Donate
Independent, objective, nonpartisan research

RB 514HJRB

Authors

RB 514HJRB

Tagged with:

Publication PDFs

Database

This is the content currently stored in the post and postmeta tables.

View live version

object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(14) "RB_514HJRB.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1550646" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4055) "www.ppic.org Online Learning and Student Outcomes in California’s Community Colleges M ay 2014 Hans Johnson • Marisol Cuellar Mejia with research support from Kevin Cook Supported with funding from the Donald Bren Foundation SUMMARY C alifornia’s community colleges of er more online credit courses than any other public higher education institution in the country. By 2012, online course enrollment in the state’s community colleges totaled almost one million, representing about 11 percent of total enrollment. Indeed, practically all of the enrollment increases over the past ten years have occurred in online courses. Among students taking credit courses in 2011–12, one of every f ve took at least one online course. These trends raise critical questions about the ef ect of online learning on student out- comes. In this study, we consider both short- and long-term outcomes, focusing on partici- pation, course completion and passing, degree attainment, and transfer to four-year institu- tions. As the enrollment trends suggest, we f nd that online learning has provided new access to higher education, with online participation increasing for each of the state’s largest ethnic groups. Still, participation is uneven across groups, with African Americans participating at relatively high rates and Latinos lagging all groups. When we examine student outcomes, we f nd a surprising result: short-term outcomes are poor, but long-term outcomes are not. How does this break down? In the short term, course by course, student outcomes are worse in online courses than in traditional courses. Students are less likely to complete an online course than a traditional course, and they are less likely to complete an online course with a passing grade. We f nd lower course success rates across all types of students, across a wide set of subjects, and ISTOCK Online Learning and Student Outcomes in California’s Community Colleges 2 www.ppic.org across almost all colleges. Indeed, once we control for a full set of student characteristics (including overall grade point averages [GPAs]) and institutional factors, we fnd that online course success rates are between 11 and 14 percentage points lower than traditional course success rates. In addition, we fnd that online learning does nothing to overcome achieve - ment gaps across racial/ethnic groups—in fact, these gaps are even larger in online classes. However, when we examine long-term outcomes, the picture looks brighter. Students who take at least some online courses are more likely than those who take only traditional courses to earn an associate’s degree or to transfer to a four-year institution. For some stu - dents, online courses ofer a useful tool that helps them to reach their goals. Online learning is still relatively new—and there is reason to believe that the online per - formance gaps that we identify in this report can be minimized with strategic planning and improved technology. Providing more online versions of high-demand courses should be one priority. Community colleges should also review the quality of current online courses and consider implementing a standardized learning management system to assess student behavior and engagement and to identify areas where improvement is needed. Finally, gath - ering information on the cost of developing and maintaining online courses is vital to under - standing the potential efciencies of online learning. Governor Jerry Brown has proposed spending tens of millions of dollars to promote innovations in learning across California’s higher education systems. With more funding and new initiatives on the horizon, the community colleges have the opportunity to make even greater strides in their online learning programs. For the full report and related resources, please visit our publication page: www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=1096 Students are less likely to complete an online course than a traditional course, and they are less likely to complete an online course with a passing grade." } ["___content":protected]=> string(106) "

RB 514HJRB

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(111) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/online-learning-and-student-outcomes-in-community-colleges-summary/rb_514hjrb/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8915) ["ID"]=> int(8915) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:42:05" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4366) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(10) "RB 514HJRB" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(10) "rb_514hjrb" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(14) "RB_514HJRB.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1550646" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4055) "www.ppic.org Online Learning and Student Outcomes in California’s Community Colleges M ay 2014 Hans Johnson • Marisol Cuellar Mejia with research support from Kevin Cook Supported with funding from the Donald Bren Foundation SUMMARY C alifornia’s community colleges of er more online credit courses than any other public higher education institution in the country. By 2012, online course enrollment in the state’s community colleges totaled almost one million, representing about 11 percent of total enrollment. Indeed, practically all of the enrollment increases over the past ten years have occurred in online courses. Among students taking credit courses in 2011–12, one of every f ve took at least one online course. These trends raise critical questions about the ef ect of online learning on student out- comes. In this study, we consider both short- and long-term outcomes, focusing on partici- pation, course completion and passing, degree attainment, and transfer to four-year institu- tions. As the enrollment trends suggest, we f nd that online learning has provided new access to higher education, with online participation increasing for each of the state’s largest ethnic groups. Still, participation is uneven across groups, with African Americans participating at relatively high rates and Latinos lagging all groups. When we examine student outcomes, we f nd a surprising result: short-term outcomes are poor, but long-term outcomes are not. How does this break down? In the short term, course by course, student outcomes are worse in online courses than in traditional courses. Students are less likely to complete an online course than a traditional course, and they are less likely to complete an online course with a passing grade. We f nd lower course success rates across all types of students, across a wide set of subjects, and ISTOCK Online Learning and Student Outcomes in California’s Community Colleges 2 www.ppic.org across almost all colleges. Indeed, once we control for a full set of student characteristics (including overall grade point averages [GPAs]) and institutional factors, we fnd that online course success rates are between 11 and 14 percentage points lower than traditional course success rates. In addition, we fnd that online learning does nothing to overcome achieve - ment gaps across racial/ethnic groups—in fact, these gaps are even larger in online classes. However, when we examine long-term outcomes, the picture looks brighter. Students who take at least some online courses are more likely than those who take only traditional courses to earn an associate’s degree or to transfer to a four-year institution. For some stu - dents, online courses ofer a useful tool that helps them to reach their goals. Online learning is still relatively new—and there is reason to believe that the online per - formance gaps that we identify in this report can be minimized with strategic planning and improved technology. Providing more online versions of high-demand courses should be one priority. Community colleges should also review the quality of current online courses and consider implementing a standardized learning management system to assess student behavior and engagement and to identify areas where improvement is needed. Finally, gath - ering information on the cost of developing and maintaining online courses is vital to under - standing the potential efciencies of online learning. Governor Jerry Brown has proposed spending tens of millions of dollars to promote innovations in learning across California’s higher education systems. With more funding and new initiatives on the horizon, the community colleges have the opportunity to make even greater strides in their online learning programs. For the full report and related resources, please visit our publication page: www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=1096 Students are less likely to complete an online course than a traditional course, and they are less likely to complete an online course with a passing grade." ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:42:05" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(10) "rb_514hjrb" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:42:05" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:42:05" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(52) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/RB_514HJRB.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }