,998. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $547,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 2 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 208 Center for Civic Education Program Description: Funds provided to the Center for Civic Education for the purpose of implementing a middle school and junior high school civic education program. The Center for Civic Education determines which LEAs can participate and provides the LEAs with the Center's curriculum. Eligibility Criteria: Only the Center for Civic Education is eligible. Funding Description: Funding is allocated to the Center for Civic Education only. No funding is available for application by LEAs. Special Considerations: Data on participating districts is unavailable. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $250,000. The total funding appropria ted in 2007-2008 is $250,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 209 Environmental Educatio n (EE) Program Description: Funds support the California Regional Environmental Educat ion Community (CREEC) Network, a collaboration of science and environmental educators that provides information about resources for environmental education in each of the state’ s 11 regions. Eligibility Criteria: Institutions of higher education , LEAs, nonprofit organizations, other organizations or agencies are eligible to apply. Funding Description: Regions receive $20,500. Funding is contingent upon the yearly allocation from the Legislature. Spec ial Considerations: Of the total funding available, $360,000 comes from the California Environmental License Plate Fund for regional grants and $11,000 comes from the Department of Water Resources, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the Cali fornia Coastal Commission, and the State Consumer Services Agency to provide grants to LEAs. District participation in the EE programs is unavailable. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $371,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007-2008 is $371,000, which includes the $11,000 from State Agencies to LEAs. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 10 0 0 1 0 2 Percent of total funding (%) 81.5 0.0 0.0 5.3 0.0 13.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code : 8740 Funding Source: SF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 210 Teacher Training and Professional Development Programs The programs described in this section support regional or statewide teacher training operated by the CTC or other state agencies. 211 Alternative Certification Programs Program Description: Funds support the District Intern and University Intern teaching programs. Through these programs, teacher credential candidates receive the support and instruction that prepare them for a teaching credential, often while working as a classroom teacher. Funds also support incentive grants for districts and COEs to enhance internship programs and address the distribution of beginning teachers. Please see the CTC website for more information. Eligibility Criteria: Only COEs and districts participating in alternative certification programs are eligible. Funding Description: The allocation formula is unknown. Incentive grants may not exceed $2,500 per intern per year. Special Considerations: Each school district or county office of education that receives a grant shall provide matching funds from available sources in an amount equal to 50 percent of the cost of the alternative certification program. The Alternative Certification Program is operated by the CTC. Data concerning the districts and number of teacher served is unavailable. This program is also known as the Teacher Intern Program. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure fl exibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is unknown . The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $31,723,000. Education Code: 44305, 44380- 44387 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 212 Bilingual Teacher Training (BTTP) Program Description: Funds support schools and districts in preparing teachers, kindergarten through grade twelve who already pos sess a basic credential , for CTC authorization to provide instructional services to English learners (ELs) . The training prepares teachers in the appropriate methodologies to facilitate ELs' acquisition of English and academic development. Eligibility Cr iteria: Only the 14 currently funded COEs that serve as regional training centers are eligible to apply. These regional training centers must reapply for BTTP funds on an annual basis. Funding Description: Funding of the centers is based on number of participant teachers. Grants are awarded through an application process based on prior year data for each center and evaluative criteria demonstrating the center’s ability to provide appropriate training servic es. Special Considerations: More specific data, including the districts and number of teachers served at each center, are unavailable. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $1,950,608. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $2,141,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 14 0 0 0 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52180-52186 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 213 Teacher Credentialing Block Gran t (TCBG) Program Description: Funds support the Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment (BTSA) program. The BTSA program, co- administered by CDE and the CTC , provides assessment and support for beginning teachers. The funding sponsors veteran teacher mentors and credentialing requirements for first and second year teachers. These regional programs vary in organizational design and may include individual districts, COEs, and colleges and universities. Funding also supports regional infrastructure. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs must develop and implement teacher induction programs that meet the standards adopted by CDE and CCTC. Funding Description: Funding is apportioned to BTSA administration units based on the number of eligible first and second year teacher participants. The awards are made contingent upon the availability of funds. Special Considerations: More detailed data regarding the distr ibution of BTSA participants and participating districts is unavailable and presumably varies by year. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $93,039,475. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $128,671,000, including $3,325,000 for regional infrastructure . COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 28 28 11 77 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 36.3 10.2 4.6 48.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 41520-41522, 44279.1 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 214 Adult Education Programs The programs described in this section fund basic and career technical education for adults who are not K -12 students . 215 Adult Education Program Description: Funds support educational opportuni ties and support services for adults. Eligibility Criteria: Districts and COEs that offer educational programs for adults and have an established “c ap ADA ” are eligible for funding . Funding Descrip tion: Program funding is calculated by multiplying the funding rate by the cap ADA, adjusted for COLA. The cap ADA may be adjusted for growth or decline. ADA in excess of the cap may be funded at the excess ADA rate, determined by funding availability. A proration factor may be applied should funding be insufficient. The funding for Adult Education is allocated in the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $641,534,449. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $753,717,000, with an additional $8,739,000 in remedial education for CalWORKs recipients available through an interagency agreement. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 6 0 75 245 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.1 0.0 20.6 79.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 52616, 52616.16- .19, 52616.21, 52617 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 216 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 38 86.4 222.65 High Low (0 – 6%) 28 82.4 193.30 Medium (33 – 60%) 25 92.6 200.23 Medium (6 – 23%) 35 89.7 211.62 High (66 – 100 %) 12 80.0 520.02 High (23 – 89%) 12 92.3 348.71 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 75 78.1 86.59 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 35 46.7 62.78 Medium (33 – 60%) 96 70.6 109.60 Medium (6 – 23%) 107 80.5 96.04 High (66 – 100 %) 74 71.8 175.58 High (23 – 89%) 103 81.1 165.18 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 17 65.4 82.83 High Low (0 – 6) 27 75.0 100.41 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 28 96.6 269.91 Medium (6 – 50) 30 93.8 196.94 High (6,001+) 30 96.8 243.14 High (50 – 2,122) 18 100.0 306.51 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 60 46.5 62.66 Unified Low (0 – 6) 31 39.7 33.50 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 82 83.7 99.81 Medium (6 – 50) 78 77.2 59.58 High (10,001+) 103 95.4 142.31 High (50 – 2,122) 136 87.2 146.72 217 Adults in Correctional Facilities Program Description: Funds support educational services to adults in correctional facilities. Classes may be in basic education, high school diploma, or ESL and are intended to help inmates improve competence in reading, language arts, mathematics, vocational education, and self -esteem. The term "correctional facilities" includes any county jail, county industrial farm, or county or joint -county road camp. There are currently 33 jail education programs. Eligibility Cri teria: LEAs that received funding for Adults in Correctional Facilities in the prior fiscal year are eligible. Funds for new LEAs are contingent on funds made available as a result of a reduction or the elimination of an existing LEA's level of funding. Funding Description: Funding reimburses services provided in the previous year, subject to program- specific funding caps. Funding is equal to the prior year rate per ADA multiplied by the prior year funded ADA. The rate per ADA is the lesser of the rate tw o years prior increased by the prior year COLA, or 80 percent of the prior year statewide average adult education revenue limit amount. Funded ADA is the lesser of the reported prior year annual ADA or the prior year ADA cap . For LEAs with 20 or fewer A DA, the ADA cap is equal to the cap two years prior plus 20 ADA for growth. For LEAs with more than 20 ADA, the ADA cap is equal to the cap two years prior plus 2.5 percent for growth. If growth funds are insufficient, an adjustment will be made to the p er-pupil growth rates. Beginning in fiscal year 2007 -2008, funding for this program is apportioned through the Principal Apportionment. Special Considerations: Per Education Code 1909, Contra Costa, Marin, and Riverside COEs receive revenue limit funding for a similar historic program in the Special Schools and Classes COE revenue limit. This funding is not included in the analysis below. Level of Funding : The total amount expend ed in 2005-2006 is $14,282,408. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $17,771,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 8 0 12 14 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 6.6 0.0 19.5 73.9 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 1900-1909.5, 41840- 41841.8, 46191, 52610- 52617 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 218 Community -Based English Tutorin g (CBET) Program Description: Funds support free or subsidized English language instruction to parents or other community members who pledge to provide English language tutoring to California school children with limited English proficiency. The funds may be used for direct program services, community notification processes, transportation services, and background checks related to the tutoring program. Whenever possible, LEAs should operate programs at neighborhood school sites. The adult English language instruction can be provided by schools, colleges, universities, community -based organizatio ns, or nonprofit organizations. The CBET program was established by Proposition 227 in 1998, which require all public school instruction to be conducted in English , with limited exceptions. The Proposition appropriated $50,000,000 each year for ten years from the General Fund to support the program. Eligibility Criteria: LEAs with one or more ELs on the current year Annual Language Census Report (R -30) are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Fund ing is allocated based on the number of ELs enrolled in participating LEAs. In 2007 -2008, LEAs received $33.39 per EL. Special Considerations: The continuous appropriation under Proposition 227 was set to expire after 2006 -2007. SB 368 (Chapter 632, Statutes of 2006) continued CBET funding beyond FY06 subject to the Budget Act. This program is one of the programs gran ted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $49,989,140. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $50,000,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 4 245 56 268 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.3 20.6 5.9 73.2 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 315- 317 Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Statute, Budget Act 219 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 52 28.0 4.63 Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 23 10.6 1.63 Medium (33 – 60%) 67 41.1 9.08 Medium (6 – 23%) 68 44.2 4.79 High (66 – 100 %) 126 60.6 14.36 High (23 – 89%) 154 82.8 14.10 High Low (0 – 33 %) 26 59.1 4.69 High Low (0 – 6%) 11 32.4 1.55 Medium (33 – 60%) 19 70.4 6.58 Medium (6 – 23%) 33 84.6 5.04 High (66 – 100 %) 11 73.3 9.20 High (23 – 89%) 12 92.3 9.67 Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 71 74.0 3.64 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 23 30.7 1.20 Medium (33 – 60%) 112 82.4 7.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 122 91.7 4.74 High (66 – 100 %) 85 82.5 13.62 High (23 – 89%) 123 96.9 12.78 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs wit h funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 23 12.0 12.33 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 50 23.6 9.15 Medium (251 – 1,500) 77 42.3 10.21 Medium (6 – 50) 83 43.0 9.85 High (1,501 +) 145 78.8 10.97 High (50 – 2,122) 112 73.7 11.22 High Low (0 – 1,500) 10 38.5 7.11 High Low (0 – 6) 14 38.9 3.43 Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 17 58.6 4.46 Medium (6 – 50) 27 84.4 5.38 High (6,001+) 29 93.5 6.16 High (50 – 2,122) 15 83.3 6.75 Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 75 58.1 8.99 Unified Low (0 – 6) 36 46.2 6.54 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 86 87.8 6.52 Medium (6 – 50) 87 86.1 8.79 High (10,001+) 107 99.1 9.78 High (50 – 2,122) 145 92.9 9.43 220 Direct Support Professional Training Program Program Description: Funds support training for people to work with indiv iduals with a developmental disability living in licensed community care facilities. DDS has over 4,400 licensed community care facilities that serve over 75 percent of people with developmental disabilities living in licensed facilities. DDS implement ed a two-year, 70-hour standardized statewide competency -based training program. Training is mandatory for employees and administrators who provide direct car e in a community care facility. In lieu of the training, a challenge test may be taken for each of the 35 hour segments. Those who pass the challenge test for either of the 35 hour training segments will not be required to take that classroom segment. Through an interagency agreement, ROCPs provide this program at no cost to enrollees and are reimbursed by DDS for the challenge test and training. Eligibility Criteria: Only ROCPs that implement the Direct Support Professional Training Program are eligible for reimbursement. Funding Descr iption: Through an interagency agreement with DDS, CDE reimburses ROCP programs that operate the program in the amount of $35 per challenge test and $300 per trainee for statewide training and certification of community care facility workers. Special Considerations: The requirement for the community care facilities direct care staff training was created by Assembly Bill 2780 (Chapter 310, Statutes of 1998). Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $2,164,975. The total funding appropr iated in 2007-2008 is unknown until reimbursement claims are filed. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 52 211 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 18.7 81.3 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Apportionment Funding Authority: Budget Act 221 Child Care and Development Programs The programs described in this section support educational and child care services for children. Many of the programs support children who are not yet of school age. Much of the funding for these programs is not allocated to LEAs. 222 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 2 Program Description: Funds provide access to child care for families in California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) . The program is administered by the California Department of Social Services (DSS) and CDE . There are three different stages of CalWORKs child care . Stage 1 is administered by the DSS through county welfare departments. Stage 1 begins when a participant enters the CalWORKs grant program and engages in activities pursuant to a welfare-to -work plan. Families are referred to resource and referral agencies to assist them in finding child c are providers . Each family may be served in Stage 1 for up to six months or until the family’s work activity and child care become stable. Families can also remain in Stage 1 if there is not sufficient funding in Stages 2 and 3. State 2 is administered by CDE through its alternative payment providers (APPs). Stage 2 begins when the parent’s employment and child care arrangements are stable. Families may remain in this stage for up to 24 months after they stop receiving CalWORKs cash assistance. CalWOR Ks Stage 2 child care is the only programmatic entitlement in law. Eligibility Criteria: Only CDE contracted APPs are eligible for funding to provide services to eligible CalWORKs Stage 2 recipients. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to APPs. CalWORK providers are reimbursed for services up to a maximum rate equivalent to the 85th percentile of the rates charged by private providers in the same region (determined by a “regional market rate (RMR) survey” conducted every two years). Special Conside rations: Other requirements apply . Child care providers must meet certain conditions or requirements in order to receive payment for their services. There are certain age limits for children. These conditions may vary by county. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $123,414,213. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $474,436,000, of which $418,459,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 13 0 0 1 0 62 Percent of total funding (%) 12.5 0.0 0.0 1.9 0.0 85.6 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8350- 8359.1 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 223 Alternative Payment: CalWORKs Stage 3 Program Description: Funds provide access to child care for families in California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) . The program is administered by the California Department of Social Services (DSS) and CDE . There are three different stages of CalWORKs child care . Stage 3 is administered by CDE through its alternative payment providers (APPs) . A family can move to this stage when it has exhausted its two -year limit in Stage 1 and/or Stage 2, and for as long as the family remains otherwise eligible for child care programs. CalWORKs Stage 3 child care is a discretionary program that continues to provide child care for these families as long as funding is availabl e. Eligibility Criteria: Only CDE contracted APPs are eligible for funding to provide services to eligible CalWORKs Stage 3 recipients. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to APPs. Special Considerations: Other requirements apply. Child care providers must meet certain conditions or requirements in order to receive payment for their services. There are certain age limits for children. These conditions may vary by county. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $ 124,595,663. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $404,983,000, of which $163,032,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 14 0 0 1 0 60 Percent of total funding (%) 12.9 0.0 0.0 1.9 0.0 85.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8350- 8359.1 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 224 Alternative Payment: non CalWORKs Program Description: Funds an array of child care arrangements for low income parents who are working and/or going to school , such as in -home care, family child care, and center -based care. The alternative payment program helps families arrange child care services and makes payment for those services directly to the child care provider selected by the family. It provides child care to families who are not in C alWORKS, but whose income falls below 75 percent of the state m edian income. Parents may pay a fee for services based on a sliding scale. Eligibility Criteria: Only CDE approved APPs are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Grants are awarded to APPs. Special Considerations: Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $69,894,415. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $257,037,000, of which $112,258,000 are state funds. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 15 0 0 1 0 72 Percent of total funding (%) 20.3 0.0 0.0 1.6 0.0 78.2 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8220 Funding Source: F & GF, Contract Funding Authority: Budget Act 225 American Indian Early Childhood Educatio n (AIECE) Program Description: Funds support efforts to develop and test educational models that increase competence in reading, language arts, mathematics, and self -esteem for American Indian children in pre -kindergarten through grade four. The American Indian Early Childhood Education (AIECE) Program began in the 1970s. There are nine counties participating in the program for 2007 -2008. Descriptions of each program in the nine counties are available online. Eligibility Criteria: Funds are designated for schools with at least 10 percent American Indian students . Funding Description: Funding is allocated through a competitive process for three-year cycles. In 2007-2008, the minimum allocation was $50,685 and the maximum was $110,333. Special Considerations: Funding has been allocated for fiscal year 2007 -2008 through the governor's line item discretion. Funding is co ntingent upon allocation to CDE from the State Budget. This program is one of the programs granted expenditure flexibility in the 2009 Budget Act. Level of Funding: The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $598,000. The total funding appropriated in 2007 -2008 is $661,997. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 1 1 0 6 0 0 Percent of total funding (%) 14.6 10.3 0.0 75.1 0.0 0.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 226 Funding Analysis: Per Pupil Funding by Poverty Concentration Poverty concentration ranges from 0 to 100 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch. Per Pupil Funding by English Learner Concentration English learner concentration ranges from 0 to 89 percent. It is measured by the proportion of enrollment identified as EL. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . Elementary Low (0 – 6%) 1 0.5 691.77 Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 1 0.5 691.77 High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 33 %) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6%) 0 0.0 . Medium (33 – 60%) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 0 0.0 . High (23 – 89%) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 33 %) 1 1.0 27.53 Unified Low (0 – 6%) 4 5.3 41.54 Medium (33 – 60%) 2 1.5 43.29 Medium (6 – 23%) 0 0.0 . High (66 – 100 %) 3 2.9 21.53 High (23 – 89%) 2 1.6 17.01 Per Pupil Funding by District Size District size is created to have roughly three equivalent quantiles within district type. It is measured by ADA. This definition differs from the one used for equalization purposes. Per Pupil Funding by Enrollment Density Enrollment density ranges from 0 to 2,122 students per square kilometer of district usable land. Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Total with funding Percent of LEAs with funding (%) Mean per pupil funding ($/ADA) Elementary Low (0 – 250) 1 0.5 691.77 Elementary Low (0 – 6) 1 0.5 691.77 Medium (251 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (1,501 +) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 1,500) 0 0.0 . High Low (0 – 6) 0 0.0 . Medium (1,501 – 6,000) 0 0.0 . Medium (6 – 50) 0 0.0 . High (6,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . Unified Low (0 – 3,000) 5 3.9 46.60 Unified Low (0 – 6) 3 3.8 47.67 Medium (3,001 – 10,000) 1 1.0 10.97 Medium (6 – 50) 3 3.0 20.65 High (10,001+) 0 0.0 . High (50 – 2,122) 0 0.0 . 227 California Child Care Initiative Program Description: Funds support initiatives to the availability of quality child care providers and programs in the state. The Initiative is conducted by local resource and refer ral agencies under contract with CDE. It implements a five -stage process to build child care capacity: assessing local supply and demand, recruiting potential licensed family child care providers, providing training in providing quality care and how to ma nage a small business effectively, providing technical assistance on licensing procedures, and providing ongoing support to help providers stay in operation. Eligibility Criteria: Only child care resource and referral agencies selected as pilot sites are eligible for funding. Funding Description: Awarded on a grant basis by CDE to eligible entities. Special Considerations: The Initiative requires that each dollar of state money awarded is matched by two dollars from other sources, including private corpo rations, the federal government, or local governments. Level of Funding : The total amount expended in 2005 -2006 is $244,499. The total state funding available in 2007 -2008 is $250,000. COE District Charter* Non LEA Elementary High Unified Number with funding 0 0 0 0 0 1 Percent of total funding (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100.0 *Includes direct funded charters only; locally funded charters are included with their district. Education Code: 8215 Funding Source: GF, Grant Funding Authority: Budget Act 228 Campus Tax Bailout Program Description: Funds disbursed to 25 community college districts that levied special property tax rates in 1977-1978 to fund child care services . These taxes were eliminated by Propos ition 13, passed in 1978, and this program is meant to compensate the districts for the loss of those funds. Eligibility Criteria: Only community colleges that levied child care p