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JTF 2004ElectionJTF

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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(23) "JTF_2004ElectionJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "67419" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5035) "CALIFORNIA’S 2004 ELECTION November 2004 Democrats had the advantage in voter registration and at the polls this year. As of the close of registration for the November 2nd election, 16.6 million Californians were registered to vote. Democrats (43%) had a lead over Republicans (35%) in registration, while 18 percent of voters registered as decline-to-state and 4 percent had other party affiliations. Media exit polls from the election reported a similar 6 to 8 point edge for Democrats over Republicans. The Secretary of State predicts voter turnout at above 70 percent when all ballots are tallied. Voting patterns in the presidential and U.S. Senate races are consistent with the recent past. John Kerry defeated George W. Bush by more than one million votes (55% to 44%) in California, marking the fourth election in a row where a Democrat won the presidential race by a double-digit margin. In the U.S. Senate race, Barbara Boxer’s win over Bill Jones by more than two million votes (58% to 38%) was well over the margins of her victories in two previous elections. The big Democratic wins for Kerry and Boxer were a result of overwhelming support from within their party, majority support among independent voters, solid showings in Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, and high levels of support among women and nonwhites. Bush and Jones had strong showings in Republican strongholds – the Central Valley, Inland Empire (Riverside and San Bernardino Counties), and Orange County – as well as among white men and weekly churchgoers, who accounted for about one-third of the voters this year, according to media exit polls. The status quo reigns in California’s Congressional Delegation. Of the 53 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, 51 incumbents were up for reelection this year and all were reelected. In the two open seats, a Democrat and a Republican were elected to office. In January, California will send 33 Democrats and 20 Republicans to the U.S. House of Representatives, reflecting no change in the partisan balance of the state delegation. The new delegation is a diverse group in terms of their demographic profile: There are 35 men and 18 women, 40 whites, 7 Latinos, 4 blacks, and 2 Asians. In pre-election polls, 39 percent of Californians gave their congressional representatives excellent or good ratings. The State Legislature has turned over since term limits but its partisan makeup is unchanged. Legislative elections were held for all 80 of the two-year seats in the State Assembly, and 20 of the four-year seats in the 40-member State Senate. Incumbents won all of their State Senate races (10) and State Assembly races (56). Although there were 18 open seats in the State Assembly and 8 in the Senate due to term limit vacancies, there is no change in the partisan makeup of the new State Assembly (48 Democrats, 32 Republicans) and State Senate (25 Democrats, 15 Republicans). In pre-election polls, 49 percent of California adults and 47 percent of likely voters said they approved of the overall performance of the state legislators in their local districts. California voters passed 9 of 16 state propositions on the ballot. Californians faced a long ballot with a diverse set of state propositions. Among the highlights, voters passed 4 fiscal measures that included a state funding guarantee for local governments (84%) and increased funding for children’s hospital construction (58%), mental health services (53%), and stem cell research (59%). A state measure to maintain the partisan primary system (67%) outpolled an open primary initiative (46%). A majority of voters favored a measure to expand the use of DNA samples in criminal investigations (62%), while opposing an effort to place limits on the “three strikes” criminal sentencing law (53%). Voters approved measures to improve access to public records (83%) and place limits on business lawsuits (59%). A referendum on requiring employers to provide health care insurance for workers was defeated (49% yes, 51% no). Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org California Electorate 4 18 43 Presidential and U.S. Senate Elections 1 44 4 38 55 58 35 Dem ocrats Kerry Bush Other Boxer Jones Other Republicans Independent Other California Congressional Delegation 35 33 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Democrats 20 Republicans California State Legislature 80 Assembly Seats 40 Senate Seats 32 15 48 25 Number of Democrats Number of Republicans Number of seats in U.S. House of Representatives Percent who voted yes Fiscal Ballot Measures 90 84 80 70 59 58 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Prop 1A Prop 71 Prop 61 Local Gov't Stem Cells Children's Revenues Hospitals 53 Prop 63 Mental Health Percent who voted yes Primary Election Measures 70 67 60 50 46 40 30 20 10 0 Prop 60- Partisan Prop 62- Open Sources: California Secretary of State, CNN exit poll, Los Angeles Times exit poll, and PPIC Statewide Surveys (August, September, and October 2004). Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(124) "

JTF 2004ElectionJTF

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As of the close of registration for the November 2nd election, 16.6 million Californians were registered to vote. Democrats (43%) had a lead over Republicans (35%) in registration, while 18 percent of voters registered as decline-to-state and 4 percent had other party affiliations. Media exit polls from the election reported a similar 6 to 8 point edge for Democrats over Republicans. The Secretary of State predicts voter turnout at above 70 percent when all ballots are tallied. Voting patterns in the presidential and U.S. Senate races are consistent with the recent past. John Kerry defeated George W. Bush by more than one million votes (55% to 44%) in California, marking the fourth election in a row where a Democrat won the presidential race by a double-digit margin. In the U.S. Senate race, Barbara Boxer’s win over Bill Jones by more than two million votes (58% to 38%) was well over the margins of her victories in two previous elections. 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In January, California will send 33 Democrats and 20 Republicans to the U.S. House of Representatives, reflecting no change in the partisan balance of the state delegation. The new delegation is a diverse group in terms of their demographic profile: There are 35 men and 18 women, 40 whites, 7 Latinos, 4 blacks, and 2 Asians. In pre-election polls, 39 percent of Californians gave their congressional representatives excellent or good ratings. The State Legislature has turned over since term limits but its partisan makeup is unchanged. Legislative elections were held for all 80 of the two-year seats in the State Assembly, and 20 of the four-year seats in the 40-member State Senate. Incumbents won all of their State Senate races (10) and State Assembly races (56). 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A majority of voters favored a measure to expand the use of DNA samples in criminal investigations (62%), while opposing an effort to place limits on the “three strikes” criminal sentencing law (53%). Voters approved measures to improve access to public records (83%) and place limits on business lawsuits (59%). A referendum on requiring employers to provide health care insurance for workers was defeated (49% yes, 51% no). Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org California Electorate 4 18 43 Presidential and U.S. Senate Elections 1 44 4 38 55 58 35 Dem ocrats Kerry Bush Other Boxer Jones Other Republicans Independent Other California Congressional Delegation 35 33 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Democrats 20 Republicans California State Legislature 80 Assembly Seats 40 Senate Seats 32 15 48 25 Number of Democrats Number of Republicans Number of seats in U.S. House of Representatives Percent who voted yes Fiscal Ballot Measures 90 84 80 70 59 58 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Prop 1A Prop 71 Prop 61 Local Gov't Stem Cells Children's Revenues Hospitals 53 Prop 63 Mental Health Percent who voted yes Primary Election Measures 70 67 60 50 46 40 30 20 10 0 Prop 60- Partisan Prop 62- Open Sources: California Secretary of State, CNN exit poll, Los Angeles Times exit poll, and PPIC Statewide Surveys (August, September, and October 2004). 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