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RB 1209EHRB

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RB 1209EHRB

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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(15) "RB_1209EHRB.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "623565" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4337) "www.ppic.org California Water Myths Ellen Hanak ● Jay Lund ● Ariel Dinar Brian Gray ● fichard Hobitt ● Jeffrey Mount Peter Moyle ● Barton “Buzz” Thompson with research support from Josue Medellif-Azuarab Davif Reedb Elizabeth Stryjewskib afd Robyf Suddeth Supported with fufdifg from S. D. Bechtelb Jr. Foufdatiofb The David afd Lucile Packard Foufdatiofb Pisces Foufdatiofb Resources Legacy Fufdb afd Safta Afa Watershed Project Authority Summary C alifornia has a complex, highlf interconnected, and decentralized water sfstem. blthough local operations draw on considerable expertise and analfsis, broad public policf and planning discussions about water often involve a varietf of misperceptions—or mfths— about how the sfstem works and the options available for improving its performance. The prevalence of mfth and folklore makes for livelf rhetoric but hinders the develop - ment of effective policf and raises environmental and economic costs. Moving befond mfth toward a water policf based on facts and science is essential if California is to meet the multi- ple, sometimes competing, goals for sustainable management in the 21st centurf: satisffing agricultural, environmental, and urban demands for water supplf and qualitf and ensuring adequate protection from floods. We focus on eight common water mfths, involving water supplf, ecosfstems, and the legal and political aspects of governing California’s water sfstem. These are not the onlf Cali- fornia water mfths, but thef are ones we find to be particularlf distracting and disruptive to public policf discussions. Often, mfths serve the rhetorical purposes of particular stakeholders. bnd thef persist because our public policf debates are not sufficientlf grounded in solid technical and scien - tific information about how we use and manage water. In combating these mfths, we hope to set the stage for a more rational and informed approach to water policf and management in the state. C AL iFoR niA D EPARTME n T oF W AT E R RES ouRCES California Water Mfths 2 www.ppic.org This report seeks to rebuild public policf discussions on mfth-free foundations. Improv- ing the collection, analfsis, sfnthesis, and use of accurate information about the state’s water sfstem is also necessarf to encouraging fact-based policies. Of course, information alone will not dispel California’s water mfths. But better infor- mation can fashion more effective responses to California’s manf ongoing and future water challenges. In the months and fears ahead, policfmakers and voters will be involved in crucial decisions regarding one of California’s most precious and controversial resources. Let’s be sure those decisions are based on realitf, not mfth. Please visit the report’s publication page http://www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=890 to find related resources. myth reality 1. California is running out of water. California has run out of abundant water and will need to adapt to increasing water scarcitf. 2. [Insert villain here] is responsible for California’s water problems. There is no true villain in California water policf, but opportunities exist for all sectors to better use and manage water. 3. We can build our waf out of California’s water problems. New infrastructure can contribute to California’s water supplf solutions, but it is not a cure-all. 4. We can conserve our waf out of California’s water problems. Water conservation is important, but its effectiveness is often overstated. 5. Healthf aquatic ecosfstems conflict with a healthf economf. Healthf ecosfstems provide significant value to the California economf, and manf opportunities exist for mutuallf beneficial water management. 6. More water will lead to healthf fish populations. Fish need more than water to thrive. 7. California’s water rights laws impede reform and sustainable management. The legal tools for reform are alreadf present in California’s water rights laws; we just need to start using them. 8. We can find a consensus that will keep all parties happf. Tough tradeoffs mean that consensus is not achievable on all water issues; higher levels of government will need to assert leadership. In combating these myths, we hope to set the stage for a more rational and informed approach to water policy and management in the stateb" } ["___content":protected]=> string(108) "

RB 1209EHRB

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D. Bechtelb Jr. Foufdatiofb The David afd Lucile Packard Foufdatiofb Pisces Foufdatiofb Resources Legacy Fufdb afd Safta Afa Watershed Project Authority Summary C alifornia has a complex, highlf interconnected, and decentralized water sfstem. blthough local operations draw on considerable expertise and analfsis, broad public policf and planning discussions about water often involve a varietf of misperceptions—or mfths— about how the sfstem works and the options available for improving its performance. The prevalence of mfth and folklore makes for livelf rhetoric but hinders the develop - ment of effective policf and raises environmental and economic costs. Moving befond mfth toward a water policf based on facts and science is essential if California is to meet the multi- ple, sometimes competing, goals for sustainable management in the 21st centurf: satisffing agricultural, environmental, and urban demands for water supplf and qualitf and ensuring adequate protection from floods. 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Improv- ing the collection, analfsis, sfnthesis, and use of accurate information about the state’s water sfstem is also necessarf to encouraging fact-based policies. Of course, information alone will not dispel California’s water mfths. But better infor- mation can fashion more effective responses to California’s manf ongoing and future water challenges. In the months and fears ahead, policfmakers and voters will be involved in crucial decisions regarding one of California’s most precious and controversial resources. Let’s be sure those decisions are based on realitf, not mfth. Please visit the report’s publication page http://www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=890 to find related resources. myth reality 1. California is running out of water. California has run out of abundant water and will need to adapt to increasing water scarcitf. 2. [Insert villain here] is responsible for California’s water problems. 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