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JTF CaliforniansandFutureJTF

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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(32) "JTF_CaliforniansandFutureJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "176337" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5343) "CALIFORNIANS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD THE FUTURE JANUARY 2009 ƒ CONFIDENCE IN STATE’S ABILITY TO PLAN FOR THE FUTURE IS DECLINING. California’s population, currently about 38 million, is projected to grow by nearly 25% to 47 million  in 2025. But only 50% of Californians have confidence in the state government’s ability to plan for  this growth—and only 10% say they have a great deal of confidence. Although confidence was 8  points higher in 2004 (58%), only 12% said they had a great deal of confidence in the state. Among  registered voters, Democrats are more likely than Republicans (55% to 47%) to express confidence  in the state’s ability to handle this future population growth.    ƒ MANY ARE UNAWARE OF THE TERM “INFRASTRUCTURE,” BUT NEARLY ALL RECOGNIZE ITS IMPORTANCE. California will need significant infrastructure improvement if it’s to accommodate its projected  growth. Although 34% of residents say they know a lot (and 35% a little) about the concept of infra‐ structure, another 30% say they have never heard of this term. In August 2004, a similar percentage  of residents had heard of the term infrastructure, but they were less likely to know a lot about it  (26% a lot, 45% a little), and nearly as many as today had not heard of the term at all (27% in 2004,  30% in 2008). When told that infrastructure refers to a variety of public works projects, 94% say that  the condition of roads and other infrastructure is very (67%) or somewhat (27%) important to the  quality of life and economic vitality in their region. Findings were similar in 2004 (68% very  important, 29% somewhat important).  ƒ MAJORITIES BELIEVE THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS LACK ADEQUATE INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING. Infrastructure projects require major outlays of public funds, and 55% of residents believe their local  government does not have adequate funding for the roads, school facilities, and other infrastructure  projects necessary to prepare for future growth (39% believe their local government does have  adequate resources). In 2004, residents were slightly more likely to say funding was falling short  (60%). Residents are definitely interested in infrastructure:  71% would like to be involved a lot  (32%) or some (39%) in discussions about planning for the future in their part of California. A  slightly lower percentage (66%) said the same in 2004 (25% a lot, 41% some).  ƒ CALIFORNIANS ANTICIPATE A WORKFORCE SKILLS GAP… Recent studies have indicated that more college‐educated workers will be needed as the California  economy transitions from manufacturing to service‐oriented jobs. When asked to look ahead 20  years, most residents (67%) recognize that the state’s economy will need a greater percentage of  college‐educated workers if current trends continue, yet nearly half (47%) anticipate that there may  not be enough college‐educated residents to fill the jobs and skills likely to be in demand.    ƒ … AND PLACE HIGH IMPORTANCE ON THE STATE’S HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM. Nearly all Californians (95%) say the state’s higher education system is important to the quality of  life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years, with 72% saying it is very important.  And while 85% percent think it is very (46%) or somewhat (39%) important for the state to spend  more money to increase capacity at public colleges and universities, 45% have very little (33%) or   no (12%) confidence in the state’s ability to plan for the future of the higher education system.  Californians’ Attitudes Toward the Future Confidence in State Government’s Ability to Plan for Future 2004 2008 2% 2% 40% 58% 48% 50% Great deal/some Very little/none Don’t know Understanding of Infrastructure 50 45 40 35 30 % 25 20 15 10 5 0 34 26 Know a lot 45 35 2004 2008 30 27 Know a little Haven’t heard of infrastructure Importance of Infrastructure to Regional Economy and Quality of Life 80 68 67 60 2004 2008 % 40 20 29 27 Adequacy of Local Government’s Infrastructure Funding 80 2004 2008 60 60 55 % 40 39 33 20 0 Very important Somewhat important Perceptions of California's Future Workforce Needs In 20 years, California will need ____  of college-educated workers 5% 8% 20% 67% 0 Adequate Not adequate Perceptions of California's Future Supply of Workers In 20 years, California will have ____ college-educated residents for the jobs/skills in demand 7% 16% 47% 30% Nov. 2008 a higher percentage the same percentage a lower percentage Don't know Nov. 2008 not enough just enough more than enough Don't know Sources: State of California, Department of Finance, Race/Ethnic Population with Age and Sex Detail, 2000–2050. PPIC Statewide Surveys, August 2004 and October and November 2008. Contact: surveys@ppic.org Supported with funding from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation." } ["___content":protected]=> string(142) "

JTF CaliforniansandFutureJTF

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(103) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/californians-attitudes-toward-the-future/jtf_californiansandfuturejtf/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8476) ["ID"]=> int(8476) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:37:57" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3685) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(28) "JTF CaliforniansandFutureJTF" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(28) "jtf_californiansandfuturejtf" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(32) "JTF_CaliforniansandFutureJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "176337" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5343) "CALIFORNIANS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD THE FUTURE JANUARY 2009 ƒ CONFIDENCE IN STATE’S ABILITY TO PLAN FOR THE FUTURE IS DECLINING. California’s population, currently about 38 million, is projected to grow by nearly 25% to 47 million  in 2025. But only 50% of Californians have confidence in the state government’s ability to plan for  this growth—and only 10% say they have a great deal of confidence. Although confidence was 8  points higher in 2004 (58%), only 12% said they had a great deal of confidence in the state. Among  registered voters, Democrats are more likely than Republicans (55% to 47%) to express confidence  in the state’s ability to handle this future population growth.    ƒ MANY ARE UNAWARE OF THE TERM “INFRASTRUCTURE,” BUT NEARLY ALL RECOGNIZE ITS IMPORTANCE. California will need significant infrastructure improvement if it’s to accommodate its projected  growth. Although 34% of residents say they know a lot (and 35% a little) about the concept of infra‐ structure, another 30% say they have never heard of this term. In August 2004, a similar percentage  of residents had heard of the term infrastructure, but they were less likely to know a lot about it  (26% a lot, 45% a little), and nearly as many as today had not heard of the term at all (27% in 2004,  30% in 2008). When told that infrastructure refers to a variety of public works projects, 94% say that  the condition of roads and other infrastructure is very (67%) or somewhat (27%) important to the  quality of life and economic vitality in their region. Findings were similar in 2004 (68% very  important, 29% somewhat important).  ƒ MAJORITIES BELIEVE THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS LACK ADEQUATE INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING. Infrastructure projects require major outlays of public funds, and 55% of residents believe their local  government does not have adequate funding for the roads, school facilities, and other infrastructure  projects necessary to prepare for future growth (39% believe their local government does have  adequate resources). In 2004, residents were slightly more likely to say funding was falling short  (60%). Residents are definitely interested in infrastructure:  71% would like to be involved a lot  (32%) or some (39%) in discussions about planning for the future in their part of California. A  slightly lower percentage (66%) said the same in 2004 (25% a lot, 41% some).  ƒ CALIFORNIANS ANTICIPATE A WORKFORCE SKILLS GAP… Recent studies have indicated that more college‐educated workers will be needed as the California  economy transitions from manufacturing to service‐oriented jobs. When asked to look ahead 20  years, most residents (67%) recognize that the state’s economy will need a greater percentage of  college‐educated workers if current trends continue, yet nearly half (47%) anticipate that there may  not be enough college‐educated residents to fill the jobs and skills likely to be in demand.    ƒ … AND PLACE HIGH IMPORTANCE ON THE STATE’S HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM. Nearly all Californians (95%) say the state’s higher education system is important to the quality of  life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years, with 72% saying it is very important.  And while 85% percent think it is very (46%) or somewhat (39%) important for the state to spend  more money to increase capacity at public colleges and universities, 45% have very little (33%) or   no (12%) confidence in the state’s ability to plan for the future of the higher education system.  Californians’ Attitudes Toward the Future Confidence in State Government’s Ability to Plan for Future 2004 2008 2% 2% 40% 58% 48% 50% Great deal/some Very little/none Don’t know Understanding of Infrastructure 50 45 40 35 30 % 25 20 15 10 5 0 34 26 Know a lot 45 35 2004 2008 30 27 Know a little Haven’t heard of infrastructure Importance of Infrastructure to Regional Economy and Quality of Life 80 68 67 60 2004 2008 % 40 20 29 27 Adequacy of Local Government’s Infrastructure Funding 80 2004 2008 60 60 55 % 40 39 33 20 0 Very important Somewhat important Perceptions of California's Future Workforce Needs In 20 years, California will need ____  of college-educated workers 5% 8% 20% 67% 0 Adequate Not adequate Perceptions of California's Future Supply of Workers In 20 years, California will have ____ college-educated residents for the jobs/skills in demand 7% 16% 47% 30% Nov. 2008 a higher percentage the same percentage a lower percentage Don't know Nov. 2008 not enough just enough more than enough Don't know Sources: State of California, Department of Finance, Race/Ethnic Population with Age and Sex Detail, 2000–2050. 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