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The PPIC Statewide Survey provides a voice for the public and likely voters— informing policymakers, encouraging discussion, and raising awareness on critical issues of the day. © 2016 Public Policy Institute of California The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research. PPIC is a public charity. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provide d that full attribution is given to the source. Research publications reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the staff, officers, or board of directors of the Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 3 CONTACT Linda Strean 415 -291 -4412 Serina Correa 415 -291 -4417 News Release EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday , April 20, 2016 . Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: Seeing Need for School Funding , Most Favor Proposition 30 Extension, Construction Bond MAJORITY WOULD USE BUDGET SURPLUS FOR PRESCHOOL RATHER THAN PAYING DOWN DEBT SAN FRANCISCO, April 20 , 2016— Most Californians say state funding for their local public schools is inadequate, and most favor two proposals that are likely to be on the November ballot to increase it: an extension of the Proposition 30 tax increase on higher incomes and a bond measure to pay for school construction projects. These are among the key findings in the 12th annual statewide survey on Californians and E ducation released today by the Public Pol icy Institute of California (PPIC). Although state spending on local schools has recently increased, 61 percent of adults and 60 percent of likely voters say the current level of funding is not enough. Democrats (73%) and independents (65%) are far more likely to hold this view than are Republicans (42%). Majorities of adults (64%) and likely voters (62%) favor extending for 12 years the Proposition 30 tax increase on earnings over $250,000 to fund education and health care, as an initiative now circulating for the November ballot would do. Asked how they would vote on a state bond measure to pay for school construction projects, most (76% adults, 63% likely voters) would vote yes. A bond measure for school construction projects has already qualified for t he ballot. “Six in 10 Californians s ay that state government funding for their local schools is inadequate,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. “In this election -year context, solid majorities favor a Proposition 30 tax increase extension and st ate and local school bonds.” Asked about potential local school measures, majorities (74% adults, 62% likely voters) would vote yes on a local school district bond for school construction projects —more than the 55 percent majority required for passage of l ocal school bonds. Support for a local parcel tax falls short of the required two-thirds majority: 62 percent of adults and 52 percent of likely voters would vote yes. Should the two -thirds majority threshold be lowered for parcel taxes for local schools ? Again, support falls short among likely voters, with 44 percent saying it is a good idea (53% all adults). Most Prefer Using Budget Surplus for Preschool to Paying Down Debt Californians’ concerns about school funding extend to preschools. Three-quarters of adults (76%) say state government should fund voluntary preschool programs in California. And there is solid support for using some of the projected state budget surplus of several billion dollars to fund public preschool. Given a choice, 63 percent of adults say they would prefer to use the surplus this way, compared to 34 percent who would prefer to pay down the state debt and build up a reserve. (See related Just the Facts: Californians and Early Childhood Education for more findings.) PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 4 Job Approval for Brown, Legislature Holds Steady Asked how they view their state’s elected leaders, 54 percent of adults and 56 percent of likely voters approve of Governor Jerry Brown’s job performance. Fewer approve of the way he is handling the K –12 public education system (45% adults, 3 6% likely vote rs). The legislature has a job approval rating of 48 percent among adults and 40 percent among likely voters, but it is also rated lower for its handling of the K –12 system (42 % adults, 29% likely voters). Concerned about Preschool Affordability, K –12 Teacher Shortage When they are a sked about the quality of education in California’s K –12 schools, 40 percent of adults say it is a big problem —a record low since PPIC began asking the question in 1998. Notably, public school parents (27%) are much less likely than adults without school -age children (43%) to say quality is a big problem. Among racial/ethnic groups, blacks (58%) and whites (55%) are far more likely to say educational quality is a big problem than are Asians (25%) and Latinos (22%). When asked a bout preschool education, there is more concern about affordability than quality. Just 20 percent of adults view the quality of preschool education as a big problem. Nearly three -quarters of Californians say affordability is a big problem (42%) or somewhat of a problem (32%). (See survey questions 33 –38 .) Fewer than a third of adults (30%) and public school parents (29%) say teacher quality is a big problem in public schools. Concern about a shortage of teachers is higher . Majorities (53% adults, 55% public school parents) say it is a big problem. Given a set of choices for how the government can attract new teachers, adults (45%) and public school parents (47%) are most likely to say they would prefer to increase minimum starting salaries. Fewer choose prov iding forgivable loans for teacher education (21% adults), housing assistance (11% adults), or reducing the requirements needed to get a teaching credential (8%). A majority of adults (53%) are very concerned that schools in lower -income areas have a shor tage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas (31% somewhat concerned, 8% not concerned, 7% not at all concerned). Local Public Schools Get Good Grades Most adults give the quality of public schools in their neighborhoods grades of A (20%) o r B (37%). Ratings are generally similar across parties and regions. Among racial/ethnic groups, blacks (33%) are much less likely to give A’s or B’s to their schools than are whites (51%), Latinos (67%), or Asians (69%). Most Californians (61%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for college. Their responses are slightly less positive when asked how schools are doing in preparing students for jobs and the workforce. Just over half of adults (52%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent or good job in this area . Blacks are the racial/ethnic group least likely to say their local schools are doing a good or excellent job preparing students for college (49%) or for jobs and the workforce (36%). A majority of adults (53%) say they are very concerned that students in lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school (33% somewhat concerned, 7% not too concerned, 6% not at all concerned). Partisan Divide on Common Core Two years after implementation of the Common Core State Standards, most adults (66%) and public school parents (75%) have heard at least a little about these standards for English and math. Among public school parents, 40 percen t say their child’s school or district provided information about Common Core and that it was adequate. Another 22 percent say they received information but needed more, and 35 percent say they were not given information about Common Core. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 5 Based on what they have read or heard, Californians are somewhat divided in their opinions of Common Core. While 43 percent of adults favor the standards, 39 percent are opposed and 18 percent are undecided. Public school parents are more likely to favor t he standards (51% favor, 36% oppose) . Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (55%) and Asians (48%) are more likely than blacks (37%) and whites (34%) to favor Common Core. And Democrats (46%) are more likely than independents (35%) and much more likely than Republicans (23%) to favor Common Core. Even though views of the standards are mixed, a majority of Californians are confident (15% very, 39% somewhat) that Common Core will make students more college and career ready. “Reflecting the 2016 presidential c ampaign dialogue, Common Core is a politically polarizing issue in California today,” Baldassare said. “Still, a majority of Californians have confidence that Common Core will lead to positive outcomes for college readiness and workforce skills.” In additi on, a majority of adults (57%) say they are confident that Common Core will achieve another of its goals: helping student s develop critical thinking and problem -solving skills. Most adults (58%) are also very or somewhat confident that teachers are adequat ely prepared to teach the skills. Confidence is even higher among public school parents (72%). Last spring, students took the new Smarter Balanced Assessment, online tests designed to measure whether students meet grade -level standards in math, reading, a nd writing. While less than half of public school parents had heard about the tests last April, a majority (55%) today have heard at least a little about them (45% heard nothing at all). Asked last April to predict how students would do on the new tests, 4 2 percent of public school parents said they expected scores to be about the same as those on past tests. As educational policymakers expected, t his proved not to be the case. When the results were released in fall 2015, a smaller percentage of California students had met or exceeded standards than had done so on previous tests. However, when public school parents are asked today about the test results, only about a quarter (26%) correctly answer that students scored lower on the Smarter Balanced Assessment . Few Know about New School Funding Formula but Most Favor Its Goals The state enacted the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) to provide school districts with more spending flexibility. However, m ost adults (55%) think state government has the most contr ol in deciding how state funds are spent in local schools, and nearly half of public school parents (47%) agree. Yet most Californians think it is local districts (45%) or schools (37%) that should have the most control . Just 15 percent say the state gover nment should. Only about a third of adults (30%) and public school parents (36%) have heard about the LCFF, but after being read a brief description , strong majorities (76% adults, 77% public school parents) favor it. The LCFF provides additional funding to districts with more English Learners and lower -income students. Strong majorities of Californians (65% adults, 73% public school parents) are at least somewhat confident that the additional funding will be spent on these students. Most adults (76%) expect the academic achievement of English Learners and low -income students to improve as a result. As part of the LCFF, school districts are required to develop, adopt, and annually update a three -year Local Control and Accountability Plan. Districts are requ ired to involve parents and encouraged to seek input from parents of lower -income students and English Learners. How did the districts do? Half of public school parents (51%) say they were provided with information about how to get involved. Half of those with household incomes below $40,000 (49%) say they were provided with information. Latino public school parents (58%) are slightly more likely than white parents (50%) to have received information. In the end, just 4 percent of public school parents say t hey were very involved in the development of their school’s accountability plan, and 14 percent say they were somewhat involved. “Parental involvement and knowledge are clearly works in progress as local school districts implement the state’s new curriculum, student testing, and funding plans,” Baldassare said. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 6 State Government and Local Schools Key Findings  Job approval ratings stand at 54 percent for Governor Jerry Brown and 48 percent for the California L egislature. Somewhat fewer approve of the governor’s and legislature’s handling of K –12 education but slightly more say they don’t know. (page 7)  Six in 10 adults and likely voters say the current level of state funding for their local public schools is not enough. Solid majorities also favor extending the Prop 30 income tax increase to fund health care and education, and would vote yes on a state bond for school construction . (page 8 )  Seventy -four percent of adults and 62 percent of likely voters would vote yes on a local bond measure for school construction. A measure for a local parcel tax for local public schools garners less support (62 % adults, 52% likely voters). (page 9)  Four in 10 adults think the quality of K–12 education in the state is a big problem , a record low . But a majority of Californians give their local p ublic schools a grade of A or B . (page 10)  Half of Californians think a shortage of teachers is a big problem in the state. Fewer (30 %) see teacher quality as a big problem. A plurality prefer state and local government attract new teachers by increas ing the minimum starting salary . (page 11 )  Californians are more likely to say that their local public school s are doing an excellent or good job of pr eparing students for college (61%) than preparing students for jobs and the workforce ( 52%). (page 12 )  Majorities of adults are very concerned that schools in low -income areas have a shortage of good teachers (53 %) and that students in those areas are less likely to be ready for college (5 3%). (page 13 ) 54 45 0 20 40 60 80 Percent adults Job overall K– 12 public education Approval ratings of Governor Brown 48 42 0 20 40 60 80 Percent adults Job overall K– 12 public education Approval ratings of the California Legislature 74 62 0 20 40 60 80 Percent All adults Likely voters Would vote yes on a local school bond (55% needed to pass) PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 7 Approval Ratings of State Elected Officials Fifty-four percent of Californians and 5 6 percent of likely voters approve of the way Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor. Current a pproval is similar to that in March (51% adults, 5 3% likely voters) and last April ( 50% adults, 5 3% likely voters). Today , Democrats (7 2%) are more likely th an independents ( 47 %) and Republicans (27 %) to approve. Across regions, approval is higher in the San Francisco Bay Area (62%) and Los Angeles (59 %) than elsewhere (50 % Central Valley , 48% Inland Empire , 46% Orange/San Diego). Latinos (6 5%) , blacks (6 1%) , and Asians ( 57%) are more likely than whites (47 %) to approve. Fewer approve of Governor Brown’s handling of the state’s K –12 public education system (45 % adults, 36 % likely voters) , and approximately one in four Californians say they don’t know. Last April, approval ratings of the governor regarding K–12 education were similar (41 % adults, 34% likely voters). Today, Democrats (5 0%) are more likely than independents (3 9%) and Republicans (1 8%) to approve. A solid majority of public school parents (60 %) also approv e of the governor’s handling of K –12 education. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind His job as governor of California Approve 54 % 72% 27% 47% 56% Disapprove 26 13 65 34 35 Don't know 19 15 9 19 9 The state's K –12 public education system Approve 45 50 18 39 36 D isapprove 30 23 54 36 39 Don't know 25 28 28 25 25 Forty-eight percent of Californians and 40 percent of likely voters approve of the legislature’s job performance. Current approval is similar to that in March (44% adults, 38% likely voters) and slightly higher than last April among all adults (42% adults, 36% likely voters). Today, Democrats (55%) are more likely to approve than independents (39%) or Republicans (2 1%). Approval is higher in Los Angeles (5 3%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (52%) than in other regions (43% Inland Empire, 42% Cent ral Valley , 39 % Orange/San Diego ). Latinos (6 2%) and Asians (5 4%) approve of the state legislature more often than blacks and whites (37% each). Approval of the legislature ’s handling of the K –12 public education system is lower (42 % adults, 2 9% likely vot ers), with one in five Californians saying they don’t know. Results for adults were slightly lower last April (3 5% adults, 2 6% likely voters). Approval today is high er for Democrats (4 1%) and independents (3 8%) than for Republicans (1 5%). Once again, over half of public school parents (53 %) express approval. “Do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Its job Approve 48 % 55% 21% 39% 40% Disapprove 38 30 74 48 51 Don’ t know 14 15 6 12 9 The state’ s K–12 public education system Approve 42 41 15 38 29 D isapprove 39 36 62 45 51 Don’ t know 19 23 23 18 20 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 8 State Funding Although state funding for local schools has recently increased, solid majorities of adults (61%) and likely voters (6 0%) think current state funding for their local public schools is not enough. The results were similar last April (60% adults, 54% likely voters). Republicans (4 2%) are far less likely than Democrats (73 %) and independents (65%) to hold this view. Sixty-six percent of public school parents say state funding is inadequate. “Do you think the current level of state funding for your local public schools is more than enough, just enough, or not enough ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 9% 5% 18% 11% 13% Just enough 26 19 36 19 22 Not enough 61 73 42 65 60 Don't know 4 4 4 4 5 An initiative that is now circulating for the November 2016 ballot calls for a 12 -year extension of the Proposition 30 tax increase on higher -income Californians to fund education and health care. Sixty -four percent of adults and 62 percent of likely voters favor this version of a Proposition 30 tax extension, similar to results in March (61% adults, 58% likely voters). Democrats (8 2%) and independents (62%) are far more likely than Republicans (3 2%) to voice support . A strong majority of public school parents ( 67 %) favor this extension . “As you may know, voters passed Proposition 30 in November 2012. It increased taxes on earnings over $250,000 until 2018 and sales taxes by one-quarter cent until 2016. Do you favor or oppose extending for 12 years the tax increase on earnings over $250,000 to fund education and health care? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 64% 82% 32% 62% 62% Oppose 32 15 65 33 35 Don't know 4 2 3 6 2 A state bond measure that would pay for school construction projects has qualified for the November 2016 ballot . Seventy -six percent of adults and 6 3 percent of likely voters say they would vote yes on a state school bond, s omewhat higher than last April (66% adults, 55% likely voters). Support among Democrats (83%) is higher than among independents (60%) and Republicans (51%). An overwhelming majority of public school parents (84 %) support the measure. “If the state ballot had a bond measure to pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 76% 83% 51% 60% 63% No 21 12 47 37 32 Don ’t know 3 5 2 4 4 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 9 Raising Local School Revenues Would Californians support local school bonds , which require a majority vote of 55 percent to pass? Seventy -four percent of adults and 6 2 percent of likely voters would vote yes on a local bond measure to pay for school construction projects. Current support is slightly higher than it was last April (65% adults, 55% likely voters) . We have found majority support among adults in all earlier polling. Today, 79 percent of Democrats, 6 1 percent of independents, and 5 0 percent of Republicans would vote yes. Eight y-one percent of public school parents would vote yes. “If your local school district had a bond measure on the ballot to pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 74% 79% 50% 61% 62% No 24 18 48 36 34 Don ’t know 2 3 3 3 4 A two-thirds majority vote is required to pass local parcel taxes in California. Sixty -two percent of adults and 5 2 percent of likely voters would vote yes to increase their local parcel taxes to provide more funds for local public schools. We found similar levels of support for a local parcel tax measure last April (57% adults, 49% likely voters). Today, Democrats ( 71%) are more likely to say they would vote yes than independents (4 9%) and Republicans (3 7%). S eventy percent of public school parents would v ote yes on a local parcel tax for schools. Across regions, support for a local parcel tax only garners a two -thirds majority in the San Francisco Bay Area (67%). “What if there was a measure on your local ballot to increase local parcel taxes to provide more funds for the local public schools, would you vote yes or no ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 62% 71% 37% 49% 52% No 33 24 60 44 43 Don ’t know 5 5 3 7 5 Should we lower the two -thirds local tax threshold? Support among likely voters falls short of the simple majority vote that would be required to make this change to Proposition 13. Fifty-three percent of adults and 44 percent of likely voters say it is a good idea to replace the two -thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent vote to pass local parcel taxes for local public schools. The results were similar last April (50% adults, 44% likely voters). Today, 5 7 percent of Democrats, 4 0 percent of independents, and 33 percent of Republicans say this is a good idea . A solid majority of public school parents (64 %) s upport lowering the threshold to 55 percent. “Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea to replace the two -thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for voters to pass local parcel taxes for the local public schools ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Good idea 53% 57% 33% 40% 44% Bad idea 40 34 64 53 49 Don’t know 7 9 3 6 7 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 10 School Quality Four in 10 adults say that the quality of education in California’s K –12 public schools is a big problem today ( 32% somewhat of a problem, 24% not much of a problem). That is down somewhat from last April (48%) and a record low since we began asking the question in 1998. Notably, public school parents (27%) are much less likely than adults without school -age children (43%) to say the quality of public school education is a big problem. Across parties, a solid majority of Republicans (60%) say the quality of K– 12 education is a big problem, followed by about half of independents (52%) and even fewer Democrats (41%). The perception that the quality of public education is a big problem increases with age (31% under 35 , 39% 35 to 54 , 51% 55 and older). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (58%) and whites (55%) are far more likely to say quality is a big problem than are Asians (25%) and Latinos (22%). Regardless of how they view the quality of education in California, about six in 10 say that funding for their local schools is not enough . However, those who say that the quality of edu cation is a big problem are less likely than others to favor extending Proposition 30 (57% to 70%), vote yes on a local school bond (64% to 81%), or vote yes on a local parcel tax for schools (54% to 68%). “How much of a problem is the quality of education in California’s K –12 public schools today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem ?” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind Big problem 40% 41% 60% 52% 27% Somewhat of a problem 32 41 29 34 34 Not much of a problem 24 13 8 13 36 Don’t know 4 4 3 1 2 When asked to rate the quality of public schools in their own neighborhood, most Californians give a positive response. A majority give their local schools a grade of A (20%) or B (37%), while 27 percent say C, 9 percent say D, and only 4 percent say F. At least half have said A or B since 2005. Public school parents (68% A or B) are much more likely than non-parents (53%) to rate their local schools positively. Ratings are generally similar across parties and regions, but among racial/ethnic groups, blacks (33% A or B) are much less likely than whites (51%), Latinos (67%), or Asians (69%) to rate their local schools positively. Responses from Californians in our survey are similar to those of adult s nationwide on a similar question in a September 2015 P hi Delta Kappa /Gallup poll (13% A , 38% B, 31% C, 9% D, 4% F). “Next, overall, how would you rate the quality of public schools in your neighborhood today? If you had to give your local public schools a grade, would it be A, B, C, D, or F?” A 20% B 37% C 27% D 9% F 4% Don ’t know 3% 69 33 67 51 0 20 40 60 80 100 Asians BlacksLatinos Whites Percent A or B PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 11 School Teachers Majorities of adults (53%) and public school parents (55%) say a teacher shortage is a big problem in California’s K –12 public schools today. Democrats (61%) are more likely than independents (50%) or Republicans (42%) to view a teacher shortage a s a big problem. Blacks (61%) and Latinos (59%) are more likely than whites (50%) and Asians (46%) to say the same. Those with incomes below $40,000 (60%) are more likely than those with higher incomes (47%) to hold this view . Those without a college degree (55% no college, 56% some college) are somewhat more likely than degree holders (47%) to see a teacher shortage as a big problem . We did not ask this question in earlier PPIC Statewide Surveys. Fewer than one in three adults (30%) and public school parents (29%) say that teacher quality is a big problem in California’s public schools today. Findings among all adults were similar in April 2013 (28%). Across regions, Central Valley residents (22%) are least likely to view teacher quality as a big problem ( 28% San Francisco Bay Area, 33% Orange/San Diego, 35% Los Angeles, 36% Inland Empire). Responses are similar across parties, education, and income groups. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (44%) are the most likely to say teacher quality is a big problem ( 30% Asians, 30% whites, 28% Latinos). “Next, I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking ab out California’s K –12 public schools today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not really a problem. How about…?” A shortage of teachers Teacher quality All adults Public school parents All adults Public school parents Big problem 53% 55% 30% 29% Somewhat of a problem 28 30 45 39 Not really a problem 16 15 22 31 Don’t know 3 – 2 1 Given a set of choices for how the government could attract new K–12 public school teachers, pluralities of adults (45%) and public school parents (47%) say they would most prefer to increase the minimum starting salary. Indeed, increasing the minimum salary is the most common response across parties, regions, and demographic groups. Fewer choose providing forgivable loans for teacher education (21%), providing housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees (11%), or reducing some of the requirements needed to get a teaching credential (8%). Democrats (47%) are somewhat more likely than independents (38%) or Republicans (36%) to prefer increasing the minimum starting salary. “How would you most prefer that the state and local governments attract new K–12 public school teachers…?” All adults Party Public school p arents Dem Rep Ind Increase the minimum starting salary 45% 47% 36% 38% 47% Provide forgivable loans for teacher education 21 20 25 24 24 Provide housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees 11 15 7 11 6 Reduce some of the requirements needed to get a teaching credential 8 4 10 6 8 None, government should not increase efforts to attract new teachers (volunteered) 4 2 11 7 2 All of the above (volunteered) 5 8 3 7 8 Other (volunteered) 2 1 6 4 2 Don’t know 3 3 3 4 3 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 12 View that local public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for… Preparing Students for College and Careers A majority of adults (61%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent (13%) or good (48%) job preparing students for college ( 25% not so good, 9% poor). At least half have said so since April 2013. Today, responses are similar across parties . Public school parents (73 %) are much more likely than non - parents (57%) to say their local public sc hools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for college. Across regions, Central Valley residents (70%) are most likely to say that schools are doing a n excellent or good job (62% Orange/San Diego, 62% Inland Empire, 60% San Francisco Bay A rea, 52% Los Angeles). A cross racial/ethnic groups, blacks (49%) are least likely to say the same. Those with some college (51%) are somewhat less likely than degree holders (59%) or those with no college (69%) to say that schools are doing an excellent or good job at college preparation . “Are your local public schools doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for college? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Excellent 13% 21% 6% 12% 12% 19% Good 48 47 43 54 46 54 Not so good 25 24 31 23 24 20 Poor 9 3 15 8 11 4 Don’t know 5 5 5 3 7 3 About half of adults (52%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for jobs and the workforce. Public school parents (69%) are far more likely than non-parents (46%) to say schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for the workforce. Those with no college (63%) are more likely than those with more education (39% some college, 53% college degree) to say schools are doing an excellent or good job. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (36%) are least l ikely to say schools are doing an excellent or good job in this area (47% whites, 60% Asians, 61% Latinos). Responses across parties are largely similar . “Are your local public schools doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing stud ents for jobs and the workforce ?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Excellent 10% 14% 3% 13% 9% 16% Good 42 46 33 48 38 53 Not so good 29 27 33 29 30 22 Poor 13 8 23 8 16 5 Don’t know 6 4 8 3 8 4 34 31 36 44 41 48 52 46 41 43 44 54 53 58 61 0 20 40 60 80 Percent all adults Jobs and the workforce College PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 13 Concern about inequity at schools in lower-income areas Concerns about Inequity A majority of adults (53%) say they are very concerned that schools in lower -income areas have a shortage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas ( 31% somewhat concerned, 8% not too concerned, 7% not at all concerned). A similar proportion (53%) say they are very co ncerned that students in lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school (33 % somewhat concerned, 7 % not too concerned, 6% not at all concerned). Our survey last April saw similar responses (57% very concerned about teacher shortage, 59% very concerned about college readiness). On both issues, Democrats are much more likely than independents and far more likely than Republicans to say they are very concerned. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks are much more likely than others to say they are very concerned about both a teacher shortage and college readiness in lower -income areas. “How concerned are you that schools in lower -income areas have a shortage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school p arents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very concerned 53 % 51% 78% 51% 53% 50% Somewhat concerned 31 36 9 33 30 29 Not too concerned 8 6 7 8 9 10 Not at all concerned 7 6 4 8 7 9 Don’ t know 1 1 1 – 2 1 Women (58%) are more likely than men (48%) to say they are very concerned about a teacher shortage in lower -income areas, and slightly more likely than men to say they are very concerned about college readiness (56% to 50%). Across regions, Central Valley residents (44%) are least likely to say they are very concerned about a teacher shortage (50% Orange/San Diego, 54% Inland Empire, 54% San Francisco Bay Area, 59% Los Angeles). Residents of Los Angeles (58%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (57%) are slightly more likely than those in other regions to say they are very concerned about college readiness in lower -income areas (49% Inland Empire, 48% Orange/San Diego, 45% Central Valley). “How concerned are you that students in lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school ?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school p arents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very concerned 53 % 44% 77% 55% 51% 53% Somewhat concerned 33 44 15 32 33 32 Not too concerned 7 9 3 6 9 7 Not at all concerned 6 3 5 7 5 7 Don’ t know 1 – – 1 1 1 68 40 53 67 46 49 0 20 40 60 80 Dem Rep IndPercent very concerned Shortage of good teachers Students are not ready for college PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 14 Common Core and Local Control Key Findings  T wo -thirds of adults have heard about the Common Core State Standards. Based on what they have read or heard, Californians are divided in their support of Common Core and split along party lines . (page 15 )  Despite mixed overall impressions of Common Core, a majority of Californians are confident that the standards will make students more college and career ready . Fifty -eight percent of adults are confident that teachers are prepared to implement Common Core . (p age 16 )  A majority of public school parents have heard at least a l ittle about the new Smarter Balanced A ssessment . Alt hough student s cores on the new test were lower statewide , a plurality of public school parents think scores were about the same as on previous tests. (page 17)  A majority of Californians (55%) think that the state government has the most control in deciding how state money is spent in public schools. A plurality (45 %) say local school districts should have the most control. (page 18)  A solid majority of Californians (69 %) have heard nothing at all about the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) . But , after being read a brief description, 76 percent favor the LCFF . (page 19 )  Two -thirds of adults are confident that districts receiving additional LCFF funding will spend it on English language learners and lower -income students. Three in four expect that the academic achievement of these students will impro ve as the state implements LCFF . (page 20)  Eight in 10 parents have not been involved in their local school district's accountability plan . Eight in 10 hope their children earn at least a four -year college degree . (pa ge 21 ) 46 23 35 36 62 49 0 20 40 60 80 Dem Rep Ind Percent Favor Oppose Opinions of the Common Core State Standards 20 26 45 18 0 20 40 60 Asians BlacksLatinos WhitesPercent View that academic achievement of English language learners and low -income students will improve a lot with Local Control Funding Formula 32 27 36 62 0 20 40 60 80 100 Latino parents White parents Percent Graduate degree Four-year college degree Parents' educational hopes for their children PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 15 Common Core State Standards Six years ago, California joined a number of other states in adopting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). In 2014, the state began implementing the new standards. Have Californians become more aware of Common Core? Today, two -thirds of adults (66%) have heard about th e Common Core State Standards. Awareness has increased slightly since last year , when only 58 percent of adults had heard of the new standards. Today, three in four public school parents have heard about the CCSS (34% a lot, 41% a little ). Republicans (41%) are more likely than Democrats (26%) and independents (34%) to say they have heard a lot about the Common Core standards. Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (34%) are the most likely to say they have heard a lot about the CCSS (21% As ians, 18% Latinos, 11% blacks). College graduates are more likely than those without a college degree to have heard a lot. The likelihood of having heard a lot about the new standards increases with higher incomes . Among public school parents, four in 10 say that their child’s school or school district provided them with information about the Common Core State Standards, and that they found the information to be adequate. A further 22 percent say they received information but felt they need ed more , and 35 percent say they were not provided information about the CCSS. “How much, if anything, have you heard about the Common Core State Standards, a new set of English and math standards that the state began implementing in recent years? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all?” All adults Household income Public school parents Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more A lot 25% 15 % 25 % 40 % 34 % A little 41 45 39 38 41 Nothing at all 33 39 35 22 24 Don’t know 1 1 – – – Californians are somewhat divided on Common Core —43 percent of adults favor the CCSS while 39 percent oppose it. Public school parents are slightly more likely to favor Common Core (51% favor, 36% oppose). Last April, a similar 47 percent of adults and 57 percent of public school parents favored the CCSS. Today, Democrats (46%) are more likely than independents (35%) and much more likely than Republicans ( 23%) to hold this view . Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (55%) and Asians (48%) are more likely tha n blacks (37%) and whites (34%) to favor the Common Core standards. “The Common Core State Standards are a single set of K –12 English language arts and math standards that most states, including California, have voluntarily adopted. From what you’ve read and heard, do you favor or oppose the Common Core education standards? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Favor 43% 48% 37% 55% 34% 51% Oppose 39 32 39 28 48 36 Don’t know 18 20 24 16 18 13 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 16 Common Core Standards Implementation Even though Californians are divided in their overall views , a majority are confident that the new Common Core standards will make students more college and career ready (54%). Four in ten adults are not too or not at all confident . Findings were similar last April, when 57 percent were confident that implementing Common Core would make students more college and career ready. Today, two in three public school parents say they are very or somewhat confident that Common Core will make students more college and career ready. There are notable partisan differences : Republicans (29%) are less likely than independents (44%) and much less likely than Democrats (53%) to express confidence that Common Core will make students more prepared. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (72%) are the most likely to say they are confident , while whites are the least likely to hold this view (39%). “How confident are you that implementing Common Core in California’s schools will make students more college or career ready upon graduation? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very confident 15% 11 % 20% 25% 8% 22 % Somewhat confident 39 49 35 47 31 45 Not too confident 22 20 23 17 26 15 Not at all confident 19 14 16 10 27 17 Don’t know 5 6 5 1 8 1 A majority of Californians (57%) also say they are confident that Common Core will achieve another of its identified goals —helping students develop critical thinking and problem -solving skills. More than one -third o f Californians express doubt (38 % not too or not at all confident). Findings were similar last April, when 57 percent expressed confidence. Today, a solid majority of public school parents (72 %) are confident that C ommon Core will help students develop these skills . Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (76 %) are the most likely to express confidence, followed by Asians (62%), blacks (51%) and whites (42 %). A majority of Californians (58%) are very or somewhat confident that teachers are adequately prepared to teach the Common Core State S tandards. Among public school parents, confidence is higher —seven in 10 express confidence. There are notable partisan differences : a majority of Democrats (59%) and half of independents (51%) express confidence that teachers are prepar ed, compared to 39 percent of Republicans. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (71%) are the most likely to express confidence in teacher preparedness , while blacks (49%) are the least likely to do so. “ How confident are you that California’s public school teachers are adequately prepared to implement the Common Core State Standards? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very confident 14% 13 % 12% 21% 10% 24 % Somewhat confident 44 44 37 50 41 48 Not too confident 24 27 29 20 26 16 Not at all confident 11 9 21 6 13 10 Don’t know 7 6 2 2 10 2 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 17 “How much, if anything, have you heard about the Smarter Balanced Assessment tests? Smarter Balanced Assessment Last spring, following the implementation of Common Core, California students took the ir first Smarter Balanced Assessment tests. This new set of tests is designed to measure whether students are meeting their grade -level standard s in math, reading, and wr iting. Last April, fewer than half of parents had heard about the Smarter Balanced Assessment. Today, a majority of public school parents (55%) have heard at least a little about the new tests , while 45 percent have heard nothing at all. “How much, if anyt hing, have you heard about the Smarter Balanced Assessment tests, the new standardized tests which will be administered online in public schools in a number of states which have implemented the Common Core State Standards? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? ” Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Latinos Whites A lot 12% 10 % 14 % 11 % 21 % A little 43 43 41 45 42 Nothing at all 45 46 44 43 35 Don’t know 1 1 1 1 2 Last April, when public school parents were asked to predict how California students would sco re on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment , a plurality of public school parents (42%) expected scores to be about the same as those on past tests. Test results released in the fall of 2015 showed that a smaller share of students met or exceeded the new standards. However, today, a plurality of pu blic school parents (37%) believe that student scores were similar to those on previous tests. Only a quarter of public school parents correctly say that students scored lower on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment. “In the spring of 2015, California public school students took the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests. The Smarter Balanced Assessment tests and the tests they replaced measure whether students are proficient in math and reading and writing at grade level. Compared to past test scores do you think that as a whole California students scored higher, lower , or about the same on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests? ” Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Latinos Whites Higher 20% 23 % 15 % 27 % 15 % About the same 37 38 39 42 25 Lower 26 23 28 21 33 Don’t know 17 16 17 11 27 8 12 36 43 0 20 40 60 2015 2016 Percent public school parents A little A lot PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 18 Local School Funding Control The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) provides local school districts with increased spending flexibility. However, most Californians (55%) and public school parents (47%) think that the state government has the most control in deciding how money from the state is spent in local public schools. This view is held by pluralities a cross parties, regions, and demographic groups. Notably, nearly three in four blacks (73%) hold this view , compared to fewer whites (59%), Latinos (50%), and Asians (48%). “Who do you think has the most control in deciding how the money from state governm ent is spent in local public schools —the local schools, the local school districts, or the state government? ” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind Local schools 11% 10 % 8 % 7 % 14 % Local school district s 29 29 24 27 35 State government 55 58 63 61 47 Other (volunteered) 1 – 2 1 2 Don’t know 3 4 3 3 2 However, few Californians think the state government should have the most control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local public schools. Nearly all Californians think the local school district s (45%) or the local schools (37%) should have the most control, while just 15 percent think the state government should. Each time we asked this question from 2008 to 201 3, more than three in four Californians h ave preferred local control, with a plurality saying school districts should have the most control. Overwhelming majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups prefer local control, but they are divided over whether this control should be in the hands of schools or school districts . Republicans (54%) are slightly more likely than Democrats (47%) and independents (48%) to prefer local school districts. Blacks (51%) and whites (49%) are slightly more likely than Asians (42%) and Latinos (42%) to p refer that local school districts have the most control. “Who do you think should have the most control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local public schools —the local schools, the local school districts, or the state government ?” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind Local schools 37% 40% 35% 40% 38% Local school districts 45 47 54 48 42 State government 15 10 10 9 17 Other (volunteered) 1 1 1 2 1 Don’t know 2 2 1 1 2 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL nlmr PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education mu Local Control Funding Formula As the state enters the second full year of implementation, relatively few Californians ( ol%) have heard about the Local Control Funding Formula. Awareness has increased r points since last year (np %) and is similar to April nlmp (ns %). Thirty-six percent of public school parents have heard about the LCFF; this share is up s points since last year ( nu%) and nearly identical to April nlmp (os %). Latinos ( ot%) and blacks ( oq%) are more likely than whites and Asians (nr % each) to have heard of the LCFF. Fewer than four in ml across parties and regions—as well as age, educat ion, and income groups—have heard of the LCFF. “Next, how much, if anything, have you heard about the Local Control Funding Formula, a policy enacted in recent years that changes the way K–12 public school districts are funded in California?” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind A lot 3% 4% 3% 2% 6% A little 27 26 22 27 30 Nothing at all 69 70 76 71 64 Despite these low levels of awareness, strong majorities of Californians (sr%) and public school parents ( ss%) are in favor of LCFF after being read a brief description. Support among all adults and public school parents was similar in April nlmp and nlmq. Support among those who have heard at least a little about the policy is slightly higher than among all adults (to % to sr%). More than two in three Californians across regions and demographic groups ar e in favor. Notably, support declines as age increases. While there is solid support across political parties, Democrats (tq%) more likely than independents ( sl%) or Republicans ( rp%) to favor the LCFF. “The Local Control Funding Formula provides additional funding to school districts that have more English language learners and low-income students and gives flexibility over how state funding is spent. Do you favor or oppose this plan?” All adults Party Public school parents Have heard about LCFF Dem Rep Ind Favor 76% 85% 64% 70% 77% 83% Oppose 19 10 31 23 18 14 Don’t know 6 5 5 7 5 3 Local Control Funding Formula Implementation The Local Control Funding Formula provides local scho ol districts with increased control over spending decisions. It also provides additional funding to school districts that have more English language learners and lower-income students. How confident are Californians that school districts that receive additional funding will spend that money on progra ms and support for English language learners and lower-income students? Two in three Californians ( rq%) are very confident ( mq%) or somewhat confident ( ql%) that this additional funding will be spent on these students. Public school parents ( so %) are even more confident ( mr% very, qs % somewhat). Confidence is higher than it was last April among all adults (up u points) and public school parents (up s points). Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos ( sn%) are the most likely to express confidence, followed by Asians ( ru%), blacks ( rp%), and PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL nlmr PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education nl whites ( qu%). Confidence is higher among Democrats ( rq%) than among independents ( qs%) and Republicans ( qr%). At least six in ml Californians across regions are confident that this additional funding will be spent on these students; residents in the San Francisco Bay Area ( sl%) are most likely to hold this view. Majorities across ag e, education, and income groups ar e confident, although confidence decreases with increasing age. “As the state implements the Local Control Funding Formula, how confident are you that local school districts which receive addi tional funding will spend that money on programs and support for English language learners and low-income students?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very confident 15% 12% 13% 19% 12% 16% Somewhat confident 50 57 51 53 47 57 Not too confident 22 19 20 18 26 17 Not at all confident 10 6 14 8 13 7 Don’t know 3 5 2 2 3 3 Given these confidence levels, it is not surprising that three in four Californians think the implementation of the new funding formula will improve the academic achievement of English language learners and lower-income students ( nt% a lot, pt% somewhat). Public school parents are even more likely to think academic achievement will improve a lot ( oq%) or somewhat (ql%). Expectation of improvement is higher today among all adults ( rr% nlmp , rt% nlmq , sr% today) and public school parents ( sm% nlmp , st% nlmq , tq% today) than in recent years. Latinos ( tu%) and Asians ( tp %) are most likely to expect improvement, followed by blacks ( ru%) and whites ( rr%). While majorities across parties are optimistic, Democrats ( tl%) are more likely to expect improvement than independents ( rr%) and Republicans ( qr%). At least two in three Californians across regions and demographic groups are optimistic. “As the state implements the Local Control Funding Formula, do you think the academic achievement of English language learners and low-income students will or will not improve?” (If it will, ask : “Do you think it will improve a lot or somewhat?”) All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Improve a lot 28% 20% 26% 45% 18% 35% Improve somewhat 48 64 43 44 48 50 Will not improve 18 9 25 9 25 12 Don’t know 7 7 6 2 9 3 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 21 Parental Involvement and the Local Control Funding Formula The LCFF require s school districts to develop, adopt, and annually update three -year Local Control and Accountability Plan s (LCAP s). As part of the LCAP process , districts are required to reach out to parents and are encouraged to seek input from parents of lower- income and English language learner students. Half of public school parents (51%) say that they were provided with information about how to get involved —an increase of 9 points from last April. Similar shares of public school parents with household incomes below and above $40,000 (49% and 55%, respectively) say they were provided with information. Latino public school parents (58%) are slightly more likely than white public school parents (50%) to have received information. Since last April, the share of Latino and white public school parents who reported receiving information increased 12 and 13 points , respectively. Mothers are much more likely than fathers to say they have been provided with information (59% to 41%). Public school parents with only a high school education (57%) were m ore likely to have received information than those with at least some college (45%). “ The Local Control Funding Formula requires school districts to seek input from parents in developing their accountability plans for how to allocate resources. Did your c hild's school or school district provide you with information? ” Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Latinos Whites Yes 51% 49 % 55 % 58 % 50 % No 44 48 39 39 42 Don’t know 5 4 6 3 7 Fewer than one in five public school parents report being very involved (4%) or somewhat involved (14%) in the development of their local school district ’s accountability plan; 81 percent say they were not involved. Notably, despite a 9 point increase in the share of public school parents who report that they were provided with information, parental involvement remained nearly identical to last year (3% very involved, 14% somewhat involved, 82% not involved ). M others are twice as like ly as fathers (23% to 11%) to say they were involved . “W ere you involved in the development of your local school district's accountability plan?” (If yes , ask : “Were you very involved or somewhat involved?”) Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Gender Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Men Women Yes, very involved 4% 5 % 3 % – 7 % Yes, somewhat involved 14 15 12 11 % 16 No, not involved 81 78 85 87 76 Don ’t know 1 2 – 1 1 When parents are asked about their educational hopes for their children, a record -matching 51 percent say they would like their youngest child to earn a graduate degree. Another 29 percent say they hope their child ear ns a four -year degree. Since we began asking this question in 2005 , at l east four in 10 parents have expressed hope that their child would obtain a graduate degree. Findings among public school parents are similar. Strong majorities of parents across income, education, and racial/ethnic groups would like their child to go to c ollege, but the share hoping for graduate degrees increases as education and income levels rise and is much higher among whites (62%) than Latinos (36%). PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 22 Regional Map PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 23 Methodology The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from survey research associate Lunna Lopes, project manager for this survey, associate survey director Dean Bonner , and survey research associate David Kordus. This survey on Californians and Education is supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Found ation, The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the LA Partnership for Early Childhood Investment, the Silver Giving Foundation, and the Stuart Foundation. It is the 1 2th annual PPIC Statewide Survey on K –12 education since 2005. The PPIC Statewide Surv ey invites input, comments, and suggestions from policy and public opinion experts and from its own advisory committee, but survey methods, questions, and content are determined solely by PPIC’s survey team. Findings in this repor t are based on a survey of 1,70 3 Califor nia adult residents, including 85 1 interviewed on landline telephones and 85 2 interviewed on cell phones. Interviews took an average of 20 minutes to complete. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights from April 3–12 , 201 6. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection, and the sample tel ephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid b iases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were conducted using a computer- generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as ma ny as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the house hold. Live landline and cell phone interviews were conducted by Abt SRBI, Inc., in English and Spanish, according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc., translated new survey questions into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. A bt SRBI uses the U.S. Census Bureau’s 201 0–201 4 American Community Survey’s (ACS) Public Use Microdata Series for California (with regional coding information from the University of Minnesota’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series for California) to comp are certain demographic characteristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the ACS figures. To estimate landline and cell phone service in California, Abt SRBI used 201 4 state -level estimates released by the National Center for Health Statistics —which used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the ACS —and 2015 estimates for the West Census Region in the latest NHIS report. The estimates for California were then compared against landline and cell phone service reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party registration of regist ered voters in our sample to party registration statewide. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing adjusted for differences across regional, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, t elephone service, and party registration groups. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 24 The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±3. 5 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total unweighted sample of 1,70 3 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 3. 5 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for unweighted subgroups is larger: for the 1, 384 registered voters, the sampling error is ± 3.8 percent; for the 997 likely voters, it is ±4. 4 percent ; for the 507 parents it is ±6. 0 percent ; for the 3 75 public school parents it is ±7. 0 percent . Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for five geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Me rced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents of other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populous areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for non -Hispanic whites, who account for 43 percent of the state’s adult population, and also for Latin os, who account for about 34 percent of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest- growing voter groups. We also present results for non -Hispanic Asians, who make up about 15 percent of the state’s adult population, and non -Hispanic bla cks, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We co mpare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, registered Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in other parties are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated per their responses to voter registration survey questions, previous election participation, and current interest in politics. The percentages presented in the report tables and in the question naire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to those in a national survey by Phi Delta Kappa /Gallup. Additional details about our methodology can be found at www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 25 Questionnaire and Results CALIFORNIANS AND EDUCATION April 3–12 , 2016 1,7 03 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ± 3.5% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMP LE PERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100 DUE TO RO UNDING Overall, do you approve or disapprove of 1. the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 54% approve 26 disapprove 19 don’t know Do you approve or disapprove of the way 2. that Govern or Brown is handling the state's kindergarten through 12th grade public education system? 45% approve 30 disapprove 25 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of 3. the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 48% approve 38 disapprove 14 don’t know Do you approve or disapprove of the way 4. that the California Legislature is handling the state's kindergarten through 12th grade public education system? 42% approve 39 disapprove 19 don’t know Next, How much of a problem is the quality of 5. education in California’s K –12 public schools today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 40% big problem 32 somewhat of a problem 24 not much of a problem 4 don’t know Next, [rotate questions 6 and 7] How concerned are you that schools in 6. lower -income areas have a shortage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas? Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about this issue ? 53% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 8 not too concerned 7 not at all concerned 1 don’t know How concerned are you that students in 7. lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school? Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about this issue? 53% very concerned 33 somewhat concerned 7 not too concerned 6 not at all concerned 1 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 26 Next, how much, if anything, have you 8. heard about the Common Core State Standards, a new set of English and math standards that the state began implementing in recent years? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? 25% a lot 41 a little 33 nothing at all 1 don’t know The Common Core State S tandards are a 9. single set of K–12 English language arts and math standards that most states, including California, have voluntarily adopted. From what you’ve read and heard, do you favor or oppose the Common Core education standards? 43% favor 39 oppose 18 don’t know [rotate questions 10 to 12] How confident are you that implementing 10. Common Core in California’s schools will make students more college or career ready upon graduation —very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 15% very confident 39 somewhat confident 22 not too confident 19 not at all confident 5 don’t know How confident are you that implementing 11. Common Core in California’s schools will help students develop critical thinking and problem solving sk ills—very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 16% very confident 41 somewhat confident 20 not too confident 18 not at all confident 5 don’t know How confident are you that California’s 12. public school teachers are adequately prepared to implement the Common Core State Standards—very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 14% very confident 44 somewhat confident 24 not too confident 11 not at all confident 7 don’t know [public school parents only] Has your child’s 13. school or school district provided you with any information about Common Core State Standards, or not? [if yes: Was this information adequate in helping you understand how Common Core will affect your child or do you feel you need more information?] 40% yes, information was adequate 22 yes, but we need more information 35 no, was not provided with any information 3 don’t know 13a. [public school parents only] How much, if anything, have you heard about the Smarter B alanced Assessment tests, the new standardized tests which will be administered online in public schools in a number of states which have implemented the Common Core State Standards? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? 12% a lot 43 a little 45 nothing at all 1 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 27 [public school parents only] In the spring of 14. 2015, California public school students took the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests. The Smarter Balanced Assessment tests and the tests they replaced measure whether students are proficient in math and reading and writing at grade level. Compared to past test scores do you think that as a whole California students scored higher, lower or about the same on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests? 20% higher 26 lower 37 about the same 17 don’t know Next, overall, how would you rate the 15. quality of public schools in your neighborhood today? If you had to give your local public schools a grade, would it be A, B, C, D, or F? [if necessary, read: Think of grades A to F a s a scale where A is the best and F is failing.] 20% A 37 B 27 C 9 D 4 F 3 don’t know [rotate questions 16 and 17] Are your local public schools doing an 16. excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for college? 13% excellent 48 good 25 not so good 9 poor 5 don’t know Are your local public schools doing an 17. excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for jobs and the workforce? 10% excellent 42 good 29 not so good 13 poor 6 don’t know Next, I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s K–12 public schools today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not really a problem. [rotate questions 18 and 19] How about teacher quality? 18. 30% big problem 45 somewhat of a problem 22 not really a problem 2 don’t know How about a shortage of teachers? 19. 53% big problem 28 somewhat of a problem 16 not really a problem 3 don’t know 19a. How would y ou most prefer that the state and local governments attract new K –12 public school teachers [rotate ] (1) increase the minimum starting salary; (2) provide forgivable loans for teacher education; (3) provide housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees [ or ] (4) reduce some of the requirements needed to get a teaching credential? 45% increase the minimum starting salary 21 provide forgivable loans for teacher education 11 provide housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees 8 reduce some of the requireme nts needed to get a teaching credential 4 none, government should not increase efforts to attract new teachers (volunteered) 5 all of the above (volunteered) 2 other (specify) 3 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 28 Changing topics, Do you think the current level of state 20. funding for your local public schools is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 9% more than enough 26 just enough 61 not enough 4 don’t know As you may know, voters passed 21. Proposition 30 in November 2012. It increased taxes on earnings over $250,000 until 2018 and sales taxes by one quarter cent until 2016. Do you favor or oppose extending for 12 years the tax increase on earnings over $250,000 to fund education and health care? 64% favor 32 oppose 4 don’t know If the state ballot had a bond measure to 22. pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no? 76% yes 21 no 3 don’t know [rotate questions 23 and 24] If your local school district had a bond 23. measure on the ballot to pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no? 74% yes 24 no 2 don’t know What if there was a measure on your local 24. ballot to increase local parcel taxes to provide more funds for the local public schools? Would you vote yes or no? 62% yes 33 no 5 don’t know Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea 25. to replace the two -thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for voters to pass local parcel taxes for the local publi c schools? 53% good idea 40 bad idea 7 don’t know Next, who do you think has the most 26. control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local public schools —[rotate order] (1 ) the local schools, (2 ) the local school districts, [or ] (3) the state government? 11% the local schools 29 the local school districts 55 the state government 1 other (specify) 3 don’t know And who do you think should have the 27. most control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local publi c schools—[rotate in same order as Q26 ] (1) the local schools, (2 ) the local school districts, [or] (3 ) the state government? 37% the local schools 45 the local school districts 15 the state government 1 other (specify) 2 don’t know Next, how much, if anything, have you 28. heard about the Local Control Funding Formula, a policy enacted last year that changes the way K–12 public school districts are funded in California? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? 3% a lot 27 a little 69 nothing at all – don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 29 The Local Control Funding Formula 29. provides additional funding to school districts that have more [ rotate ] [English language learners] [and ] [lower -income students] and gives local school districts more flexibility over how state funding is spent. In general, do you favor or oppose this plan? 76% favor 19 oppose 6 don’t know As the state implements the Local Control 30. Funding Formula, how confident are you that local school districts which receive additional funding will spend that money on programs and support for [rotate in same order as Q29] [English language learners] [and] [lower -income students] ? Are you very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 15% very confident 50 somewhat confident 22 not too confident 10 not at all confident 3 don’t know As the state implements the Local Control 31. Funding Formula, do you think the academic achievement of [rotate in same order as Q29] [English language learners] [and] [lower-income students] will or will not improve? (if it will, ask: Do you think it will improve a lot or somewhat?) 28% improve a lot 48 improve somewhat 18 will not improve 7 don’t know [public school parents only] T he Local Control 32. Funding Formula requires school districts to seek input from parents in developing their accountability plans for how to allocate resources. Did your child’s school or school district provide you with information about how to become involved, or not? 51% yes 44 no 5 don’t know 32a. [public school parents only] And were you involved in the development of your local school district’s accountability plan? [if yes, ask: Were you very involved or somewhat involved?] 4% yes, very involved 14 yes, somewhat involved 81 no, not involved 1 don’t know 32b. [parents only] What do you hope will be the highest grade level that your youngest child will achieve: some high school; high school graduate; two -year community college graduate or career tech nical training; four-year college graduate; or a graduate degree after college? – some high school 4% high school graduate 11 two-year community college graduate or career technical training 29 four-year college graduate 51 a graduate degree after college 5 don’t know On another topic, d o you think that the 33. state government should or should not fund voluntary preschool programs for all four -year -olds in California? 76% should 22 should not 2 don’t know The state is projected to have a budg et 34. surplus of several billion dollars. In general, how would you prefer to use this extra money? [rotate] (1 ) Would you prefer to pay down state debt and build up the reserve [or] ( 2 ) would you prefer to use some of this money to increase funding for publi c preschool and early childhood education programs in California? 34% pay down debt and build up reserve 63 increase funding for public preschool and early childhood education programs 3 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 30 How important is attending preschool to a 35. student's success in kindergarten through grade 12—very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 68% very important 21 somewhat important 6 not too important 3 not at all important 1 don’t know [rotate questions 36 and 37] How much of a problem is the quality of 36. preschool education in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 20% big problem 36 somewhat of a problem 34 not much of a problem 9 don’t know How much of a problem is the affordability 37. of preschool education in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 42% big problem 32 somewhat of a problem 20 not much of a problem 6 don’t know How concerned are you that children in 38. lower -income areas are less likely than other children to be ready for kindergarten? Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about this issue? 50% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 11 not too concerned 8 not at all concerned 1 don’t know Next, some people are registered to vote 39. and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 63% yes [ask Q39a] 37 no [skip to Q40b] 39a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Repu blican, another party, or are you registered as a decline-to -state or independent voter? 43% Democrat [ask Q 40] 27 Republican [skip to Q 40a] 5 another party ( specify) [skip to Q41] 24 independent [skip to Q40b] Would you call yourself a strong Democrat 40. or not a very strong Democrat? 64% strong 34 not very strong 2 don’t know [skip to Q41] 40a. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 52% strong 46 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to Q41] 40b. Do you think of you rself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 23% Republican Party 44 Democratic Party 23 neither ( volunteered) 9 don’t know Next, would you consider yourself to be 41. politically: [read list, rotate order from top to bottom] 14% very li beral 22 somewhat liberal 32 middle -of-the -road 21 somewhat conservative 10 very conservative 2 don’t know How closely are you following news about 42. candidates for the 2016 presidential election —very closely, fairly closely, not too closely, or not at all closely? 36% very closely 39 fairly closely 18 not too closely 7 not at all closely – don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 31 Generally speaking, how much interest 43. would you say you have in politics —a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 26% great deal 35 fair amount 29 only a little 10 none – don’t know [d1 to d1 4: demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect Angela Glover Blackwell President and CEO PolicyLink Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director B ill Lane Center for the American West Stanford University Jon Cohen Vice President of Survey Research SurveyMonkey Joshua J. Dyck Co-Director Center for Public Opinion University of Massachusetts, Lowell Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Sil icon Valley Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Professor Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California Robert Lapsley President California Business Roundtable Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Sonja Petek 2016 Master of Public Policy Candidate Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley Lisa Pitney Vice President of Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Mindy Romero Founder and Director California Civic Engagement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change Robert K. Ross, MD President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Carol Whiteside Principal California Strategies The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Donna Lucas, Chair Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect María Blanco Executive Director Undocumented Student Legal Services Center University of California Office of the President Louise Henry Bryson Chair Emerita, Board of Trustees J. Paul Getty Trust A. Marisa Chun Partner McDermott Will & Emery LLP Phil Isenberg Former Chair Delta Stewardship Council Mas Masumoto Author and Farmer Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni, LLP Gerald L. Parsky Chairman Aurora Capital Group Kim Polese Chairman ClearStreet, Inc. Gaddi H. Vasquez Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Edison International Southern California Edison Public Policy Institute of California 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94111 T: 415.291.4400 F: 415.291.4401 PPIC.ORG PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, CA 95814 T: 916.440.1120 F: 916.440.1121" } ["___content":protected]=> string(102) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(102) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-education-april-2016/s_416mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(9005) ["ID"]=> int(9005) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:42:56" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4541) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(8) "S 416MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "s_416mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_416MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1554234" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(83037) "PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 Californians & Education Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner David Kordus Lunna Lopes CONTENTS Press Release 3 State Government and Local Schools 6 Common Core and Local Control 14 Regional Map 22 Methodology 23 Questionnaire and Results 25 Supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the LA Partnership for Early Childhood Investment, the Silver Giving Foundation, and the Stuart Foundation. The PPIC Statewide Survey provides a voice for the public and likely voters— informing policymakers, encouraging discussion, and raising awareness on critical issues of the day. © 2016 Public Policy Institute of California The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research. PPIC is a public charity. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provide d that full attribution is given to the source. Research publications reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the staff, officers, or board of directors of the Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 3 CONTACT Linda Strean 415 -291 -4412 Serina Correa 415 -291 -4417 News Release EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday , April 20, 2016 . Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: Seeing Need for School Funding , Most Favor Proposition 30 Extension, Construction Bond MAJORITY WOULD USE BUDGET SURPLUS FOR PRESCHOOL RATHER THAN PAYING DOWN DEBT SAN FRANCISCO, April 20 , 2016— Most Californians say state funding for their local public schools is inadequate, and most favor two proposals that are likely to be on the November ballot to increase it: an extension of the Proposition 30 tax increase on higher incomes and a bond measure to pay for school construction projects. These are among the key findings in the 12th annual statewide survey on Californians and E ducation released today by the Public Pol icy Institute of California (PPIC). Although state spending on local schools has recently increased, 61 percent of adults and 60 percent of likely voters say the current level of funding is not enough. Democrats (73%) and independents (65%) are far more likely to hold this view than are Republicans (42%). Majorities of adults (64%) and likely voters (62%) favor extending for 12 years the Proposition 30 tax increase on earnings over $250,000 to fund education and health care, as an initiative now circulating for the November ballot would do. Asked how they would vote on a state bond measure to pay for school construction projects, most (76% adults, 63% likely voters) would vote yes. A bond measure for school construction projects has already qualified for t he ballot. “Six in 10 Californians s ay that state government funding for their local schools is inadequate,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. “In this election -year context, solid majorities favor a Proposition 30 tax increase extension and st ate and local school bonds.” Asked about potential local school measures, majorities (74% adults, 62% likely voters) would vote yes on a local school district bond for school construction projects —more than the 55 percent majority required for passage of l ocal school bonds. Support for a local parcel tax falls short of the required two-thirds majority: 62 percent of adults and 52 percent of likely voters would vote yes. Should the two -thirds majority threshold be lowered for parcel taxes for local schools ? Again, support falls short among likely voters, with 44 percent saying it is a good idea (53% all adults). Most Prefer Using Budget Surplus for Preschool to Paying Down Debt Californians’ concerns about school funding extend to preschools. Three-quarters of adults (76%) say state government should fund voluntary preschool programs in California. And there is solid support for using some of the projected state budget surplus of several billion dollars to fund public preschool. Given a choice, 63 percent of adults say they would prefer to use the surplus this way, compared to 34 percent who would prefer to pay down the state debt and build up a reserve. (See related Just the Facts: Californians and Early Childhood Education for more findings.) PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 4 Job Approval for Brown, Legislature Holds Steady Asked how they view their state’s elected leaders, 54 percent of adults and 56 percent of likely voters approve of Governor Jerry Brown’s job performance. Fewer approve of the way he is handling the K –12 public education system (45% adults, 3 6% likely vote rs). The legislature has a job approval rating of 48 percent among adults and 40 percent among likely voters, but it is also rated lower for its handling of the K –12 system (42 % adults, 29% likely voters). Concerned about Preschool Affordability, K –12 Teacher Shortage When they are a sked about the quality of education in California’s K –12 schools, 40 percent of adults say it is a big problem —a record low since PPIC began asking the question in 1998. Notably, public school parents (27%) are much less likely than adults without school -age children (43%) to say quality is a big problem. Among racial/ethnic groups, blacks (58%) and whites (55%) are far more likely to say educational quality is a big problem than are Asians (25%) and Latinos (22%). When asked a bout preschool education, there is more concern about affordability than quality. Just 20 percent of adults view the quality of preschool education as a big problem. Nearly three -quarters of Californians say affordability is a big problem (42%) or somewhat of a problem (32%). (See survey questions 33 –38 .) Fewer than a third of adults (30%) and public school parents (29%) say teacher quality is a big problem in public schools. Concern about a shortage of teachers is higher . Majorities (53% adults, 55% public school parents) say it is a big problem. Given a set of choices for how the government can attract new teachers, adults (45%) and public school parents (47%) are most likely to say they would prefer to increase minimum starting salaries. Fewer choose prov iding forgivable loans for teacher education (21% adults), housing assistance (11% adults), or reducing the requirements needed to get a teaching credential (8%). A majority of adults (53%) are very concerned that schools in lower -income areas have a shor tage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas (31% somewhat concerned, 8% not concerned, 7% not at all concerned). Local Public Schools Get Good Grades Most adults give the quality of public schools in their neighborhoods grades of A (20%) o r B (37%). Ratings are generally similar across parties and regions. Among racial/ethnic groups, blacks (33%) are much less likely to give A’s or B’s to their schools than are whites (51%), Latinos (67%), or Asians (69%). Most Californians (61%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for college. Their responses are slightly less positive when asked how schools are doing in preparing students for jobs and the workforce. Just over half of adults (52%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent or good job in this area . Blacks are the racial/ethnic group least likely to say their local schools are doing a good or excellent job preparing students for college (49%) or for jobs and the workforce (36%). A majority of adults (53%) say they are very concerned that students in lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school (33% somewhat concerned, 7% not too concerned, 6% not at all concerned). Partisan Divide on Common Core Two years after implementation of the Common Core State Standards, most adults (66%) and public school parents (75%) have heard at least a little about these standards for English and math. Among public school parents, 40 percen t say their child’s school or district provided information about Common Core and that it was adequate. Another 22 percent say they received information but needed more, and 35 percent say they were not given information about Common Core. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 5 Based on what they have read or heard, Californians are somewhat divided in their opinions of Common Core. While 43 percent of adults favor the standards, 39 percent are opposed and 18 percent are undecided. Public school parents are more likely to favor t he standards (51% favor, 36% oppose) . Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (55%) and Asians (48%) are more likely than blacks (37%) and whites (34%) to favor Common Core. And Democrats (46%) are more likely than independents (35%) and much more likely than Republicans (23%) to favor Common Core. Even though views of the standards are mixed, a majority of Californians are confident (15% very, 39% somewhat) that Common Core will make students more college and career ready. “Reflecting the 2016 presidential c ampaign dialogue, Common Core is a politically polarizing issue in California today,” Baldassare said. “Still, a majority of Californians have confidence that Common Core will lead to positive outcomes for college readiness and workforce skills.” In additi on, a majority of adults (57%) say they are confident that Common Core will achieve another of its goals: helping student s develop critical thinking and problem -solving skills. Most adults (58%) are also very or somewhat confident that teachers are adequat ely prepared to teach the skills. Confidence is even higher among public school parents (72%). Last spring, students took the new Smarter Balanced Assessment, online tests designed to measure whether students meet grade -level standards in math, reading, a nd writing. While less than half of public school parents had heard about the tests last April, a majority (55%) today have heard at least a little about them (45% heard nothing at all). Asked last April to predict how students would do on the new tests, 4 2 percent of public school parents said they expected scores to be about the same as those on past tests. As educational policymakers expected, t his proved not to be the case. When the results were released in fall 2015, a smaller percentage of California students had met or exceeded standards than had done so on previous tests. However, when public school parents are asked today about the test results, only about a quarter (26%) correctly answer that students scored lower on the Smarter Balanced Assessment . Few Know about New School Funding Formula but Most Favor Its Goals The state enacted the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) to provide school districts with more spending flexibility. However, m ost adults (55%) think state government has the most contr ol in deciding how state funds are spent in local schools, and nearly half of public school parents (47%) agree. Yet most Californians think it is local districts (45%) or schools (37%) that should have the most control . Just 15 percent say the state gover nment should. Only about a third of adults (30%) and public school parents (36%) have heard about the LCFF, but after being read a brief description , strong majorities (76% adults, 77% public school parents) favor it. The LCFF provides additional funding to districts with more English Learners and lower -income students. Strong majorities of Californians (65% adults, 73% public school parents) are at least somewhat confident that the additional funding will be spent on these students. Most adults (76%) expect the academic achievement of English Learners and low -income students to improve as a result. As part of the LCFF, school districts are required to develop, adopt, and annually update a three -year Local Control and Accountability Plan. Districts are requ ired to involve parents and encouraged to seek input from parents of lower -income students and English Learners. How did the districts do? Half of public school parents (51%) say they were provided with information about how to get involved. Half of those with household incomes below $40,000 (49%) say they were provided with information. Latino public school parents (58%) are slightly more likely than white parents (50%) to have received information. In the end, just 4 percent of public school parents say t hey were very involved in the development of their school’s accountability plan, and 14 percent say they were somewhat involved. “Parental involvement and knowledge are clearly works in progress as local school districts implement the state’s new curriculum, student testing, and funding plans,” Baldassare said. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 6 State Government and Local Schools Key Findings  Job approval ratings stand at 54 percent for Governor Jerry Brown and 48 percent for the California L egislature. Somewhat fewer approve of the governor’s and legislature’s handling of K –12 education but slightly more say they don’t know. (page 7)  Six in 10 adults and likely voters say the current level of state funding for their local public schools is not enough. Solid majorities also favor extending the Prop 30 income tax increase to fund health care and education, and would vote yes on a state bond for school construction . (page 8 )  Seventy -four percent of adults and 62 percent of likely voters would vote yes on a local bond measure for school construction. A measure for a local parcel tax for local public schools garners less support (62 % adults, 52% likely voters). (page 9)  Four in 10 adults think the quality of K–12 education in the state is a big problem , a record low . But a majority of Californians give their local p ublic schools a grade of A or B . (page 10)  Half of Californians think a shortage of teachers is a big problem in the state. Fewer (30 %) see teacher quality as a big problem. A plurality prefer state and local government attract new teachers by increas ing the minimum starting salary . (page 11 )  Californians are more likely to say that their local public school s are doing an excellent or good job of pr eparing students for college (61%) than preparing students for jobs and the workforce ( 52%). (page 12 )  Majorities of adults are very concerned that schools in low -income areas have a shortage of good teachers (53 %) and that students in those areas are less likely to be ready for college (5 3%). (page 13 ) 54 45 0 20 40 60 80 Percent adults Job overall K– 12 public education Approval ratings of Governor Brown 48 42 0 20 40 60 80 Percent adults Job overall K– 12 public education Approval ratings of the California Legislature 74 62 0 20 40 60 80 Percent All adults Likely voters Would vote yes on a local school bond (55% needed to pass) PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 7 Approval Ratings of State Elected Officials Fifty-four percent of Californians and 5 6 percent of likely voters approve of the way Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor. Current a pproval is similar to that in March (51% adults, 5 3% likely voters) and last April ( 50% adults, 5 3% likely voters). Today , Democrats (7 2%) are more likely th an independents ( 47 %) and Republicans (27 %) to approve. Across regions, approval is higher in the San Francisco Bay Area (62%) and Los Angeles (59 %) than elsewhere (50 % Central Valley , 48% Inland Empire , 46% Orange/San Diego). Latinos (6 5%) , blacks (6 1%) , and Asians ( 57%) are more likely than whites (47 %) to approve. Fewer approve of Governor Brown’s handling of the state’s K –12 public education system (45 % adults, 36 % likely voters) , and approximately one in four Californians say they don’t know. Last April, approval ratings of the governor regarding K–12 education were similar (41 % adults, 34% likely voters). Today, Democrats (5 0%) are more likely than independents (3 9%) and Republicans (1 8%) to approve. A solid majority of public school parents (60 %) also approv e of the governor’s handling of K –12 education. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind His job as governor of California Approve 54 % 72% 27% 47% 56% Disapprove 26 13 65 34 35 Don't know 19 15 9 19 9 The state's K –12 public education system Approve 45 50 18 39 36 D isapprove 30 23 54 36 39 Don't know 25 28 28 25 25 Forty-eight percent of Californians and 40 percent of likely voters approve of the legislature’s job performance. Current approval is similar to that in March (44% adults, 38% likely voters) and slightly higher than last April among all adults (42% adults, 36% likely voters). Today, Democrats (55%) are more likely to approve than independents (39%) or Republicans (2 1%). Approval is higher in Los Angeles (5 3%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (52%) than in other regions (43% Inland Empire, 42% Cent ral Valley , 39 % Orange/San Diego ). Latinos (6 2%) and Asians (5 4%) approve of the state legislature more often than blacks and whites (37% each). Approval of the legislature ’s handling of the K –12 public education system is lower (42 % adults, 2 9% likely vot ers), with one in five Californians saying they don’t know. Results for adults were slightly lower last April (3 5% adults, 2 6% likely voters). Approval today is high er for Democrats (4 1%) and independents (3 8%) than for Republicans (1 5%). Once again, over half of public school parents (53 %) express approval. “Do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Its job Approve 48 % 55% 21% 39% 40% Disapprove 38 30 74 48 51 Don’ t know 14 15 6 12 9 The state’ s K–12 public education system Approve 42 41 15 38 29 D isapprove 39 36 62 45 51 Don’ t know 19 23 23 18 20 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 8 State Funding Although state funding for local schools has recently increased, solid majorities of adults (61%) and likely voters (6 0%) think current state funding for their local public schools is not enough. The results were similar last April (60% adults, 54% likely voters). Republicans (4 2%) are far less likely than Democrats (73 %) and independents (65%) to hold this view. Sixty-six percent of public school parents say state funding is inadequate. “Do you think the current level of state funding for your local public schools is more than enough, just enough, or not enough ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 9% 5% 18% 11% 13% Just enough 26 19 36 19 22 Not enough 61 73 42 65 60 Don't know 4 4 4 4 5 An initiative that is now circulating for the November 2016 ballot calls for a 12 -year extension of the Proposition 30 tax increase on higher -income Californians to fund education and health care. Sixty -four percent of adults and 62 percent of likely voters favor this version of a Proposition 30 tax extension, similar to results in March (61% adults, 58% likely voters). Democrats (8 2%) and independents (62%) are far more likely than Republicans (3 2%) to voice support . A strong majority of public school parents ( 67 %) favor this extension . “As you may know, voters passed Proposition 30 in November 2012. It increased taxes on earnings over $250,000 until 2018 and sales taxes by one-quarter cent until 2016. Do you favor or oppose extending for 12 years the tax increase on earnings over $250,000 to fund education and health care? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 64% 82% 32% 62% 62% Oppose 32 15 65 33 35 Don't know 4 2 3 6 2 A state bond measure that would pay for school construction projects has qualified for the November 2016 ballot . Seventy -six percent of adults and 6 3 percent of likely voters say they would vote yes on a state school bond, s omewhat higher than last April (66% adults, 55% likely voters). Support among Democrats (83%) is higher than among independents (60%) and Republicans (51%). An overwhelming majority of public school parents (84 %) support the measure. “If the state ballot had a bond measure to pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 76% 83% 51% 60% 63% No 21 12 47 37 32 Don ’t know 3 5 2 4 4 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 9 Raising Local School Revenues Would Californians support local school bonds , which require a majority vote of 55 percent to pass? Seventy -four percent of adults and 6 2 percent of likely voters would vote yes on a local bond measure to pay for school construction projects. Current support is slightly higher than it was last April (65% adults, 55% likely voters) . We have found majority support among adults in all earlier polling. Today, 79 percent of Democrats, 6 1 percent of independents, and 5 0 percent of Republicans would vote yes. Eight y-one percent of public school parents would vote yes. “If your local school district had a bond measure on the ballot to pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 74% 79% 50% 61% 62% No 24 18 48 36 34 Don ’t know 2 3 3 3 4 A two-thirds majority vote is required to pass local parcel taxes in California. Sixty -two percent of adults and 5 2 percent of likely voters would vote yes to increase their local parcel taxes to provide more funds for local public schools. We found similar levels of support for a local parcel tax measure last April (57% adults, 49% likely voters). Today, Democrats ( 71%) are more likely to say they would vote yes than independents (4 9%) and Republicans (3 7%). S eventy percent of public school parents would v ote yes on a local parcel tax for schools. Across regions, support for a local parcel tax only garners a two -thirds majority in the San Francisco Bay Area (67%). “What if there was a measure on your local ballot to increase local parcel taxes to provide more funds for the local public schools, would you vote yes or no ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 62% 71% 37% 49% 52% No 33 24 60 44 43 Don ’t know 5 5 3 7 5 Should we lower the two -thirds local tax threshold? Support among likely voters falls short of the simple majority vote that would be required to make this change to Proposition 13. Fifty-three percent of adults and 44 percent of likely voters say it is a good idea to replace the two -thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent vote to pass local parcel taxes for local public schools. The results were similar last April (50% adults, 44% likely voters). Today, 5 7 percent of Democrats, 4 0 percent of independents, and 33 percent of Republicans say this is a good idea . A solid majority of public school parents (64 %) s upport lowering the threshold to 55 percent. “Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea to replace the two -thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for voters to pass local parcel taxes for the local public schools ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Good idea 53% 57% 33% 40% 44% Bad idea 40 34 64 53 49 Don’t know 7 9 3 6 7 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 10 School Quality Four in 10 adults say that the quality of education in California’s K –12 public schools is a big problem today ( 32% somewhat of a problem, 24% not much of a problem). That is down somewhat from last April (48%) and a record low since we began asking the question in 1998. Notably, public school parents (27%) are much less likely than adults without school -age children (43%) to say the quality of public school education is a big problem. Across parties, a solid majority of Republicans (60%) say the quality of K– 12 education is a big problem, followed by about half of independents (52%) and even fewer Democrats (41%). The perception that the quality of public education is a big problem increases with age (31% under 35 , 39% 35 to 54 , 51% 55 and older). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (58%) and whites (55%) are far more likely to say quality is a big problem than are Asians (25%) and Latinos (22%). Regardless of how they view the quality of education in California, about six in 10 say that funding for their local schools is not enough . However, those who say that the quality of edu cation is a big problem are less likely than others to favor extending Proposition 30 (57% to 70%), vote yes on a local school bond (64% to 81%), or vote yes on a local parcel tax for schools (54% to 68%). “How much of a problem is the quality of education in California’s K –12 public schools today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem ?” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind Big problem 40% 41% 60% 52% 27% Somewhat of a problem 32 41 29 34 34 Not much of a problem 24 13 8 13 36 Don’t know 4 4 3 1 2 When asked to rate the quality of public schools in their own neighborhood, most Californians give a positive response. A majority give their local schools a grade of A (20%) or B (37%), while 27 percent say C, 9 percent say D, and only 4 percent say F. At least half have said A or B since 2005. Public school parents (68% A or B) are much more likely than non-parents (53%) to rate their local schools positively. Ratings are generally similar across parties and regions, but among racial/ethnic groups, blacks (33% A or B) are much less likely than whites (51%), Latinos (67%), or Asians (69%) to rate their local schools positively. Responses from Californians in our survey are similar to those of adult s nationwide on a similar question in a September 2015 P hi Delta Kappa /Gallup poll (13% A , 38% B, 31% C, 9% D, 4% F). “Next, overall, how would you rate the quality of public schools in your neighborhood today? If you had to give your local public schools a grade, would it be A, B, C, D, or F?” A 20% B 37% C 27% D 9% F 4% Don ’t know 3% 69 33 67 51 0 20 40 60 80 100 Asians BlacksLatinos Whites Percent A or B PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 11 School Teachers Majorities of adults (53%) and public school parents (55%) say a teacher shortage is a big problem in California’s K –12 public schools today. Democrats (61%) are more likely than independents (50%) or Republicans (42%) to view a teacher shortage a s a big problem. Blacks (61%) and Latinos (59%) are more likely than whites (50%) and Asians (46%) to say the same. Those with incomes below $40,000 (60%) are more likely than those with higher incomes (47%) to hold this view . Those without a college degree (55% no college, 56% some college) are somewhat more likely than degree holders (47%) to see a teacher shortage as a big problem . We did not ask this question in earlier PPIC Statewide Surveys. Fewer than one in three adults (30%) and public school parents (29%) say that teacher quality is a big problem in California’s public schools today. Findings among all adults were similar in April 2013 (28%). Across regions, Central Valley residents (22%) are least likely to view teacher quality as a big problem ( 28% San Francisco Bay Area, 33% Orange/San Diego, 35% Los Angeles, 36% Inland Empire). Responses are similar across parties, education, and income groups. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (44%) are the most likely to say teacher quality is a big problem ( 30% Asians, 30% whites, 28% Latinos). “Next, I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking ab out California’s K –12 public schools today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not really a problem. How about…?” A shortage of teachers Teacher quality All adults Public school parents All adults Public school parents Big problem 53% 55% 30% 29% Somewhat of a problem 28 30 45 39 Not really a problem 16 15 22 31 Don’t know 3 – 2 1 Given a set of choices for how the government could attract new K–12 public school teachers, pluralities of adults (45%) and public school parents (47%) say they would most prefer to increase the minimum starting salary. Indeed, increasing the minimum salary is the most common response across parties, regions, and demographic groups. Fewer choose providing forgivable loans for teacher education (21%), providing housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees (11%), or reducing some of the requirements needed to get a teaching credential (8%). Democrats (47%) are somewhat more likely than independents (38%) or Republicans (36%) to prefer increasing the minimum starting salary. “How would you most prefer that the state and local governments attract new K–12 public school teachers…?” All adults Party Public school p arents Dem Rep Ind Increase the minimum starting salary 45% 47% 36% 38% 47% Provide forgivable loans for teacher education 21 20 25 24 24 Provide housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees 11 15 7 11 6 Reduce some of the requirements needed to get a teaching credential 8 4 10 6 8 None, government should not increase efforts to attract new teachers (volunteered) 4 2 11 7 2 All of the above (volunteered) 5 8 3 7 8 Other (volunteered) 2 1 6 4 2 Don’t know 3 3 3 4 3 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 12 View that local public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for… Preparing Students for College and Careers A majority of adults (61%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent (13%) or good (48%) job preparing students for college ( 25% not so good, 9% poor). At least half have said so since April 2013. Today, responses are similar across parties . Public school parents (73 %) are much more likely than non - parents (57%) to say their local public sc hools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for college. Across regions, Central Valley residents (70%) are most likely to say that schools are doing a n excellent or good job (62% Orange/San Diego, 62% Inland Empire, 60% San Francisco Bay A rea, 52% Los Angeles). A cross racial/ethnic groups, blacks (49%) are least likely to say the same. Those with some college (51%) are somewhat less likely than degree holders (59%) or those with no college (69%) to say that schools are doing an excellent or good job at college preparation . “Are your local public schools doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for college? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Excellent 13% 21% 6% 12% 12% 19% Good 48 47 43 54 46 54 Not so good 25 24 31 23 24 20 Poor 9 3 15 8 11 4 Don’t know 5 5 5 3 7 3 About half of adults (52%) say their local public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for jobs and the workforce. Public school parents (69%) are far more likely than non-parents (46%) to say schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for the workforce. Those with no college (63%) are more likely than those with more education (39% some college, 53% college degree) to say schools are doing an excellent or good job. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (36%) are least l ikely to say schools are doing an excellent or good job in this area (47% whites, 60% Asians, 61% Latinos). Responses across parties are largely similar . “Are your local public schools doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing stud ents for jobs and the workforce ?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Excellent 10% 14% 3% 13% 9% 16% Good 42 46 33 48 38 53 Not so good 29 27 33 29 30 22 Poor 13 8 23 8 16 5 Don’t know 6 4 8 3 8 4 34 31 36 44 41 48 52 46 41 43 44 54 53 58 61 0 20 40 60 80 Percent all adults Jobs and the workforce College PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 13 Concern about inequity at schools in lower-income areas Concerns about Inequity A majority of adults (53%) say they are very concerned that schools in lower -income areas have a shortage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas ( 31% somewhat concerned, 8% not too concerned, 7% not at all concerned). A similar proportion (53%) say they are very co ncerned that students in lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school (33 % somewhat concerned, 7 % not too concerned, 6% not at all concerned). Our survey last April saw similar responses (57% very concerned about teacher shortage, 59% very concerned about college readiness). On both issues, Democrats are much more likely than independents and far more likely than Republicans to say they are very concerned. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks are much more likely than others to say they are very concerned about both a teacher shortage and college readiness in lower -income areas. “How concerned are you that schools in lower -income areas have a shortage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school p arents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very concerned 53 % 51% 78% 51% 53% 50% Somewhat concerned 31 36 9 33 30 29 Not too concerned 8 6 7 8 9 10 Not at all concerned 7 6 4 8 7 9 Don’ t know 1 1 1 – 2 1 Women (58%) are more likely than men (48%) to say they are very concerned about a teacher shortage in lower -income areas, and slightly more likely than men to say they are very concerned about college readiness (56% to 50%). Across regions, Central Valley residents (44%) are least likely to say they are very concerned about a teacher shortage (50% Orange/San Diego, 54% Inland Empire, 54% San Francisco Bay Area, 59% Los Angeles). Residents of Los Angeles (58%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (57%) are slightly more likely than those in other regions to say they are very concerned about college readiness in lower -income areas (49% Inland Empire, 48% Orange/San Diego, 45% Central Valley). “How concerned are you that students in lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school ?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school p arents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very concerned 53 % 44% 77% 55% 51% 53% Somewhat concerned 33 44 15 32 33 32 Not too concerned 7 9 3 6 9 7 Not at all concerned 6 3 5 7 5 7 Don’ t know 1 – – 1 1 1 68 40 53 67 46 49 0 20 40 60 80 Dem Rep IndPercent very concerned Shortage of good teachers Students are not ready for college PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 14 Common Core and Local Control Key Findings  T wo -thirds of adults have heard about the Common Core State Standards. Based on what they have read or heard, Californians are divided in their support of Common Core and split along party lines . (page 15 )  Despite mixed overall impressions of Common Core, a majority of Californians are confident that the standards will make students more college and career ready . Fifty -eight percent of adults are confident that teachers are prepared to implement Common Core . (p age 16 )  A majority of public school parents have heard at least a l ittle about the new Smarter Balanced A ssessment . Alt hough student s cores on the new test were lower statewide , a plurality of public school parents think scores were about the same as on previous tests. (page 17)  A majority of Californians (55%) think that the state government has the most control in deciding how state money is spent in public schools. A plurality (45 %) say local school districts should have the most control. (page 18)  A solid majority of Californians (69 %) have heard nothing at all about the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) . But , after being read a brief description, 76 percent favor the LCFF . (page 19 )  Two -thirds of adults are confident that districts receiving additional LCFF funding will spend it on English language learners and lower -income students. Three in four expect that the academic achievement of these students will impro ve as the state implements LCFF . (page 20)  Eight in 10 parents have not been involved in their local school district's accountability plan . Eight in 10 hope their children earn at least a four -year college degree . (pa ge 21 ) 46 23 35 36 62 49 0 20 40 60 80 Dem Rep Ind Percent Favor Oppose Opinions of the Common Core State Standards 20 26 45 18 0 20 40 60 Asians BlacksLatinos WhitesPercent View that academic achievement of English language learners and low -income students will improve a lot with Local Control Funding Formula 32 27 36 62 0 20 40 60 80 100 Latino parents White parents Percent Graduate degree Four-year college degree Parents' educational hopes for their children PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 15 Common Core State Standards Six years ago, California joined a number of other states in adopting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). In 2014, the state began implementing the new standards. Have Californians become more aware of Common Core? Today, two -thirds of adults (66%) have heard about th e Common Core State Standards. Awareness has increased slightly since last year , when only 58 percent of adults had heard of the new standards. Today, three in four public school parents have heard about the CCSS (34% a lot, 41% a little ). Republicans (41%) are more likely than Democrats (26%) and independents (34%) to say they have heard a lot about the Common Core standards. Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (34%) are the most likely to say they have heard a lot about the CCSS (21% As ians, 18% Latinos, 11% blacks). College graduates are more likely than those without a college degree to have heard a lot. The likelihood of having heard a lot about the new standards increases with higher incomes . Among public school parents, four in 10 say that their child’s school or school district provided them with information about the Common Core State Standards, and that they found the information to be adequate. A further 22 percent say they received information but felt they need ed more , and 35 percent say they were not provided information about the CCSS. “How much, if anything, have you heard about the Common Core State Standards, a new set of English and math standards that the state began implementing in recent years? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all?” All adults Household income Public school parents Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more A lot 25% 15 % 25 % 40 % 34 % A little 41 45 39 38 41 Nothing at all 33 39 35 22 24 Don’t know 1 1 – – – Californians are somewhat divided on Common Core —43 percent of adults favor the CCSS while 39 percent oppose it. Public school parents are slightly more likely to favor Common Core (51% favor, 36% oppose). Last April, a similar 47 percent of adults and 57 percent of public school parents favored the CCSS. Today, Democrats (46%) are more likely than independents (35%) and much more likely than Republicans ( 23%) to hold this view . Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (55%) and Asians (48%) are more likely tha n blacks (37%) and whites (34%) to favor the Common Core standards. “The Common Core State Standards are a single set of K –12 English language arts and math standards that most states, including California, have voluntarily adopted. From what you’ve read and heard, do you favor or oppose the Common Core education standards? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Favor 43% 48% 37% 55% 34% 51% Oppose 39 32 39 28 48 36 Don’t know 18 20 24 16 18 13 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 16 Common Core Standards Implementation Even though Californians are divided in their overall views , a majority are confident that the new Common Core standards will make students more college and career ready (54%). Four in ten adults are not too or not at all confident . Findings were similar last April, when 57 percent were confident that implementing Common Core would make students more college and career ready. Today, two in three public school parents say they are very or somewhat confident that Common Core will make students more college and career ready. There are notable partisan differences : Republicans (29%) are less likely than independents (44%) and much less likely than Democrats (53%) to express confidence that Common Core will make students more prepared. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (72%) are the most likely to say they are confident , while whites are the least likely to hold this view (39%). “How confident are you that implementing Common Core in California’s schools will make students more college or career ready upon graduation? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very confident 15% 11 % 20% 25% 8% 22 % Somewhat confident 39 49 35 47 31 45 Not too confident 22 20 23 17 26 15 Not at all confident 19 14 16 10 27 17 Don’t know 5 6 5 1 8 1 A majority of Californians (57%) also say they are confident that Common Core will achieve another of its identified goals —helping students develop critical thinking and problem -solving skills. More than one -third o f Californians express doubt (38 % not too or not at all confident). Findings were similar last April, when 57 percent expressed confidence. Today, a solid majority of public school parents (72 %) are confident that C ommon Core will help students develop these skills . Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (76 %) are the most likely to express confidence, followed by Asians (62%), blacks (51%) and whites (42 %). A majority of Californians (58%) are very or somewhat confident that teachers are adequately prepared to teach the Common Core State S tandards. Among public school parents, confidence is higher —seven in 10 express confidence. There are notable partisan differences : a majority of Democrats (59%) and half of independents (51%) express confidence that teachers are prepar ed, compared to 39 percent of Republicans. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (71%) are the most likely to express confidence in teacher preparedness , while blacks (49%) are the least likely to do so. “ How confident are you that California’s public school teachers are adequately prepared to implement the Common Core State Standards? ” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very confident 14% 13 % 12% 21% 10% 24 % Somewhat confident 44 44 37 50 41 48 Not too confident 24 27 29 20 26 16 Not at all confident 11 9 21 6 13 10 Don’t know 7 6 2 2 10 2 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 17 “How much, if anything, have you heard about the Smarter Balanced Assessment tests? Smarter Balanced Assessment Last spring, following the implementation of Common Core, California students took the ir first Smarter Balanced Assessment tests. This new set of tests is designed to measure whether students are meeting their grade -level standard s in math, reading, and wr iting. Last April, fewer than half of parents had heard about the Smarter Balanced Assessment. Today, a majority of public school parents (55%) have heard at least a little about the new tests , while 45 percent have heard nothing at all. “How much, if anyt hing, have you heard about the Smarter Balanced Assessment tests, the new standardized tests which will be administered online in public schools in a number of states which have implemented the Common Core State Standards? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? ” Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Latinos Whites A lot 12% 10 % 14 % 11 % 21 % A little 43 43 41 45 42 Nothing at all 45 46 44 43 35 Don’t know 1 1 1 1 2 Last April, when public school parents were asked to predict how California students would sco re on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment , a plurality of public school parents (42%) expected scores to be about the same as those on past tests. Test results released in the fall of 2015 showed that a smaller share of students met or exceeded the new standards. However, today, a plurality of pu blic school parents (37%) believe that student scores were similar to those on previous tests. Only a quarter of public school parents correctly say that students scored lower on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment. “In the spring of 2015, California public school students took the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests. The Smarter Balanced Assessment tests and the tests they replaced measure whether students are proficient in math and reading and writing at grade level. Compared to past test scores do you think that as a whole California students scored higher, lower , or about the same on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests? ” Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Latinos Whites Higher 20% 23 % 15 % 27 % 15 % About the same 37 38 39 42 25 Lower 26 23 28 21 33 Don’t know 17 16 17 11 27 8 12 36 43 0 20 40 60 2015 2016 Percent public school parents A little A lot PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 18 Local School Funding Control The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) provides local school districts with increased spending flexibility. However, most Californians (55%) and public school parents (47%) think that the state government has the most control in deciding how money from the state is spent in local public schools. This view is held by pluralities a cross parties, regions, and demographic groups. Notably, nearly three in four blacks (73%) hold this view , compared to fewer whites (59%), Latinos (50%), and Asians (48%). “Who do you think has the most control in deciding how the money from state governm ent is spent in local public schools —the local schools, the local school districts, or the state government? ” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind Local schools 11% 10 % 8 % 7 % 14 % Local school district s 29 29 24 27 35 State government 55 58 63 61 47 Other (volunteered) 1 – 2 1 2 Don’t know 3 4 3 3 2 However, few Californians think the state government should have the most control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local public schools. Nearly all Californians think the local school district s (45%) or the local schools (37%) should have the most control, while just 15 percent think the state government should. Each time we asked this question from 2008 to 201 3, more than three in four Californians h ave preferred local control, with a plurality saying school districts should have the most control. Overwhelming majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups prefer local control, but they are divided over whether this control should be in the hands of schools or school districts . Republicans (54%) are slightly more likely than Democrats (47%) and independents (48%) to prefer local school districts. Blacks (51%) and whites (49%) are slightly more likely than Asians (42%) and Latinos (42%) to p refer that local school districts have the most control. “Who do you think should have the most control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local public schools —the local schools, the local school districts, or the state government ?” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind Local schools 37% 40% 35% 40% 38% Local school districts 45 47 54 48 42 State government 15 10 10 9 17 Other (volunteered) 1 1 1 2 1 Don’t know 2 2 1 1 2 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL nlmr PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education mu Local Control Funding Formula As the state enters the second full year of implementation, relatively few Californians ( ol%) have heard about the Local Control Funding Formula. Awareness has increased r points since last year (np %) and is similar to April nlmp (ns %). Thirty-six percent of public school parents have heard about the LCFF; this share is up s points since last year ( nu%) and nearly identical to April nlmp (os %). Latinos ( ot%) and blacks ( oq%) are more likely than whites and Asians (nr % each) to have heard of the LCFF. Fewer than four in ml across parties and regions—as well as age, educat ion, and income groups—have heard of the LCFF. “Next, how much, if anything, have you heard about the Local Control Funding Formula, a policy enacted in recent years that changes the way K–12 public school districts are funded in California?” All adults Party Public school parents Dem Rep Ind A lot 3% 4% 3% 2% 6% A little 27 26 22 27 30 Nothing at all 69 70 76 71 64 Despite these low levels of awareness, strong majorities of Californians (sr%) and public school parents ( ss%) are in favor of LCFF after being read a brief description. Support among all adults and public school parents was similar in April nlmp and nlmq. Support among those who have heard at least a little about the policy is slightly higher than among all adults (to % to sr%). More than two in three Californians across regions and demographic groups ar e in favor. Notably, support declines as age increases. While there is solid support across political parties, Democrats (tq%) more likely than independents ( sl%) or Republicans ( rp%) to favor the LCFF. “The Local Control Funding Formula provides additional funding to school districts that have more English language learners and low-income students and gives flexibility over how state funding is spent. Do you favor or oppose this plan?” All adults Party Public school parents Have heard about LCFF Dem Rep Ind Favor 76% 85% 64% 70% 77% 83% Oppose 19 10 31 23 18 14 Don’t know 6 5 5 7 5 3 Local Control Funding Formula Implementation The Local Control Funding Formula provides local scho ol districts with increased control over spending decisions. It also provides additional funding to school districts that have more English language learners and lower-income students. How confident are Californians that school districts that receive additional funding will spend that money on progra ms and support for English language learners and lower-income students? Two in three Californians ( rq%) are very confident ( mq%) or somewhat confident ( ql%) that this additional funding will be spent on these students. Public school parents ( so %) are even more confident ( mr% very, qs % somewhat). Confidence is higher than it was last April among all adults (up u points) and public school parents (up s points). Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos ( sn%) are the most likely to express confidence, followed by Asians ( ru%), blacks ( rp%), and PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL nlmr PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education nl whites ( qu%). Confidence is higher among Democrats ( rq%) than among independents ( qs%) and Republicans ( qr%). At least six in ml Californians across regions are confident that this additional funding will be spent on these students; residents in the San Francisco Bay Area ( sl%) are most likely to hold this view. Majorities across ag e, education, and income groups ar e confident, although confidence decreases with increasing age. “As the state implements the Local Control Funding Formula, how confident are you that local school districts which receive addi tional funding will spend that money on programs and support for English language learners and low-income students?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very confident 15% 12% 13% 19% 12% 16% Somewhat confident 50 57 51 53 47 57 Not too confident 22 19 20 18 26 17 Not at all confident 10 6 14 8 13 7 Don’t know 3 5 2 2 3 3 Given these confidence levels, it is not surprising that three in four Californians think the implementation of the new funding formula will improve the academic achievement of English language learners and lower-income students ( nt% a lot, pt% somewhat). Public school parents are even more likely to think academic achievement will improve a lot ( oq%) or somewhat (ql%). Expectation of improvement is higher today among all adults ( rr% nlmp , rt% nlmq , sr% today) and public school parents ( sm% nlmp , st% nlmq , tq% today) than in recent years. Latinos ( tu%) and Asians ( tp %) are most likely to expect improvement, followed by blacks ( ru%) and whites ( rr%). While majorities across parties are optimistic, Democrats ( tl%) are more likely to expect improvement than independents ( rr%) and Republicans ( qr%). At least two in three Californians across regions and demographic groups are optimistic. “As the state implements the Local Control Funding Formula, do you think the academic achievement of English language learners and low-income students will or will not improve?” (If it will, ask : “Do you think it will improve a lot or somewhat?”) All adults Race/Ethnicity Public school parents Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Improve a lot 28% 20% 26% 45% 18% 35% Improve somewhat 48 64 43 44 48 50 Will not improve 18 9 25 9 25 12 Don’t know 7 7 6 2 9 3 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 21 Parental Involvement and the Local Control Funding Formula The LCFF require s school districts to develop, adopt, and annually update three -year Local Control and Accountability Plan s (LCAP s). As part of the LCAP process , districts are required to reach out to parents and are encouraged to seek input from parents of lower- income and English language learner students. Half of public school parents (51%) say that they were provided with information about how to get involved —an increase of 9 points from last April. Similar shares of public school parents with household incomes below and above $40,000 (49% and 55%, respectively) say they were provided with information. Latino public school parents (58%) are slightly more likely than white public school parents (50%) to have received information. Since last April, the share of Latino and white public school parents who reported receiving information increased 12 and 13 points , respectively. Mothers are much more likely than fathers to say they have been provided with information (59% to 41%). Public school parents with only a high school education (57%) were m ore likely to have received information than those with at least some college (45%). “ The Local Control Funding Formula requires school districts to seek input from parents in developing their accountability plans for how to allocate resources. Did your c hild's school or school district provide you with information? ” Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Latinos Whites Yes 51% 49 % 55 % 58 % 50 % No 44 48 39 39 42 Don’t know 5 4 6 3 7 Fewer than one in five public school parents report being very involved (4%) or somewhat involved (14%) in the development of their local school district ’s accountability plan; 81 percent say they were not involved. Notably, despite a 9 point increase in the share of public school parents who report that they were provided with information, parental involvement remained nearly identical to last year (3% very involved, 14% somewhat involved, 82% not involved ). M others are twice as like ly as fathers (23% to 11%) to say they were involved . “W ere you involved in the development of your local school district's accountability plan?” (If yes , ask : “Were you very involved or somewhat involved?”) Public school parents only All public school parents Household income Gender Under $40,000 $40,000 or more Men Women Yes, very involved 4% 5 % 3 % – 7 % Yes, somewhat involved 14 15 12 11 % 16 No, not involved 81 78 85 87 76 Don ’t know 1 2 – 1 1 When parents are asked about their educational hopes for their children, a record -matching 51 percent say they would like their youngest child to earn a graduate degree. Another 29 percent say they hope their child ear ns a four -year degree. Since we began asking this question in 2005 , at l east four in 10 parents have expressed hope that their child would obtain a graduate degree. Findings among public school parents are similar. Strong majorities of parents across income, education, and racial/ethnic groups would like their child to go to c ollege, but the share hoping for graduate degrees increases as education and income levels rise and is much higher among whites (62%) than Latinos (36%). PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 22 Regional Map PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 23 Methodology The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from survey research associate Lunna Lopes, project manager for this survey, associate survey director Dean Bonner , and survey research associate David Kordus. This survey on Californians and Education is supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Found ation, The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the LA Partnership for Early Childhood Investment, the Silver Giving Foundation, and the Stuart Foundation. It is the 1 2th annual PPIC Statewide Survey on K –12 education since 2005. The PPIC Statewide Surv ey invites input, comments, and suggestions from policy and public opinion experts and from its own advisory committee, but survey methods, questions, and content are determined solely by PPIC’s survey team. Findings in this repor t are based on a survey of 1,70 3 Califor nia adult residents, including 85 1 interviewed on landline telephones and 85 2 interviewed on cell phones. Interviews took an average of 20 minutes to complete. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights from April 3–12 , 201 6. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection, and the sample tel ephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid b iases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were conducted using a computer- generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as ma ny as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the house hold. Live landline and cell phone interviews were conducted by Abt SRBI, Inc., in English and Spanish, according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc., translated new survey questions into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. A bt SRBI uses the U.S. Census Bureau’s 201 0–201 4 American Community Survey’s (ACS) Public Use Microdata Series for California (with regional coding information from the University of Minnesota’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series for California) to comp are certain demographic characteristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the ACS figures. To estimate landline and cell phone service in California, Abt SRBI used 201 4 state -level estimates released by the National Center for Health Statistics —which used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the ACS —and 2015 estimates for the West Census Region in the latest NHIS report. The estimates for California were then compared against landline and cell phone service reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party registration of regist ered voters in our sample to party registration statewide. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing adjusted for differences across regional, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, t elephone service, and party registration groups. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 24 The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±3. 5 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total unweighted sample of 1,70 3 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 3. 5 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for unweighted subgroups is larger: for the 1, 384 registered voters, the sampling error is ± 3.8 percent; for the 997 likely voters, it is ±4. 4 percent ; for the 507 parents it is ±6. 0 percent ; for the 3 75 public school parents it is ±7. 0 percent . Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for five geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Me rced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents of other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populous areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for non -Hispanic whites, who account for 43 percent of the state’s adult population, and also for Latin os, who account for about 34 percent of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest- growing voter groups. We also present results for non -Hispanic Asians, who make up about 15 percent of the state’s adult population, and non -Hispanic bla cks, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We co mpare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, registered Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in other parties are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated per their responses to voter registration survey questions, previous election participation, and current interest in politics. The percentages presented in the report tables and in the question naire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to those in a national survey by Phi Delta Kappa /Gallup. Additional details about our methodology can be found at www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 25 Questionnaire and Results CALIFORNIANS AND EDUCATION April 3–12 , 2016 1,7 03 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ± 3.5% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMP LE PERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100 DUE TO RO UNDING Overall, do you approve or disapprove of 1. the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 54% approve 26 disapprove 19 don’t know Do you approve or disapprove of the way 2. that Govern or Brown is handling the state's kindergarten through 12th grade public education system? 45% approve 30 disapprove 25 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of 3. the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 48% approve 38 disapprove 14 don’t know Do you approve or disapprove of the way 4. that the California Legislature is handling the state's kindergarten through 12th grade public education system? 42% approve 39 disapprove 19 don’t know Next, How much of a problem is the quality of 5. education in California’s K –12 public schools today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 40% big problem 32 somewhat of a problem 24 not much of a problem 4 don’t know Next, [rotate questions 6 and 7] How concerned are you that schools in 6. lower -income areas have a shortage of good teachers compared to schools in wealthier areas? Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about this issue ? 53% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 8 not too concerned 7 not at all concerned 1 don’t know How concerned are you that students in 7. lower -income areas are less likely than other students to be ready for college when they finish high school? Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about this issue? 53% very concerned 33 somewhat concerned 7 not too concerned 6 not at all concerned 1 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 26 Next, how much, if anything, have you 8. heard about the Common Core State Standards, a new set of English and math standards that the state began implementing in recent years? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? 25% a lot 41 a little 33 nothing at all 1 don’t know The Common Core State S tandards are a 9. single set of K–12 English language arts and math standards that most states, including California, have voluntarily adopted. From what you’ve read and heard, do you favor or oppose the Common Core education standards? 43% favor 39 oppose 18 don’t know [rotate questions 10 to 12] How confident are you that implementing 10. Common Core in California’s schools will make students more college or career ready upon graduation —very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 15% very confident 39 somewhat confident 22 not too confident 19 not at all confident 5 don’t know How confident are you that implementing 11. Common Core in California’s schools will help students develop critical thinking and problem solving sk ills—very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 16% very confident 41 somewhat confident 20 not too confident 18 not at all confident 5 don’t know How confident are you that California’s 12. public school teachers are adequately prepared to implement the Common Core State Standards—very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 14% very confident 44 somewhat confident 24 not too confident 11 not at all confident 7 don’t know [public school parents only] Has your child’s 13. school or school district provided you with any information about Common Core State Standards, or not? [if yes: Was this information adequate in helping you understand how Common Core will affect your child or do you feel you need more information?] 40% yes, information was adequate 22 yes, but we need more information 35 no, was not provided with any information 3 don’t know 13a. [public school parents only] How much, if anything, have you heard about the Smarter B alanced Assessment tests, the new standardized tests which will be administered online in public schools in a number of states which have implemented the Common Core State Standards? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? 12% a lot 43 a little 45 nothing at all 1 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 27 [public school parents only] In the spring of 14. 2015, California public school students took the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests. The Smarter Balanced Assessment tests and the tests they replaced measure whether students are proficient in math and reading and writing at grade level. Compared to past test scores do you think that as a whole California students scored higher, lower or about the same on the new Smarter Balanced Assessment tests? 20% higher 26 lower 37 about the same 17 don’t know Next, overall, how would you rate the 15. quality of public schools in your neighborhood today? If you had to give your local public schools a grade, would it be A, B, C, D, or F? [if necessary, read: Think of grades A to F a s a scale where A is the best and F is failing.] 20% A 37 B 27 C 9 D 4 F 3 don’t know [rotate questions 16 and 17] Are your local public schools doing an 16. excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for college? 13% excellent 48 good 25 not so good 9 poor 5 don’t know Are your local public schools doing an 17. excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for jobs and the workforce? 10% excellent 42 good 29 not so good 13 poor 6 don’t know Next, I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s K–12 public schools today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not really a problem. [rotate questions 18 and 19] How about teacher quality? 18. 30% big problem 45 somewhat of a problem 22 not really a problem 2 don’t know How about a shortage of teachers? 19. 53% big problem 28 somewhat of a problem 16 not really a problem 3 don’t know 19a. How would y ou most prefer that the state and local governments attract new K –12 public school teachers [rotate ] (1) increase the minimum starting salary; (2) provide forgivable loans for teacher education; (3) provide housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees [ or ] (4) reduce some of the requirements needed to get a teaching credential? 45% increase the minimum starting salary 21 provide forgivable loans for teacher education 11 provide housing assistance such as mortgage guarantees 8 reduce some of the requireme nts needed to get a teaching credential 4 none, government should not increase efforts to attract new teachers (volunteered) 5 all of the above (volunteered) 2 other (specify) 3 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 28 Changing topics, Do you think the current level of state 20. funding for your local public schools is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 9% more than enough 26 just enough 61 not enough 4 don’t know As you may know, voters passed 21. Proposition 30 in November 2012. It increased taxes on earnings over $250,000 until 2018 and sales taxes by one quarter cent until 2016. Do you favor or oppose extending for 12 years the tax increase on earnings over $250,000 to fund education and health care? 64% favor 32 oppose 4 don’t know If the state ballot had a bond measure to 22. pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no? 76% yes 21 no 3 don’t know [rotate questions 23 and 24] If your local school district had a bond 23. measure on the ballot to pay for school construction projects, would you vote yes or no? 74% yes 24 no 2 don’t know What if there was a measure on your local 24. ballot to increase local parcel taxes to provide more funds for the local public schools? Would you vote yes or no? 62% yes 33 no 5 don’t know Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea 25. to replace the two -thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for voters to pass local parcel taxes for the local publi c schools? 53% good idea 40 bad idea 7 don’t know Next, who do you think has the most 26. control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local public schools —[rotate order] (1 ) the local schools, (2 ) the local school districts, [or ] (3) the state government? 11% the local schools 29 the local school districts 55 the state government 1 other (specify) 3 don’t know And who do you think should have the 27. most control in deciding how the money from state government is spent in local publi c schools—[rotate in same order as Q26 ] (1) the local schools, (2 ) the local school districts, [or] (3 ) the state government? 37% the local schools 45 the local school districts 15 the state government 1 other (specify) 2 don’t know Next, how much, if anything, have you 28. heard about the Local Control Funding Formula, a policy enacted last year that changes the way K–12 public school districts are funded in California? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all? 3% a lot 27 a little 69 nothing at all – don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 29 The Local Control Funding Formula 29. provides additional funding to school districts that have more [ rotate ] [English language learners] [and ] [lower -income students] and gives local school districts more flexibility over how state funding is spent. In general, do you favor or oppose this plan? 76% favor 19 oppose 6 don’t know As the state implements the Local Control 30. Funding Formula, how confident are you that local school districts which receive additional funding will spend that money on programs and support for [rotate in same order as Q29] [English language learners] [and] [lower -income students] ? Are you very confident, somewhat confident, not too confident, or not at all confident? 15% very confident 50 somewhat confident 22 not too confident 10 not at all confident 3 don’t know As the state implements the Local Control 31. Funding Formula, do you think the academic achievement of [rotate in same order as Q29] [English language learners] [and] [lower-income students] will or will not improve? (if it will, ask: Do you think it will improve a lot or somewhat?) 28% improve a lot 48 improve somewhat 18 will not improve 7 don’t know [public school parents only] T he Local Control 32. Funding Formula requires school districts to seek input from parents in developing their accountability plans for how to allocate resources. Did your child’s school or school district provide you with information about how to become involved, or not? 51% yes 44 no 5 don’t know 32a. [public school parents only] And were you involved in the development of your local school district’s accountability plan? [if yes, ask: Were you very involved or somewhat involved?] 4% yes, very involved 14 yes, somewhat involved 81 no, not involved 1 don’t know 32b. [parents only] What do you hope will be the highest grade level that your youngest child will achieve: some high school; high school graduate; two -year community college graduate or career tech nical training; four-year college graduate; or a graduate degree after college? – some high school 4% high school graduate 11 two-year community college graduate or career technical training 29 four-year college graduate 51 a graduate degree after college 5 don’t know On another topic, d o you think that the 33. state government should or should not fund voluntary preschool programs for all four -year -olds in California? 76% should 22 should not 2 don’t know The state is projected to have a budg et 34. surplus of several billion dollars. In general, how would you prefer to use this extra money? [rotate] (1 ) Would you prefer to pay down state debt and build up the reserve [or] ( 2 ) would you prefer to use some of this money to increase funding for publi c preschool and early childhood education programs in California? 34% pay down debt and build up reserve 63 increase funding for public preschool and early childhood education programs 3 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 30 How important is attending preschool to a 35. student's success in kindergarten through grade 12—very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 68% very important 21 somewhat important 6 not too important 3 not at all important 1 don’t know [rotate questions 36 and 37] How much of a problem is the quality of 36. preschool education in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 20% big problem 36 somewhat of a problem 34 not much of a problem 9 don’t know How much of a problem is the affordability 37. of preschool education in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 42% big problem 32 somewhat of a problem 20 not much of a problem 6 don’t know How concerned are you that children in 38. lower -income areas are less likely than other children to be ready for kindergarten? Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about this issue? 50% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 11 not too concerned 8 not at all concerned 1 don’t know Next, some people are registered to vote 39. and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 63% yes [ask Q39a] 37 no [skip to Q40b] 39a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Repu blican, another party, or are you registered as a decline-to -state or independent voter? 43% Democrat [ask Q 40] 27 Republican [skip to Q 40a] 5 another party ( specify) [skip to Q41] 24 independent [skip to Q40b] Would you call yourself a strong Democrat 40. or not a very strong Democrat? 64% strong 34 not very strong 2 don’t know [skip to Q41] 40a. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 52% strong 46 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to Q41] 40b. Do you think of you rself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 23% Republican Party 44 Democratic Party 23 neither ( volunteered) 9 don’t know Next, would you consider yourself to be 41. politically: [read list, rotate order from top to bottom] 14% very li beral 22 somewhat liberal 32 middle -of-the -road 21 somewhat conservative 10 very conservative 2 don’t know How closely are you following news about 42. candidates for the 2016 presidential election —very closely, fairly closely, not too closely, or not at all closely? 36% very closely 39 fairly closely 18 not too closely 7 not at all closely – don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY APRIL 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Education 31 Generally speaking, how much interest 43. would you say you have in politics —a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 26% great deal 35 fair amount 29 only a little 10 none – don’t know [d1 to d1 4: demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect Angela Glover Blackwell President and CEO PolicyLink Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director B ill Lane Center for the American West Stanford University Jon Cohen Vice President of Survey Research SurveyMonkey Joshua J. Dyck Co-Director Center for Public Opinion University of Massachusetts, Lowell Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Sil icon Valley Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Professor Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California Robert Lapsley President California Business Roundtable Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Sonja Petek 2016 Master of Public Policy Candidate Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley Lisa Pitney Vice President of Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Mindy Romero Founder and Director California Civic Engagement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change Robert K. Ross, MD President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Carol Whiteside Principal California Strategies The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Donna Lucas, Chair Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect María Blanco Executive Director Undocumented Student Legal Services Center University of California Office of the President Louise Henry Bryson Chair Emerita, Board of Trustees J. Paul Getty Trust A. Marisa Chun Partner McDermott Will & Emery LLP Phil Isenberg Former Chair Delta Stewardship Council Mas Masumoto Author and Farmer Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni, LLP Gerald L. Parsky Chairman Aurora Capital Group Kim Polese Chairman ClearStreet, Inc. Gaddi H. Vasquez Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Edison International Southern California Edison Public Policy Institute of California 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94111 T: 415.291.4400 F: 415.291.4401 PPIC.ORG PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, CA 95814 T: 916.440.1120 F: 916.440.1121" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:42:56" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(8) "s_416mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:42:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:42:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(50) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_416MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }