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JTF YoungChildrenJTF

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(24) "JTF_YoungChildrenJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "64540" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3450) "JUST THE FACTS CALIFORNIA'S YOUNG CHILDREN September 2002 Nearly half of California’s young children are Hispanic. California has just over three million children ages five years and under. Forty-eight percent of these children are Hispanic, 32 percent are white, 9 percent are Asian, 7 percent are African American, 3 percent are of multiple races, and less than 1 percent are Native American. In the general California population, whites are the largest group at 47 percent, followed by Hispanics at 32 percent. Almost half of young children in California have a foreign-born parent. Only 3 percent of young children are themselves foreign-born, but 48 percent have at least one parent who was born outside of the United States. This share is roughly three times that of the rest of the nation. Most young children in immigrant families are Hispanic (74 percent) or Asian (11 percent). Nearly one-third of the state’s young children are not living with married parents. Thirty percent of young children are not living with married parents. Overall, 18 percent of young children live with single mothers, 5 percent with domestic partners, 2 percent with single fathers, 2 percent with another relative, and 1 percent with a non-relative. Among young African American children, nearly two-thirds do not live with married parents. Relatives are providing child care for working parents of young children. More than half of young children have mothers who work outside the home. For children ages four and under who have an employed parent, care by a relative is one of the most common forms of non-parental child care (27 percent), followed by center-based care (22 percent). Poverty remains high among young children in California. The young child poverty rate fell substantially from a high of 32 percent in 1994 to 20 percent in 2000. However, it remains well above the 1969 rate (13 percent). Of poor young children, 45 percent live with a married, employed parent and about 19 percent live with an employed single mother. Many young children in the state have parents with low levels of education. Nearly one in four young children have parents without a high school diploma. Over 50 percent of young Hispanic children in foreign-born families have parents who do not have a high school diploma. In the rest of the nation, only 13 percent of young children have both parents lacking a high school diploma. Many young children in California have no health insurance. About one in five young children in California has no health insurance. Among African American children, 42 percent have incomplete vaccinations at age two, much higher than the statewide average of 29 percent. Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org Income Trends for California Families with Young Children, 1979-2000 $140 $120 $100 High income (90th percentile) Family $80 income (1000s) $60 $40 Median income $20 Low income (10th percentile) $0 1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 Year 1994 1997 2000 Share of Births to Women with Less than Twelve Years of Education, by Race, Ethnicity, and Nativity, 1999 70 60 50 40 Percentage of births 30 20 10 0 White Hispanic, Hispanic, Asian, Asian, Southeast African Native foreign-born U.S.-born foreign-born U.S.-born Asian American American Source: PPIC calculations based on Census 2000, the March Current Population Survey, and Vital Statistics Birth Records. Child care information is from the Urban Institute." } ["___content":protected]=> string(126) "

JTF YoungChildrenJTF

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