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PPIC is a public charity. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source. Research publications reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of our funders or of the staff, officers, advisory councils, or board of directors of t he Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 3 CONTACT Linda Strean 415 -291 -4412 Serina Correa 415 -291 -4417 News Release EMBARGOED : Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PST on Thursday, December 8, 2016. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWI DE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND HIG HER EDUCATION Most See College Affordability as Big Problem MAJORITIES FAVOR A HIGHER EDUCATION CONS TRUCTION BOND, FEWER SUPPORT RAISING TAXES OR STUDENT FEES SAN FRANCISCO, December 8 , 2016—Most Californians say the overall affordability of the state’s public colleges and universities is a big problem, while few say the same about the quality of education. These are among the key findings of a survey on the state’s public higher education sys tem released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC). As the University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) consider raising tuition for the next academic year, 57 percent of residents say affordability is a big prob lem (28% somewhat of a problem, 13% not much of a problem). At least half of adults across political, income, and age groups see affordability as a big problem. When asked to name the most important issue facing the state’s public colleges and universities , 46 percent of Californians mention affordability, cost, or student tuition and fees. All other issues were mentioned by less than 10 percent of adults. In contrast, just 15 percent of Californians say the quality of higher education is a big problem. Acr oss political, age, racial/ethnic, and income groups, 25 percent or fewer say quality is a big problem. While most Californians see cost as an obstacle to getting a college education, there are differences of opinion about the accessibility of loans and f inancial aid. A strong majority of adults (72%) agree with the statement that the price of a college education keeps student s who are qualified and motivated from going to college . This is a view held by solid majorities across parties, regions, and racial/ethnic, age, education, and income groups. Yet 58 percent agree that almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid (39% disagree). Adults with annual incomes below $40,000 (67%) are much more likely than those wit h higher incomes (50%) to agree. Californians with less education are more likely than those with more education to say that anyone who needs aid can get it (68% high school or less, 54% some college, 49% college graduates). An overwhelming majority of adu lts (78%) agree with the statement that students have to borrow too much money to pay for a college education. How could the government make higher education more affordable? Solid majorities of adults (73%) and likely voters (62%) favor increasing governm ent funding to make community college free. Californians are even more supportive of increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges and universities : 82 percent of adults and 80 percent of likely voters are in favor. “With many Californians saying that affordability is the most important problem facing public higher education, there is overwhelming support for free community college and for expanding student scholarships,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 4 Most Say Higher Education Lacks Adequate State Funding Most adults (67%) say state funding for California’s colleges and universities is inadequate, while far fewer say there is more than enough (10%) or just enough (19%) funding . Yet only 13 percent say that increased state funding alone will significantly improve the higher education system. Half (49%) say that both increasing state funding and using existing funds more wisely would significantly improve the system, and 36 percent say w iser use of existing funds alone would do so. Notably, 42 percent of those who attended a community college or a CSU school say that existing funds need to be used more wisely , compared to just 22 percent of those who attended UC. Shortly after California voters approved Proposition 51, a bond measure to pay for construction projects for K–12 and community colleges, the survey ask ed about the idea of a similar measure to fund higher education construction projects. Solid majorities of adults (65%) and likely voters (60%) say they would vote yes. Support is much lower for two other ways to raise revenue for higher education. When Californians are aske d if they would be willing to pay higher taxes to increase funding for the system, 48 percent of adults and 4 8 percent of likely voters say yes, while 50 percent in each group say no. Californians are even less likely to support raising student fees: only 23 percent of adults and 21 percent of likely voters are in favor. “With two in three Californians saying th at the public higher education system needs more state funding today, solid majorities support a state bond,” Baldassare said. “Half support a tax hike and one in four favo r a student fee increase.” Another way to raise funding is to increase the number of out -of -state students who pay higher tuition . Adults are divided on this idea (46 % yes, 50% no). Support drops significantly if this option would mean that fewer California students are admitted: j ust 21 percent of adults are in favor. State Leaders’ App roval Ratings Rise as Budget, Tuition Stabilize Governor Brown has an overall job approval rating of 57 percent among adults and 59 percent among likely voters. Fewer (45% adults, 41% likely voters) approve of how the governor is handling the state’s public college and university system. However, his rating in this area is much higher than when PPIC last asked about this in 2011 (31% adults, 29% likely voters approved ). The legislature has an overall job approval rating today of 49 percent among adults and 45 percent among likely voters. Approval of the legislature’s hand ling of higher education is also lower (4 2% adults, 35% likely voters) than its overall rating but highe r today than it was in 2011 (21% adults, 14% likely voters). Baldassare summed up : “Governor Brown and the California Legislature have seen their approval ratings rise as the state’s budget situation and student tuition costs have stabilized in recent years.” High Marks for Colleges, Universities—but Also Concerns Most Californians give positive ratings to each branch of the higher education system, the California Community Colleges (15% excellent, 51% good), UC (14% excellent, 51% good), and CSU (10% excellent, 56% good). Notably, the proportion of Californians who give the CSU system a positive rating has increased 10 points since PPIC’s last higher education survey in 2011. UC’s rating increased by a more modest 6 points and the community college rating is about the same. Among Californians who attended a public c ollege or university, strong majorities say the branch of the system they attended is doing a good to excellent job (69% community college, 67% CSU, 71% UC). While Californians are generally positive about the quality of their colleges and universities, t hey also have concerns about these institutions. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 5  Admission to UC : An overwhelming majority of residents are concerned ( 38% very concerned, 38% somewhat concerned) about the difficulty state high school students face in gaining admission to one of the UC ca mpuses. More than two -thirds of residents across all regions, parties, and demographic groups say they are concerned, with African Americans far more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to say they are very concerned.  CSU’s four -year graduation rate : Mo st adults are concerned (24% very, 30% somewhat ) about the share of students who graduate within four years from CSU.  Community college transfers: About half of adults are concerned (21% very, 31% somewhat) about the share of students who successfully tran sfer from the state’s community colleges to a four -year degree program. Californians value the role of community colleges in preparing students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities: 78 percent say it is very important. At the same time, Calif ornians value another of the community colleges’ key roles: 78 percent say it is very important that the colleges include career technical, or vocational, education. Diversity Viewed as Very Important Asked about the value of student diversity, 61 percent of adults say it is very important for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body, while 20 percent say it is not important. Similarly, 61 percent of adults say it is very important for these institutions to have an economica lly diverse student body (15% not important). Californians Divided on the Value of a College Education How important is a college education to success in today’s economy? Opinions are split evenly among Californians, with 49 percent saying it is necessary to succeed and 49 percent saying there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education. There are notable splits among demographic groups on this question. Solid majorities of adults with no college education (60%) and those with annual incomes below $40,000 (60%) say college is necessary to succeed . Majorities of those with more education and higher incomes say there are many ways to succeed without college (56% of those with at least some college, 57% with incomes of $40,000 or more). Latinos (67%) are much more likely than whites (36%) to say college is necessary. About half of African Americans (52%) and Asian Americans (49%) also express this view. Ask ed how prepared students are for college-level work, a strong majority of adults (67%) say that many students require basic skills and remedial education. Nearly All Say Higher Education System Is Important to State’s Future At the same time, nearly all Californians say the state’s higher education system is important (77% very, 19% somewhat) to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. Yet fewer than half (45%) recognize that the state will face a shortage of the college- educated residents needed for the jobs of the future, as PPIC research has shown. A majority say they have confidence ( 16% a great deal, 43% some ) in the state government to plan for the future of higher education, while 40 percent have little or none. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 6 Perceptions of Public Higher Education Key Findings  When asked to name the most important issue facing California’s public colleges and universities , 46 percent of Californians mention affordability . Californians are divided on whether the state’s public higher education system is headed in the right direction or the wrong direction (45% each) . (page 7 )  Approximately one in six Californians (15 %) say the quality of education in California’ s public colleges and universities is a big problem, while a majority (57%) see affordability as a big problem. (page 8)  A pprov al of the way Governor Brown and the California Legisla ture are handling the state’s public higher education system has increased sharply since we last asked about this in 2011 . (page 9 )  Two -thirds of Californians give excellent or good rating s to t he California Community College s system (66 %), the Califo rnia State University system (66 %), and the University of Califor nia system (65 %). CSU approval has increase d the most since 2011, when we last asked this question . Many Californians are unfamiliar with some basic facts about the three systems. (page s 10 , 11 )  About half of adults are very or somewhat concerned about the transfer rate at California’s community colleges (52 %) and the graduation rate in the CSU system (54 %). Three in four adults (76%) are concerned about the difficulty of admittance to the UC system. (page s 11, 12)  Sixty -seven percent of adults say the level of state funding for public higher education is not enough. One in eight adults say that more funding alone will improve higher education, while about half ( 49%) say that both more funding and better use of existing funds are needed. (page 13 ) 44 31 57 45 0 20 40 60 80 100 Overall job Public higher educationPercent all adults Nov 2011 Dec 2016 Governor Brown’s approval ratings 25 21 49 42 0 20 40 60 80 100 Overall job Public higher education Percent all adults Nov 2011 Dec 2016 California Legislature’s approval ratings 62 5659 66 66 65 0 20 40 60 80 100 California Community Colleges California State University University of California Percent all adults % excellent/goodNov 2011 Dec 2016 Ratings of the three branches of California’s public higher education system PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 7 Most Important Issue and Overall Direction When asked to name the most important issue facing California’s public colleges and universities today, 4 6 percent of adults mention affordability, cost, or student tuition and fees. All other topics are mentioned by less than one in ten adults, including not enough government funding (5 %); administrative costs , bureaucracy, and waste ( 4 % ); overall accessibility (4 %); and political views (3%). Affordability and cost is also the most important issue among likely voters (52%) and leads other topic areas by wide margins across political parties and regions of the state, as well as across age, education, gender, inc ome, and racial/ethnic groups. Californians named affordability and cost as the most important issue in public higher education whe n we first asked this open -ended question in our 2007 PPIC Statewide Survey on higher education, as well as when it was last asked in November 2010. Today, affordability and cost are mentioned more often than in the earlier PPIC surveys. When asked about the public higher education system overall, 45 percent say it is going in the right direction and 4 5 percent say it is going in the wrong direction. Responses were much more negative when we last asked this question in the 2011 PPIC survey on higher education (28% right direction, 62% wrong direction). Today, Democrats, Latinos, those with annual incomes under $40,000, and non – college educated adults are more likely than others to say it is going in the right direction . “ Thinking about the pub lic higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? ” Right direction Wrong direction Don’t know All adults 45% 45% 10% Likely voters 38 54 9 Party Democrat s 49 40 11 Republicans 21 72 7 Independent s 33 55 11 Household i ncome Under $40,000 55 36 10 $40,000 to $80,000 39 52 10 $80,000 or more 37 54 9 Race/E thnicity African Americans 42 51 6 Asian Americans 41 36 23 Latinos 59 32 8 Whites 35 57 7 Age 18– 34 47 42 10 35–54 45 45 10 55 and older 42 49 10 Californians name affordability the most important issue in public higher education 35 3746 0 20 40 60 80 100 2007 20102016 Percent all adults Affordability, costs, student tuition and fees PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 8 Quality and Affordability of Public Higher Education With tuition increases in two of the three branches of California’s public higher education system under discussion , most Californians are concerned about the ove rall affordability of education ; far fewer express concern about the overall quality of education in California’s public colleges and universities . Fifty -seven percent of adults say the overall affordability of public higher education is a big problem. Today, perceptions of a ffordability are similar to PPIC surveys in December 2014 (59%) , November 2011 (61%) , and October 2007 (53%). By contrast, 15 percent of adults say the quality of higher education is a big problem, down somewhat from 2014 (25%) and 2011 (24%) , but similar to 2007 (18%). Concern about the quality of edu cation in California’s public K–12 schools is much more widespread: in April, 40 percent of adults and 53 percent of likely voters rated it as a big problem. “ How about the overall ______ of education in California’s public co lleges and universities today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a pro blem, or not much of a problem?” A ll adults Quality Affordability Big problem 15% 57% Somewhat of a problem 35 28 Not much of a problem 45 13 Don’t know 4 2 The affordability of public higher education is rated as a big problem by half or more across political, income , and age groups , while concern is lower among the non –college educated (47%) . African Americans (76%) and whites (70%) are more likely than Asian Americans (45%) and Latinos (44%) to hold this view . When it comes to the quality of public higher education, Democrats ( 11%) are less likely than Republicans (2 5% )— and those under 35 (1 1%) are less likely than those 55 and older (21%)— to say it is a big problem. One in four or fewer across political, age, racial/ethnic , and income groups say quality is a big problem. Percent saying big problem Quality Affordability All adults 15% 57% Likely voters 17 65 Party Democrat s 11 69 Republicans 25 60 Independent s 18 64 Household i ncome Under $40,000 16 50 $40,000 to $80,000 16 70 $80,000 or more 13 63 Race/Ethnicity African Americans 13 76 Asian Americans 9 45 Latinos 13 44 Whites 18 70 Age 18–34 11 56 35–54 14 55 55 and older 21 61 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 9 Approval Ratings of State Elected Officials Fifty-seven percent of adults and 59 percent of likely voters approve of the way Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor. Current approval is similar to October (55% adults, 56% likely voters) and last December (51% adults, 54% likely voters). Today, Democrats (8 1% ) are more likely than independents (49% ) and Republicans (25%) to approve. Approval is higher in the San Francisco Bay Area (65 %) than elsewhere (5 9% Los Angeles, 5 4% Orange/San Diego , 53% Central Valley, 50% Inland Empire ), and it is higher among African Americans (6 9% ), Asian Americans (66 %), and Latinos (6 3% ) than among whites (49%). Fewer approve of Governor Brown’s handling of California’s public college and university system (4 5% adults, 41 % likely voters ), and approximately one in four Californians say they don’t know. In April, approval ratings of the governor regarding K –12 public education were similar (45% adults, 36% likely voters). The governor’s approval ratings on higher education were much lower when we last asked this question in PPIC’s 2011 survey on higher education (31% adults, 29% likely voters). Today, Democrats (5 4% ) are more likely than independents (3 8% ) and Republicans (1 8% ) to express approval on public higher education. “Do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling…?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind His job as governor of California Approve 57% 81% 25% 49% 59% Disapprove 24 6 63 34 33 Don't know 18 13 11 17 8 California’s public college and university system Approve 45 54 18 38 41 Disapprove 31 22 60 36 38 Don't know 24 24 22 26 21 Forty-nine percent of Californians and 4 5 percent of likely voters approve of the legislature’s job performance. Approval was similar in October (46% adults, 43% likely voters) and slightly lower last December (41% adults, 38% likely voters). Today, Democrats (64% ) are more likely than independents (3 8% ) or Republicans (21 %) to approve. Approval is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (5 4% , 49% Los Angeles, 48% Inland Empire , 47 % Central Valley, 45%, Orange/San Diego) and higher among Latinos (5 8% ) and Asian Americans (57 %) than among African Americans ( 46%) and whites (4 0% ). Approval of the legislature’s handling of California’s public c ollege and university system is somewhat lower ( 42 % adults, 3 5% likely voters). T he legislature’s approval ratings regarding K –12 public education were similar in April (42% adults, 29% likely voters). The legislature’s approval ratings on higher education were much lower when we last as ked this question in our November 2011 survey (21% adults, 14% likely voters). Today, Democrats (49%) are more likely than independents (3 2%) and Republicans (20 %) to approve. “Do you approve or disapprove of the way the California Legislature is handling …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Its job Approve 49% 64% 21% 38% 45% Disapprove 38 20 70 50 44 Don't know 13 16 9 12 11 California’s public college and university system Approve 42 49 20 32 35 Disapprove 42 36 63 51 51 Don't know 16 15 18 18 15 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 10 Institutional Ratings Most Californians give positive ratings to each branch of California’s higher education system — California Community Colleges (CCC) (15% excellent, 51% good); California State University (CSU) (10% excellent, 56% good) ; and University of California (UC) (14% excellent, 51% good). Notably, the proportion of Californians who give the CSU system a positive rating has increased by 10 points since our 2011 survey . For the UC system, the increase in positive ratings has been more modest (6 percentage points), while ratings for the CCC system remain similar to those in 2011. “Overall, is the ________ doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job? ” All adults California Community Colleges system California State University system University of California system Excellent 15% 10% 14% Good 51 56 51 Not so good 19 19 20 Poor 7 6 7 Don’t know 8 9 8 Strong majorities of Californians (66 %), likely voters (65%), and those who attended a California community college (69%) say the CCC sy stem is overall doing an excellent or good job. Regionally, r esidents in Orange/San Diego (73 %) are the most likely to give the CCC system a positive rating while those in the Inland Empire (58%) are the lea st likely to do so. Majorities across parties and across income, age, and racial/ethnic groups give the CCC system a positive rating. The CSU system also receives positive ratings. About two-thirds of adults (66%), likely voters (63 %), and those who atten ded a CSU (67%) rate the system as excellent or good . Across parties, solid majorities of Democrats (71%) and independents (60%) give CSU a positive rating , compared to half of Republican s. Majorities across regions and demographic groups rate CSU as excel lent or good. Most Californians (65%), likely voters (62%), and those who attended a University of California school (71%) rate the UC system as excellent or good. Across parties, Republicans (48%) are less likely than Democrats (74%) and independents (59%) to give the UC system an excellent or good rating. Majorities across regions and racial/ethnic groups give the UC system positive ratings. Percent saying excellent/good California Community Colleges system California State University system University of California system All adults 66% 66% 65% Likely voters 65 63 62 Party Democrat s 71 72 74 Republicans 58 49 48 Independent s 63 61 59 Race/E thnicity African Americans 72 64 59 Asian Americans 71 72 80 Latinos 68 69 66 Whites 62 62 60 Age 18–34 71 71 72 35–54 63 66 65 55 and older 64 61 58 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 11 Institutional Knowledge Californians have positive views of the CCC, CSU, and UC system s, but how familiar are they with some key facts about the three systems? The UC system has the highest state tuition of the three systems, followed by the CSU system and the CCC system. Today, a majority of Californians (55 %) correctly identify the UC system as having the highest state tuition and fees —23 percent are unsure and 22 percent in correctly name one of the other public higher education systems . T he CCC system has the highest enrollment, followed by CSU and UC. When asked which system has the most students enrol led, 45 percent of Californians correctly identify CCC, while 27 percent are unsure and 28 percent name another system. O nly 38 percent of Californians correctly identify CSU as the system that awards the highest number of bachelor’s degrees each year. M ore than a third (35%) are unsure and 27 percent name another system. “ Do you happen to know which branch …?” All adults …has the highest state tuition and fees …has the most students enrolled …awards the highest number of bachelor’s degrees each year California Community College s 3 % 45 % 9 % California State University 19 18 38 University of California 55 10 18 Don’t know 23 27 35 Institutional Concerns An overwhelming majority of Californians are very (38%) or somewhat (38%) concerned about the difficulty California high school students face in gaining admission to one of the UC campuses. According to the University of California Office of the President, the 2015 system -wide admission rate for in -state students was 60 percent. Today, m ore than two-thirds of residents across all regions , parties, and demographic groups express concern about the competitiveness of admissions to the UC system. Notably, African Americans are far more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to say they are very concerne d. “F or each of the following, please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned. How about the difficulty for California’s high school students to gain admission to one of the campuses in the Univers ity of California system?” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very concerned 38% 41 % 36 % 38 % 62 % 29 % 37 % 39 % Somewhat concerned 38 36 38 39 20 44 39 37 Not too concerned 13 13 13 16 9 22 12 12 Not at all concerned 9 8 12 6 8 5 11 9 Don’t know 1 1 – 2 1 – 1 2 A majority of Californians are very (24%) or somewhat (30%) concerned about the four -year graduation rate of students who attend California State Universities. As noted in recent PPIC research, across the California State University system an average 19 percent of students graduate within four years; PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 12 57 percent graduate within six years. Across regions , residents in the Central Valley (65%) are the most likely to say they are concerned about CSU graduation rates , while those in Orange/San Diego (47%) are the least likely to say the same . Californians who attended a CSU (66%) are more likely than those who attended a CCC (53%) or UC (50%) to say they are concerned about CSU graduation rates. The level of c oncern is similar across income and racial/ ethnic groups. “For each of the following, please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not to o concerned, or not at all concerned. How about the rate of students who graduate within four years from California State Universities? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very concerned 24% 23% 24% 24% 27% 19% 25% 23% Somewhat concerned 30 32 32 29 28 32 34 29 Not too concerned 25 24 24 30 23 35 17 28 Not at all concerned 17 17 18 13 20 12 20 17 Don’t know 4 3 3 4 2 2 5 4 Fifty -two percent of Californians are very (21%) or somewhat (31%) concerned about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges to a four -year degree program. As noted in recent PPIC research, f ewer than half of students who enter community college with the intention to transfer actually do so. Califor nians who attended a CCC (57%) or CSU (54%) are more likely than those who attended a UC (44%) to say they are concerned about the transfer rate at California’s community colleges. Across racial/ethnic groups, African Americans are more likely than whites to say they are very concerned. “F or each of the following, please tell me if you ar e very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned. How about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges to a four -year degree program? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very concerned 21% 21 % 20 % 21 % 36 % 25 % 20 % 18 % Somewhat concerned 31 34 33 25 23 30 37 27 Not too concerned 25 22 25 30 16 24 23 28 Not at all concerned 19 20 19 20 24 19 17 21 Don’t know 4 2 3 3 1 2 3 5 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 13 Adequacy and Efficient Use of State Funding Californians continue to view the level of state funding of higher education as inadequate. Today, two - thirds of adults say that funding for California’s public colleges and universities is not adequate , while far few er say there is more than enough (10%) or just enough (19 %) funding . The share saying that there is not enough funding has decreased slightly since our 2011 PPIC survey on high er education (74% not enough), though it is higher today than it was in 2007 , when 57 percent said the level of funding was not adequate . Across parties, Democrats (83 %) are far more likely than independents (61%) and Republicans (45%) to say the current level of state funding is not adequate . M ajorities across regions say that funding is not adequate; residents in Los Angeles (71%) are the most likely to hold this view , while those in Orange/San Diego (57%) are the least likely to do so. Across racial/ethnic groups, African Americans (77 %) and Latinos (73%) are more likely than Asian Americans (63%) and whites (62%) to say there is not enough funding. Women are somewhat more likely than men to say the current level of state funding is not adequate ( 71 % to 62%). “D o you think the current level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 10% 2 % 23 % 11 % 13 % Just enough 19 12 25 23 19 Not enough 67 83 45 61 63 Don’t know 5 3 8 4 5 Half of Californians (49%) say that to significantly improve the state’s higher education system, the amount of state funding needs to be increased and existing funds need to be used more wisely. O nly 13 percent of residents think that increasing state funding alone is the best way to significantly improve the state’s public higher education system. I n the 2011 PPIC survey on higher educa tion, a similar share of adults ( 50%) said more funds and better use of existing funding were both needed. Today, there are stark partisan differences on this issue : 59 percent of Democrats say more funds and better use of existing funds is necessary , whi le a similar proportion of Republicans (57%) say better use of existing funds alone is needed. Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (43%) and Latinos (35%) are more likely than Asian Americans (22%) and African Americans (24%) to say that wiser use of exist ing funds is needed. Notably, 42 percent of those who attended a CCC or a CSU say that existing funds need to be used more wisely, compared to only 22 percent of those who attended a UC. “To significantly improve California’s public higher education syste m, which of the following statements do you agree with the most —We need to use existing state funds more wisely, or we need to increase the amount of state funding, or we need to use existing state funds more wisely and increase the amount of state funding ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Use funds more wisely 36% 20 % 57 % 41 % 40 % Increase state funding 13 18 7 8 11 Use funds more wisely and increase funding 49 59 35 50 49 Don’t know 3 2 1 1 1 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 14 Attitudes and Policy Preferences Key Findings  H alf of Californians (49%) say that a college education is neces sary for success in today’s work world . Two in three think many students require remedial education when they enter college. (page 15 )  Seven in ten Californians (72%) a gree that the price of college deters qualified and motivated students, and 58 percent agree that almost anyone who needs financial help can get loans or financial aid. Most continue to say that students have to borrow too much money. (page 16)  M ajorities of Californians continue to say it is very important to have a student body that is racially diverse (61 %) and economically diverse (61 %) in public colleges and universities. (page 17)  Overwhelming majorities of Californians say it is very important for community colleges to include career te chnical and vocational education ( 78 %) and classes that prepare students to transfer to four - year colleges (78 %). (page 18)  Overwhelming majorities of Californians favor increasing funding for student grants and scholarships (82%) and increasing government funding to make community college free (73% ). (page 19 )  Sixty -five percent of Californians support a state bond for higher education, and 48 percent are willing to pay higher taxes to raise revenue for higher education. But only 23 percent would increas e student fees. (page 20)  Three in four Californians say public higher education is very important to the state’s future ; 45 percent a nticipate a shortage of college -educated workers. Six in ten have at least some confidence in the state ’s ability to plan for the future . (page 21 ) 49 42 49 57 0 20 40 60 80 100 Californians Adults nationwide*Percent College is necessaryThere are many ways to succeed Necessityof college to succeed in today's work world *Public Agenda, July 2016 77 7079 55 0 20 40 60 80 100 African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Percent Support for a state bond measure for construction projects for higher education 86 5571 13 3426 0 20 40 60 80 100 Dem Rep Ind Percent Somewhat importantVery important ImportanceofCalifornia’s higher education system to the state's quality of life and economic vitality PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 15 College Importance and Student Preparation Do Californians think that a college education is necessary to be successful in today’s economy, or are there many ways to succeed without one? Opinions of California adults are evenly divided, with 49 percent saying a college education is necessary to succeed and 49 percent saying there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without one. Nationally, adults in a July Public Agenda survey were sligh tly less likely to say a college education is necessary (42%). Earlier PPIC surveys found majorities saying college is necessary , similar to the national trends in 2008 and 2009 Public Agenda surveys. Solid majorities of Californians with no college education (60%) and those with annual incomes below $ 40,000 (60%) say college is necessary to succeed. Notably, majorities of those with more education and with higher incomes say there are many ways to succeed without a college education (56% among those with at least some college, 57% incomes of $40,000 or more). The opinion that college is necessary is far more common among Latinos (67%) than whites (36%); about half of African Americans (52%) and Asian Americans (49%) say it is necessary. Across regions , Inland Empire residents (59%) are the most likely and Central Valley residents (42%) are the least likely to say college is necessary; about half in other regions hold this view. Across parties, a majority of Democrats (55%) say college is necessary to s ucceed, while majorities of independents (54%) and Republicans (71%) say there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education. “Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work wor ld, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites College is necessary 49% 60% 40% 43% 52% 49% 67% 36% Many ways to succeed without a college education 49 39 58 56 47 49 32 63 Don’t know 1 1 2 1 1 2 – 1 A strong majority of Californians (67 %) think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college. Only 26 percent say that most students enter college already prepared for college -level work. Findings were similar in the November 2011 PPIC survey (69% many require remedial education, 23% most students are prepared ). Today, at least six in ten across parties and regions, a s well as age, education, and income groups say that many students require remedial education when they enter college. Majorities across ra cial/ethnic groups say the same, with African Americans (75%), whites (71%), and Latinos (67%) more likely than Asian Americans (55%) to say so. “Do you think that most students are prepared for college -level work when they enter college, or do you think t hat many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Most students are prepared 26% 28% 24% 23% 19% 35% 27% 22% Many require basic skills and remedial education 67 66 66 71 75 55 67 71 Don’t know 7 6 9 6 5 10 6 7 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 16 College Costs and Student Finances Most Californians today see cost as an obstacle to getting a college education, but there are differences in opinion about the accessibility of loans and financial aid. Seventy -two percent of Californians agree that the price of a college education keeps s tudents who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so . Findings have been similar since 2007. Today, at least six in ten across regions and racial/ethnic, age, education, and income groups agree. Solid majorities across parties agree, with independents (76%) and Democrats (75%) somewhat more likely than Republicans (67%) to do so. Majorities across ideological groups also agree that the price of an education keeps qualified students away, with self -described liberals (80%) more likely to sa y so than conservatives (64%). “Please say if you agree or disagree with the following statements… The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so .” All adults Education Parents of children 18 or younger High school or less Some college College graduate Agree 72% 69% 75% 73% 72% Disagree 27 29 24 26 27 Don’t know 2 2 1 1 1 A majority of Californians (58%) agree that almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid; f our in ten (39%) disagree. In PPIC surveys since 2008 , at least half have agreed. Today, Republicans (60%) are more likely than Democrats (49%) to say almost anyone can get loans or financial aid (54% independents). Those with annual incomes below $40,000 (67%) are much more likely than those with higher incomes (50%) to agree. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (70%) are more likely than Asian Americans (59%), African Americans (57%), and whites (51%) to say almost anyone ca n get financial aid. Majorities across age groups agree. Notably, we find that those with less education are more likely to hold favorable views of financial aid opportunities than those with more education ( 68% high school or less, 54% some college, 49% college graduates). The belief that almost anyone can get financial aid is slightly more prevalent among t hose who have attended a CCC school (54%) than among those who have attended CSU (47%) or UC (42 %). Among parents of children 18 or younger, about two -thirds (65%) say that almost anyone can get loans or financial aid. “P lease say if you agree or disagree with the following statements… Almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid.” All adults Education Parent s of children 18 or younger High school or less Some college College graduate Agree 58% 68% 54% 49% 65% Disagree 39 31 44 46 33 Don’t know 3 1 2 5 2 An overwhelming majority of Californians (78%) continue to agree with the statement that students have to borrow too much money to pay for a college education. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups have agreed on this issue since October 2007, when we first asked this question . Today, college graduates (88%) and those with some college (92%) are more likely to agree than those with less education (60%). Democrats (91%) are more likely than Republicans (81%) to agree (87% independents). Those with incomes above $40,000 (89%) are more likely to agree than are those with lower incomes (67% below $40,000). PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 17 Importance of Student Diversity A solid majority of Californians (61%) say that it is very important for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body, while one in five say it is not important. Californians today are slightly more likely than in previous PPIC surveys to say that racial diversity among students is very important (53% 2011, 54% 2010, 54% 2009, 55% 2008). While most Californians today say that diversity at public colleges and universities is important, there are differences in opinion across group s. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups say racial diversity is very important. B ut whites (54%) are somewhat less likely than Asian Americans (63%) or Latinos (66%), and far less likely than African Americans (86%), to hold this view . There are wide par tisan differences, with Democrats (78%) far more likely than independents (52%) or Republicans (32%) to say having a racially diverse student body is very important . Across income groups, those with annual incomes below $80,000 (67%) are more likely than t hose with higher incomes (51%) to say racial diversity is very important. “How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body —that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minoriti es?” All adults Party Race/Ethnicity Dem Rep Ind African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very important 61% 78% 32% 52% 86% 63% 66% 54% Somewhat important 18 14 29 22 11 15 14 23 Not too important 9 3 17 13 1 13 7 10 Not at all important 11 4 20 12 1 9 11 12 Don’t know 1 – – 1 – – 2 1 A solid majority of Californians (61%) also say that it is very important for public colleges and universities to have an eco nomically diverse student body, with a mix of students from lower-, middle -, and upper -income ba ckgrounds. Fifteen percent say it is not important. Californians today are somewhat more likely to say economic diversity is very important than they were in 2011 (54%). Today, majorities across income groups say economi c diversity is very important, but this opinion is somewhat less common among those with incomes of $80,000 or more (54%) than among those with lower incomes. Democrats (79%) are far more likely than independents (55%) or Republicans (36%) to say it is ver y important to have an economically diverse student body. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups say economic diversity is very important, with African Americans (86%) more likely than other groups to say so (67% Asian Americans, 63% Latinos, 54% whites). Adults age 18 to 34 (67%) are somewhat more likely than older adults (60% age 35 to 54, 56% 55 and older) to say it is very important. “How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have an economically diverse student body —that is, a mix of students from lower, middl e, and upper-income backgrounds?” All adults Party Household income Dem Rep Ind Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Very important 61% 79% 36% 55% 63% 66% 54% Somewhat important 23 15 32 22 21 22 28 Not too important 9 3 16 12 9 7 11 Not at all important 6 3 17 8 6 5 7 Don’t know 1 – – 3 1 1 – PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 18 Role of Community Colleges There is widespread agreement among Californians about the importance of two key roles for community colleges: providing career technical education and preparing students for transfer to four -year schools . An overwhelming majority of Californians (78%) say it is very important that community colleges offer career technical or vocational edu cation, similar to previous PPIC surveys (72% 2011, 73% 2010, 76% 2007). Today, at least seven in ten across parties and regions, a s well as racial/ethnic, age, education, and income groups , say this is very important, though there are some differences acr oss groups. Californians age 18 to 34 (70%) are less likely than older Californians (83% age 35 to 54, 82% 55 and older) to say technical and vocational education is very important. Those working full time (82%) and those who have retired (83%) are somewha t more likely than those not working for other reasons (73%) or working part time (73%) to say it is very important. Inde pendents (85%) and Democrats (82%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (76%) to say this. “ How important to you is it that commun ity colleges include career technical or vocational education ?” All adults Party Education Dem Rep Ind High school or less Some college College graduate Very important 78% 82% 76% 85% 80% 75% 80% Somewhat important 19 16 21 14 18 22 17 Not too important 2 2 2 – 2 3 2 Not at all important – – 1 1 – – 1 Don’t know – – – 1 – – – An overwhelming majority of Californians (78%) also say it is very important that community colleges offer classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities. Responses were similar in previous PPIC surveys (73% 2011, 78% 2010, 81% 2007). Californians with a high school education or less (83%) are more likely than those with more education (76% some college, 72% college graduates) to hold this view . Those who have attended a CCC (81%) are somewhat more likely than those who have attended a CSU (74%) or a UC (73%) to say this is very important. This view is also more common among De mocrats (85%) than among independents (75%) or Republicans (69%). Across racial/ethnic groups, Asian Americans (62%) are the least likely to say preparing students to transfer to a four -year school is very important (77% whites, 82% African Americans, 86% Latinos). Among those saying it is very important to include classes that prepare students to transfer to a four - year school, 54 percent are very or somewhat concerned about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges. Among others, 43 percent are concerned. “How important to you is it that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities?” All adults Party Education Dem Rep Ind High school or less Some college College graduate Very important 78% 85% 69% 75% 83% 76% 72% Somewhat important 18 12 24 18 13 19 22 Not too important 2 2 4 2 2 2 3 Not at all important 1 – 1 3 1 1 2 Don’t know 1 – 1 1 1 2 – PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 19 Affordability and Government Programs With affordability mentioned as the top issue facing California’s public colleges and universities, what do Californians think about possible ways to make higher education more affordable? More than seven in ten Californians (73%) and six in ten likely voters (62%) favor increasing government funding to make community college free. An overwhelming majority of Democrats (85%) and six in ten independents (61%) support this proposal, compared to 43 percent of Republicans. Majorities of residents across regions are in favor . S upport is highest in Los Angeles (82%), followed by the San Francisco Bay Area (76%), the Central Valley (70%), the Inland Empire (68%), and Orange/San Diego (59%). Majorities across demographic groups are also in favor, but some differences do emerge. African Americans (94%) and Latinos (88%) are more likely than Asian Americans (71%) and whites (60%) to favor making community college free. Sup port is higher among those with no college education (82%) compared with those who have attended college (67% some college, 66% college graduate). Support declines as household inc ome increases, and those with (74%) and without (72 %) children 18 or younger are in favor. “For each of the following, please say if you favor or oppose the propo sal. How about increasing government funding to make community college free?” All adults Party Household income Dem Rep Ind Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Favor 73% 85% 43% 61% 84% 74% 57% Oppose 26 15 55 36 15 25 41 Don’t know 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 Californians are even more supportive of increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges and universities. Eight in ten Californians (82%) and likely voters (80%) are in favor of this proposal. Unlike the proposal to make community colleges free, there is bipartisan majority support for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges , with nearly all Democ rats (94%), three in four independents (74%) and two in three Republicans (66%) in favor. More than three in four Californians across regions favor this proposal (84% San Francisco Bay Area, 84% Los Angeles, 82% Central Valley, 78% Inland Empire, 76% Orang e/San Diego). More than three in four across demographics groups are also in favor. Support is somewhat higher among women than men (86% to 78%) and declines with age. “For each of the following, please say if you favor or oppose the proposal. How about increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges and universities? ” All adults Party Household income Dem Rep Ind Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Favor 82% 94% 66% 74% 85% 83% 78% Oppose 17 6 32 24 14 16 21 Don’t know 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 Both of these proposals garner broad support: 67 percent of Californians are in favor of both proposals and only 11 percent oppose both proposals. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 20 Raising Revenue As the state’s higher education system look s for ways to fund construction projects, one method would be a state bond. On the November 2016 ballot, Proposition 51 , a school construction bond for K –12 and community colleges , passed with 55 percent support. When asked about the g eneral idea of a bond measure on the state ballot for higher education construction projects , two in three Californians (65%) and six in ten likely voters (60%) are in favor. Support has increased 11 points since December 2014 and is at its highest point s ince we began asking this question in 2007 (64% October 2007, 53% November 2009, 58% November 2011, 54% December 2014, 65% today). Support is also at its highest point among likely voters (56% October 2007, 46% November 2009, 52% November 2011, 44% Decembe r 2014, 60% today). Today, majorities of Democrats (77%) and independents (58%) are in favor , compared to 44 percent of Republicans. More than six in ten across regions and majorities across demographic groups are in favor. “If the state ballot had a bond measure to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 65% 77% 44% 58% 60% No 29 18 54 36 35 Don’t know 6 5 3 6 5 Californians are less supportive of two other proposals to increase funding for public higher education if the state needed more money. Californians are divided on the idea of paying higher taxes . Though a strong majority of Democrats are willing to pay hi gher taxes, majorities of Republicans and independents are not willing to do so . Across regions and demographic groups, support is higher among certain age, racial/ethnic, and education groups (60% age 18 to 34, 59% African Americans, 55% college graduates). An overwhelming majority are opposed to increasing student fees as a way to provide more money . T hree in ten or fewer across parties, regions, and demographic groups express willingness to increas e student fees . “W hat if the state government said it needed more money to increase funding for California’s public higher education system , would you be willing to…for this purpose, or not?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind …pay higher taxes Yes 48% 68% 20% 42% 48% No 50 31 79 54 50 Don’t know 2 1 1 4 2 …i ncrease student fees Yes 23 21 23 20 21 No 74 76 74 76 76 Don’t know 3 3 2 4 3 Another possible way to increase funding for the state’s higher education system would be to increase the number of out- of-state students who pay higher tuition. Californians are divided on this issue overall, and support declines if it would mean fewer in-state admissions (21% yes, even if fewer in -state students ; 25% yes, but not if fewer in -state students; 50% no). One in four or fewer across parties, regions, and demographic groups are in favor if it mean s fewer in -state students are admitted. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 21 Planning for the Future Nearly all Californians say that the state’s higher education system is very (77%) or somewhat (19%) important to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. Results have been similar since this question was first asked in 2007. Majorities across parties say higher education is very important to the state’s future (86% Democrats, 71% independents , 55% Republicans). At least three in four across regions consider the system very important. More than two in three across demographic groups say the system is very important . H owever , African Americans (89%), Latinos (87%), and Asian Americans (80%) are more likely than whites (69%) to hold this view. “In general, how important is California’s higher education sy stem to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years ?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Likely voters African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very important 77% 89% 80% 87% 69% 75% Somewhat important 19 10 17 12 23 20 Not too important 2 – – 1 4 3 Not at all important 2 1 3 – 3 1 Don’t know 1 – 1 – 1 – A plurality of Californians (45%) recognize that the state will face a shortage in the number of college - educated residents needed for the jobs of the future (32% just enough, 17% more than enough). PPIC research has shown that the state will have a shortage of 1.1 million college -educated workers in 2030. The share of Californians who say the state will face a shortage is similar to last September (50%) and has been between 45 and 56 percent in nine PPIC surveys since 2007. Across parties, a majority of Democrats (54%) , compared to about four in ten Republicans (43%) and independents (39%), anticipate a shortage of college -educated workers. About hal f of residents in the Inland Empire (53%) and the Central Valley (52%) say the state will not have enough college -educated workers, while somewhat fewer elsewhere hold this view. A plurality of residents across demograph ic groups expect a shortage. “In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have more than enough, not e nough, or just enough college -educated residents needed for the jobs an d skills likely to be in demand?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/San Diego Inland Empire More than enough 17% 14% 20% 17% 18% 11% 15% Just enough 32 30 27 32 43 28 30 Not enough 45 52 44 44 38 53 49 Don’t know 6 4 9 7 1 8 6 About six in ten Californians have a great deal (16%) or some (43%) confidence in the state government to plan for the future of higher education, while 40 percent have very little or none. Findings today are similar to September 2015 (55% confident ), December 2014 (60 %), and October 2007 (57%) . But in PPIC surveys from 2009 to 2012, confidence was between 40 and 50 percent. Today, Democrats and independents are more likely than Republicans to be confident. More than half of Californians across regions and demographic group s have confidence in the state government’s ability to plan for the future. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 22 Regional Map PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 23 Methodology The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from research associate Lunna Lopes, project manager for this survey, associate survey director Dean Bonner, and survey research associate David Kordus. The Californians and Higher Education survey is supported with funding from the Arjay and Frances Miller Foundation, the Flora Family Foundation, John and Louise Bryson, Walter Hewlett, and t he William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The PPIC Statewide Survey invites input , comments, and suggestions from policy and public opinion experts and from its own advisory committee , but survey methods, questions, and content are determined solely by PPIC’s survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 1,711 California adult residents, including 851 interviewed on landl ine telephones and 860 interviewed on cell phones . Interviews took an average of 19 minutes to complete. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights from November 13 –22, 2016. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer- generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured tha t both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were conducted using a computer- generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the cost of the call. Cell phone in terviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Live landline and cell phone interviews were conducted by Abt SRBI, Inc., in English and Spanish, according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc., translated new survey questions into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI uses the US Census Bureau’s 2010– 2014 American Community Survey’s (ACS) Public Use Microdata Series for California (with regional coding information from the University of Minnesota’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series for California) to compare certain demographic characteristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the ACS figures. To estimate landline and cell phone service in California, Abt SRBI used 2014 state -level estimates released by the National Center for Health Statistics —which used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the ACS —and 2015 estimates for the West Census Region in the latest NHIS report. The estimates for California were then compared against landline and cell phone service repo rted in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party registration of registered voters in our sample to party registration statewide. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing adjusted for differences across regional, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone service, and party registration groups. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into cons ideration, is ±3.5 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total unweighted sample of 1,7 11 adults. This means that 95 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 24 times out of 100, the results will be within 3. 5 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for unweighted subgroups is larger: for the 1, 417 registered voters, the sampling error is ± 3.8 percent; for the 1, 123 likely voters, it is ±4. 3 percent ; for the 400 respondents who attended a California community college , it is ± 7.3 percent; for the 270 who attended a California State University campus, it is ±10.0 percent; for the 185 who attended a University of California campus , it is ± 11.2 percent . Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. R esults may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for five geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents of other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populous areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for non -Hispanic whites, who account for 43 percent of t he state’s adult population, and also for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest- growing voter groups. We also present results for non- Hispanic Asian American s, who make up about 15 percent of the state’s adult population, and non -Hispanic African Americans , who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, bu t sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We present results for Californians with a high school education or less, for those with some college (which includes those holding an associate degree), and college graduates (including those holding bachelor’s degrees or higher). We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, registered Republicans, and decline -to - state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in other parties are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated per their responses to survey questions about voter registration, previous election participation, and current interest in politics. The percentages pres ented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to those in national surveys by Public Agenda . Additional details about our methodology can be found at www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 25 Questionnaire and Results CALIFORNIANS AND HIG HER EDUCATION November 13– 22, 201 6 1,711 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ±3.5 % AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE P ERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100 D UE TO ROUNDING First, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 57% approve 24 disapprove 18 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Governor Brown is handling California’s public college and university system? 45% approve 31 disapprove 24 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 49% approve 38 disapprove 13 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling California’s public college and university system? 42% approve 42 disapprove 16 don’t know Thinking about the public higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 45% right direction 45 wrong direction 10 don’t know Next, what do you think is the most important issue facing California’s public co lleges and universities today? [code, don’t read] 46% student costs, affordability, tuition, fees 5 not enough government funding, state budget cuts 4 access to education, reduced admissions 4 administrative costs, salaries, waste 3 campus safety 3 financial aid 3 professors are too political 2 class size, overcrowding, student -teacher ratio 2 immigrants 2 lack of racial/ethnic diversity 2 quality of education overall 2 reduced course offerings, courses full 14 other 8 don’t know I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s public higher education system today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem. First… [rotate qu estions 7 and 8 ] How about the overall quality of education in California’s public colleges and universities today ? 15% big problem 35 somewhat of a problem 45 not much of a problem 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 26 How about the overall affordability of education for stu dents in California’s public colleges and universities today ? 57% big problem 28 somewhat of a problem 13 not much of a problem 2 don’t know As you may know, California’s public higher education system has three branches —the California Community College system, the California State University system, and the University of California system. [rotate questions 9 to 11] Overall, is the California Community College system doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job? 15% excellent 51 good 19 not so good 7 poor 8 don’t know Overall, is the California State University system doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job? 10% excellent 56 good 19 not so good 6 poor 9 don’t know Overall, is the University of California system doing an excel lent, good, not so good, or poor job? 14% excellent 51 good 20 not so good 7 poor 8 don’t know [rotate questions 12 to 14] Do you happen to know which branch has the highest state tuition and fees—[rotate] (1) the California Community College system, (2) the California State University system, [or] (3) the University of California system? 3% California Community College 19 California State University 55 University of California 23 don’t know Do you happen t o know which branch has the most students enrolled —[rotate] (1) the California Community College system, (2) the California State University system, [or] (3) the University of California system? 45% California Community College 18 California State Univer sity 10 University of California 27 don’t know Do you happen to know which branch awards the highest number of bachelor’s degrees each year —[rotate] (1) the California Community College system, (2) the California State University system, [or] (3) the University of California system? 9% California Community College 38 California State University 18 University of California 35 don’t know Next, for each of the following, please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned. [rotate questions 15 to 17] How about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges to a four -year degree program? 21% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 25 not too concerned 19 not at all concerned 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 27 How about the rate of students who graduate within four years from California State Universities? 24% very concerned 30 somewhat concerned 25 not too concerned 17 not at all concerned 4 don’t know How about the difficulty for California’s high school students to gain admission to one of the campuses in the University of California system? 38% very concerned 38 somewhat concerned 13 not too concerned 9 not at all concerned 1 don’t know Next, do you think the current level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 10% more than enough 19 just enough 67 not enough 5 don’t know To significantly improve Californi a’s public higher education system, which of the following statements do you agree with the most? [rotate responses 1 and 2] (1) We need to use existing state funds more wisely, [or] (2) We need to increase the amount of state funding, [or] (3) We need to use existing state funds more wisely and increase the amount of state funding. 36% use funds more wisely 13 increase state funding 49 use funds more wisely and increase funding 3 don’t know Next, please say if you agree or disagree wit h the following statements. [rotate questions 20 to 22] The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so. 72% agree 27 disagree 2 don’t know Almost anyone who needs financial help to go to c ollege can get loans or financial aid. 58% agree 39 disagree 3 don’t know Students have to borrow too much money to pay for their college education . 78% agree 21 disagree 1 don’t know Next, do you think that most students are prepared for college-level work when they enter college, or do you think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college? 26% most students are prepared 67 many require basic skills and remedial education 7 don’t know Do you th ink that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education? 49% college is necessary 49% many ways to succeed witho ut a college education 1 don’t know [question 25 deleted ] [rotate questions 26 to 27] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 28 How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body —that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minorities? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 61% very important 18 somewhat important 9 not too important 11 not at all important 1 don’t know How important do you think it is for public colle ges and universities to have an economically diverse student body —that is, a mix of students from lower, middle, and upper-income backgrounds? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 61% very important 23 somewhat important 9 not too important 6 not at all important 1 don’t know Next, [rotate questions 28 and 29 ] How important to you is it that community colleges include career technical or vocational education —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 78% very important 19 somewhat important 2 not too important – not at all important – don’t know How important to you is it that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 78% very important 18 somewhat important 2 not too important 1 not at all important 1 don’t know Next, I am going to read you some ways that the federal and state government can make California’s higher education system more affordable to students. For each of the following, please say if you favor or oppose the proposal. [rotate questions 30 to 31] How about increasing government funding to make community college free? (Do you favor or oppose this proposal?) 73% favor 26 oppose 1 don’t know How about increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleg es and universities? (Do you favor or oppose this proposal?) 82% favor 17 oppose 1 don’t know Next, what if the state government said it needed more money to increase funding for California’s public higher education system? [rotate questions 32 and 33 ] Would you be willing to pay higher taxes for this purpose, or not? 48% yes 50 no 2 don’t know Would you be willing to increase student fees for this purpose, or not? 23% yes 74 no 3 don’t know Would you be willing to admit more out -of- state student s paying higher tuition for this purpose, or not? [ if yes: Would you still support this even if it meant admitting fewer in -state students?] 21% yes, even if it meant admitting fewer in-state students 25 yes, but not if it meant admitting fewer in-state students 50 no 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 29 If the state ballot had a bond measure to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no? 65% yes 29 no 6 don’t know Changing topics, In general, how important is Califor nia’s higher education system to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years—very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 77% very important 19 somewhat important 2 not too important 2 not at all important 1 don’t know In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have [rotate 1 and 2] (1) more than enough, (2) not enough, [ or ] just enough college -educated residents needed for the jobs and skill s likely to be in demand? 17% more than enough 45 not enough 32 just enough 6 don’t know How much confidence do you have in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of California’s higher education system—a great deal, only some, very lit tle, or none? 16% a great deal 43 only some 28 very little 12 none 1 don’t know Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 63% yes [ask q39a] 37 no [skip to q40b] 39a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 43% Democrat [ask q4 0] 28 Republican [skip to q40 a] 5 another party (specify) [skip to q41] 24 independent [skip to q4 0b] Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 67% strong 33 not very strong – don’t know [skip to q4 1] 40a. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 60% strong 37 not very strong 2 don’t know [skip to q41] 40b. Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 25% Republican Party 42 Democratic Party 26 neither (volunteered) 7 don’t know Would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 15% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 26 middle -of-the -road 22 somewhat conservative 14 very conservative 3 don’t know Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 30% great deal 31 fair amount 28 only a little 11 none 1 don’t know [d1-d15 demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect Angela Glover Blackwell President and CEO PolicyLink Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director B ill Lane Center for the American West Stanford University Jon Cohen Vice President of Survey Research SurveyMonkey Joshua J. Dyck Co-Director Center for Public Opinion University of Massachusetts, Lowell Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Sil icon Valley Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Professor Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California Robert Lapsley President California Business Roundtable Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Sonja Petek Fiscal and Policy Analyst California Legislative Analyst’s Office Lisa Pitney Vice President of Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Mindy Romero Founder and Director California Civic Engag ement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change Robert K. Ross, MD President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Carol Whiteside Principal California Strategies The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mas Masumoto, Chair Author and Farmer Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect María Blanco Executive Director Undocumented Student Legal Services Center University of California Office of the President Louise Henry Bryson Chair Emerita, Board of Trustees J. Paul Getty Trust A. Marisa Chun Partner McDermott Will & Emery LLP Chet Hewitt President and CEO Sierra Health Foundation Phil Isenberg Former Chair Delta Stewardship Council Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni, LLP Gerald L. Parsky Chairman Aurora Capital Group Kim Polese Chairman ClearStreet, Inc. Gaddi H. Vasquez Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Edison International Southern California Edison Public Policy Institute of California 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94111 T: 415.291.4400 F: 415.291.4401 PPIC.ORG PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, C A 95814 T: 916.440.1120 F: 916.440.1121" } ["___content":protected]=> string(104) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(113) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-higher-education-december-2016/s_1216mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(9035) ["ID"]=> int(9035) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:43:15" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4599) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(9) "S 1216MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(9) "s_1216mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(13) "S_1216MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "687525" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(81747) "PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 Californians & Higher Educati on Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner David Kordus Lunna Lopes CONTENTS Press Release 3 Perceptions of Public Higher Education 6 Attitudes and Policy Preferences 14 Regional Map 22 Methodology 23 Questionnaire and Results 25 Supported with funding from the Arjay and Frances Miller Foundation, the Flora Family Foundation, John and Louise Bryson, Walter Hewlett, and t he William and Flora Hewlett Foundation The PPIC Statewide Survey provides a voice for the public and likely voters— informing policymakers, encouraging discussion, and raising awareness on critical issues of the day. © 2016 Public Policy Institute of California The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research. PPIC is a public charity. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source. Research publications reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of our funders or of the staff, officers, advisory councils, or board of directors of t he Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 3 CONTACT Linda Strean 415 -291 -4412 Serina Correa 415 -291 -4417 News Release EMBARGOED : Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PST on Thursday, December 8, 2016. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWI DE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND HIG HER EDUCATION Most See College Affordability as Big Problem MAJORITIES FAVOR A HIGHER EDUCATION CONS TRUCTION BOND, FEWER SUPPORT RAISING TAXES OR STUDENT FEES SAN FRANCISCO, December 8 , 2016—Most Californians say the overall affordability of the state’s public colleges and universities is a big problem, while few say the same about the quality of education. These are among the key findings of a survey on the state’s public higher education sys tem released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC). As the University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) consider raising tuition for the next academic year, 57 percent of residents say affordability is a big prob lem (28% somewhat of a problem, 13% not much of a problem). At least half of adults across political, income, and age groups see affordability as a big problem. When asked to name the most important issue facing the state’s public colleges and universities , 46 percent of Californians mention affordability, cost, or student tuition and fees. All other issues were mentioned by less than 10 percent of adults. In contrast, just 15 percent of Californians say the quality of higher education is a big problem. Acr oss political, age, racial/ethnic, and income groups, 25 percent or fewer say quality is a big problem. While most Californians see cost as an obstacle to getting a college education, there are differences of opinion about the accessibility of loans and f inancial aid. A strong majority of adults (72%) agree with the statement that the price of a college education keeps student s who are qualified and motivated from going to college . This is a view held by solid majorities across parties, regions, and racial/ethnic, age, education, and income groups. Yet 58 percent agree that almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid (39% disagree). Adults with annual incomes below $40,000 (67%) are much more likely than those wit h higher incomes (50%) to agree. Californians with less education are more likely than those with more education to say that anyone who needs aid can get it (68% high school or less, 54% some college, 49% college graduates). An overwhelming majority of adu lts (78%) agree with the statement that students have to borrow too much money to pay for a college education. How could the government make higher education more affordable? Solid majorities of adults (73%) and likely voters (62%) favor increasing governm ent funding to make community college free. Californians are even more supportive of increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges and universities : 82 percent of adults and 80 percent of likely voters are in favor. “With many Californians saying that affordability is the most important problem facing public higher education, there is overwhelming support for free community college and for expanding student scholarships,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 4 Most Say Higher Education Lacks Adequate State Funding Most adults (67%) say state funding for California’s colleges and universities is inadequate, while far fewer say there is more than enough (10%) or just enough (19%) funding . Yet only 13 percent say that increased state funding alone will significantly improve the higher education system. Half (49%) say that both increasing state funding and using existing funds more wisely would significantly improve the system, and 36 percent say w iser use of existing funds alone would do so. Notably, 42 percent of those who attended a community college or a CSU school say that existing funds need to be used more wisely , compared to just 22 percent of those who attended UC. Shortly after California voters approved Proposition 51, a bond measure to pay for construction projects for K–12 and community colleges, the survey ask ed about the idea of a similar measure to fund higher education construction projects. Solid majorities of adults (65%) and likely voters (60%) say they would vote yes. Support is much lower for two other ways to raise revenue for higher education. When Californians are aske d if they would be willing to pay higher taxes to increase funding for the system, 48 percent of adults and 4 8 percent of likely voters say yes, while 50 percent in each group say no. Californians are even less likely to support raising student fees: only 23 percent of adults and 21 percent of likely voters are in favor. “With two in three Californians saying th at the public higher education system needs more state funding today, solid majorities support a state bond,” Baldassare said. “Half support a tax hike and one in four favo r a student fee increase.” Another way to raise funding is to increase the number of out -of -state students who pay higher tuition . Adults are divided on this idea (46 % yes, 50% no). Support drops significantly if this option would mean that fewer California students are admitted: j ust 21 percent of adults are in favor. State Leaders’ App roval Ratings Rise as Budget, Tuition Stabilize Governor Brown has an overall job approval rating of 57 percent among adults and 59 percent among likely voters. Fewer (45% adults, 41% likely voters) approve of how the governor is handling the state’s public college and university system. However, his rating in this area is much higher than when PPIC last asked about this in 2011 (31% adults, 29% likely voters approved ). The legislature has an overall job approval rating today of 49 percent among adults and 45 percent among likely voters. Approval of the legislature’s hand ling of higher education is also lower (4 2% adults, 35% likely voters) than its overall rating but highe r today than it was in 2011 (21% adults, 14% likely voters). Baldassare summed up : “Governor Brown and the California Legislature have seen their approval ratings rise as the state’s budget situation and student tuition costs have stabilized in recent years.” High Marks for Colleges, Universities—but Also Concerns Most Californians give positive ratings to each branch of the higher education system, the California Community Colleges (15% excellent, 51% good), UC (14% excellent, 51% good), and CSU (10% excellent, 56% good). Notably, the proportion of Californians who give the CSU system a positive rating has increased 10 points since PPIC’s last higher education survey in 2011. UC’s rating increased by a more modest 6 points and the community college rating is about the same. Among Californians who attended a public c ollege or university, strong majorities say the branch of the system they attended is doing a good to excellent job (69% community college, 67% CSU, 71% UC). While Californians are generally positive about the quality of their colleges and universities, t hey also have concerns about these institutions. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 5  Admission to UC : An overwhelming majority of residents are concerned ( 38% very concerned, 38% somewhat concerned) about the difficulty state high school students face in gaining admission to one of the UC ca mpuses. More than two -thirds of residents across all regions, parties, and demographic groups say they are concerned, with African Americans far more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to say they are very concerned.  CSU’s four -year graduation rate : Mo st adults are concerned (24% very, 30% somewhat ) about the share of students who graduate within four years from CSU.  Community college transfers: About half of adults are concerned (21% very, 31% somewhat) about the share of students who successfully tran sfer from the state’s community colleges to a four -year degree program. Californians value the role of community colleges in preparing students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities: 78 percent say it is very important. At the same time, Calif ornians value another of the community colleges’ key roles: 78 percent say it is very important that the colleges include career technical, or vocational, education. Diversity Viewed as Very Important Asked about the value of student diversity, 61 percent of adults say it is very important for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body, while 20 percent say it is not important. Similarly, 61 percent of adults say it is very important for these institutions to have an economica lly diverse student body (15% not important). Californians Divided on the Value of a College Education How important is a college education to success in today’s economy? Opinions are split evenly among Californians, with 49 percent saying it is necessary to succeed and 49 percent saying there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education. There are notable splits among demographic groups on this question. Solid majorities of adults with no college education (60%) and those with annual incomes below $40,000 (60%) say college is necessary to succeed . Majorities of those with more education and higher incomes say there are many ways to succeed without college (56% of those with at least some college, 57% with incomes of $40,000 or more). Latinos (67%) are much more likely than whites (36%) to say college is necessary. About half of African Americans (52%) and Asian Americans (49%) also express this view. Ask ed how prepared students are for college-level work, a strong majority of adults (67%) say that many students require basic skills and remedial education. Nearly All Say Higher Education System Is Important to State’s Future At the same time, nearly all Californians say the state’s higher education system is important (77% very, 19% somewhat) to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. Yet fewer than half (45%) recognize that the state will face a shortage of the college- educated residents needed for the jobs of the future, as PPIC research has shown. A majority say they have confidence ( 16% a great deal, 43% some ) in the state government to plan for the future of higher education, while 40 percent have little or none. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 6 Perceptions of Public Higher Education Key Findings  When asked to name the most important issue facing California’s public colleges and universities , 46 percent of Californians mention affordability . Californians are divided on whether the state’s public higher education system is headed in the right direction or the wrong direction (45% each) . (page 7 )  Approximately one in six Californians (15 %) say the quality of education in California’ s public colleges and universities is a big problem, while a majority (57%) see affordability as a big problem. (page 8)  A pprov al of the way Governor Brown and the California Legisla ture are handling the state’s public higher education system has increased sharply since we last asked about this in 2011 . (page 9 )  Two -thirds of Californians give excellent or good rating s to t he California Community College s system (66 %), the Califo rnia State University system (66 %), and the University of Califor nia system (65 %). CSU approval has increase d the most since 2011, when we last asked this question . Many Californians are unfamiliar with some basic facts about the three systems. (page s 10 , 11 )  About half of adults are very or somewhat concerned about the transfer rate at California’s community colleges (52 %) and the graduation rate in the CSU system (54 %). Three in four adults (76%) are concerned about the difficulty of admittance to the UC system. (page s 11, 12)  Sixty -seven percent of adults say the level of state funding for public higher education is not enough. One in eight adults say that more funding alone will improve higher education, while about half ( 49%) say that both more funding and better use of existing funds are needed. (page 13 ) 44 31 57 45 0 20 40 60 80 100 Overall job Public higher educationPercent all adults Nov 2011 Dec 2016 Governor Brown’s approval ratings 25 21 49 42 0 20 40 60 80 100 Overall job Public higher education Percent all adults Nov 2011 Dec 2016 California Legislature’s approval ratings 62 5659 66 66 65 0 20 40 60 80 100 California Community Colleges California State University University of California Percent all adults % excellent/goodNov 2011 Dec 2016 Ratings of the three branches of California’s public higher education system PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 7 Most Important Issue and Overall Direction When asked to name the most important issue facing California’s public colleges and universities today, 4 6 percent of adults mention affordability, cost, or student tuition and fees. All other topics are mentioned by less than one in ten adults, including not enough government funding (5 %); administrative costs , bureaucracy, and waste ( 4 % ); overall accessibility (4 %); and political views (3%). Affordability and cost is also the most important issue among likely voters (52%) and leads other topic areas by wide margins across political parties and regions of the state, as well as across age, education, gender, inc ome, and racial/ethnic groups. Californians named affordability and cost as the most important issue in public higher education whe n we first asked this open -ended question in our 2007 PPIC Statewide Survey on higher education, as well as when it was last asked in November 2010. Today, affordability and cost are mentioned more often than in the earlier PPIC surveys. When asked about the public higher education system overall, 45 percent say it is going in the right direction and 4 5 percent say it is going in the wrong direction. Responses were much more negative when we last asked this question in the 2011 PPIC survey on higher education (28% right direction, 62% wrong direction). Today, Democrats, Latinos, those with annual incomes under $40,000, and non – college educated adults are more likely than others to say it is going in the right direction . “ Thinking about the pub lic higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? ” Right direction Wrong direction Don’t know All adults 45% 45% 10% Likely voters 38 54 9 Party Democrat s 49 40 11 Republicans 21 72 7 Independent s 33 55 11 Household i ncome Under $40,000 55 36 10 $40,000 to $80,000 39 52 10 $80,000 or more 37 54 9 Race/E thnicity African Americans 42 51 6 Asian Americans 41 36 23 Latinos 59 32 8 Whites 35 57 7 Age 18– 34 47 42 10 35–54 45 45 10 55 and older 42 49 10 Californians name affordability the most important issue in public higher education 35 3746 0 20 40 60 80 100 2007 20102016 Percent all adults Affordability, costs, student tuition and fees PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 8 Quality and Affordability of Public Higher Education With tuition increases in two of the three branches of California’s public higher education system under discussion , most Californians are concerned about the ove rall affordability of education ; far fewer express concern about the overall quality of education in California’s public colleges and universities . Fifty -seven percent of adults say the overall affordability of public higher education is a big problem. Today, perceptions of a ffordability are similar to PPIC surveys in December 2014 (59%) , November 2011 (61%) , and October 2007 (53%). By contrast, 15 percent of adults say the quality of higher education is a big problem, down somewhat from 2014 (25%) and 2011 (24%) , but similar to 2007 (18%). Concern about the quality of edu cation in California’s public K–12 schools is much more widespread: in April, 40 percent of adults and 53 percent of likely voters rated it as a big problem. “ How about the overall ______ of education in California’s public co lleges and universities today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a pro blem, or not much of a problem?” A ll adults Quality Affordability Big problem 15% 57% Somewhat of a problem 35 28 Not much of a problem 45 13 Don’t know 4 2 The affordability of public higher education is rated as a big problem by half or more across political, income , and age groups , while concern is lower among the non –college educated (47%) . African Americans (76%) and whites (70%) are more likely than Asian Americans (45%) and Latinos (44%) to hold this view . When it comes to the quality of public higher education, Democrats ( 11%) are less likely than Republicans (2 5% )— and those under 35 (1 1%) are less likely than those 55 and older (21%)— to say it is a big problem. One in four or fewer across political, age, racial/ethnic , and income groups say quality is a big problem. Percent saying big problem Quality Affordability All adults 15% 57% Likely voters 17 65 Party Democrat s 11 69 Republicans 25 60 Independent s 18 64 Household i ncome Under $40,000 16 50 $40,000 to $80,000 16 70 $80,000 or more 13 63 Race/Ethnicity African Americans 13 76 Asian Americans 9 45 Latinos 13 44 Whites 18 70 Age 18–34 11 56 35–54 14 55 55 and older 21 61 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 9 Approval Ratings of State Elected Officials Fifty-seven percent of adults and 59 percent of likely voters approve of the way Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor. Current approval is similar to October (55% adults, 56% likely voters) and last December (51% adults, 54% likely voters). Today, Democrats (8 1% ) are more likely than independents (49% ) and Republicans (25%) to approve. Approval is higher in the San Francisco Bay Area (65 %) than elsewhere (5 9% Los Angeles, 5 4% Orange/San Diego , 53% Central Valley, 50% Inland Empire ), and it is higher among African Americans (6 9% ), Asian Americans (66 %), and Latinos (6 3% ) than among whites (49%). Fewer approve of Governor Brown’s handling of California’s public college and university system (4 5% adults, 41 % likely voters ), and approximately one in four Californians say they don’t know. In April, approval ratings of the governor regarding K –12 public education were similar (45% adults, 36% likely voters). The governor’s approval ratings on higher education were much lower when we last asked this question in PPIC’s 2011 survey on higher education (31% adults, 29% likely voters). Today, Democrats (5 4% ) are more likely than independents (3 8% ) and Republicans (1 8% ) to express approval on public higher education. “Do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling…?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind His job as governor of California Approve 57% 81% 25% 49% 59% Disapprove 24 6 63 34 33 Don't know 18 13 11 17 8 California’s public college and university system Approve 45 54 18 38 41 Disapprove 31 22 60 36 38 Don't know 24 24 22 26 21 Forty-nine percent of Californians and 4 5 percent of likely voters approve of the legislature’s job performance. Approval was similar in October (46% adults, 43% likely voters) and slightly lower last December (41% adults, 38% likely voters). Today, Democrats (64% ) are more likely than independents (3 8% ) or Republicans (21 %) to approve. Approval is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (5 4% , 49% Los Angeles, 48% Inland Empire , 47 % Central Valley, 45%, Orange/San Diego) and higher among Latinos (5 8% ) and Asian Americans (57 %) than among African Americans ( 46%) and whites (4 0% ). Approval of the legislature’s handling of California’s public c ollege and university system is somewhat lower ( 42 % adults, 3 5% likely voters). T he legislature’s approval ratings regarding K –12 public education were similar in April (42% adults, 29% likely voters). The legislature’s approval ratings on higher education were much lower when we last as ked this question in our November 2011 survey (21% adults, 14% likely voters). Today, Democrats (49%) are more likely than independents (3 2%) and Republicans (20 %) to approve. “Do you approve or disapprove of the way the California Legislature is handling …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Its job Approve 49% 64% 21% 38% 45% Disapprove 38 20 70 50 44 Don't know 13 16 9 12 11 California’s public college and university system Approve 42 49 20 32 35 Disapprove 42 36 63 51 51 Don't know 16 15 18 18 15 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 10 Institutional Ratings Most Californians give positive ratings to each branch of California’s higher education system — California Community Colleges (CCC) (15% excellent, 51% good); California State University (CSU) (10% excellent, 56% good) ; and University of California (UC) (14% excellent, 51% good). Notably, the proportion of Californians who give the CSU system a positive rating has increased by 10 points since our 2011 survey . For the UC system, the increase in positive ratings has been more modest (6 percentage points), while ratings for the CCC system remain similar to those in 2011. “Overall, is the ________ doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job? ” All adults California Community Colleges system California State University system University of California system Excellent 15% 10% 14% Good 51 56 51 Not so good 19 19 20 Poor 7 6 7 Don’t know 8 9 8 Strong majorities of Californians (66 %), likely voters (65%), and those who attended a California community college (69%) say the CCC sy stem is overall doing an excellent or good job. Regionally, r esidents in Orange/San Diego (73 %) are the most likely to give the CCC system a positive rating while those in the Inland Empire (58%) are the lea st likely to do so. Majorities across parties and across income, age, and racial/ethnic groups give the CCC system a positive rating. The CSU system also receives positive ratings. About two-thirds of adults (66%), likely voters (63 %), and those who atten ded a CSU (67%) rate the system as excellent or good . Across parties, solid majorities of Democrats (71%) and independents (60%) give CSU a positive rating , compared to half of Republican s. Majorities across regions and demographic groups rate CSU as excel lent or good. Most Californians (65%), likely voters (62%), and those who attended a University of California school (71%) rate the UC system as excellent or good. Across parties, Republicans (48%) are less likely than Democrats (74%) and independents (59%) to give the UC system an excellent or good rating. Majorities across regions and racial/ethnic groups give the UC system positive ratings. Percent saying excellent/good California Community Colleges system California State University system University of California system All adults 66% 66% 65% Likely voters 65 63 62 Party Democrat s 71 72 74 Republicans 58 49 48 Independent s 63 61 59 Race/E thnicity African Americans 72 64 59 Asian Americans 71 72 80 Latinos 68 69 66 Whites 62 62 60 Age 18–34 71 71 72 35–54 63 66 65 55 and older 64 61 58 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 11 Institutional Knowledge Californians have positive views of the CCC, CSU, and UC system s, but how familiar are they with some key facts about the three systems? The UC system has the highest state tuition of the three systems, followed by the CSU system and the CCC system. Today, a majority of Californians (55 %) correctly identify the UC system as having the highest state tuition and fees —23 percent are unsure and 22 percent in correctly name one of the other public higher education systems . T he CCC system has the highest enrollment, followed by CSU and UC. When asked which system has the most students enrol led, 45 percent of Californians correctly identify CCC, while 27 percent are unsure and 28 percent name another system. O nly 38 percent of Californians correctly identify CSU as the system that awards the highest number of bachelor’s degrees each year. M ore than a third (35%) are unsure and 27 percent name another system. “ Do you happen to know which branch …?” All adults …has the highest state tuition and fees …has the most students enrolled …awards the highest number of bachelor’s degrees each year California Community College s 3 % 45 % 9 % California State University 19 18 38 University of California 55 10 18 Don’t know 23 27 35 Institutional Concerns An overwhelming majority of Californians are very (38%) or somewhat (38%) concerned about the difficulty California high school students face in gaining admission to one of the UC campuses. According to the University of California Office of the President, the 2015 system -wide admission rate for in -state students was 60 percent. Today, m ore than two-thirds of residents across all regions , parties, and demographic groups express concern about the competitiveness of admissions to the UC system. Notably, African Americans are far more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to say they are very concerne d. “F or each of the following, please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned. How about the difficulty for California’s high school students to gain admission to one of the campuses in the Univers ity of California system?” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very concerned 38% 41 % 36 % 38 % 62 % 29 % 37 % 39 % Somewhat concerned 38 36 38 39 20 44 39 37 Not too concerned 13 13 13 16 9 22 12 12 Not at all concerned 9 8 12 6 8 5 11 9 Don’t know 1 1 – 2 1 – 1 2 A majority of Californians are very (24%) or somewhat (30%) concerned about the four -year graduation rate of students who attend California State Universities. As noted in recent PPIC research, across the California State University system an average 19 percent of students graduate within four years; PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 12 57 percent graduate within six years. Across regions , residents in the Central Valley (65%) are the most likely to say they are concerned about CSU graduation rates , while those in Orange/San Diego (47%) are the least likely to say the same . Californians who attended a CSU (66%) are more likely than those who attended a CCC (53%) or UC (50%) to say they are concerned about CSU graduation rates. The level of c oncern is similar across income and racial/ ethnic groups. “For each of the following, please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not to o concerned, or not at all concerned. How about the rate of students who graduate within four years from California State Universities? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very concerned 24% 23% 24% 24% 27% 19% 25% 23% Somewhat concerned 30 32 32 29 28 32 34 29 Not too concerned 25 24 24 30 23 35 17 28 Not at all concerned 17 17 18 13 20 12 20 17 Don’t know 4 3 3 4 2 2 5 4 Fifty -two percent of Californians are very (21%) or somewhat (31%) concerned about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges to a four -year degree program. As noted in recent PPIC research, f ewer than half of students who enter community college with the intention to transfer actually do so. Califor nians who attended a CCC (57%) or CSU (54%) are more likely than those who attended a UC (44%) to say they are concerned about the transfer rate at California’s community colleges. Across racial/ethnic groups, African Americans are more likely than whites to say they are very concerned. “F or each of the following, please tell me if you ar e very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned. How about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges to a four -year degree program? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very concerned 21% 21 % 20 % 21 % 36 % 25 % 20 % 18 % Somewhat concerned 31 34 33 25 23 30 37 27 Not too concerned 25 22 25 30 16 24 23 28 Not at all concerned 19 20 19 20 24 19 17 21 Don’t know 4 2 3 3 1 2 3 5 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 13 Adequacy and Efficient Use of State Funding Californians continue to view the level of state funding of higher education as inadequate. Today, two - thirds of adults say that funding for California’s public colleges and universities is not adequate , while far few er say there is more than enough (10%) or just enough (19 %) funding . The share saying that there is not enough funding has decreased slightly since our 2011 PPIC survey on high er education (74% not enough), though it is higher today than it was in 2007 , when 57 percent said the level of funding was not adequate . Across parties, Democrats (83 %) are far more likely than independents (61%) and Republicans (45%) to say the current level of state funding is not adequate . M ajorities across regions say that funding is not adequate; residents in Los Angeles (71%) are the most likely to hold this view , while those in Orange/San Diego (57%) are the least likely to do so. Across racial/ethnic groups, African Americans (77 %) and Latinos (73%) are more likely than Asian Americans (63%) and whites (62%) to say there is not enough funding. Women are somewhat more likely than men to say the current level of state funding is not adequate ( 71 % to 62%). “D o you think the current level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 10% 2 % 23 % 11 % 13 % Just enough 19 12 25 23 19 Not enough 67 83 45 61 63 Don’t know 5 3 8 4 5 Half of Californians (49%) say that to significantly improve the state’s higher education system, the amount of state funding needs to be increased and existing funds need to be used more wisely. O nly 13 percent of residents think that increasing state funding alone is the best way to significantly improve the state’s public higher education system. I n the 2011 PPIC survey on higher educa tion, a similar share of adults ( 50%) said more funds and better use of existing funding were both needed. Today, there are stark partisan differences on this issue : 59 percent of Democrats say more funds and better use of existing funds is necessary , whi le a similar proportion of Republicans (57%) say better use of existing funds alone is needed. Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (43%) and Latinos (35%) are more likely than Asian Americans (22%) and African Americans (24%) to say that wiser use of exist ing funds is needed. Notably, 42 percent of those who attended a CCC or a CSU say that existing funds need to be used more wisely, compared to only 22 percent of those who attended a UC. “To significantly improve California’s public higher education syste m, which of the following statements do you agree with the most —We need to use existing state funds more wisely, or we need to increase the amount of state funding, or we need to use existing state funds more wisely and increase the amount of state funding ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Use funds more wisely 36% 20 % 57 % 41 % 40 % Increase state funding 13 18 7 8 11 Use funds more wisely and increase funding 49 59 35 50 49 Don’t know 3 2 1 1 1 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 14 Attitudes and Policy Preferences Key Findings  H alf of Californians (49%) say that a college education is neces sary for success in today’s work world . Two in three think many students require remedial education when they enter college. (page 15 )  Seven in ten Californians (72%) a gree that the price of college deters qualified and motivated students, and 58 percent agree that almost anyone who needs financial help can get loans or financial aid. Most continue to say that students have to borrow too much money. (page 16)  M ajorities of Californians continue to say it is very important to have a student body that is racially diverse (61 %) and economically diverse (61 %) in public colleges and universities. (page 17)  Overwhelming majorities of Californians say it is very important for community colleges to include career te chnical and vocational education ( 78 %) and classes that prepare students to transfer to four - year colleges (78 %). (page 18)  Overwhelming majorities of Californians favor increasing funding for student grants and scholarships (82%) and increasing government funding to make community college free (73% ). (page 19 )  Sixty -five percent of Californians support a state bond for higher education, and 48 percent are willing to pay higher taxes to raise revenue for higher education. But only 23 percent would increas e student fees. (page 20)  Three in four Californians say public higher education is very important to the state’s future ; 45 percent a nticipate a shortage of college -educated workers. Six in ten have at least some confidence in the state ’s ability to plan for the future . (page 21 ) 49 42 49 57 0 20 40 60 80 100 Californians Adults nationwide*Percent College is necessaryThere are many ways to succeed Necessityof college to succeed in today's work world *Public Agenda, July 2016 77 7079 55 0 20 40 60 80 100 African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Percent Support for a state bond measure for construction projects for higher education 86 5571 13 3426 0 20 40 60 80 100 Dem Rep Ind Percent Somewhat importantVery important ImportanceofCalifornia’s higher education system to the state's quality of life and economic vitality PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 15 College Importance and Student Preparation Do Californians think that a college education is necessary to be successful in today’s economy, or are there many ways to succeed without one? Opinions of California adults are evenly divided, with 49 percent saying a college education is necessary to succeed and 49 percent saying there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without one. Nationally, adults in a July Public Agenda survey were sligh tly less likely to say a college education is necessary (42%). Earlier PPIC surveys found majorities saying college is necessary , similar to the national trends in 2008 and 2009 Public Agenda surveys. Solid majorities of Californians with no college education (60%) and those with annual incomes below $ 40,000 (60%) say college is necessary to succeed. Notably, majorities of those with more education and with higher incomes say there are many ways to succeed without a college education (56% among those with at least some college, 57% incomes of $40,000 or more). The opinion that college is necessary is far more common among Latinos (67%) than whites (36%); about half of African Americans (52%) and Asian Americans (49%) say it is necessary. Across regions , Inland Empire residents (59%) are the most likely and Central Valley residents (42%) are the least likely to say college is necessary; about half in other regions hold this view. Across parties, a majority of Democrats (55%) say college is necessary to s ucceed, while majorities of independents (54%) and Republicans (71%) say there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education. “Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work wor ld, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites College is necessary 49% 60% 40% 43% 52% 49% 67% 36% Many ways to succeed without a college education 49 39 58 56 47 49 32 63 Don’t know 1 1 2 1 1 2 – 1 A strong majority of Californians (67 %) think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college. Only 26 percent say that most students enter college already prepared for college -level work. Findings were similar in the November 2011 PPIC survey (69% many require remedial education, 23% most students are prepared ). Today, at least six in ten across parties and regions, a s well as age, education, and income groups say that many students require remedial education when they enter college. Majorities across ra cial/ethnic groups say the same, with African Americans (75%), whites (71%), and Latinos (67%) more likely than Asian Americans (55%) to say so. “Do you think that most students are prepared for college -level work when they enter college, or do you think t hat many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college? ” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Most students are prepared 26% 28% 24% 23% 19% 35% 27% 22% Many require basic skills and remedial education 67 66 66 71 75 55 67 71 Don’t know 7 6 9 6 5 10 6 7 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 16 College Costs and Student Finances Most Californians today see cost as an obstacle to getting a college education, but there are differences in opinion about the accessibility of loans and financial aid. Seventy -two percent of Californians agree that the price of a college education keeps s tudents who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so . Findings have been similar since 2007. Today, at least six in ten across regions and racial/ethnic, age, education, and income groups agree. Solid majorities across parties agree, with independents (76%) and Democrats (75%) somewhat more likely than Republicans (67%) to do so. Majorities across ideological groups also agree that the price of an education keeps qualified students away, with self -described liberals (80%) more likely to sa y so than conservatives (64%). “Please say if you agree or disagree with the following statements… The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so .” All adults Education Parents of children 18 or younger High school or less Some college College graduate Agree 72% 69% 75% 73% 72% Disagree 27 29 24 26 27 Don’t know 2 2 1 1 1 A majority of Californians (58%) agree that almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid; f our in ten (39%) disagree. In PPIC surveys since 2008 , at least half have agreed. Today, Republicans (60%) are more likely than Democrats (49%) to say almost anyone can get loans or financial aid (54% independents). Those with annual incomes below $40,000 (67%) are much more likely than those with higher incomes (50%) to agree. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (70%) are more likely than Asian Americans (59%), African Americans (57%), and whites (51%) to say almost anyone ca n get financial aid. Majorities across age groups agree. Notably, we find that those with less education are more likely to hold favorable views of financial aid opportunities than those with more education ( 68% high school or less, 54% some college, 49% college graduates). The belief that almost anyone can get financial aid is slightly more prevalent among t hose who have attended a CCC school (54%) than among those who have attended CSU (47%) or UC (42 %). Among parents of children 18 or younger, about two -thirds (65%) say that almost anyone can get loans or financial aid. “P lease say if you agree or disagree with the following statements… Almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid.” All adults Education Parent s of children 18 or younger High school or less Some college College graduate Agree 58% 68% 54% 49% 65% Disagree 39 31 44 46 33 Don’t know 3 1 2 5 2 An overwhelming majority of Californians (78%) continue to agree with the statement that students have to borrow too much money to pay for a college education. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups have agreed on this issue since October 2007, when we first asked this question . Today, college graduates (88%) and those with some college (92%) are more likely to agree than those with less education (60%). Democrats (91%) are more likely than Republicans (81%) to agree (87% independents). Those with incomes above $40,000 (89%) are more likely to agree than are those with lower incomes (67% below $40,000). PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 17 Importance of Student Diversity A solid majority of Californians (61%) say that it is very important for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body, while one in five say it is not important. Californians today are slightly more likely than in previous PPIC surveys to say that racial diversity among students is very important (53% 2011, 54% 2010, 54% 2009, 55% 2008). While most Californians today say that diversity at public colleges and universities is important, there are differences in opinion across group s. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups say racial diversity is very important. B ut whites (54%) are somewhat less likely than Asian Americans (63%) or Latinos (66%), and far less likely than African Americans (86%), to hold this view . There are wide par tisan differences, with Democrats (78%) far more likely than independents (52%) or Republicans (32%) to say having a racially diverse student body is very important . Across income groups, those with annual incomes below $80,000 (67%) are more likely than t hose with higher incomes (51%) to say racial diversity is very important. “How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body —that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minoriti es?” All adults Party Race/Ethnicity Dem Rep Ind African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very important 61% 78% 32% 52% 86% 63% 66% 54% Somewhat important 18 14 29 22 11 15 14 23 Not too important 9 3 17 13 1 13 7 10 Not at all important 11 4 20 12 1 9 11 12 Don’t know 1 – – 1 – – 2 1 A solid majority of Californians (61%) also say that it is very important for public colleges and universities to have an eco nomically diverse student body, with a mix of students from lower-, middle -, and upper -income ba ckgrounds. Fifteen percent say it is not important. Californians today are somewhat more likely to say economic diversity is very important than they were in 2011 (54%). Today, majorities across income groups say economi c diversity is very important, but this opinion is somewhat less common among those with incomes of $80,000 or more (54%) than among those with lower incomes. Democrats (79%) are far more likely than independents (55%) or Republicans (36%) to say it is ver y important to have an economically diverse student body. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups say economic diversity is very important, with African Americans (86%) more likely than other groups to say so (67% Asian Americans, 63% Latinos, 54% whites). Adults age 18 to 34 (67%) are somewhat more likely than older adults (60% age 35 to 54, 56% 55 and older) to say it is very important. “How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have an economically diverse student body —that is, a mix of students from lower, middl e, and upper-income backgrounds?” All adults Party Household income Dem Rep Ind Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Very important 61% 79% 36% 55% 63% 66% 54% Somewhat important 23 15 32 22 21 22 28 Not too important 9 3 16 12 9 7 11 Not at all important 6 3 17 8 6 5 7 Don’t know 1 – – 3 1 1 – PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 18 Role of Community Colleges There is widespread agreement among Californians about the importance of two key roles for community colleges: providing career technical education and preparing students for transfer to four -year schools . An overwhelming majority of Californians (78%) say it is very important that community colleges offer career technical or vocational edu cation, similar to previous PPIC surveys (72% 2011, 73% 2010, 76% 2007). Today, at least seven in ten across parties and regions, a s well as racial/ethnic, age, education, and income groups , say this is very important, though there are some differences acr oss groups. Californians age 18 to 34 (70%) are less likely than older Californians (83% age 35 to 54, 82% 55 and older) to say technical and vocational education is very important. Those working full time (82%) and those who have retired (83%) are somewha t more likely than those not working for other reasons (73%) or working part time (73%) to say it is very important. Inde pendents (85%) and Democrats (82%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (76%) to say this. “ How important to you is it that commun ity colleges include career technical or vocational education ?” All adults Party Education Dem Rep Ind High school or less Some college College graduate Very important 78% 82% 76% 85% 80% 75% 80% Somewhat important 19 16 21 14 18 22 17 Not too important 2 2 2 – 2 3 2 Not at all important – – 1 1 – – 1 Don’t know – – – 1 – – – An overwhelming majority of Californians (78%) also say it is very important that community colleges offer classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities. Responses were similar in previous PPIC surveys (73% 2011, 78% 2010, 81% 2007). Californians with a high school education or less (83%) are more likely than those with more education (76% some college, 72% college graduates) to hold this view . Those who have attended a CCC (81%) are somewhat more likely than those who have attended a CSU (74%) or a UC (73%) to say this is very important. This view is also more common among De mocrats (85%) than among independents (75%) or Republicans (69%). Across racial/ethnic groups, Asian Americans (62%) are the least likely to say preparing students to transfer to a four -year school is very important (77% whites, 82% African Americans, 86% Latinos). Among those saying it is very important to include classes that prepare students to transfer to a four - year school, 54 percent are very or somewhat concerned about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges. Among others, 43 percent are concerned. “How important to you is it that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities?” All adults Party Education Dem Rep Ind High school or less Some college College graduate Very important 78% 85% 69% 75% 83% 76% 72% Somewhat important 18 12 24 18 13 19 22 Not too important 2 2 4 2 2 2 3 Not at all important 1 – 1 3 1 1 2 Don’t know 1 – 1 1 1 2 – PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 19 Affordability and Government Programs With affordability mentioned as the top issue facing California’s public colleges and universities, what do Californians think about possible ways to make higher education more affordable? More than seven in ten Californians (73%) and six in ten likely voters (62%) favor increasing government funding to make community college free. An overwhelming majority of Democrats (85%) and six in ten independents (61%) support this proposal, compared to 43 percent of Republicans. Majorities of residents across regions are in favor . S upport is highest in Los Angeles (82%), followed by the San Francisco Bay Area (76%), the Central Valley (70%), the Inland Empire (68%), and Orange/San Diego (59%). Majorities across demographic groups are also in favor, but some differences do emerge. African Americans (94%) and Latinos (88%) are more likely than Asian Americans (71%) and whites (60%) to favor making community college free. Sup port is higher among those with no college education (82%) compared with those who have attended college (67% some college, 66% college graduate). Support declines as household inc ome increases, and those with (74%) and without (72 %) children 18 or younger are in favor. “For each of the following, please say if you favor or oppose the propo sal. How about increasing government funding to make community college free?” All adults Party Household income Dem Rep Ind Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Favor 73% 85% 43% 61% 84% 74% 57% Oppose 26 15 55 36 15 25 41 Don’t know 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 Californians are even more supportive of increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges and universities. Eight in ten Californians (82%) and likely voters (80%) are in favor of this proposal. Unlike the proposal to make community colleges free, there is bipartisan majority support for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges , with nearly all Democ rats (94%), three in four independents (74%) and two in three Republicans (66%) in favor. More than three in four Californians across regions favor this proposal (84% San Francisco Bay Area, 84% Los Angeles, 82% Central Valley, 78% Inland Empire, 76% Orang e/San Diego). More than three in four across demographics groups are also in favor. Support is somewhat higher among women than men (86% to 78%) and declines with age. “For each of the following, please say if you favor or oppose the proposal. How about increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleges and universities? ” All adults Party Household income Dem Rep Ind Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Favor 82% 94% 66% 74% 85% 83% 78% Oppose 17 6 32 24 14 16 21 Don’t know 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 Both of these proposals garner broad support: 67 percent of Californians are in favor of both proposals and only 11 percent oppose both proposals. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 20 Raising Revenue As the state’s higher education system look s for ways to fund construction projects, one method would be a state bond. On the November 2016 ballot, Proposition 51 , a school construction bond for K –12 and community colleges , passed with 55 percent support. When asked about the g eneral idea of a bond measure on the state ballot for higher education construction projects , two in three Californians (65%) and six in ten likely voters (60%) are in favor. Support has increased 11 points since December 2014 and is at its highest point s ince we began asking this question in 2007 (64% October 2007, 53% November 2009, 58% November 2011, 54% December 2014, 65% today). Support is also at its highest point among likely voters (56% October 2007, 46% November 2009, 52% November 2011, 44% Decembe r 2014, 60% today). Today, majorities of Democrats (77%) and independents (58%) are in favor , compared to 44 percent of Republicans. More than six in ten across regions and majorities across demographic groups are in favor. “If the state ballot had a bond measure to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 65% 77% 44% 58% 60% No 29 18 54 36 35 Don’t know 6 5 3 6 5 Californians are less supportive of two other proposals to increase funding for public higher education if the state needed more money. Californians are divided on the idea of paying higher taxes . Though a strong majority of Democrats are willing to pay hi gher taxes, majorities of Republicans and independents are not willing to do so . Across regions and demographic groups, support is higher among certain age, racial/ethnic, and education groups (60% age 18 to 34, 59% African Americans, 55% college graduates). An overwhelming majority are opposed to increasing student fees as a way to provide more money . T hree in ten or fewer across parties, regions, and demographic groups express willingness to increas e student fees . “W hat if the state government said it needed more money to increase funding for California’s public higher education system , would you be willing to…for this purpose, or not?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind …pay higher taxes Yes 48% 68% 20% 42% 48% No 50 31 79 54 50 Don’t know 2 1 1 4 2 …i ncrease student fees Yes 23 21 23 20 21 No 74 76 74 76 76 Don’t know 3 3 2 4 3 Another possible way to increase funding for the state’s higher education system would be to increase the number of out- of-state students who pay higher tuition. Californians are divided on this issue overall, and support declines if it would mean fewer in-state admissions (21% yes, even if fewer in -state students ; 25% yes, but not if fewer in -state students; 50% no). One in four or fewer across parties, regions, and demographic groups are in favor if it mean s fewer in -state students are admitted. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 21 Planning for the Future Nearly all Californians say that the state’s higher education system is very (77%) or somewhat (19%) important to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. Results have been similar since this question was first asked in 2007. Majorities across parties say higher education is very important to the state’s future (86% Democrats, 71% independents , 55% Republicans). At least three in four across regions consider the system very important. More than two in three across demographic groups say the system is very important . H owever , African Americans (89%), Latinos (87%), and Asian Americans (80%) are more likely than whites (69%) to hold this view. “In general, how important is California’s higher education sy stem to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years ?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Likely voters African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Whites Very important 77% 89% 80% 87% 69% 75% Somewhat important 19 10 17 12 23 20 Not too important 2 – – 1 4 3 Not at all important 2 1 3 – 3 1 Don’t know 1 – 1 – 1 – A plurality of Californians (45%) recognize that the state will face a shortage in the number of college - educated residents needed for the jobs of the future (32% just enough, 17% more than enough). PPIC research has shown that the state will have a shortage of 1.1 million college -educated workers in 2030. The share of Californians who say the state will face a shortage is similar to last September (50%) and has been between 45 and 56 percent in nine PPIC surveys since 2007. Across parties, a majority of Democrats (54%) , compared to about four in ten Republicans (43%) and independents (39%), anticipate a shortage of college -educated workers. About hal f of residents in the Inland Empire (53%) and the Central Valley (52%) say the state will not have enough college -educated workers, while somewhat fewer elsewhere hold this view. A plurality of residents across demograph ic groups expect a shortage. “In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have more than enough, not e nough, or just enough college -educated residents needed for the jobs an d skills likely to be in demand?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/San Diego Inland Empire More than enough 17% 14% 20% 17% 18% 11% 15% Just enough 32 30 27 32 43 28 30 Not enough 45 52 44 44 38 53 49 Don’t know 6 4 9 7 1 8 6 About six in ten Californians have a great deal (16%) or some (43%) confidence in the state government to plan for the future of higher education, while 40 percent have very little or none. Findings today are similar to September 2015 (55% confident ), December 2014 (60 %), and October 2007 (57%) . But in PPIC surveys from 2009 to 2012, confidence was between 40 and 50 percent. Today, Democrats and independents are more likely than Republicans to be confident. More than half of Californians across regions and demographic group s have confidence in the state government’s ability to plan for the future. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 22 Regional Map PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 23 Methodology The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from research associate Lunna Lopes, project manager for this survey, associate survey director Dean Bonner, and survey research associate David Kordus. The Californians and Higher Education survey is supported with funding from the Arjay and Frances Miller Foundation, the Flora Family Foundation, John and Louise Bryson, Walter Hewlett, and t he William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The PPIC Statewide Survey invites input , comments, and suggestions from policy and public opinion experts and from its own advisory committee , but survey methods, questions, and content are determined solely by PPIC’s survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 1,711 California adult residents, including 851 interviewed on landl ine telephones and 860 interviewed on cell phones . Interviews took an average of 19 minutes to complete. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights from November 13 –22, 2016. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer- generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured tha t both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were conducted using a computer- generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the cost of the call. Cell phone in terviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Live landline and cell phone interviews were conducted by Abt SRBI, Inc., in English and Spanish, according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc., translated new survey questions into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI uses the US Census Bureau’s 2010– 2014 American Community Survey’s (ACS) Public Use Microdata Series for California (with regional coding information from the University of Minnesota’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series for California) to compare certain demographic characteristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the ACS figures. To estimate landline and cell phone service in California, Abt SRBI used 2014 state -level estimates released by the National Center for Health Statistics —which used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the ACS —and 2015 estimates for the West Census Region in the latest NHIS report. The estimates for California were then compared against landline and cell phone service repo rted in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party registration of registered voters in our sample to party registration statewide. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing adjusted for differences across regional, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone service, and party registration groups. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into cons ideration, is ±3.5 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total unweighted sample of 1,7 11 adults. This means that 95 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 24 times out of 100, the results will be within 3. 5 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for unweighted subgroups is larger: for the 1, 417 registered voters, the sampling error is ± 3.8 percent; for the 1, 123 likely voters, it is ±4. 3 percent ; for the 400 respondents who attended a California community college , it is ± 7.3 percent; for the 270 who attended a California State University campus, it is ±10.0 percent; for the 185 who attended a University of California campus , it is ± 11.2 percent . Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. R esults may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for five geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents of other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populous areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for non -Hispanic whites, who account for 43 percent of t he state’s adult population, and also for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest- growing voter groups. We also present results for non- Hispanic Asian American s, who make up about 15 percent of the state’s adult population, and non -Hispanic African Americans , who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, bu t sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We present results for Californians with a high school education or less, for those with some college (which includes those holding an associate degree), and college graduates (including those holding bachelor’s degrees or higher). We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, registered Republicans, and decline -to - state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in other parties are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated per their responses to survey questions about voter registration, previous election participation, and current interest in politics. The percentages pres ented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to those in national surveys by Public Agenda . Additional details about our methodology can be found at www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 25 Questionnaire and Results CALIFORNIANS AND HIG HER EDUCATION November 13– 22, 201 6 1,711 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ±3.5 % AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE P ERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100 D UE TO ROUNDING First, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 57% approve 24 disapprove 18 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Governor Brown is handling California’s public college and university system? 45% approve 31 disapprove 24 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 49% approve 38 disapprove 13 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling California’s public college and university system? 42% approve 42 disapprove 16 don’t know Thinking about the public higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 45% right direction 45 wrong direction 10 don’t know Next, what do you think is the most important issue facing California’s public co lleges and universities today? [code, don’t read] 46% student costs, affordability, tuition, fees 5 not enough government funding, state budget cuts 4 access to education, reduced admissions 4 administrative costs, salaries, waste 3 campus safety 3 financial aid 3 professors are too political 2 class size, overcrowding, student -teacher ratio 2 immigrants 2 lack of racial/ethnic diversity 2 quality of education overall 2 reduced course offerings, courses full 14 other 8 don’t know I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s public higher education system today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem. First… [rotate qu estions 7 and 8 ] How about the overall quality of education in California’s public colleges and universities today ? 15% big problem 35 somewhat of a problem 45 not much of a problem 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 26 How about the overall affordability of education for stu dents in California’s public colleges and universities today ? 57% big problem 28 somewhat of a problem 13 not much of a problem 2 don’t know As you may know, California’s public higher education system has three branches —the California Community College system, the California State University system, and the University of California system. [rotate questions 9 to 11] Overall, is the California Community College system doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job? 15% excellent 51 good 19 not so good 7 poor 8 don’t know Overall, is the California State University system doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job? 10% excellent 56 good 19 not so good 6 poor 9 don’t know Overall, is the University of California system doing an excel lent, good, not so good, or poor job? 14% excellent 51 good 20 not so good 7 poor 8 don’t know [rotate questions 12 to 14] Do you happen to know which branch has the highest state tuition and fees—[rotate] (1) the California Community College system, (2) the California State University system, [or] (3) the University of California system? 3% California Community College 19 California State University 55 University of California 23 don’t know Do you happen t o know which branch has the most students enrolled —[rotate] (1) the California Community College system, (2) the California State University system, [or] (3) the University of California system? 45% California Community College 18 California State Univer sity 10 University of California 27 don’t know Do you happen to know which branch awards the highest number of bachelor’s degrees each year —[rotate] (1) the California Community College system, (2) the California State University system, [or] (3) the University of California system? 9% California Community College 38 California State University 18 University of California 35 don’t know Next, for each of the following, please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned. [rotate questions 15 to 17] How about the rate of students who successfully transfer from California’s community colleges to a four -year degree program? 21% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 25 not too concerned 19 not at all concerned 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 27 How about the rate of students who graduate within four years from California State Universities? 24% very concerned 30 somewhat concerned 25 not too concerned 17 not at all concerned 4 don’t know How about the difficulty for California’s high school students to gain admission to one of the campuses in the University of California system? 38% very concerned 38 somewhat concerned 13 not too concerned 9 not at all concerned 1 don’t know Next, do you think the current level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 10% more than enough 19 just enough 67 not enough 5 don’t know To significantly improve Californi a’s public higher education system, which of the following statements do you agree with the most? [rotate responses 1 and 2] (1) We need to use existing state funds more wisely, [or] (2) We need to increase the amount of state funding, [or] (3) We need to use existing state funds more wisely and increase the amount of state funding. 36% use funds more wisely 13 increase state funding 49 use funds more wisely and increase funding 3 don’t know Next, please say if you agree or disagree wit h the following statements. [rotate questions 20 to 22] The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so. 72% agree 27 disagree 2 don’t know Almost anyone who needs financial help to go to c ollege can get loans or financial aid. 58% agree 39 disagree 3 don’t know Students have to borrow too much money to pay for their college education . 78% agree 21 disagree 1 don’t know Next, do you think that most students are prepared for college-level work when they enter college, or do you think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college? 26% most students are prepared 67 many require basic skills and remedial education 7 don’t know Do you th ink that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education? 49% college is necessary 49% many ways to succeed witho ut a college education 1 don’t know [question 25 deleted ] [rotate questions 26 to 27] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 28 How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body —that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minorities? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 61% very important 18 somewhat important 9 not too important 11 not at all important 1 don’t know How important do you think it is for public colle ges and universities to have an economically diverse student body —that is, a mix of students from lower, middle, and upper-income backgrounds? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 61% very important 23 somewhat important 9 not too important 6 not at all important 1 don’t know Next, [rotate questions 28 and 29 ] How important to you is it that community colleges include career technical or vocational education —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 78% very important 19 somewhat important 2 not too important – not at all important – don’t know How important to you is it that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 78% very important 18 somewhat important 2 not too important 1 not at all important 1 don’t know Next, I am going to read you some ways that the federal and state government can make California’s higher education system more affordable to students. For each of the following, please say if you favor or oppose the proposal. [rotate questions 30 to 31] How about increasing government funding to make community college free? (Do you favor or oppose this proposal?) 73% favor 26 oppose 1 don’t know How about increasing government funding for scholarships and grants for students attending four -year colleg es and universities? (Do you favor or oppose this proposal?) 82% favor 17 oppose 1 don’t know Next, what if the state government said it needed more money to increase funding for California’s public higher education system? [rotate questions 32 and 33 ] Would you be willing to pay higher taxes for this purpose, or not? 48% yes 50 no 2 don’t know Would you be willing to increase student fees for this purpose, or not? 23% yes 74 no 3 don’t know Would you be willing to admit more out -of- state student s paying higher tuition for this purpose, or not? [ if yes: Would you still support this even if it meant admitting fewer in -state students?] 21% yes, even if it meant admitting fewer in-state students 25 yes, but not if it meant admitting fewer in-state students 50 no 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY DECEMBER 2016 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Higher Education 29 If the state ballot had a bond measure to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no? 65% yes 29 no 6 don’t know Changing topics, In general, how important is Califor nia’s higher education system to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years—very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 77% very important 19 somewhat important 2 not too important 2 not at all important 1 don’t know In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have [rotate 1 and 2] (1) more than enough, (2) not enough, [ or ] just enough college -educated residents needed for the jobs and skill s likely to be in demand? 17% more than enough 45 not enough 32 just enough 6 don’t know How much confidence do you have in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of California’s higher education system—a great deal, only some, very lit tle, or none? 16% a great deal 43 only some 28 very little 12 none 1 don’t know Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 63% yes [ask q39a] 37 no [skip to q40b] 39a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 43% Democrat [ask q4 0] 28 Republican [skip to q40 a] 5 another party (specify) [skip to q41] 24 independent [skip to q4 0b] Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 67% strong 33 not very strong – don’t know [skip to q4 1] 40a. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 60% strong 37 not very strong 2 don’t know [skip to q41] 40b. Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 25% Republican Party 42 Democratic Party 26 neither (volunteered) 7 don’t know Would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 15% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 26 middle -of-the -road 22 somewhat conservative 14 very conservative 3 don’t know Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 30% great deal 31 fair amount 28 only a little 11 none 1 don’t know [d1-d15 demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect Angela Glover Blackwell President and CEO PolicyLink Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director B ill Lane Center for the American West Stanford University Jon Cohen Vice President of Survey Research SurveyMonkey Joshua J. Dyck Co-Director Center for Public Opinion University of Massachusetts, Lowell Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Sil icon Valley Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Professor Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California Robert Lapsley President California Business Roundtable Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Sonja Petek Fiscal and Policy Analyst California Legislative Analyst’s Office Lisa Pitney Vice President of Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Mindy Romero Founder and Director California Civic Engag ement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change Robert K. Ross, MD President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Carol Whiteside Principal California Strategies The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mas Masumoto, Chair Author and Farmer Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect María Blanco Executive Director Undocumented Student Legal Services Center University of California Office of the President Louise Henry Bryson Chair Emerita, Board of Trustees J. Paul Getty Trust A. Marisa Chun Partner McDermott Will & Emery LLP Chet Hewitt President and CEO Sierra Health Foundation Phil Isenberg Former Chair Delta Stewardship Council Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni, LLP Gerald L. Parsky Chairman Aurora Capital Group Kim Polese Chairman ClearStreet, Inc. Gaddi H. Vasquez Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Edison International Southern California Edison Public Policy Institute of California 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94111 T: 415.291.4400 F: 415.291.4401 PPIC.ORG PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, C A 95814 T: 916.440.1120 F: 916.440.1121" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:43:15" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(9) "s_1216mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:43:15" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:43:15" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(51) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_1216MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }