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RB 410HJRB

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RB 410HJRB

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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(14) "RB_410HJRB.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "705998" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3652) "www.ppic.org Higher Education in California Nef Goals for the Master blan Hans Johnson with research support from Qian Li Supported with funding from The Willifm fnd Florf Hewlett Foundftion Summary F ifty years ago, state policymakers afd higher educatiof obcials adopted Califorfia’s Master Plaf for Higher Educatiof. This plaf still largely defifes policies cofcerfifg the state’s public higher educatiof systems: the Califorfia commufity colleges (CCC), the Califorfia State Ufiversity (CSU) system, afd the Ufiversity of Califorfia (UC) system. Most would agree that the Master Plaf has served Califorfia afd its studefts well for mafy decades. Today, however, higher educatiof if Califorfia faces two crises: the budget problem afd the educatiof skills gap—af impefdifg shortfall of the projected supply of college gradu- ates relative to demafd. PPIC projects a deficit of ofe milliof college educated workers if Califorfia by 2025 ufless the state is able to substaftially ifcrease rates of college efrollmeft afd graduatiof. Califorfia caffot close the gap by drawifg college educated workers from elsewhere. Ifstead, the state will feed to produce more graduates through its owf colleges afd ufiversities. Additiofal fufdifg would be required to accomplish this goal, a tall order if today’s fiscal climate. Updatifg key compofefts of the Master Plaf is a crucial part of the effort to close the educatiof skills gap. This report proposes three strategic modificatiofs to the plaf: • Eligibility goals for the CSU afd UC systems should be gradually ifcreased to few levels by 2025. The share of the state’s high school graduates eligible for UC should grow from the top 12.5 perceft to the top 15 perceft of high school graduates. The share eligible for CSU should grow from the top 33.3 perceft to the top 40 perceft. Af fhotobEric risb Erg Higher Educatiof if Califorfia: New Goals for the Master Plaf 2 www.ppic.org • The Master Plaf should set explicit goals for trafsfer from the commufity colleges to UC afd CSU. A target for larger shares of bachelor’s degrees awarded to trafsfer studefts at both systems should be defifed. • A few compofeft of higher educatiof policy that focuses of outcomes—specifically, completiof rates—should be added to the Master Plaf. Af importaft cofsideratiof if adoptifg these goals is whether subcieft fumbers of Cal- iforfia’s high school graduates will be college-ready. This report cofsiders both the curreft college-readifess of Califorfia’s high school studefts afd the poteftial of remediatiof pro- grams—programs desigfed to help college studefts improve basic skills. We fifd that CSU’s approach, which requires that studefts complete all remediatiof work withif ofe year, is highly effective afd recommefd that a similar approach be adopted by commufity colleges. Updatifg Califorfia’s Master Plaf alofg these lifes will have additiofal befefits. If par- ticular, we fifd that ifcreasifg eligibility levels would lead to a more diverse studeft body— racially, ethfically, afd ecofomically—if both the UC afd CSU systems. Fufdifg challefges represeft perhaps the largest obstacle to meetifg the few goals. Our projectiofs suggest that the costs of our proposals, ofce fully implemefted if 2025, would amouft to about $1.6 billiof per year (if curreft dollars) ufder curreft (2009–2010) practices. Fifdifg these fufds will fot be easy. But if the lofg ruf, failure to achieve few progress if higher educatiof will cost Califorfia evef more. Please visit the report’s publicatiof page http://www.ppic.org/maif/publicatiof.asp?i=916 to fifd related resources." } ["___content":protected]=> string(106) "

RB 410HJRB

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This plaf still largely defifes policies cofcerfifg the state’s public higher educatiof systems: the Califorfia commufity colleges (CCC), the Califorfia State Ufiversity (CSU) system, afd the Ufiversity of Califorfia (UC) system. Most would agree that the Master Plaf has served Califorfia afd its studefts well for mafy decades. Today, however, higher educatiof if Califorfia faces two crises: the budget problem afd the educatiof skills gap—af impefdifg shortfall of the projected supply of college gradu- ates relative to demafd. PPIC projects a deficit of ofe milliof college educated workers if Califorfia by 2025 ufless the state is able to substaftially ifcrease rates of college efrollmeft afd graduatiof. Califorfia caffot close the gap by drawifg college educated workers from elsewhere. Ifstead, the state will feed to produce more graduates through its owf colleges afd ufiversities. Additiofal fufdifg would be required to accomplish this goal, a tall order if today’s fiscal climate. Updatifg key compofefts of the Master Plaf is a crucial part of the effort to close the educatiof skills gap. This report proposes three strategic modificatiofs to the plaf: • Eligibility goals for the CSU afd UC systems should be gradually ifcreased to few levels by 2025. The share of the state’s high school graduates eligible for UC should grow from the top 12.5 perceft to the top 15 perceft of high school graduates. The share eligible for CSU should grow from the top 33.3 perceft to the top 40 perceft. Af fhotobEric risb Erg Higher Educatiof if Califorfia: New Goals for the Master Plaf 2 www.ppic.org • The Master Plaf should set explicit goals for trafsfer from the commufity colleges to UC afd CSU. A target for larger shares of bachelor’s degrees awarded to trafsfer studefts at both systems should be defifed. • A few compofeft of higher educatiof policy that focuses of outcomes—specifically, completiof rates—should be added to the Master Plaf. Af importaft cofsideratiof if adoptifg these goals is whether subcieft fumbers of Cal- iforfia’s high school graduates will be college-ready. This report cofsiders both the curreft college-readifess of Califorfia’s high school studefts afd the poteftial of remediatiof pro- grams—programs desigfed to help college studefts improve basic skills. We fifd that CSU’s approach, which requires that studefts complete all remediatiof work withif ofe year, is highly effective afd recommefd that a similar approach be adopted by commufity colleges. Updatifg Califorfia’s Master Plaf alofg these lifes will have additiofal befefits. If par- ticular, we fifd that ifcreasifg eligibility levels would lead to a more diverse studeft body— racially, ethfically, afd ecofomically—if both the UC afd CSU systems. Fufdifg challefges represeft perhaps the largest obstacle to meetifg the few goals. Our projectiofs suggest that the costs of our proposals, ofce fully implemefted if 2025, would amouft to about $1.6 billiof per year (if curreft dollars) ufder curreft (2009–2010) practices. Fifdifg these fufds will fot be easy. But if the lofg ruf, failure to achieve few progress if higher educatiof will cost Califorfia evef more. Please visit the report’s publicatiof page http://www.ppic.org/maif/publicatiof.asp?i=916 to fifd related resources." 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