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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(28) "JTF_IndependentVotersJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "77293" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5608) "PPIC.ORG California’s Independent Voters Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, David Kordus, and Lunna Lopes  The share of independent voters continues to increase. As of the June 2016 primary, the share of California voters registered as independents, also known as “ decline to state ” or “no party preference” voters , was 23.3 % — a more than twofold increase since the November 199 2 p residential election (10.3%). Over the same period, the percentage of voters affiliated with each of the major parties has fallen: Republicans from 37 % to 27.3%, Democrats from 49 .1% to 44.8%. Since May 2012, t he share of independents has increased slightly ( from 21.3%); the share of Democrats has also risen (43.4% to 44.8%) , while the share of Republicans has fallen 3 points (30.2% to 27.3%). The total number of registered voters has increased slightly, from 17.15 million in May 201 2 to 17.92 million in May 201 6, and so has the number of indep endents (4.18 million today, 3.65 million in May 2012) .  A plurality of independents lean toward the Democratic Party. Our surveys over the p ast year indicate that more independents who are likely to vote lean toward the Democratic than toward the Republic an Party (41% to 32%), while 27 % lean toward neither party. Democratic leanings among independents were similar in 200 8 (4 4 %) and 2012 (43 %), as were Republican leanings ( 28% in 2008 , 30 % in 2012 ) and the share leaning toward neither major party (28% in 20 08, 27 % in 201 2). Four in ten independent likely voters view themselves as ideologically middle-of-the -road ( 41%), while three in ten self -identify as liberal ( 28%) or say they are conservative ( 31%).  Most independents say neither party does an adequate job. Most independent likely voters have unfavorable views of both the Democratic Party ( 55%) and the Republican Party ( 69%). When independents are asked why they are registered as “no party preference” nearly half say they are not satisfied with the parti es or that parties don’t reflect their views ( 48%); one in five say they vote for candidates, not party ( 21%). When asked if the major parties do an adequate job representing the American people, or if they do such a poor job that a third major party is ne eded, independent likely voters (69%) are much more likely than partisans (57 % Republicans, 52 % Democrats) to say a third party is needed.  Independents align with Democrats on some issues … On issues that divide voters along party lines, independent likely voters often agree with Democrats. For example, 69% of Democrats and 65 % of independents say recreational marijuana should be legal , while a majority of Republicans are opposed (56 % not legal, 42% legal ). On extending the Proposition 30 tax increase on the wealthy to fund education and healthcare , 80% of Democrats and 65 % of independents are in favor, while 68 % of Republicans are opposed.  … but they are an ideologically divided group. The views of independent voters who lean toward a party are often similar to that party’s positions . But on many issues that divide partisans, independents as a group are divided. When asked about the 2010 health care reform law, for example, independent likely voters are closely divided ( 51% favorable, 44 % unfavorable). A similar pattern holds rega rding the question of whether everyone has a fair chance to get ahead in today’s economy : 63% of Democrats say just a few people at the top have a chance, while 70% of Republicans say everyone has a fair chance to get ahead ; among independents, 58 % say everyone has a fair chance to get ahead and 38% say just a few people at the top have a chance .  Independents tend to vote for Democratic presidential candidates—but most do not like their choices . Leading up to the 2016 electio n, most independents were not satisfied with their choices of presidential candidates (May 2016: 35% satisfied, 62% not satisfied). In our July survey , independents prefer Hillary Clinton (37%) over Donald Trump ( 24%), Gary Johnson ( 10%), or Jill Stein ( 5% ), with 11% saying they would vote for someone else or would not vote, and 13 % undecided. SEPTEMBER 2016 CALIFORNIA’S INDEPENDENT VOTERS SEPTEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG Party registration in presidential election years Sources: California Secretary of State, Report of Registration, October 2012 and May 2016 . Seven PPIC Statewide Surveys from September 201 5 to July 2016 , 2,451 independents, of whom 1, 627 are likely voters. For more information on the demographic differences between independents and others, see “ California Voter and Party Profiles .” Contact: survey@ppic.org 37 24 10 5 11 13 2016 presidential election preferences July 2016 Hillary ClintonDonald TrumpGary JohnsonJill SteinSomeone else/would not voteDon't know 44 43 41 28 30 32 28 2727 0 10 20 30 40 50 2008 20122016 Percent Leanings toward major parties Democratic Party Republican Party Neither (volunteered) 38 24 55 69 0 20 40 60 80 Democratic Party Republican Party Percent Favorability of political parties FavorableUnfavorable 49 4745 4344 4445 37 36 3535 3129 27 10 1114 18 20 21 23 4 5 5 5 46 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1992 19962000 20042008 20122016* Percent Democratic Republican Decline-to-state Other parties Note: Numbers may not add to 100% due to rounding. *Prior to June primary. All other years, prior to November general election. % independent likely voters 28 41 31 Political ideology Liberal Middle-of-the-road Conservative % independent likely voters % independent likely voters % independent likely voters" } ["___content":protected]=> string(134) "

JTF IndependentVotersJTF

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(89) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/californias-independent-voters/jtf_independentvotersjtf/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8626) ["ID"]=> int(8626) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:39:18" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3876) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(24) "JTF IndependentVotersJTF" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(24) "jtf_independentvotersjtf" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(28) "JTF_IndependentVotersJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "77293" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(5608) "PPIC.ORG California’s Independent Voters Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, David Kordus, and Lunna Lopes  The share of independent voters continues to increase. As of the June 2016 primary, the share of California voters registered as independents, also known as “ decline to state ” or “no party preference” voters , was 23.3 % — a more than twofold increase since the November 199 2 p residential election (10.3%). Over the same period, the percentage of voters affiliated with each of the major parties has fallen: Republicans from 37 % to 27.3%, Democrats from 49 .1% to 44.8%. Since May 2012, t he share of independents has increased slightly ( from 21.3%); the share of Democrats has also risen (43.4% to 44.8%) , while the share of Republicans has fallen 3 points (30.2% to 27.3%). The total number of registered voters has increased slightly, from 17.15 million in May 201 2 to 17.92 million in May 201 6, and so has the number of indep endents (4.18 million today, 3.65 million in May 2012) .  A plurality of independents lean toward the Democratic Party. Our surveys over the p ast year indicate that more independents who are likely to vote lean toward the Democratic than toward the Republic an Party (41% to 32%), while 27 % lean toward neither party. Democratic leanings among independents were similar in 200 8 (4 4 %) and 2012 (43 %), as were Republican leanings ( 28% in 2008 , 30 % in 2012 ) and the share leaning toward neither major party (28% in 20 08, 27 % in 201 2). Four in ten independent likely voters view themselves as ideologically middle-of-the -road ( 41%), while three in ten self -identify as liberal ( 28%) or say they are conservative ( 31%).  Most independents say neither party does an adequate job. Most independent likely voters have unfavorable views of both the Democratic Party ( 55%) and the Republican Party ( 69%). When independents are asked why they are registered as “no party preference” nearly half say they are not satisfied with the parti es or that parties don’t reflect their views ( 48%); one in five say they vote for candidates, not party ( 21%). When asked if the major parties do an adequate job representing the American people, or if they do such a poor job that a third major party is ne eded, independent likely voters (69%) are much more likely than partisans (57 % Republicans, 52 % Democrats) to say a third party is needed.  Independents align with Democrats on some issues … On issues that divide voters along party lines, independent likely voters often agree with Democrats. For example, 69% of Democrats and 65 % of independents say recreational marijuana should be legal , while a majority of Republicans are opposed (56 % not legal, 42% legal ). On extending the Proposition 30 tax increase on the wealthy to fund education and healthcare , 80% of Democrats and 65 % of independents are in favor, while 68 % of Republicans are opposed.  … but they are an ideologically divided group. The views of independent voters who lean toward a party are often similar to that party’s positions . But on many issues that divide partisans, independents as a group are divided. When asked about the 2010 health care reform law, for example, independent likely voters are closely divided ( 51% favorable, 44 % unfavorable). A similar pattern holds rega rding the question of whether everyone has a fair chance to get ahead in today’s economy : 63% of Democrats say just a few people at the top have a chance, while 70% of Republicans say everyone has a fair chance to get ahead ; among independents, 58 % say everyone has a fair chance to get ahead and 38% say just a few people at the top have a chance .  Independents tend to vote for Democratic presidential candidates—but most do not like their choices . Leading up to the 2016 electio n, most independents were not satisfied with their choices of presidential candidates (May 2016: 35% satisfied, 62% not satisfied). In our July survey , independents prefer Hillary Clinton (37%) over Donald Trump ( 24%), Gary Johnson ( 10%), or Jill Stein ( 5% ), with 11% saying they would vote for someone else or would not vote, and 13 % undecided. SEPTEMBER 2016 CALIFORNIA’S INDEPENDENT VOTERS SEPTEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG Party registration in presidential election years Sources: California Secretary of State, Report of Registration, October 2012 and May 2016 . Seven PPIC Statewide Surveys from September 201 5 to July 2016 , 2,451 independents, of whom 1, 627 are likely voters. For more information on the demographic differences between independents and others, see “ California Voter and Party Profiles .” Contact: survey@ppic.org 37 24 10 5 11 13 2016 presidential election preferences July 2016 Hillary ClintonDonald TrumpGary JohnsonJill SteinSomeone else/would not voteDon't know 44 43 41 28 30 32 28 2727 0 10 20 30 40 50 2008 20122016 Percent Leanings toward major parties Democratic Party Republican Party Neither (volunteered) 38 24 55 69 0 20 40 60 80 Democratic Party Republican Party Percent Favorability of political parties FavorableUnfavorable 49 4745 4344 4445 37 36 3535 3129 27 10 1114 18 20 21 23 4 5 5 5 46 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1992 19962000 20042008 20122016* Percent Democratic Republican Decline-to-state Other parties Note: Numbers may not add to 100% due to rounding. *Prior to June primary. All other years, prior to November general election. % independent likely voters 28 41 31 Political ideology Liberal Middle-of-the-road Conservative % independent likely voters % independent likely voters % independent likely voters" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:39:18" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(24) "jtf_independentvotersjtf" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:39:18" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:39:18" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(66) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/JTF_IndependentVotersJTF.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }