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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(14) "RB_512HJRB.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "798016" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3707) "www.ppic.org Defunding Higher Education What Are the Effects on College Enrollment? Hans Johnson with support from Belinda Reyes and David Ezekiel Supported with funding from the Donald Bren Foundation and The James Irvine Foundation SUMMARY C alifornia’s financial commitment to higher education has been compromised by fiscal crises and competing state priorities. Despite large increases in the demand for higher education, state general fund spending in this area has declined notably over the past ten years. California now spends more on corrections than on its public universities. This report examines the effects of this disinvestment on the enrollment rates of recent high school graduates at the University of California (UC), the California State University (CSU), and the California Community Colleges. Key findings include: • Increasingly, h igh s chool g raduates i n C alifornia a re l ess l ikely t o e nroll i n a ny f our-year college. • Enrollment rates a t U C a nd C SU h ave f allen b y o ne-fifth o ver t he p ast fi ve y ears, f rom a bout 22 percent of all high school graduates to below 18 percent. • Among the s tate’s m ost h ighly p repared h igh s chool g raduates, t he e nrollment r ate h as declined even more—from around 67 percent to 55 percent. • Many opt f or o vercrowded c ommunity c olleges, b ut i ncreases i n e nrollment r ates t here d o not make up for the declines at UC and CSU. • A small but n otable s hare o f t hose w ho w ere e ligible a nd e ven a ccepted i nto U C a nd C SU do not attend college anywhere. REUTERS/LUCY NICHOLSON Defunding Higher Education2www.ppic.org These enrollment declines have occurred as California’s public colleges and universities have employed various strategies to balance their budgets. Those strategies include cutting courses, programs, a nd s tudent s ervices, a s w ell a s m aking a dministrative c uts. C ertain p oli- cies and practices have been designed to limit enrollment, including capping enrollment at more desirable campuses. From a student perspective, the increased tuition and fees at UC and CSU campuses have been the most dramatic change, and community college students have faced greater difficulties in finding classes. Increased state f unding f or h igher e ducation w ould a lmost c ertainly r everse t hese trends. A proposed t ax i nitiative c ould l ead t o i ncreased r evenue f or t he s tate, w ith p olicy- makers explicitly i dentifying h igher e ducation a s a p rimary b eneficiary i f t he i nitiative p asses. Regardless of t he s uccess o f t he i nitiative, s teps c ould a nd s hould b e t aken t o e nsure t hat higher education expenditures are allocated in as efficient a manner as possible. One sugges- tion, for example, would fund the state’s colleges on the basis of student outcomes, such as courses and degrees completed, as well as enrollment. But without additional revenue, such steps are not l ikely t o f ully o vercome t he o verall d ecline i n s tate s upport f or h igher e ducation. If current enrollment t rends p ersist, C alifornia f aces a n a larming l oss o f c ollege g raduates— at a time when the state needs to be developing a more highly skilled workforce to ensure its future prosperity. PPIC has projected that the state will fall one million college graduates short of economic demand by 2025 unless enrollment and graduation rates improve substantially. Had enrollment rates not declined over the past few years, California would be on a path toward closing this workforce gap. Instead, it looms as large as ever. Please visit the report’s publication page to find related resources: www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=988" } ["___content":protected]=> string(106) "

RB 512HJRB

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Hans Johnson with support from Belinda Reyes and David Ezekiel Supported with funding from the Donald Bren Foundation and The James Irvine Foundation SUMMARY C alifornia’s financial commitment to higher education has been compromised by fiscal crises and competing state priorities. Despite large increases in the demand for higher education, state general fund spending in this area has declined notably over the past ten years. California now spends more on corrections than on its public universities. This report examines the effects of this disinvestment on the enrollment rates of recent high school graduates at the University of California (UC), the California State University (CSU), and the California Community Colleges. Key findings include: • Increasingly, h igh s chool g raduates i n C alifornia a re l ess l ikely t o e nroll i n a ny f our-year college. • Enrollment rates a t U C a nd C SU h ave f allen b y o ne-fifth o ver t he p ast fi ve y ears, f rom a bout 22 percent of all high school graduates to below 18 percent. • Among the s tate’s m ost h ighly p repared h igh s chool g raduates, t he e nrollment r ate h as declined even more—from around 67 percent to 55 percent. • Many opt f or o vercrowded c ommunity c olleges, b ut i ncreases i n e nrollment r ates t here d o not make up for the declines at UC and CSU. • A small but n otable s hare o f t hose w ho w ere e ligible a nd e ven a ccepted i nto U C a nd C SU do not attend college anywhere. REUTERS/LUCY NICHOLSON Defunding Higher Education2www.ppic.org These enrollment declines have occurred as California’s public colleges and universities have employed various strategies to balance their budgets. Those strategies include cutting courses, programs, a nd s tudent s ervices, a s w ell a s m aking a dministrative c uts. C ertain p oli- cies and practices have been designed to limit enrollment, including capping enrollment at more desirable campuses. From a student perspective, the increased tuition and fees at UC and CSU campuses have been the most dramatic change, and community college students have faced greater difficulties in finding classes. Increased state f unding f or h igher e ducation w ould a lmost c ertainly r everse t hese trends. A proposed t ax i nitiative c ould l ead t o i ncreased r evenue f or t he s tate, w ith p olicy- makers explicitly i dentifying h igher e ducation a s a p rimary b eneficiary i f t he i nitiative p asses. Regardless of t he s uccess o f t he i nitiative, s teps c ould a nd s hould b e t aken t o e nsure t hat higher education expenditures are allocated in as efficient a manner as possible. One sugges- tion, for example, would fund the state’s colleges on the basis of student outcomes, such as courses and degrees completed, as well as enrollment. But without additional revenue, such steps are not l ikely t o f ully o vercome t he o verall d ecline i n s tate s upport f or h igher e ducation. If current enrollment t rends p ersist, C alifornia f aces a n a larming l oss o f c ollege g raduates— at a time when the state needs to be developing a more highly skilled workforce to ensure its future prosperity. PPIC has projected that the state will fall one million college graduates short of economic demand by 2025 unless enrollment and graduation rates improve substantially. Had enrollment rates not declined over the past few years, California would be on a path toward closing this workforce gap. Instead, it looms as large as ever. 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