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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(30) "JTF_ImmigrantsEducationJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "89429" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(3813) "April 2011 IMMIGRANTS AND EDUCATION Hans Johnson  Many working-age immigrants have little formal education … In 2009, 36% of immigrants ages 25 to 64 in California had not graduated from high school, compared to 31% of immigrants in the United States and 8% of U.S.‐born California residents. An additional 19% of immigrants in California had finished high school but never went on to college. Immigrants dominate the sector of adults in California with less than a high school education, accounting for 73% of this low‐education population.  … but large numbers of working-age immigrants are college graduates. At the other end of the spectrum, 28% of immigrants have bachelor’s degrees, compared to 30% of U.S.‐born natives. In California, 25% of immigrants have attained bachelor’s or more advanced degrees, compared to 34% of U.S.‐born residents in the state. Thirty-one percent of California residents with graduate degrees are foreign‐born.  Today’s immigrants are more highly educated than in the past. In 1970, 17% of recently arrived immigrants ages 25 to 64 had graduated from college and 33% had minimal formal education (middle school or less). In 2009, 35% of recently arrived immigrants had college degrees and only 20% had minimal educational attainment. The share of college graduates among U.S.‐born Californians has also increased over time, from 15% in 1970 to 34% in 2009.  Immigrants from Asia tend to be highly educated. Immigrants from Southwest Asia and India in particular have the highest levels of education; 64% have attained bachelor’s or more advanced degrees, compared to 56% of East Asian immigrants, the next-most‐educated group. Of the countries from which 100,000-plus people have migrated to California, the proportion of with at least a bachelor’s degree is highest for India (75%), Taiwan (71%), and China (57%).  Immigrants from Latin America tend to be less educated. In California, only 7% of immigrants from Latin America have college degrees; 77% have high school diplomas or less. Since immigrants from Mexico make up 79% of immigrants from this region, they dominate the group’s demographic statistics. Only 5% of California’s Mexican immigrants graduated from four-year colleges, and 82% have a high school education or less. Even so, only the Philippines, India, and China send more college graduates to California than Mexico.  Strong educational progress occurs across generations. The children and grandchildren of immigrants in California and the nation as a whole tend to be much better educated than their parents. Among first-generation immigrants age 57 to 66, 36% have not graduated from high school, compared to only 8% of second-generation descendants in their children’s age cohort (30–39). After the second generation, the proportion of Californians age 30 to 39 without high school diplomas drops to 6%. www.ppic.org IMMIGRANTS AND EDUCATION April 2011 Educational attainment of U.S.-born and foreign born residents, 2009 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 12% 22% 37% 21% 8% CA native 10% 20% 33% 28% 9% US native 9% 16% 19% 19% 36% CA immigrant 11% 17% 19% 22% 31% US immigrant Advanced degree Bachelor's degree Some college High school graduate Less than high school Source: .2009 American Community Survey, adults ages 25 and over. Immigrant share of all adults in California by educational attainment, 2009 80% 70% 73% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 36% 24% 30% 31% 10% 0% Less than High school Some college Bachelor's Master's or high school diploma degree professional diploma degree 43% Doctoral degree Source: 2009 American Community Survey, adults ages 25 and over. Sources: American Community Surveys; Decennial Censuses; Current Population Surveys. Contact: johnson@ppic.org www.ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(138) "

JTF ImmigrantsEducationJTF

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An additional 19% of immigrants in California had finished high school but never went on to college. Immigrants dominate the sector of adults in California with less than a high school education, accounting for 73% of this low‐education population.  … but large numbers of working-age immigrants are college graduates. At the other end of the spectrum, 28% of immigrants have bachelor’s degrees, compared to 30% of U.S.‐born natives. In California, 25% of immigrants have attained bachelor’s or more advanced degrees, compared to 34% of U.S.‐born residents in the state. Thirty-one percent of California residents with graduate degrees are foreign‐born.  Today’s immigrants are more highly educated than in the past. In 1970, 17% of recently arrived immigrants ages 25 to 64 had graduated from college and 33% had minimal formal education (middle school or less). In 2009, 35% of recently arrived immigrants had college degrees and only 20% had minimal educational attainment. The share of college graduates among U.S.‐born Californians has also increased over time, from 15% in 1970 to 34% in 2009.  Immigrants from Asia tend to be highly educated. Immigrants from Southwest Asia and India in particular have the highest levels of education; 64% have attained bachelor’s or more advanced degrees, compared to 56% of East Asian immigrants, the next-most‐educated group. Of the countries from which 100,000-plus people have migrated to California, the proportion of with at least a bachelor’s degree is highest for India (75%), Taiwan (71%), and China (57%).  Immigrants from Latin America tend to be less educated. In California, only 7% of immigrants from Latin America have college degrees; 77% have high school diplomas or less. Since immigrants from Mexico make up 79% of immigrants from this region, they dominate the group’s demographic statistics. Only 5% of California’s Mexican immigrants graduated from four-year colleges, and 82% have a high school education or less. Even so, only the Philippines, India, and China send more college graduates to California than Mexico.  Strong educational progress occurs across generations. The children and grandchildren of immigrants in California and the nation as a whole tend to be much better educated than their parents. Among first-generation immigrants age 57 to 66, 36% have not graduated from high school, compared to only 8% of second-generation descendants in their children’s age cohort (30–39). After the second generation, the proportion of Californians age 30 to 39 without high school diplomas drops to 6%. www.ppic.org IMMIGRANTS AND EDUCATION April 2011 Educational attainment of U.S.-born and foreign born residents, 2009 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 12% 22% 37% 21% 8% CA native 10% 20% 33% 28% 9% US native 9% 16% 19% 19% 36% CA immigrant 11% 17% 19% 22% 31% US immigrant Advanced degree Bachelor's degree Some college High school graduate Less than high school Source: .2009 American Community Survey, adults ages 25 and over. Immigrant share of all adults in California by educational attainment, 2009 80% 70% 73% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 36% 24% 30% 31% 10% 0% Less than High school Some college Bachelor's Master's or high school diploma degree professional diploma degree 43% Doctoral degree Source: 2009 American Community Survey, adults ages 25 and over. Sources: American Community Surveys; Decennial Censuses; Current Population Surveys. 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