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JTF CAMinorityVotersJTF

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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_CAMinorityVotersJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "77550" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3589) "CALIFORNIA’S MINORITY AND IMMIGRANT VOTERS June 2004 Minorities in California and in the rest of the nation vote at similar rates In 2000, 56 percent of adult Asian and 54 percent of adult Latino citizens in California voted in the general election, compared with 53 percent of Asians and 51 percent of Latinos in the rest of the nation. The difference in black voter turnout in the 2000 election was even slighter – 66 percent in California compared to 67 percent nationally. Compared to other states, California has a large share of Asian and Latino voters Among states, California had the second largest share of Asians who voted in the 2000 presidential election (8%) but trailed Hawaii by a large margin, where 68 percent of the voting population was Asian. Latinos cast 15 percent of California’s total votes in the 2000 election, placing it third among states – behind New Mexico (29%) and Texas (18%) and tied with Arizona (15%). The share of black voters (8%) was small compared to states with the largest shares: Georgia (32%), Mississippi (29%), and Maryland (28%). The percentage of minority voters differs across California’s regions In the San Francisco Bay Area, Asians made up a larger share of the voters (12%) in the 2000 election than they did in the Los Angeles region (10%), the South Coast, and the Central Valley (3% each). Latinos composed almost a quarter of the voters in the Los Angeles region (24%), but they constituted a smaller share in the Central Valley (14%), the South Coast (11%), and the San Francisco Bay Area (6%). Blacks made up a larger share of the voters in the Los Angeles region (14%) than in the San Francisco Bay Area (7%), the Central Valley (5%), and the South Coast (2%). California has a large share of immigrant voters Between the 1996 and 2000 presidential elections, the share of foreign-born voters in California rose from 11 percent to 13 percent, significantly higher than the national average in 2000 (5%). In 2000, the share of foreign-born voters in California was slightly higher than New York’s (11%) and Florida’s (11%) – two states that have also attracted large numbers of immigrants in the past decade. Los Angeles has the largest share of immigrant voters In the 2000 election, the Los Angeles region had the largest share of foreign-born voters in the state (20%), followed by the San Francisco Bay Area (16%), the South Coast (11%), and the Central Valley (7%). Comparing the 1996 and 2000 elections, the share of foreign-born voters in the San Francisco Bay Area doubled from 8 percent to 16 percent, while the share of foreignborn voters in the South Coast dropped from 14 percent to 11 percent. Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org Minority Share of Voting Population, 2000 Presidential Election Asian Black Latino White National 2% 12 5 81 California New York 7% 2% 8 14 14 7 70 77 Florida 1% 10 11 78 Minority Share of Voting Population Across California’s Regions Percent 50 40 30 20 10 0 Bay Area Central Valley Los Angeles South Coast 1996 2000 Percent Immigrant Share of Voting Population Across California’s Regions 50 40 30 1996 2000 20 10 0 Bay Area Central Valley Los Angeles South Coast Sources: Current Population Survey Voter Supplement (CPS-VS), November 1996 and November 2000. Notes: The California sample sizes are: 5,241 for 1996 and 5,036 for 2000. The CPS-VS identifies 22 of California’s 58 counties; see http://www.bls.census.gov/cps/bmetro96.htm for a list of counties identified. Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(132) "

JTF CAMinorityVotersJTF

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(99) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/californias-minority-and-immigrant-voters/jtf_caminorityvotersjtf/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8413) ["ID"]=> int(8413) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:37:24" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3611) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "JTF CAMinorityVotersJTF" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(23) "jtf_caminorityvotersjtf" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_CAMinorityVotersJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "77550" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3589) "CALIFORNIA’S MINORITY AND IMMIGRANT VOTERS June 2004 Minorities in California and in the rest of the nation vote at similar rates In 2000, 56 percent of adult Asian and 54 percent of adult Latino citizens in California voted in the general election, compared with 53 percent of Asians and 51 percent of Latinos in the rest of the nation. The difference in black voter turnout in the 2000 election was even slighter – 66 percent in California compared to 67 percent nationally. Compared to other states, California has a large share of Asian and Latino voters Among states, California had the second largest share of Asians who voted in the 2000 presidential election (8%) but trailed Hawaii by a large margin, where 68 percent of the voting population was Asian. Latinos cast 15 percent of California’s total votes in the 2000 election, placing it third among states – behind New Mexico (29%) and Texas (18%) and tied with Arizona (15%). The share of black voters (8%) was small compared to states with the largest shares: Georgia (32%), Mississippi (29%), and Maryland (28%). The percentage of minority voters differs across California’s regions In the San Francisco Bay Area, Asians made up a larger share of the voters (12%) in the 2000 election than they did in the Los Angeles region (10%), the South Coast, and the Central Valley (3% each). Latinos composed almost a quarter of the voters in the Los Angeles region (24%), but they constituted a smaller share in the Central Valley (14%), the South Coast (11%), and the San Francisco Bay Area (6%). Blacks made up a larger share of the voters in the Los Angeles region (14%) than in the San Francisco Bay Area (7%), the Central Valley (5%), and the South Coast (2%). California has a large share of immigrant voters Between the 1996 and 2000 presidential elections, the share of foreign-born voters in California rose from 11 percent to 13 percent, significantly higher than the national average in 2000 (5%). In 2000, the share of foreign-born voters in California was slightly higher than New York’s (11%) and Florida’s (11%) – two states that have also attracted large numbers of immigrants in the past decade. Los Angeles has the largest share of immigrant voters In the 2000 election, the Los Angeles region had the largest share of foreign-born voters in the state (20%), followed by the San Francisco Bay Area (16%), the South Coast (11%), and the Central Valley (7%). Comparing the 1996 and 2000 elections, the share of foreign-born voters in the San Francisco Bay Area doubled from 8 percent to 16 percent, while the share of foreignborn voters in the South Coast dropped from 14 percent to 11 percent. Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org Minority Share of Voting Population, 2000 Presidential Election Asian Black Latino White National 2% 12 5 81 California New York 7% 2% 8 14 14 7 70 77 Florida 1% 10 11 78 Minority Share of Voting Population Across California’s Regions Percent 50 40 30 20 10 0 Bay Area Central Valley Los Angeles South Coast 1996 2000 Percent Immigrant Share of Voting Population Across California’s Regions 50 40 30 1996 2000 20 10 0 Bay Area Central Valley Los Angeles South Coast Sources: Current Population Survey Voter Supplement (CPS-VS), November 1996 and November 2000. Notes: The California sample sizes are: 5,241 for 1996 and 5,036 for 2000. The CPS-VS identifies 22 of California’s 58 counties; see http://www.bls.census.gov/cps/bmetro96.htm for a list of counties identified. 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