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Californians’ Views on Climate Change

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(22) "jtf-climate-change.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "105863" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(6532) "Californians’ Views on Climate Change SEPTEMBER 2018 Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, Alyssa Dykman, and Lunna Lopes  Most Californians say it is important for the state to be a leader on climate change. A majority of Californians say it is very important (54%) that the state is a world leader in fighting climate change; 24% say it is somewhat important. Democrats (67%) are much more likely than independents (48%) and Republicans (23%) to say it is very important. Strong majorities of Latinos (68%) and African Americans (65%)—and fewer whites (47%) and Asian Americans (46%)—say it is very important. Two in three Californians (65%) favor the state acting independently of the federal government to combat global warming, while 28% are opposed. Democrats (82%) are far more likely than independents (61%) or Republicans (29%) to favor state efforts. Majorities across regions and age, education, gender, income, and racial/ethnic groups support state action.  Two in three Californians say the effects of global warming are already occurring. Two-thirds of Californians (67%) say global warming’s effects have already begun, and one in five (20%) say the effects will begin in the future. Only 8% say the effects will never happen. Since 2005, when PPIC began asking this question, majorities have said the effects have already begun. Today, majorities across regions and age, education, gender, and income groups hold this view. Asian Americans (78%) are the most likely to say the effects have already begun, while whites (12%) are the most likely to say the effects will never happen. A similar proportion of adults nationwide (60%, March 2018 Gallup Poll) say the effects have already begun.  Most Californians are concerned about the impact of global warming. Most Californians (80%) view global warming as a very serious (56%) or somewhat serious (24%) threat to the state’s future economy and quality of life. At least half across age, education, gender, income, and racial/ethnic groups see global warming as a very serious threat. Democrats (76%) are three times as likely as Republicans (22%) to hold this view. More than eight in ten Californians across regions and demographic groups are very or somewhat concerned about more severe wildfires caused by extreme weather, a possible impact of global warming. More than seven in ten Californians are very or somewhat concerned about ocean warming affecting marine and coastal life (78%) and rising sea levels having an impact on flooding and beach erosion (74%). On both issues, concern is higher among Democrats than among Republicans.  Most Californians support state efforts to address global warming. In PPIC surveys from 2006 to 2016, strong majorities of Californians favored the state’s landmark law limiting greenhouse gas emissions (Assembly Bill 32). Today, 67% said they favor the more ambitious goals set by Senate Bill 32. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (73%) are the most likely to be in favor while whites (64%) are the least likely. When asked about a proposed state law that would require 100% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources (Senate Bill 100), 72% of Californians are in favor, while 21% are opposed. At least six in ten across regions and demographic groups are in favor of both policies.  Majorities support action on climate change even if it brings increased costs. Half of Californians (50%) say they would be willing to pay more for electricity generated by renewable sources to reduce global warming. When asked how state action to reduce global warming might affect gas prices, a majority of Californians (56%) say they expect prices would increase. Half of Californians (48%) believe that state policies to combat global warming would cause there to be more jobs around the state, while 18% would expect fewer jobs; 23% think there would be no effect.  Most Californians say the issue of global warming is personally important. Most Californians (62%) say the issue of global warming is important to them personally (28% extremely important, 34% very important), compared to 48% of adults nationwide (June 2018, ABC News/Stanford/ Resources for the Future Poll). Most Democrats (80%) and independents (61%) say global warming is extremely or very important to them personally, while 29% of Republicans say the same. Latinos (72%) are the most likely to hold this view, followed by Asian Americans (64%), African Americans (61%), and whites (55%). PPIC.ORG CALIFORNIANS’ VIEWS ON CLIMATE CHANGE SEPTEMBER 2018 100 80 60 % 40 20 How important is it that California acts as a leader around the world in efforts to flight climate change? % saying “very important” 67 48 23 0 Dem Rep Ind How serious is the threat of global warming to California’s future? 100 80 % saying “very serious” 60 % 40 20 0 Dem Ind Rep 76 59 22 Source: PPIC Statewide Survey, July 2018. Margin of error for all adults is ±3.4%. Source: PPIC Statewide Survey series. The margin of error for all adults in July 2018 is ±3.4%. The margins of error for subgroups are larger. Demographic breakdown of views on climate change Favor California Willing to pay more Say state efforts to making its own for electricity if it were reduce global warming policy generated by will lead to higher renewable sources gasoline prices All adults 65% 50% 56% Say state efforts to reduce global warming will lead to more jobs 48% Likely voters 62 51 58 51 Democratic Party registration (registered Republican voters only) Independent 82 64 29 21 61 49 51 64 78 29 62 49 African Americans 67 44 57 49 Race/Ethnicity Asian Americans Latinos 71 65 70 49 47 51 56 51 Whites 60 48 60 47 Central Valley 54 51 60 47 Inland Empire 56 37 51 41 Region Los Angeles 73 49 62 50 Orange/San Diego 62 49 54 45 San Francisco Bay Area 73 60 50 51 Gender Men Women 62 48 68 53 59 47 54 49 18 to 34 75 60 60 51 Age 35 to 54 65 48 53 48 55 and older 55 43 56 46 Under $40,000 66 48 57 46 Income $40,000 to under $80,000 69 56 65 55 $80,000 or more 64 55 51 49 Sources: PPIC Statewide Survey: Californians and the Environment, July 2018 (1,711 adults and 1,020 likely voters), and PPIC Statewide Survey series. The margin of error for all adults in July 2018 is +/-3.4%. The margins of error for subgroups are larger. Contact: surveys@ppic.org Supported with funding from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Flora Family Foundation, and the Heising-Simons Foundation PPIC.ORG" } ["___content":protected]=> string(143) "

Californians’ Views on Climate Change

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(89) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/californians-views-on-climate-change/jtf-climate-change/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(16174) ["ID"]=> int(16174) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-09-07 14:03:30" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4501) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(39) "Californians’ Views on Climate Change" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(18) "jtf-climate-change" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(22) "jtf-climate-change.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "105863" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(6532) "Californians’ Views on Climate Change SEPTEMBER 2018 Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, Alyssa Dykman, and Lunna Lopes  Most Californians say it is important for the state to be a leader on climate change. A majority of Californians say it is very important (54%) that the state is a world leader in fighting climate change; 24% say it is somewhat important. Democrats (67%) are much more likely than independents (48%) and Republicans (23%) to say it is very important. Strong majorities of Latinos (68%) and African Americans (65%)—and fewer whites (47%) and Asian Americans (46%)—say it is very important. Two in three Californians (65%) favor the state acting independently of the federal government to combat global warming, while 28% are opposed. Democrats (82%) are far more likely than independents (61%) or Republicans (29%) to favor state efforts. Majorities across regions and age, education, gender, income, and racial/ethnic groups support state action.  Two in three Californians say the effects of global warming are already occurring. Two-thirds of Californians (67%) say global warming’s effects have already begun, and one in five (20%) say the effects will begin in the future. Only 8% say the effects will never happen. Since 2005, when PPIC began asking this question, majorities have said the effects have already begun. Today, majorities across regions and age, education, gender, and income groups hold this view. Asian Americans (78%) are the most likely to say the effects have already begun, while whites (12%) are the most likely to say the effects will never happen. A similar proportion of adults nationwide (60%, March 2018 Gallup Poll) say the effects have already begun.  Most Californians are concerned about the impact of global warming. Most Californians (80%) view global warming as a very serious (56%) or somewhat serious (24%) threat to the state’s future economy and quality of life. At least half across age, education, gender, income, and racial/ethnic groups see global warming as a very serious threat. Democrats (76%) are three times as likely as Republicans (22%) to hold this view. More than eight in ten Californians across regions and demographic groups are very or somewhat concerned about more severe wildfires caused by extreme weather, a possible impact of global warming. More than seven in ten Californians are very or somewhat concerned about ocean warming affecting marine and coastal life (78%) and rising sea levels having an impact on flooding and beach erosion (74%). On both issues, concern is higher among Democrats than among Republicans.  Most Californians support state efforts to address global warming. In PPIC surveys from 2006 to 2016, strong majorities of Californians favored the state’s landmark law limiting greenhouse gas emissions (Assembly Bill 32). Today, 67% said they favor the more ambitious goals set by Senate Bill 32. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (73%) are the most likely to be in favor while whites (64%) are the least likely. When asked about a proposed state law that would require 100% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources (Senate Bill 100), 72% of Californians are in favor, while 21% are opposed. At least six in ten across regions and demographic groups are in favor of both policies.  Majorities support action on climate change even if it brings increased costs. Half of Californians (50%) say they would be willing to pay more for electricity generated by renewable sources to reduce global warming. When asked how state action to reduce global warming might affect gas prices, a majority of Californians (56%) say they expect prices would increase. Half of Californians (48%) believe that state policies to combat global warming would cause there to be more jobs around the state, while 18% would expect fewer jobs; 23% think there would be no effect.  Most Californians say the issue of global warming is personally important. Most Californians (62%) say the issue of global warming is important to them personally (28% extremely important, 34% very important), compared to 48% of adults nationwide (June 2018, ABC News/Stanford/ Resources for the Future Poll). Most Democrats (80%) and independents (61%) say global warming is extremely or very important to them personally, while 29% of Republicans say the same. Latinos (72%) are the most likely to hold this view, followed by Asian Americans (64%), African Americans (61%), and whites (55%). PPIC.ORG CALIFORNIANS’ VIEWS ON CLIMATE CHANGE SEPTEMBER 2018 100 80 60 % 40 20 How important is it that California acts as a leader around the world in efforts to flight climate change? % saying “very important” 67 48 23 0 Dem Rep Ind How serious is the threat of global warming to California’s future? 100 80 % saying “very serious” 60 % 40 20 0 Dem Ind Rep 76 59 22 Source: PPIC Statewide Survey, July 2018. Margin of error for all adults is ±3.4%. Source: PPIC Statewide Survey series. The margin of error for all adults in July 2018 is ±3.4%. The margins of error for subgroups are larger. Demographic breakdown of views on climate change Favor California Willing to pay more Say state efforts to making its own for electricity if it were reduce global warming policy generated by will lead to higher renewable sources gasoline prices All adults 65% 50% 56% Say state efforts to reduce global warming will lead to more jobs 48% Likely voters 62 51 58 51 Democratic Party registration (registered Republican voters only) Independent 82 64 29 21 61 49 51 64 78 29 62 49 African Americans 67 44 57 49 Race/Ethnicity Asian Americans Latinos 71 65 70 49 47 51 56 51 Whites 60 48 60 47 Central Valley 54 51 60 47 Inland Empire 56 37 51 41 Region Los Angeles 73 49 62 50 Orange/San Diego 62 49 54 45 San Francisco Bay Area 73 60 50 51 Gender Men Women 62 48 68 53 59 47 54 49 18 to 34 75 60 60 51 Age 35 to 54 65 48 53 48 55 and older 55 43 56 46 Under $40,000 66 48 57 46 Income $40,000 to under $80,000 69 56 65 55 $80,000 or more 64 55 51 49 Sources: PPIC Statewide Survey: Californians and the Environment, July 2018 (1,711 adults and 1,020 likely voters), and PPIC Statewide Survey series. The margin of error for all adults in July 2018 is +/-3.4%. The margins of error for subgroups are larger. Contact: surveys@ppic.org Supported with funding from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Flora Family Foundation, and the Heising-Simons Foundation PPIC.ORG" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-09-07 21:03:30" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(18) "jtf-climate-change" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2018-09-07 14:04:01" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-09-07 21:04:01" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(61) "http://www.ppic.org/wp-content/uploads/jtf-climate-change.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }