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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(13) "S_1111MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "799073" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(93681) "CONTENTS About the Survey 2 P ress Release 3 C urrent Conditions and the Future 6 O verall Perceptions and Attitudes 1 6 Regional Map 2 4 Methodology 25 Questionnaire and Results 2 7 higher education november 2011 & P P I C S TAT E W I D E S U R V E Y Californians mark baldassare D ean bonner Sonja Petek Jui Shrestha in collaboration with The James Irvine Foundation November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 2 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Sur vey provides policymakers, the media, and the public with objective, advocacy-free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of California residents. Inaugurated in April 1998, this is the 121st PPIC Sta tewide Sur vey. In all, the sur veys have generated a database of responses from more than 256,000 Californians. Th e current sur vey, Californians and Higher Education, was conducted with funding from The James Ir vine Foundation. Its goal is to inform state policymakers, encourage discussion, and raise public awareness about Californians’ opinions on issues affecting the state’s public colleges and universities . It is the fifth annual PPIC Statewide Sur vey on higher education since 2007. California’s public higher education system includes three branches—the University of California (UC) system, the California State University (CSU) system, and the California Community College (CCC) system —and is the third largest area of state spending after K –12 education and health and human ser vices. T he system ser ves more than 3.5 million students, wit h more than 220,000 in the UC system , nearly 412,000 o n CSU campuses, and more than 2.9 million attending community colleges. P ublic higher education in California has sustained considerable reductions in state funding recently . Although all state budget areas ha ve undergone significant cuts over the past several years, higher education does not enjoy the same funding mandates and legal protections as other state ser vices such as K –12 education or prisons and corrections . And because higher education generates revenue through student fees, it is often an easier target for budget -cut ting than other programs. Consequently, the state’s public colleges and universities have b een forced to make d ifficult choices to make up for cuts , including increasing student fees signi ficantly and eliminating courses . At the same time, PPIC research shows that the state will face a severe shor tage of needed college-educated workers—approximately 1 million—by 2025 . This sur vey presents the responses of 2,503 adult residents throughout California, inter viewed in multiple languages by landline or cell phone. It includes findings on:  Approval ratings of the governor and legislature overall and on their handling of public colleges and universities ; opinions about current conditions in the higher education system ; ratings of the three higher education branches; concerns about measures being taken to deal with decreased state fundi ng; priorities for spending on higher education, preferences for raising revenues, and perceptions about the impor tance of the system to the state’s future.  Perceptions of higher education affordability, financial aid, student loan debt, preparedness, and access; attitudes about the impor tance and purpose of college, the impor tance of diversity, K –12 schools ’ role in preparing students for college, and the role of community colleges and two- year programs ; and parents’ educational hopes for their children.  Time trends, national comparisons, and variations in perceptions, attitudes, and preferences about higher education issues across the five major regions of the state (Central Valley, San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles County, Inland Empire, and Orange/San Diego Counties), among Asians, blacks, Latinos, and non- Hispanic whites, among parents, and across socioeconomic and political groups. This repor t may be downloaded free of charge from our website ( www.ppic.org). For questions about the sur vey, please contact sur vey@ppic.org . Tr y our PPIC Statewide Sur vey interactive tools online at http://www.ppic.org/main/sur vAdvancedSearch.asp. November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 3 PPIC Statewide Survey CONTACT Linda Strean 415-291-4412 Andrew Hattori 415- 291-4417 NEWS RELEASE EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PST on Wednesday , November 16, 2011. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: http://www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND HIGHER EDUCATION Amid Concerns About Budget Cuts, Most Say Higher Education System Heading in Wrong Direction BUT HALF BALK AT HIGHER TAXES, MOST O PPOSE HIGHER STUDENT FEES SAN FRANCISCO , November 16, 2011— Most Californians say the state’s public higher education system is headed in the wrong direction, according to a statewide survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), with funding fro m The James Irvine Foundation . With the possibility of more cuts to the state’s public colleges and universities looming, most residents say affordability and the state budget situation —rather than educational quality— are big problems. Just 28 percent of Californians say the public higher education system is headed in the right direction, while 62 percent see it headed in the wrong direction —a view shared across political parties and regions of the state. Only 24 percent say overall educational quality is a big problem , but 61 percent say overall affordabi lity of education for students is a big problem and an even greater 69 percent say the overall state budget situati on is a big problem . Californians (74%) say there is not enough s tate funding for higher education, a view held by majorities across parties (82% Democrats, 71% independents, 58% Republicans). A solid majority (65%) say that public colleges and universities have been affected a lot by budget cuts. Californians are much more critical of the way Governor Jerry Brown is handling higher education than they are of his overall performance. His overall job approval rating among likely voters is 47 percent (38% disapprove, 15% don’t know) —close to its highest point (48% July) since he took office. But just 29 percent of likely voters approve of his handling of public higher education (53% disapprove, 18% don’t know). The legislature fares poorly in both areas among likely voters , with a 17 percent overall job approval rating (70% disapprove, 13% don’t know) and a 14 percent approval rating on handling higher education (71% disapprove, 15% don’t know) . “Most Californians say budget cuts have hurt public colleges and universities a lot,” says Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. “Their concerns about where the system is headed are reflected in the low grades they give their leaders for handling higher education.” Californians place an increasingly high priority on state spending for public colleges and un iversities. Most consider it a high (29%) or very high (41%) priority. The percentage of residents who consider spending in this area a very high priority has increased 15 points since 2008 (26% 2008, 41% today). And in the context of the state budget, mos t Californians (59%) favor more state spending on public colleges and universities even if this means less money for other state programs. Most (63%) say the quality of education will suffer if the state makes more cuts . Most Democrats (74%) and independents (60%) have this view, while Republicans are divided (48% quality will suffer, 47% quality could be maintained). PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 4 LESS THAN HALF WOULD PAY HIGHER TAXES TO MAINTAIN FUNDING Despite Californians’ worries about the fiscal situation in higher education, 52 p ercent of residents are unwilling to pay higher taxes to maintain current funding, while 45 percent would do so. Likely voters are divided (49% yes, 49% no). Most Democrats (63%) would pay higher taxes, while most independents (55%) and Republicans (71%) would not. When it comes to other ideas for raising revenues, adults (69%) and likely voters (65%) are opposed to increasing student fees to maintain current funding. Opposition to higher fees has increased since last year, by 7 points among all adults and 5 points among likely voters. About half of Californians (52%) favor admitting more out -of -state students —who pay higher tuition —to maintain current funding. But that support drops to 20 percent if it would mean admitting fewer students from California. One idea that does garner support: a hypothetical statewide bond measure to pay for construction projects in the state’s higher education system ( adults: 58% yes, 34% no; likely voters: 52% yes, 41% no). Such a measure would require a simple majority vote to pass. RATINGS FOR THREE BRANCHES ARE POSITIVE —BUT LOWER Residents give good or excellent marks to each branch of the state’s higher education system: California Community College s (62% ), California State University ( 56%), and the University of California (59% ). But ratings have declined since 2007 for both CSU (down 1 0%) and UC (down 8 points), while ratings for community colleges have been similar over time . Majorities of parents whose children attend public colleges and universities give the system excellent or good ratings: community colleges (67%), CSU (59%), and UC ( 62%). Despite these positive ratings, few Californians (4%) see the state system as the best when asked to compare it to that of other states . Less than half of residents (47%) conside r the California system above average or better (16% one of the best, 27% above average, 31% average, 15% below average). Less than half of parents with children 18 or younger (48%) and parents of children now attending a public college or university (48%) say the system is above average or better. Half of alumni (50%) hold this view. Current students are more favorable: 58 percent say the system is above average or better. MOST SAY AID IS AVAI LABLE—BUT STUDENTS MUST BORROW TOO MUCH When asked about some of the specific ways that the higher education system has dealt with decreased funding, 65 percent of residents are very concerned about increasing tuition and fees. Over half (55%) are very concerned about colleges and universities offering fewer classes o r admitting fewer students (53%). Parents of children in the system are even more concerned about higher tuition and fees (77%), as are current students (70%). Reflecting concerns about affordability, a strong majority of Californians (70%) say the price of college keeps qualified and motivated students from attending. There is widespread agreement on this question among Californians across parties, regions, and demographic groups. Nevertheless, many residents (55%) say loans and financial aid are available to those who need it, while 40 percent disagree. Those with incomes under $40,000 (63%) and those without any college education (65%) are much more likely to say that financial help is available than those at higher income and education levels. Latinos (67%) and Asians (61%) are more likely than blacks (44%) and whites (48%) to say that financial aid is availabl e. Among current students at public colleges and universities, 47 percent agree and 50 percent disagree that there is financial help for those wh o need it. A strong majority (75%) say students have to borrow too much money to pay for college. Across parties, regions, and demographic groups, adults concur. Middle -income (81%) and upper -income (80%) residents are much more likely than those with lower incomes (68%) to feel that students must borrow too much. PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 5 College graduates (80%) and those with some college education (83%) are much more likely than those with no college experience (65%) to agree. LESS THAN HALF SAY T WO-YEAR DEGREE OR TECHN ICAL TRAINING HELPS A LOT What value do Californians put on a college education? Most (58%) say it is necessary for success in today’s work world, while 39 percent believe there are many ways to succeed without it. However, the percentage saying college is necessary has reached a low point since PPIC first began asking the question in 2007 (64% 2007, 68% 2008, 66% 2009, 63% 2010 , 58% today). Latinos are the ethnic or racial group most likely to say that success depends on a college education (Latinos 73%, Asians 63%, blacks 53%, whites 46%). Nearly all residents (96%) say career technical or vocational education in community colleges is at least somewhat important. But Californians do not necessarily see it as the key to success. Less than half (45%) say a two- year community college degree or technical training helps a lot in achieving success in the work world, and 42 percent say it helps some (9% does not help too much, 2% does not help at all). Parents of children age 18 or younger express high hopes for their children’s educational attainment. When asked the highest grade they hope their youngest child will achieve, 45 percent of these parents say a graduate degree and 38 percent say a degree from a four -year college. Just 10 percent choose a two -year college degree or technical training, and 3 percent say high school or less. When it comes to having the resources and information needed for their child to reach this goal, most are very confident (32%) or somewhat confident (39%) that they do. But the share of parents who say they are very confident has declined significantly (56% April 2005, 32% today). Half of parents (52%) are very wor ried about being able to afford a college education for their youngest child . Concern is far higher among Latino parents (66% very worried) than whites (37% very worried). Looking at the value of higher education more broadly, nearly all Californians say t he state’s higher education system is very important (73%) or somewhat important (23%) to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. A plurality (49%) recognize that California faces a shortage of college- educated residents needed for the jobs of the future. But just 10 percent say they have a great deal of confidence in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of public higher education (37% only some confidence, 34% ver y little confidence, 16% none). MORE KEY FINDINGS  P lurality say purpose of a college educa tion is to gain specific skills—page s 17, 21 -22 Californians are more likely to say that the purpose of college is gaining skills and knowledge for the workplace (46%) than to say that it is personal and intellectual growth (35%). The purpose of community college? Thirty -five percent say it is preparing students to transfer to four -year colleges, while 29 percent say it is career technical or vocational education.  Majority say most students unprepared ac ademically—pages 19, 2 1 Just 23 percent say most students are prepared to do college -level work , while 69 percent say most students require remediation. Most (86%) say it is very important for K –12 schools to prepare students for colleges, but only 44 percent say schools are doing a good or excellent job of doing so.  Support for racial , economic diversity on campus —page 20 Three -fourths of residents say a racially diverse student body is very important (53%) or somewhat important (22%). Their views on t he importance of an economically diverse student population are similar (54% very impo rtant, 27% somewhat important). November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 6 CURRENT CONDITIONS AND THE FUTURE KEY FINDINGS  Californians are much more critical of the way Governor Brown is handling the state’s public college and university system than they are of the way he is handling his job as governor . T he legislature re ceives poor marks on both counts . (page 7 )  Six in 10 Californians say the state’s public higher education system is headed in the wrong direction . M ost do not consider educational quality to be a big problem, but they do think affordability and the state budget s ituation are. (page s 8, 9 )  M ajorities give excellent or good ratings to the C alifornia Community Colleges (62%), California State University (56%), and University of California (59 %), although the ratings have declined over time. (page 10 )  Three in four residents say state funding for higher education is not enough and two in three say public colleges and universities have been affected a lot by budget cuts. They are very concerned about schools increasing fees, offering fewer co urses, and re ducing admissions. (page s 11 , 12 )  Californians are increasingly likely to place a very hi gh priority on state spending for higher education. A majority say the state should spend more in this area even if it mean s less for other programs. (page 13)  Still, half of Californians would not pay higher taxes to benefit higher education and m ajorities oppose increasing student fees. A majority (5 8%) would support a state bond measure to pay for higher education construction projects. (page 14)  A plurality of residents anticipate a shortage of college -educated workers in the state’s future . J ust under half trust the state government to plan accordingly. (page 15) 47 29 38 53 0 20 40 60 80 Handling hisjob overallHandling publiccollege anduniversity system Percent likely voters Approve Disapprove Approval Ratings of Governor Brown 666667625659 0 20 40 60 80 100 CaliforniaCommunityColleges California StateUniversityUniversityof California Percent all adults 2007 2011 Ratings of the Three Branches of Higher Education % saying excellentor good 26263641 2833 3229 0 20 40 60 80 100 2008200920102011 Percent all adults High priority Very high priority Priority for State Spending on Higher Education PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 7 APPROVAL RATINGS OF STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS Governor Brown, who releas ed his public pension reform plan just days after we began interviewing, has the approval of 44 percent of Californians, while 30 percent disapprove, and 26 percent are unsure how to rate the governor. Brown’s overall approval ratings in earlier PPIC Statewide Surveys include: 41 percent in January, 34 percent in February, 34 percent in March, 40 percent in April, 42 percent in May, 42 percent in July, and 41 percent in September. Today, j ust under half of likely voters (47%) approve and 38 percent dis approve. Most Democrats (64%) approve of Governor Brown, while most Republicans (56%) disapprove and independents are divided (36% approve, 37% disapprove, 26% don’t know). Across regions, approval of the governor surpasses 50 percent only in the San Francisco Bay Area (53%). Findings are reversed when it comes to Governor Brown’s handling of California’s public college and university system —31 percent approve, 44 percent disapprove, and 25 percent don’t know. Among likely voters, 53 percent disapprove whil e just 29 percent approve. Democrats, Republicans, and independents are more likely to disapprove than approve of his handling of higher education, with Republicans (60%) the most disapproving. Residents in the Inland Empire (51%) and Orange/San Diego Counties (49%) are the most likely— and those in the Central Valley (38%) the least likely —to disapprove. “O verall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling…” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind His job as governor of California? Approve 44% 64% 24% 36% 47% Disapprove 30 19 56 37 38 Don't know 26 16 20 26 15 California’s public college and university system? Approve 31 36 21 27 29 Disapprove 44 41 60 54 53 Don't know 25 23 19 20 18 One in four Californians (25%) approve of the California Legislature ; 55 percent disapprove. Likely voters are even more disapproving (17% approve, 70% disapprove). Approval has rebounded from record low s in March and November 2010 (14%), but has been below 30 percent since April 2008. Most Republicans (75%), independents (66%) , and Democrats (59% ) disapprove, as do at least half across regions . Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (69%) are most disapproving (59% blacks, 49% Asians, 37% Latinos). Californians hold similar opinions of the legislature for its handling of the state’s public college and university system (21% approve, 59% disapprove), with likely voters once again more disapproving (14% approve, 71% disapprove). Solid majorities across parties disapprove, as do majorities across regions. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling…” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Its job? Approve 25% 26% 11% 16% 17% Disapprove 55 59 75 66 70 Don't know 19 15 14 18 13 California’s public college and university system? Approve 21 20 11 12 14 Disapprove 59 64 72 69 71 Don't know 20 16 17 19 15 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 8 OVERALL OUTLOOK When it comes to the direction of the public higher education system in California today, most Californians say it is heading in the wrong direction (62%), while 28 percent say it is heading in the right direction. Six in 10 or more across regions say the system is heading in the wrong direction , with resid ents in the San Francisco Bay Area most negative (68% wrong direction). More than seven in 10 across parties hold this view (71% Democrats, 73% independents, 75% Republicans). Solid majorities of Asians (60%), blacks (61%), and whites (74%) say the system is heading in the wrong direction, while Latinos are divided (42% right direction, 48% wrong direction). More than seven in 10 of those with at least some college education say the state’s higher education system is heading in the wrong direction compared to far fewer of those with a high school education or less (48%). Women (67%) are more likely than men (58%) to say wrong direction. Six in 10 California parents of children 18 or younger say the system is heading in the wrong direction and parents with ch ildren currently attending a California public college or university are even more pessimistic (69% wrong direction). The perception that the higher education system is heading in the wrong direction is even higher among current students (73%) and alumni ( 76%) of California public colleges and universities. “Thinking about the public higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction?” All Adults Education Parents of Children 18 or Younger High School or Less Some College College Graduate Right direction 28% 40% 19% 17% 33% Wrong direction 62 48 71 76 60 Don’t know 10 12 10 7 7 When asked to think about California’s higher education system compared to other states, just one in five say it is among the best in the country (4% best, 16% one of the best). Another 27 percent think it is above average, 31 percent consider it average, and 15 percent below average. Likely voters hold similar opinions. Likely voters hold similar opinions. Democrats (54%) are more likely than independents (47%) or Republicans (42%) to say the system is at least above average. Across regions, only in the Sa n Francisco Bay Area does the perception that the system is at least above average garner a majority (56%). Just under half of parents of children 18 or younger (48%) or parents with children currently attending a California public college or university (4 8%) say the system is at least above average. The perception that the higher education system is at least above average is higher among its current students (58%), while half of alumni (50%) hold this view. “Compared with other states, how would you rate the quality of the public higher education system in California today? Do you think it is the best in the country, one of the best in the country, above average, average, or below average?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind The best in the country 4% 4% 3% 3% 4% One of the best in the country 16 20 15 15 18 Above average 27 30 24 29 29 Average 31 27 29 31 27 Below average 15 13 23 16 17 Don’t know 6 6 7 5 5 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 9 PROBLEM SERIOUSNESS With the possibility of more cuts to California’s higher education system looming, most Californians continue to call the overall affordability of education for students and the overall state budget situation big problems —but far fewer say so about the overall quality of education. Seven in 10 Californians (69%) say that the state budget situation is a big problem (down 5 points from 2010 and similar to 2009). Sixty -one percent of Californians call the overall affordability of education for students a big problem. Findings about affordability today are similar to 2010 (60%) and 2009 (57%), but higher than in 2008 (52%) and 2007 (53%). Twenty -four percent of Californians say the quality of education is a big problem, up slightly since 2007 (18% 2007, 18% 2008, 21% 2009, 22% 2010, 24% today). “I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s higher education system today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem. How about…” The overall state budget situation? The overall affordability of education for students? The overall quality of education? Big problem 69% 61% 24% Somewhat of a problem 17 25 36 Not much of a problem 8 11 34 Don’t know 5 4 6 More than s even in 10 across parties and at least two in three across regions think the state budget situation is a big problem for higher education. Whites (81%) and blacks (79%) are much more likely than Asians (64%) and far more likely than Latinos (54%) to hold t his view. Those with at least some college or who live in a household making at least $40,000 annually are more likely than others to hold this view. The affordability of higher education is viewed as a big problem by more than six in 10 across parties, an d majorities across regions agree. Differences emerge across racial /ethnic groups , with blacks (67%) and whites (66%) the most likely to say big problem followed by Latinos (56%) and Asians (50%). Majorities across income groups consi der affordability a big problem, as do six in 10 parents of children 18 or younger and two in three parents of children now attending a California public college or university. When it comes to the overall quality of education, fewer than three in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups say this is a big problem, but some differences do emerge. Asians (18%) are the least likely racial/ethnic group to say big problem , while more educated and affluent Californians are less likely than others to hold this view. One in four parents of children currently attending a California public college or university and students currently attending one of these branches say quality is a big problem. Percent saying big problem Overall state budget situation Overall affordability Overall quality All Adults 69% 61% 24% Likely Voters 78 65 24 Parents of Children 18 or Younger 65 59 24 Race/Ethnicity Asians 64 50 18 Blacks 79 67 29 Latinos 54 56 26 Whites 81 66 23 Household Income Under $40,000 60 59 26 $40,000 to under $80,000 77 66 26 $80,000 or more 80 61 18 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 10 RATINGS OF THE THREE BRANCHES Californians give positive ratings to each branch of California’s higher education system: California Community College s (10% excellent, 52% good), California State University (6% excellent, 50% good), U niversity of C alifornia (11% excellent, 48% good). Since 2007, there has been a slow drop in positive ratings of the CSU system (down 10 points) and UC system (down 8 points ), while ratings of the CCC system have been similar over time . “As you may know, California’s higher education system has three branches—the California Community College system, the California State University system, and the University of California system. Overall, is the … d oing an excellent, good, not-so -good, or poor job?” California Community College system California State University system University of California system Excellent 10% 6% 11% Good 52 50 48 Not -so -good 21 25 23 Poor 8 6 6 Don’t know 9 13 12 Solid majorities of Californians (62%) and parents of children attending a California public college or university (67 %) consider the CCC system to be excellent or good, as do more than six in 10 across parties. Residents in the Inland Empire (68%), Orange/San Diego Counties (6 4%), and the Central Valley (63%) are more likely than adults elsewhere to hold positive views. Whites (66 %) are the most likely racial/ethnic group to give positive ratings (58 % Asians, 59% Latinos, 52% blacks). Majorities of adults (56%) , voters across parties, and parents of children attending a California public college or university (59%) give excellent or good ratings to the CSU system. Orange/San Diego residents (62%) are the most likely —and San Francisco Bay Area residents (51%) the least likely —to give positive ratings. Findings are similar across racial/ethnic groups and positive ratings rise with increasing income. Majorities of Californians (59 %) and parents of children attending a California public college or university (6 2%) rate the University of California system as excellent or good. Democrats (66%) are more positive than independents (58%) and Republicans (55%). Majorities across regions and racial/ethnic groups give positive ratings , wit h residents of Los Angeles (62%) and Asians (69%) most likely to do so. Percent saying excellent or good California Community College system California State University system University of California system All Adults 62% 56% 59% Likely Voters 66 59 59 Parents of Children Attending California Public College or University 67 59 62 Race/Ethnicity Asians 58 57 69 Blacks 52 56 52 Latinos 59 53 56 Whites 66 58 58 Region Central Valley 63 54 58 San Francisco Bay Area 59 51 54 Los Angeles 57 58 62 Orange/San Diego 64 62 59 Inland Empire 68 59 58 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 11 LEVEL OF STATE FUNDING When it comes to the level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities, Californians continue to say state funding is not enough. Today, 74 percent of Californians say funding is not enough, while far fewer say it is more than enough (7%) or just enough (14%). The view that there is not enough funding was the same last year (74%), but was much lower in 2007 (57% not enough, 28% just enough). Today, Democrats (82%) are the most likely to say there is not enough funding , followed by independents (71%) and Republicans (58%). More than two in three across regions and demographic groups think there is not enough funding, but some differences do emerge. Inland Empire (79%) and San Francisco Bay Area residents (78%) are the mo st likely—and Central Valley residents (67%) are the least likely —to say that state funding is not enough. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (85%) are the most likely to say that there is not enough funding , followed by Latinos (78%), Asians (74%), and w hites (69%). Among those who are currently students in one of California’s public colleges or universities, most (84%) say that funding is not enough. Most parents of children 18 or younger (79%) and those with children currently attending a California col lege (72%) also say that funding is not enough. “D o you think the current level of state funding f or California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 7% 3% 18% 11% 12% Just enough 14 12 18 14 14 Not enough 74 82 58 71 71 Don’t know 5 2 6 4 4 Solid majorities of Californians (65%) and likely voters (68%) say that the state’s public colleges and universities have been affected a lot by recent state budget cuts. Democrats (77%) are far more likely than Republicans or independents (56% each) to say so. Residents in the Inland Empire (71%) and Los Angeles (69%) are the most likely to say colleges and universities have been affected a lot , followed by those in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%), Orange/San Diego Counties (61%), and the Central Valley ( 59%). More than 60 percent of men, women, and all age, education, and income groups say that colleges and universities have been affected a lot . Among those who are current students of California public colleges or universities, 77 percent say that schools have been affected a lot, while 70 percent of parents of current students hold this view. “Would you say the state’s public colleges and universities have or have not been affected by recent state budget cuts? (if they have: Have they been affected a lot or somewhat?)” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Affected a lot 65% 77% 56% 56% 68% Affected somewhat 25 17 33 34 24 Not affected 5 3 7 6 4 Don’t know 5 3 4 4 4 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 12 SPECIFIC CONCERNS ABOUT STATE BUDGET CUTS Californians are concerned about a number of ways that public colleges and universities have dealt with decreased funding, but they express the most concern about increasing tuition and fees for students. Two in three Californians are very concerned about increasing tuition (65%), compared to just over half who are very concerned about schools offering fewer college classes (55%) or about admitting fewer students (53%). The share very concerned about increasing tuition and fees and offering fewer classes has been similar since 2009. There has been a decrease since last year in the percentage who are very concerned about admitting fewer students (57% 2009, 62% 2010, 53% very concerned today). “There are a number of ways California’s public colleg es and universities have dealt with decreased funding. Please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concern ed about each of the following. How about… ” Increasing tuition and fees for students? Offering fewer college classes? Admitting fewer college students? Very concerned 65% 55% 53% Somewhat concerned 24 31 31 Not too concerned 5 7 8 Not at all concerned 5 5 6 Don’t know 1 1 2 Democrats (73%) are more likely than independents (62%) and Republicans (53%) to be very concerned about rising tuition and fees for students. More than six in 10 across regions and demographic groups are very concerned about increasing tuition. Among parents of current students at California public colleges or universities, 77 percent are very concerned, as are 70 percent of current students. When it comes to offering fewer college courses or admitting fewer college students, majorities of parents of children attending a California public college or university are very concerned about colleges offering fewer classes (64%) and about admitting fewer students (57%). Current students are more concerned about class offerings (71%) than student ad missions (58%). Blacks are the most likely to be very concerned about class offerings, while Latinos are most likely to be very concerned about student admissions. Central Valley residents are the least likely to be very concerned about either issue. Percent saying very concerned Increasing tuition and fees for students Offering fewer college classes Admitting fewer college students All Adults 65% 55% 53% Likely Voters 66 57 54 Parents of Children Attending California Public College or University 77 64 57 Race/Ethnicity Asians 66 53 53 Blacks 81 67 75 Latinos 68 62 53 Whites 62 51 50 Region Central Valley 61 47 49 San Francisco Bay Area 70 59 53 Los Angeles 65 59 52 Orange/San Diego 64 53 56 Inland Empire 61 51 53 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 13 STATE BUDGET CHOICES Seven in 10 Californian s place a high (29%) or very high (41%) priority on state spending for higher education. The percentage who consider spending in this area to be a very high priority has risen 15 points since 2008 (26% 2008, 26% 2009, 36% 201 0, 41% today). Although majorities across parties say spending on higher education is a high or very high priority, Democrats (50%) are the most likely to say this should be a very high priority for the state (36% independents, 31% Republicans). Reflecting the importance they place on higher education, most Californians (59%) and likely voters (57%) favor the state government spending more on public colleges and universities, even if it means less for other state programs. Support was similar last year (57% adults, 57% likely voters). Most Democrats (65%) favor spending more on higher education, while Republicans are divided (49% favor, 45% oppose). Independents are more likely to favor (52%) than oppose (39%) this idea. Asians (70%) are more likel y than Latinos (60%), whites (56%), and blacks (54%) to favor increased spending even at the expense of other programs. Among parents of children attending a California publ ic college or university, 67 percent favor this idea. Among students now attending one of these schools, 71 percent express support. “Do you favor or oppose the state government spending more money on public colleges and universities, even if it means less money for other state programs?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 59% 65% 49% 52% 57% Oppose 33 27 45 39 35 Don’t know 8 8 6 9 8 If the state government makes budget cuts in higher education (which could happen again as soon as January), most Californians (63%) say the quality of education will suffer. Far fewer (32%) say the state could make cuts and still maintain a high quality of education. Results were similar last year (66 % quality will suffer, 29% quality could be maintained). Solid majorities of Democrats (74%) and independents (60%) say quality will suffer under budget cuts, while Republicans are divided (48% quality will suffer, 47% quality could be maintained). Majorities across regions and racial/ethnic and other demographic groups believe educational quality will suffer if more cuts are made. This concern is especially pronounced among students currently attending one of the state’s public colleges or universities (76%). “Which comes closer to your view? If the state government makes budget cuts in higher education, the quality of education will suffer, or the state government could make budget cuts in higher education and st ill maintain a high quality of education.” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Quality will suffer 63% 74% 48% 60% 62% Quality could be maintained 32 23 47 35 34 Don’t know 5 2 5 4 4 To improve educational quality significantly , most Californians (50%) say the amount of state funding needs to be increased and that existing funds need to be used more wisely. Thirty-four percent say just using funds more wisely would improve quality, while only 12 percent say increasing funding alone is the key. Results were similar last year. This issue continues to divide voters along party lines: Democrats (63%) say both things are needed; Republicans (58%) say existing funds need to be used more wisel y. PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 14 RAISING REVENUES Although most Californians express deep concerns about the fiscal situation of the higher education system, half say they are unwilling to pay higher taxes to maintain current funding for public colleges and universities . Meanwhile, there is widespread opposition to increasing student fees for this purpose. Fifty -two percent of Californians would not pay higher taxes to maintain current funding levels for higher education; 45 percent would. Likely voters are divided (49% yes, 49% no). Last year, Californians and likely voters were evenly divided (49% yes, 49% no); in 2009, adults (41% yes, 56% no) and likely voters (43% yes, 54% no) were more likely to oppose than favor the idea. Most Democrats (63%) would pay higher taxes; most Republicans (71%) would not. Independents are opposed (41% yes, 55% no). Strong majorities of Californians (69%) and likely voters (65%) oppose increasing student fees to maintai n current funding for public colleges and universities. Each branch of the higher education system has significantly increased student fees over the past several years. Opposition has increased 7 points among all adults since last year (from 62% to 69%) an d 5 points among likely voters (from 60% to 65%). At least six in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups oppose increasing student fees. “W hat if the state said it needed more money just to maintain current funding for public colleges and universities. Would you be willing to…” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Pay higher taxes for this purpose, or not? Yes 45% 63% 29% 41% 49% No 52 35 71 55 49 Don't know 3 2 1 4 2 Increase student fees for this purpose, or not? Yes 28 29 38 28 32 No 69 68 60 69 65 Don't know 3 2 2 3 3 To maintain current funding for higher education, Californians favor admitting more out-of -state students who pay higher tuition, but support declines if that would mean fewer California admissions (20% yes, even if fewer in -state students, 32% yes, but not if fewer in -state students, 42% no). Support for out -of - state admissions at the expense of California admissions has declined slightly (26% 2010, 20% today). One idea that generates majority support among Californians is a hypothetical bond measure to pay for construction projects in the state’s higher education system. Fifty- eight percent of all adults would vote yes and 34 percent would vote no. Among likely voters, 52 perce nt would vote yes and 41 percent no. This type of statewide bond would require a simple majority vote to pass. Support for a hypothetical bond measure among all adults was higher in 2007 (64%), but slightly lower in 2009 (53%). This idea divides voters alo ng party lines (68% of Democrats would vote yes and 55% of Republicans would vote no) and independents are about evenly split (47% yes, 45% no). “If there was a bond measure on the state ballot in 2012 to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 58% 68% 39% 47% 52% No 34 25 55 45 41 Don’t know 8 8 6 8 7 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 15 PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE Nearly all Californians say that the state’s higher education system is very (73%) or somewhat (23%) important to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. Results have been similar since this question was first asked in 2007. More than six in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups say the higher education system is very important to the state’s future. Democrats , at 82 percent , are the most likely party group to express this view (70% independents, 64% Republicans). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (84%) and Latinos (80%) are more likely than whites (70%) and Asians (64%) to say the system is very important to the state’s future. Across education groups, those with college degrees are the most likely to consider the system very important. A plurality of Cal ifornians (49%) also recognize that the state will face a shortage of college -educated residents needed for the jobs of the future. About one in three think the state will have just enough college -educated workers and 13 percent think it will have more than enough. PPIC research has shown that the state will have a shortage of 1 million college -educated workers by 2025. The percentage who say the state will face a shortage is down 7 points from last year (56% 2010, 49% today), but is similar to 2009 (49%), 2008 (47%), and 2007 (52%). Across parties, majorities of Democrats (59%) and independents (55%) anticipate a shortage of college- educated workers, compared to 41 percent of Republicans. Across regions and demographic groups, pluralities say there will not be enough. “In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have more than enough, not enough, or just enough college-educated residents needed for the jobs and skills likely to be in demand?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 13% 8% 20% 10% 11% Just enough 32 28 33 30 30 Not enough 49 59 41 55 53 Don’t know 6 5 6 5 7 Just under half of Californians (47%) express at least some confidence in the state government to plan for the future of higher education: 10 percent have a great deal of confidence and 37 percent only some. The other half of Californians have very little (34%) or no confidence (16%) in the state government to plan. Confidence was much higher when we first asked this question in 2007 (57%), but had dropped significantly by 2010 (52% 2008, 41% 2009, 40% 2010). Today, confidence has inched back up to 47 perce nt. Among those who believe the state will face a shortage of college- educated workers, 58 percent have very little or no confidence in the state to plan accordingly. Across parties, Democrats (56%) are much more likely to express confidence than independents (39%) or Republicans (38%) . “How much confidence do you have in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of California’s higher education system— a great deal, only some, very little, or none?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind A great deal 10% 9% 6% 7% 6% Only some 37 47 32 32 37 Very little 34 32 37 36 35 None 16 10 26 24 21 Don’t know 2 2 – – 1 November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 16 OVERALL PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES KEY FINDINGS  A majority of Californians say that a college education is necessary for success in today’s work world; Latinos are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to say this. ( page 17 )  Solid majorities of Californians —including those across racial/ethnic, income, and education groups —agree that the price of college limits access and that students have to borrow too much to pay for college . ( page 18 )  Seven in 10 Californians say that many qualified people lack the opportunity to go to college. The share of residents holding this view declines with rising income and education levels. (page 19 )  Although 86 percent of Californians consider it very important for the state’s K –12 public schools to prepare students for college, only 44 percent say the y are doing an excellent or good job of it . (page 21)  Seven in 10 Californians say it is very important for community colleges to include career technical or vocational education , but less than half say a two- year degree can greatly help a person to be successful in the work world. (page 22)  Most parents would like their children to obtain a four -year or postgraduate degree; however, many are worried about being able to pay for that education, with concern especially high among Latino parents and lower -income parents. (page 23) 7973 55 0 20 40 60 80 100 Under$40,000$40,000 to$80,000$80,000or more Percent all adults Percent Who Say Many Qualified People Lack the Opportunity to Attend College 29 39 55 43 0 20 40 60 80 AsiansBlacksLatinosWhites Percent all adults HowMuch a Two-Year Degree Helps a Person Be Successful % saying a lot 310 38 45 3 High school or less Two-year degree/technical training Four-year degree Postgraduate degree Don't know Parents' Educational Hopes for Their Children Percent parents PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 17 IMPORTANCE AND PURPOSE OF COLLEGE Most Californians (58%) b elieve that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world , while 39 percent believe there are many ways to succeed without a college education. Since we first ask ed this question in 2007, the percentage saying college is necessary has hit a low point (64% 2007, 68% 2008, 66% 2009, 63% 2010, 58% today). There are considerable differences across demographic groups about the perceived necessity of college. Nearly three in four Latinos (73%) say success depends on a college education, compared to fewer Asians (63%) , blacks (53%), and whites (46%). Women are much more likely than men (64% to 52%) to consider college a necessity. Los Angeles (63%), San Francisco Bay Area (62%), and Inland Empire (61%) residents are more likely than those in the Central Valley (53%) and Orange/San Diego Counties (51%) to express this view. Two in three parents (65%) view college as a necessity. “Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites College is necessary 58% 63 % 53% 73% 46% 65 % Many ways to succeed 39 34 47 25 50 32 Don’t know 3 3 – 1 4 3 Californians offer mixed opinions about the purpose of college. A plurality (46%) say that the main purpose of college is to teach specific skills and knowledge that can be used in the workplace, while 35 percent say the main purpose should be to help an i ndividual grow personally and intellectually. Another 18 percent volunteer that the main purpose of college is both of these goals. This question was asked in a nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center in March. Results were similar among adults nationwide (39% personal/intellectual growth, 47% skills/knowledge, 12% both). Across most regions and demographic groups, greater shares choose skills and knowledge for the workplace over personal and intellectual growth. There are some exceptions , however. College graduates are somewhat more likely to value personal and intellectual growth over specific skills and knowledge for the workplace (43% to 37%). A plurality of Asians (48%) choose personal and intellectual growth, while pluralities in other racial/ethnic groups (49% blacks, 48% whites, 45% Latinos) choose skills and knowledge that can be applied in the workplace. Those age d 18 to 34 are more divided between the two goals but residents who are older believe it is more important to learn skil ls for the workplace. Those with incomes of $80,000 or more are divided about evenly between these goals , while those with lower incomes name workforce skills. “W hich comes closer to your view, even if neither is exactly right? The main purpose of college should be to help an individual grow personally and intellectually , or to teach specific skills and knowledge that can be used in the workplace.” All Adults Education Parents of Children 18 or Younger High school or less Some college College graduate Personal, intellectual growth 35% 32 % 33% 43% 34 % Specific skills, knowledge 46 53 44 37 46 Both equally (volunteered) 18 14 22 19 17 Don’t know 1 2 1 1 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 18 HIGHER EDUCATION AFFORDABILITY Reflecting their belief that affordability is a big problem, a strong majority of Californians (70%) say that the price of college keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so; 27 percent disagree. Since 2007, at least two in three Californians have said that the pr ice is a barrier to entry (66% 2007, 69% 2009, 73% 2010, 70% today). There is widespread agreement among Californians , with more than six in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups saying the price of college is keeping qualified students out. R epublicans (61%) are less likely than independents (74%) and Democrats (75%) to express this view, as are Latinos (64%) compared with other racial/ethnic groups (72% whites, 75% Asians, 79% blacks). “P lease say if you agree or disagree with the following statements. The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so.” All Adults Household Income Parents of Children 18 or Younger Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Agree 70% 70 % 73 % 69 % 68 % Disagree 27 28 25 30 30 Don’t know 2 2 2 2 2 Although most Californians perceive the price of college as a barrier to attendance, many (55%) believe that loans and financial aid are available to those who need it; 40 percent disagree. Results have been similar since this question was first asked in 2008. Democrats are somewhat more likely to disagree (50%) than agree (44 %) that loans and financial aid are available to those who need help. Most Republicans (57%) and independen ts (51%) think financial help is available. Nearly two in three of those with incomes under $40,000 (63%) and those without any college education (65%) say financial help is available , compared to about half of other groups ( 49 % $ 40,000 or more, 47 % some college, and 49 % college graduates ). Latinos (6 7%) and Asians (61%) are much more likely than whites (48%) and blacks (44%) to agree that financial help is available. Among current students, 47 percent agree and 50 percent disagree that there is financial help for those who need it. Many Californians may believe that loans and financial aid are there for those who need it, but a strong majority (75%) also believe that students have to borrow too much money to pay for their college education; 23 percent disag ree. Findings have been nearly identical each year since 2007. Majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups believe students have to borrow too much to go to college, but there are some interesting differences. For example, middle - (81%) and upper -income (80%) residents are much more likely than lower -income residents (68%) to think students have to borrow too much. College graduates (80%) and those with some college education (83%) are much more likely than those without any college education (65%) to hold this view. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (57%) are the least likely to consider this a problem (82% Asians, 83% whites, 90% blacks). “P lease say if you agree or disagree with the following statements. Students have to borrow too much money to pay for their college education.” All Adults Household Income Parents of Children 18 or Younger Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Agree 75% 68 % 81 % 80 % 71 % Disagree 23 30 17 17 27 Don’t know 3 2 2 3 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 19 STUDENT PREPAREDNESS AND ACCESS Underscoring their views of affordability as a barrier to entry, seven in 10 Californians (70%) say that many qualified people do not have the opportunity to go to college; one in four (26%) say the vast majority of those wh o are qualified and motivated have the opportunity to go. Since 2007, strong majorities have expressed the view that many qualified people lack the opportunity to go to college (65% 2007, 68% 2008 and 2009, 71% 2010, 70% today). Majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups say that there are qualified candidates who have no access to college , but there are some key differences. Those who are not college graduates (77% high school or less, 73% some college) are much more likely than college g raduates (56%) to say there is an access problem. Along similar lines, more than seven in 10 of those with incomes under $40,000 (79%) or between $40,000 and $80,000 (73%) hold this view , compared to 55 percent of those making $80,000 or more. Democrats (75%) are much more likely than independents (62%) and Republicans (60%) to consider access a problem for qualified potential applicants. Across regions, San Francisco Bay Area residents (64%) are the least likely to hold this view (69% Orange/San Diego Counties, 72% Los Angeles, 73% Inland Empire, 74% Central Valley). And across racial/ethnic groups, whites (61%) are the least likely to say that many qualified people lack the opportunity to go to college (68% Asians, 76% blacks, 82% Latinos). Among those who view college as necessary for success in the workplace, 74 percent believe many qualified people lack the opportunity to attend. “Do you think that currently, the vast majority of people who are qualified to go to college have the opportunity to do so, or do you think there are many people who are qualified to go but don’t have the opportunity to do so? ” All Adults Education Parents of Children 18 or Younger High School or Less Some College College Graduate Majority have the opportunity 26% 20 % 24 % 39 % 24 % Many don’t have the opportunity 70 77 73 56 72 Don’t know 4 3 4 5 3 Californians believe there are many qualified people who do not get the chance to go to college, but they also think that many of those who do enter college are unprepared. Just 23 percent say that most students are prepared for college -level work when they enter college, while 69 percent say that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college. Seven in 10 voters across parties believe many students need remedial help. Across regions, Inland Empire residents (81%) are the most likely to hold this view, followed by those in the San Francisco Bay Area (73%), Orange/San Diego Counties (69%) , Los Angeles (66%), and the Central Valley (65%). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (84%) are much more likely than Latinos (70%), whites (69%), and Asians (57%) to say many students need remedia tion. Among those currently attending a California public college or university, 75 percent think many students require basic skills and remedial education. “Do you think that most students are prepared for college-level work when they enter college, or do you think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Most are prepared 23% 32% 13% 23% 23% 23% Many require remediation 69 57 84 70 69 69 Don’t know 8 11 3 8 8 8 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 20 IMPORTANCE OF STUDENT DIVERSITY Three in four Californians believe that it is very (53%) or somewhat important (22%) for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body, with one in four saying it is not too important (11%) or not at all important (13%). Results have been nearly identical in past years (55% very, 23% somewhat 2008; 54% very, 23% somewhat 2009; 54% very, 23% somewhat 2010). Californians’ views on economic diversity are similar. E ight in 10 say that it is very (54%) or somewhat important (27 %), while one in five say it is not too important (10%) or not at all important (9%). Findings have been similar each time we asked this question (57% very, 25% somewhat 2008; 54% very, 26% somewhat 2009; 57% very, 26% somewhat 2010). “How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have…” A racially diverse student body—that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minorities? An economically diverse student body—that is, a mix of students from lower-, middle-, and upper-income backgrounds? Very important 53% 54 % Somewhat important 22 27 Not too important 11 10 Not at all important 13 9 Don’t know 1 1 Half of likely voters (50%) and about six in 10 parents of children 18 or younger (58%) say that a racially diverse student body is very important . Blacks (83%) are by far the most likely racial/ethnic group to say that racial diversity is very important; a so lid majority of Latinos agree (63%) while fewer Asians (50%) and whites (44%) hold this view. The perception that racial diversity is very important declines with income. Democrats (67%) are far more likely than independents (45%) and Republicans (33%) to have this view. Just over half of current students, parents of current students, and residents across age groups consider this very important. About half of likely voters (52%) and 56 percent of parents of children 18 or younger say economic diversity is v ery important. An overwhelming majority of b lacks (80%) and six in 10 Latinos (60%) say economic diversity is very important , compared to fewer Asians (50%) and whites (48%) . Those earning $80,000 or more (47%) are less likely than others (59% under $40,00 0, 55% $40,000 to $80,000) to say an economically diverse student body is very important. Democrats (67%) are far more likely than independents (47%) and Republicans (39%) to hold this view. Six in 10 current higher education students (60%) say economic diversity is very important, compared to 49 percent of parents of current students . Percent saying very important A racially diverse student body An economically diverse student body All Adults 53% 54 % Likely Voters 50 52 Parents of Children 18 or Younger 58 56 Race/Ethnicity Asians 50 50 Blacks 83 80 Latinos 63 60 Whites 44 48 Household Income Under $40,000 61 59 $40,000 to under $80,000 52 55 $80,000 or more 44 47 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 21 ROLE OF K–12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS An overwhelming majority of adults (86%) say that it is ve ry important for California’s K–12 public schools to prepare students for college, while 11 percent say it is somewhat important and 2 percent not too important. In surveys on K –12 education, strong majorities held this view (81% Apr il 2007, 76% April 2009 ). Blacks (96%) and Latinos (94%) are more likely than whites (84%) and Asians (72%) to say so. “How important to y ou is it that California’s K –12 public schools prepare students for college ?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very important 86% 72 % 96% 94% 84% 9 0% Somewhat important 11 25 2 5 13 9 Not too important 2 3 2 1 2 1 Don’t know 1 1 – – 1 1 Californians consider college preparation very important, but 51 percent say the K –12 public schools are doing a not -so -good (33%) or poor job (18%) at this. Forty -four percent say excellent (8%) or good (36%) job. Parents hold a more favorable view than all ad ults (11% excellent, 43% good, 29% not so good, 15% poor). In surveys on K –12 education, about half have given negative ratings to K –12 public schools when it comes to preparing students for college (53% April 2006, 48% April 2009, 53% April 2010, 52% April 2011). Latinos are much more likely ( 62%) than Asians ( 48%), or whites (31% ) and blacks (30%) to have a favorable opinion. Among those who say many college students require remediation, just 37 percent say K –12 public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for college. “Are California's K –12 public schools doing an excellent, good, not- so-good, or poor job in preparing students for college?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Excellent 8% 6 % 2% 17% 3% 1 1% Good 36 42 28 45 28 43 Not -so -good 33 33 46 25 37 29 Poor 18 7 22 10 26 15 Don’t know 5 12 2 3 5 3 ROLE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES A plurality of Californians (35%) say the most important goal of the state’s community colleges is preparing students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities. Three in 10 (29%) say career technical or vocational education and 17 percent say lifelong learning. Far fewer say providing basic skills or remedial education (7%) or providing associate degrees (6%). In 2010, 41 percent said transfer preparation was the most important goal and 25 percent said career technical or vocational education. To day, pluralities across parties and regions favor transfer preparation, and this view rises with income. Residents age 55 and older are less likely than younger Californians to have this view. Asians are more likely to choose career technical or vocational education over transfer preparation (38% to 31%) , while p luralities of whites (35%), Latinos (39%), and blacks (38%) view transfer preparation as the main goal of community colleges. PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 22 ROLE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES (CONTINUED) Almost all Californians say that it is very (73%) or somewhat (23%) important that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities. The percentage saying this is very important has declined somewhat since 2007 (81% 2007, 78% 2010, 73% today). Democrats (76%) are more likely than independents (68%) and Republicans (66%) to hold this view. Blacks (87%) and Latinos (80%) are more likely than whites (70%) and Asians (60%) to view transfer preparation as very important. Solid majorities across regions and demographic groups say including classes to prepare students to transfer is very important. About three in four adults currently attending (77%) and those who attended (75%) a California public college or university share this view. Nearly all residents say including career technical or vocational education in community colleges is very (72%) or somewhat (24%) important. A similar share thought this was very important in past years (76 % 2007, 73 % 2010). Majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups say this is very important. Still, b lacks (83%) are more likely than Latinos and wh ites (74% each), and are far more likely than Asians (54%) to hold this view. Seven in 10 current higher education students (70%) and 76 percent of alumni say including career technical or vocational education is very important. “How important to you is i t that community colleges include career technical or vocational education ?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very important 72% 54 % 83% 74% 74% 74 % Somewhat important 24 41 14 23 22 22 Not too important 3 3 3 2 3 2 Not at all important 1 2 – 1 1 1 How do Californians view a two- year community college degree or technical training when it comes to helping a person be successful in today’s work world? Fewer than half say it helps a lot (45%), 42 percent say it helps some, while just one in 10 say not too much (9%) or not at all (2%) . Latinos (55%) are much more likely than whites (43%) or blacks (39%) and far more likely than Asians (29%) to say a two -year degree hel ps a lot to be successful in the workplace. Inland Empire residents (52%) are the most likely to say a two -year degree helps a lot, followed by those in Orange/San Diego Counties (46%), the San Francisco Bay Area (46%), the Central Valley (43%) , and Los Angeles (42%). The view that a two -year community college degree or technical training is very helpful for the workplace declines with income and education . Among those who believe that it is very important for community colleges to include career technical or vocational education, 52 percent say that a two-year degree helps a person a lot to succeed in today’s work world. “How much does a two-year community college degree or technical training help a person to be successful in today’s work world? ” All Adults Household Income Parents of Children 18 or Younger Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more A lot 45% 49 % 45 % 38 % 49 % Some 42 37 43 50 40 Not too much 9 10 7 10 9 Not at all 2 2 3 1 1 Don’t know 2 2 2 2 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 23 PARENTS’ PERSPECTIVES Parents of children age 18 or younger express high hopes that their youngest child will be a four -year college graduate (38%) or have a graduate degree (45%). Fewer parents hope their child will achieve a two -year college degree or technical training (10%) , or a high school education or less (3%). In eight surveys since 2005, at least 83 percent have said a four-year college graduate or a graduate degree. In this survey, we used the “two- year community college graduate or career technical training” category, f or which the response is higher (10%) than in November 2010 (5%) when we used “some college or career technical training” or in surveys from April 2005 to April 2010 (less than 5%) when we used “some college.” Latino parents (44%) are somewhat m ore likely than whites (35%) to say four -year college graduate , while white parents (55%) are far more likely than Latinos (29%) to say graduate degree. (Sample sizes for Asian and black parents are too small for separate analysis.) Regardless of whether t hey graduated from college themselves, the vast majority of parents would like their children to obtain a four -year or graduate degree. Still, parents who are college graduates (73%) are more than twice as likely as those who are not (35%) to hope their yo ungest child completes a graduate degree . “What do you hope will be the highest grade level that your youngest child will achieve: some high school; high school graduate; two-year community college graduate or career technical training; four- year college graduate; or a graduate degree after college?” Parents of Children 18 or Younger Only All Parents of Children 18 or Younger Race/Ethnicity Education Latinos Whites Not a college graduate College graduate High school or less 3% 5 % 1 % 5 % – Two-year college graduate/technical training 10 17 6 14 1 % Four -year college graduate 38 44 35 43 26 Graduate degree after college 45 29 55 35 73 Don’t know 3 5 3 4 1 About seven in 10 parents say they are very (32%) or somewhat confident (39%) that they have the resources and information needed for their child to reach the grade level they hope for. The share saying they are very confident in having the needed resources and information has declined since 2005 (56% April 2005, 50% April 2009, 46% April 2010, 32% today). White parents are far more likely to say they are very confident (50%) than are Latino parents (20%). About half of parents say they are very worried about being able to afford a college education for their youngest child, down 5 points since last year, but higher than in earlier years (43% 2007, 46% 2008, 51% 2009, 57% 2010, 52% today). Concern is twice as high among Latinos (66% very worried) than whites (37%). Parents earning $80,000 or more (32%) are far less likely than those earning less to be very worried (53% $40,000 to under $80,000 and 65% under $40,000). Still, those with high incomes are far more likely to say they are very or somewhat worried (67%) than not too or not at all worried (33%) . “How worried are you about being able to afford a college education for your youngest child?” Parents of Children 18 or Younger Only All Parents of Children 18 or Younger Race/Ethnicity Household Income Latinos Whites Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Very worried 52% 66 % 37 % 65 % 53 % 32 % Somewhat worried 29 22 34 25 25 35 Not too worried 10 9 13 5 15 15 Not at all worried 9 4 16 4 7 18 November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 25 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from Sonja Petek, project manager for this survey, and survey research associates Dean Bonner and Jui Shrestha. This survey was conducted with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. We benefited from discussions with Irvine program staff and PPIC staff; however, the methods, questions, and content of this report were determined solely by Mark Baldassare and the survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 2,5 03 California adult residents, including 2, 003 interviewed on landline telephones and 50 0 interviewed on cell phones. Live interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days from October 25 –November 8, 2011. Interviews took an average of 20 minutes to complete. Landl ine interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were included in this survey to account for the growing number of Californians who use them. These interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers wi th California area codes were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a California resident, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the potential cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Landline and cell phone interviewing was conducted in English, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin or Cantonese), Vietnamese, and Korean, according to respondents’ preferences. We chose these languages because Spanish is the dominant language among non -English -speaking adults in California, followed in prevalence by the three Asian languages. Accent on Languages, Inc. translated the survey into Spanis h, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI Inc. translated the survey into Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean, and conducted all telephone interviewing. With assistance from Abt SRBI we used recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2006– 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) for California to compare certain demo graphic characteristics of the survey sample— region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was comparable to the ACS figures. Abt SRBI used data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey and data from the 2006– 2008 ACS for California, both to estimate landline and cell phone service in California and to compare the data against landline and cell phone service reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party affiliation of registered voters in our sample to statewide party registration. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight , while sample balancing adjusted for any differences across region al, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone service, and party registration groups. PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 26 The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±3.1 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total sample of 2,50 3 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 3.1 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger: For the 1,618 registered voters, it is ±3.3 percent; for the 1,161 likely voters, it is ±3.6 percent; for the 1,059 parents of children 18 or younger, it is ± 5 percent. Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. Throughout the report, w e refer to five geographic regions that account for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sut ter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Cost a, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents from other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to report separately. We present sp ecific results for no n-Hispanic whites and for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. We also present results for non- Hispanic Asians, who make up about 14 percent of the state’s adult popu lation, and non- Hispanic blacks, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in another party are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated by their responses to survey questions on voter registration, previous election participation, and current interest in politics . The percentages presented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to results from a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center. Additional details about our methodology can be found at http://www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request with an email to surveys@ppic.org . November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 27 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND HIGHER EDUCATION October 25– November 8 , 2011 2,503 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietname se MARGIN OF ERROR ±3.1% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE PERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100 D UE TO ROUNDING 1. First, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 44% approve 30 disapprove 26 don’t know 2. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Governor Brown is handling California’s public college and university system? 31% approve 44 disapprove 25 don’t know 3. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 25% approve 55 disapprove 19 don’t know 4. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling California’s public college and university system? 21% approve 59 disapprove 20 don’t know 5. Thinking about the p ublic higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 28% right direction 62 wrong direction 10 don’t know I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s higher education system today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem. First… [rotate questions 6 to 8] 6. How about the overall quality of educatio n in California’s public colleges and universities today ? 24% big problem 36 somewhat of a problem 34 not much of a problem 6 don’t know 7. How about the overall affordability of education for students in California’s public colleges and universities t oday? 61% big problem 25 somewhat of a problem 11 not much of a problem 4 don’t know 8. How about the overall state budget situation for California’s public colleges and universities today? 69% big problem 17 somewhat of a problem 8 not much of a problem 5 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 28 As you may know, California’s higher education system has three branches—the California Community College system, the California State University system , and the University of California system. [rotate questions 9 to 11] 9. Overall , is the California Community College system doing an excellent, good, not -so - good, or poor job? 10% excellent 52 good 21 not so good 8 poor 9 don’t know 10. Overall, is the California State University system doing an excellent, good, not -so - good, o r poor job? 6% excellent 50 good 25 not so good 6 poor 13 don’t know 11. Overall, is the University of California system doing an excellent, good, not -so -good, or poor job? 11% excellent 48 good 23 not s o good 6 poor 12 don’t know 12. Next, do you think the current level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 7% more than enough 14 just enough 74 not enough 5 don’t know 13. To significantly improve Calif ornia’s higher education system, which of the following statements do you agree with the most ? [rotate responses 1 and 2] (1) We need to use existing state funds more wisely, [or] (2) We need to increase the amount of state funding, [or] (3) We need to use existing state funds more wisely and increase the amount of state funding. 34% use funds more wisely 12 increase state funding 50 use funds more wisely and increase funding 3 don’t know 14. Which comes closer to your view? [rotate ] (1 ) If the state government makes budget cuts in higher education, the quality of education will suffer, [or] ( 2 ) the state government could make budget cuts in higher education and still mainta in a high quality of education. 63% if state makes cuts, quality will suffer 32 state could make cuts and maintain quality 5 don’t know As you may know, in an effort to close the gap between state spending and revenues over the past few years, the governor and legislature have made cuts in all major budget areas, including higher education. There are a number of ways California’s public colleges and universities have dealt with decreased funding. Please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about each of the following. [rotate questions 15 to 17] 15. How about increasing tuition and fees for college students to deal with decreased state funding ? 65% very concerned 24 somewhat concerned 5 not too concerned 5 not at all concerned 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 29 16. How about admitting fewer college students to deal with decreased state funding ? 53% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 8 not too concerned 6 not at all concerned 2 don’t know 17. How about offering fewer college classes to deal with decreased state funding ? 55% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 7 not too concerned 5 not at all concerned 1 don’t know Next, please say if you agree or disagree with the following statements. [rotate questions 18 to 20] 18. The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so. 70% agree 27 disagree 2 don’t know 19. Almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid. 55% agree 40 disagree 5 don’t know 20. Students have to borrow too m uch money to pay for their college education. 75% agree 23 disagree 3 don’t know 21. Next, do you think that most students are prepared for college -level work when they enter college, or do you think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college? 23% most students are prepared 69 many require basic skills and remedial education 8 don’t know 22. Which comes closer to your view, even if neither is exactly right? The mai n purpose of college should be [rotate ] (1 ) to help an individual grow personally and intellectually [or] (2) to teach specific skills and knowledge that can be used in the workplace. 35% to help an individual grow personally and intellectually 46 to teach specific skills and knowledge that can b e used in the workplace 18 both equally (volunteered) 1 don’t know [rotate questions 23 and 24] 23. Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education? 58% college is necessary 39 many ways to succeed without a college education 3 don’t know 24. Do you think that currently, the vast majority of people who are qualified to go to college have the oppor tunity to do so, or do you think there are many people who are qualified to go but don’t have the opportunity to do so? 26% majority have the opportunity 70 many people don’t have the opportunity 4 don’t know [rotate questions 25 and 26] 25. How importa nt do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body —that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minorities? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all import ant? 53% very important 22 somewhat important 11 not too important 13 not at all important 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 30 26. How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have an economically diverse student body —that is, a mix of students from lower -, middle -, and upper -income backgrounds? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 54% very important 27 somewhat important 10 not too important 9 not at all important 1 don’t know Next, please t hink about the state’s kindergarten through 12th grade public schools. 27. How important to y ou is it that California’s K –12 public schools prepare students for college —very important, somewhat important, or not too important? 86% very important 11 somew hat important 2 not too important 1 don’t know 28. And are California's K –12 public schools doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for college? 8% excellent 36 good 33 not so good 18 poor 5 don’t know 29. On another topic, California’s community colleges have several important goals. From among the following, which do you think is the most important goal? [read list, rotate responses] 35% pr eparing students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities 29 providing career technical or vocational education 17 providing courses for lifelong learning and personal enrichment 7 providing basic skills or remedial education 6 providing associate degrees 5 don’t know [rotate questions 30 and 31] 30. How important to you is it that community colleges include career technical or vocational education —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 72% very important 24 somewhat important 3 not too important 1 not at all im portant – don’t know 31. How important to you is it that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 73% very important 23 somewhat important 2 not too important 1 not at all important 1 don’t know 32. How much does a two- year community college degree or technical training help a person to be successful in today’s work world —a lot, some, not too much, or not at all? 45% a lot 42 some 9 not too much 2 not at all 2 don’t know 33. On another topic, given the state’s current budget situation, on a scale of 1 to 5 —with 1 being a very low priority and 5 being a very high priority —what priority should be given to spending for California’s public colleges and universities? 3% very low priority 5 low priority 21 medium priority 29 high priority 41 very high priority 2 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 31 34. Do you favor or oppose the state government spending more money on public colleges and universities, even if it means less money for other state programs? 59% favor 33 oppose 8 don’t know 35. Would you say the state’s public colleges and universities have or have not been affect ed by recent state budget cuts? ( if they have: H ave they been affected a lot or somewhat?) 65% affected a lot 25 affected somewhat 5 not affected 5 don’t know Next, what if the state said it needed more money just to maintain current funding for public colleges and universities. [rotate questions 36 and 37] 36. Would you be willing to pay higher taxes for this purpose, or not? 45% yes 52 no 3 don’t know 37. Would you be willing to increase student fees for this purpose, or not? 28% yes 69 no 3 don’t know 38. Would you be willing to admit more out -of - state students paying higher tuit ion for this purpose, or not? ( if yes: Would you still support this even if it meant adm itting fewer in -state students?) 20% yes, even if it meant admitting fewer in-state students 32 yes, but not if it meant admitting fewer in -state students 42 no 6 don’t know 39. If there was a bond measure on the state ballot in 2012 to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no? 58% yes 34 no 8 don’t know 40. Changing topics, compared with other states, how would you rate the quality of the public higher education system in California today? Do you think it is [rotate order] (1 ) the best in the country, ( 2) one of the best in the country, ( 3) above ave rage, (4 ) average, [or] (5 ) below average? 4% the best in the country 16 one of the best in the country 27 above average 31 average 15 below average 6 don’t know 41. In general, how important is California’s higher education system to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 73% very important 23 some what important 2 not too important 1 not at all important 1 don’t know 42. In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have [rotate 1 and 2] (1) more than enough, (2) not enough, [or] just enough college- educated residents needed for the jobs and skills likely to be in demand? 13% more than enough 49 not enough 32 just enough 6 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 32 43. How much confidence do you have in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of California’s higher education system? 10% a great deal 37 only some 34 very little 16 none 2 don’t know 44. Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 65% yes [ask q44a] 35 no [skip to q45b] 44a.Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or are you registered as a decline -to -state or independent voter? 44% Democrat [ask q45] 32 Republican [skip to q45a] 3 another party (specify ) [skip to q46] 21 independe nt [skip to q45b] 45. Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 55% strong 42 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q46] 45a.Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 55% strong 41 not very strong 5 don’t know [skip to q46] 45b.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 20% Republican Party 46 Democratic Party 28 neither (volunteered) 6 don’t know 46. Would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 12% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 29 middle -of -the -road 23 somewhat conservative 13 very conservative 3 don’t know 47. Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics ? 24% great deal 34 fair amount 32 only a little 10 none – don’t know D4d. [parents of children 18 or younger only] What do you hope will be the highest grade level that your youngest child will achieve? – some high school 3% high school graduate 10 two-year community college graduate or career technical training 38 four -year college graduate 45 a graduate degree after college 3 don’t know D4e.[parents of children 18 or younger only] How worried are you about being able to afford a college education for your youngest child? Are you very worried, somewhat worried, not too worried, or not at all worried? 52% very worried 29 somewhat worried 10 not too worried 9 not at all worried – don’t know D4 f. [parents of children 18 or younger only] How confident are you that you have the resources and information needed for this child to reach that grade level ? 32% very conf ident 39 somewhat confident 28 not too confident 1 not at all confident (volunteered) – don’t know [d1–d4c and d 4g–d16: demographic questions]" } ["___content":protected]=> string(104) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(113) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-higher-education-november-2011/s_1111mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8814) ["ID"]=> int(8814) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:41:06" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4176) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(9) "S 1111MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(9) "s_1111mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(13) "S_1111MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "799073" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(93681) "CONTENTS About the Survey 2 P ress Release 3 C urrent Conditions and the Future 6 O verall Perceptions and Attitudes 1 6 Regional Map 2 4 Methodology 25 Questionnaire and Results 2 7 higher education november 2011 & P P I C S TAT E W I D E S U R V E Y Californians mark baldassare D ean bonner Sonja Petek Jui Shrestha in collaboration with The James Irvine Foundation November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 2 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Sur vey provides policymakers, the media, and the public with objective, advocacy-free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of California residents. Inaugurated in April 1998, this is the 121st PPIC Sta tewide Sur vey. In all, the sur veys have generated a database of responses from more than 256,000 Californians. Th e current sur vey, Californians and Higher Education, was conducted with funding from The James Ir vine Foundation. Its goal is to inform state policymakers, encourage discussion, and raise public awareness about Californians’ opinions on issues affecting the state’s public colleges and universities . It is the fifth annual PPIC Statewide Sur vey on higher education since 2007. California’s public higher education system includes three branches—the University of California (UC) system, the California State University (CSU) system, and the California Community College (CCC) system —and is the third largest area of state spending after K –12 education and health and human ser vices. T he system ser ves more than 3.5 million students, wit h more than 220,000 in the UC system , nearly 412,000 o n CSU campuses, and more than 2.9 million attending community colleges. P ublic higher education in California has sustained considerable reductions in state funding recently . Although all state budget areas ha ve undergone significant cuts over the past several years, higher education does not enjoy the same funding mandates and legal protections as other state ser vices such as K –12 education or prisons and corrections . And because higher education generates revenue through student fees, it is often an easier target for budget -cut ting than other programs. Consequently, the state’s public colleges and universities have b een forced to make d ifficult choices to make up for cuts , including increasing student fees signi ficantly and eliminating courses . At the same time, PPIC research shows that the state will face a severe shor tage of needed college-educated workers—approximately 1 million—by 2025 . This sur vey presents the responses of 2,503 adult residents throughout California, inter viewed in multiple languages by landline or cell phone. It includes findings on:  Approval ratings of the governor and legislature overall and on their handling of public colleges and universities ; opinions about current conditions in the higher education system ; ratings of the three higher education branches; concerns about measures being taken to deal with decreased state fundi ng; priorities for spending on higher education, preferences for raising revenues, and perceptions about the impor tance of the system to the state’s future.  Perceptions of higher education affordability, financial aid, student loan debt, preparedness, and access; attitudes about the impor tance and purpose of college, the impor tance of diversity, K –12 schools ’ role in preparing students for college, and the role of community colleges and two- year programs ; and parents’ educational hopes for their children.  Time trends, national comparisons, and variations in perceptions, attitudes, and preferences about higher education issues across the five major regions of the state (Central Valley, San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles County, Inland Empire, and Orange/San Diego Counties), among Asians, blacks, Latinos, and non- Hispanic whites, among parents, and across socioeconomic and political groups. This repor t may be downloaded free of charge from our website ( www.ppic.org). For questions about the sur vey, please contact sur vey@ppic.org . Tr y our PPIC Statewide Sur vey interactive tools online at http://www.ppic.org/main/sur vAdvancedSearch.asp. November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 3 PPIC Statewide Survey CONTACT Linda Strean 415-291-4412 Andrew Hattori 415- 291-4417 NEWS RELEASE EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PST on Wednesday , November 16, 2011. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: http://www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND HIGHER EDUCATION Amid Concerns About Budget Cuts, Most Say Higher Education System Heading in Wrong Direction BUT HALF BALK AT HIGHER TAXES, MOST O PPOSE HIGHER STUDENT FEES SAN FRANCISCO , November 16, 2011— Most Californians say the state’s public higher education system is headed in the wrong direction, according to a statewide survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), with funding fro m The James Irvine Foundation . With the possibility of more cuts to the state’s public colleges and universities looming, most residents say affordability and the state budget situation —rather than educational quality— are big problems. Just 28 percent of Californians say the public higher education system is headed in the right direction, while 62 percent see it headed in the wrong direction —a view shared across political parties and regions of the state. Only 24 percent say overall educational quality is a big problem , but 61 percent say overall affordabi lity of education for students is a big problem and an even greater 69 percent say the overall state budget situati on is a big problem . Californians (74%) say there is not enough s tate funding for higher education, a view held by majorities across parties (82% Democrats, 71% independents, 58% Republicans). A solid majority (65%) say that public colleges and universities have been affected a lot by budget cuts. Californians are much more critical of the way Governor Jerry Brown is handling higher education than they are of his overall performance. His overall job approval rating among likely voters is 47 percent (38% disapprove, 15% don’t know) —close to its highest point (48% July) since he took office. But just 29 percent of likely voters approve of his handling of public higher education (53% disapprove, 18% don’t know). The legislature fares poorly in both areas among likely voters , with a 17 percent overall job approval rating (70% disapprove, 13% don’t know) and a 14 percent approval rating on handling higher education (71% disapprove, 15% don’t know) . “Most Californians say budget cuts have hurt public colleges and universities a lot,” says Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. “Their concerns about where the system is headed are reflected in the low grades they give their leaders for handling higher education.” Californians place an increasingly high priority on state spending for public colleges and un iversities. Most consider it a high (29%) or very high (41%) priority. The percentage of residents who consider spending in this area a very high priority has increased 15 points since 2008 (26% 2008, 41% today). And in the context of the state budget, mos t Californians (59%) favor more state spending on public colleges and universities even if this means less money for other state programs. Most (63%) say the quality of education will suffer if the state makes more cuts . Most Democrats (74%) and independents (60%) have this view, while Republicans are divided (48% quality will suffer, 47% quality could be maintained). PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 4 LESS THAN HALF WOULD PAY HIGHER TAXES TO MAINTAIN FUNDING Despite Californians’ worries about the fiscal situation in higher education, 52 p ercent of residents are unwilling to pay higher taxes to maintain current funding, while 45 percent would do so. Likely voters are divided (49% yes, 49% no). Most Democrats (63%) would pay higher taxes, while most independents (55%) and Republicans (71%) would not. When it comes to other ideas for raising revenues, adults (69%) and likely voters (65%) are opposed to increasing student fees to maintain current funding. Opposition to higher fees has increased since last year, by 7 points among all adults and 5 points among likely voters. About half of Californians (52%) favor admitting more out -of -state students —who pay higher tuition —to maintain current funding. But that support drops to 20 percent if it would mean admitting fewer students from California. One idea that does garner support: a hypothetical statewide bond measure to pay for construction projects in the state’s higher education system ( adults: 58% yes, 34% no; likely voters: 52% yes, 41% no). Such a measure would require a simple majority vote to pass. RATINGS FOR THREE BRANCHES ARE POSITIVE —BUT LOWER Residents give good or excellent marks to each branch of the state’s higher education system: California Community College s (62% ), California State University ( 56%), and the University of California (59% ). But ratings have declined since 2007 for both CSU (down 1 0%) and UC (down 8 points), while ratings for community colleges have been similar over time . Majorities of parents whose children attend public colleges and universities give the system excellent or good ratings: community colleges (67%), CSU (59%), and UC ( 62%). Despite these positive ratings, few Californians (4%) see the state system as the best when asked to compare it to that of other states . Less than half of residents (47%) conside r the California system above average or better (16% one of the best, 27% above average, 31% average, 15% below average). Less than half of parents with children 18 or younger (48%) and parents of children now attending a public college or university (48%) say the system is above average or better. Half of alumni (50%) hold this view. Current students are more favorable: 58 percent say the system is above average or better. MOST SAY AID IS AVAI LABLE—BUT STUDENTS MUST BORROW TOO MUCH When asked about some of the specific ways that the higher education system has dealt with decreased funding, 65 percent of residents are very concerned about increasing tuition and fees. Over half (55%) are very concerned about colleges and universities offering fewer classes o r admitting fewer students (53%). Parents of children in the system are even more concerned about higher tuition and fees (77%), as are current students (70%). Reflecting concerns about affordability, a strong majority of Californians (70%) say the price of college keeps qualified and motivated students from attending. There is widespread agreement on this question among Californians across parties, regions, and demographic groups. Nevertheless, many residents (55%) say loans and financial aid are available to those who need it, while 40 percent disagree. Those with incomes under $40,000 (63%) and those without any college education (65%) are much more likely to say that financial help is available than those at higher income and education levels. Latinos (67%) and Asians (61%) are more likely than blacks (44%) and whites (48%) to say that financial aid is availabl e. Among current students at public colleges and universities, 47 percent agree and 50 percent disagree that there is financial help for those wh o need it. A strong majority (75%) say students have to borrow too much money to pay for college. Across parties, regions, and demographic groups, adults concur. Middle -income (81%) and upper -income (80%) residents are much more likely than those with lower incomes (68%) to feel that students must borrow too much. PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 5 College graduates (80%) and those with some college education (83%) are much more likely than those with no college experience (65%) to agree. LESS THAN HALF SAY T WO-YEAR DEGREE OR TECHN ICAL TRAINING HELPS A LOT What value do Californians put on a college education? Most (58%) say it is necessary for success in today’s work world, while 39 percent believe there are many ways to succeed without it. However, the percentage saying college is necessary has reached a low point since PPIC first began asking the question in 2007 (64% 2007, 68% 2008, 66% 2009, 63% 2010 , 58% today). Latinos are the ethnic or racial group most likely to say that success depends on a college education (Latinos 73%, Asians 63%, blacks 53%, whites 46%). Nearly all residents (96%) say career technical or vocational education in community colleges is at least somewhat important. But Californians do not necessarily see it as the key to success. Less than half (45%) say a two- year community college degree or technical training helps a lot in achieving success in the work world, and 42 percent say it helps some (9% does not help too much, 2% does not help at all). Parents of children age 18 or younger express high hopes for their children’s educational attainment. When asked the highest grade they hope their youngest child will achieve, 45 percent of these parents say a graduate degree and 38 percent say a degree from a four -year college. Just 10 percent choose a two -year college degree or technical training, and 3 percent say high school or less. When it comes to having the resources and information needed for their child to reach this goal, most are very confident (32%) or somewhat confident (39%) that they do. But the share of parents who say they are very confident has declined significantly (56% April 2005, 32% today). Half of parents (52%) are very wor ried about being able to afford a college education for their youngest child . Concern is far higher among Latino parents (66% very worried) than whites (37% very worried). Looking at the value of higher education more broadly, nearly all Californians say t he state’s higher education system is very important (73%) or somewhat important (23%) to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. A plurality (49%) recognize that California faces a shortage of college- educated residents needed for the jobs of the future. But just 10 percent say they have a great deal of confidence in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of public higher education (37% only some confidence, 34% ver y little confidence, 16% none). MORE KEY FINDINGS  P lurality say purpose of a college educa tion is to gain specific skills—page s 17, 21 -22 Californians are more likely to say that the purpose of college is gaining skills and knowledge for the workplace (46%) than to say that it is personal and intellectual growth (35%). The purpose of community college? Thirty -five percent say it is preparing students to transfer to four -year colleges, while 29 percent say it is career technical or vocational education.  Majority say most students unprepared ac ademically—pages 19, 2 1 Just 23 percent say most students are prepared to do college -level work , while 69 percent say most students require remediation. Most (86%) say it is very important for K –12 schools to prepare students for colleges, but only 44 percent say schools are doing a good or excellent job of doing so.  Support for racial , economic diversity on campus —page 20 Three -fourths of residents say a racially diverse student body is very important (53%) or somewhat important (22%). Their views on t he importance of an economically diverse student population are similar (54% very impo rtant, 27% somewhat important). November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 6 CURRENT CONDITIONS AND THE FUTURE KEY FINDINGS  Californians are much more critical of the way Governor Brown is handling the state’s public college and university system than they are of the way he is handling his job as governor . T he legislature re ceives poor marks on both counts . (page 7 )  Six in 10 Californians say the state’s public higher education system is headed in the wrong direction . M ost do not consider educational quality to be a big problem, but they do think affordability and the state budget s ituation are. (page s 8, 9 )  M ajorities give excellent or good ratings to the C alifornia Community Colleges (62%), California State University (56%), and University of California (59 %), although the ratings have declined over time. (page 10 )  Three in four residents say state funding for higher education is not enough and two in three say public colleges and universities have been affected a lot by budget cuts. They are very concerned about schools increasing fees, offering fewer co urses, and re ducing admissions. (page s 11 , 12 )  Californians are increasingly likely to place a very hi gh priority on state spending for higher education. A majority say the state should spend more in this area even if it mean s less for other programs. (page 13)  Still, half of Californians would not pay higher taxes to benefit higher education and m ajorities oppose increasing student fees. A majority (5 8%) would support a state bond measure to pay for higher education construction projects. (page 14)  A plurality of residents anticipate a shortage of college -educated workers in the state’s future . J ust under half trust the state government to plan accordingly. (page 15) 47 29 38 53 0 20 40 60 80 Handling hisjob overallHandling publiccollege anduniversity system Percent likely voters Approve Disapprove Approval Ratings of Governor Brown 666667625659 0 20 40 60 80 100 CaliforniaCommunityColleges California StateUniversityUniversityof California Percent all adults 2007 2011 Ratings of the Three Branches of Higher Education % saying excellentor good 26263641 2833 3229 0 20 40 60 80 100 2008200920102011 Percent all adults High priority Very high priority Priority for State Spending on Higher Education PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 7 APPROVAL RATINGS OF STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS Governor Brown, who releas ed his public pension reform plan just days after we began interviewing, has the approval of 44 percent of Californians, while 30 percent disapprove, and 26 percent are unsure how to rate the governor. Brown’s overall approval ratings in earlier PPIC Statewide Surveys include: 41 percent in January, 34 percent in February, 34 percent in March, 40 percent in April, 42 percent in May, 42 percent in July, and 41 percent in September. Today, j ust under half of likely voters (47%) approve and 38 percent dis approve. Most Democrats (64%) approve of Governor Brown, while most Republicans (56%) disapprove and independents are divided (36% approve, 37% disapprove, 26% don’t know). Across regions, approval of the governor surpasses 50 percent only in the San Francisco Bay Area (53%). Findings are reversed when it comes to Governor Brown’s handling of California’s public college and university system —31 percent approve, 44 percent disapprove, and 25 percent don’t know. Among likely voters, 53 percent disapprove whil e just 29 percent approve. Democrats, Republicans, and independents are more likely to disapprove than approve of his handling of higher education, with Republicans (60%) the most disapproving. Residents in the Inland Empire (51%) and Orange/San Diego Counties (49%) are the most likely— and those in the Central Valley (38%) the least likely —to disapprove. “O verall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling…” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind His job as governor of California? Approve 44% 64% 24% 36% 47% Disapprove 30 19 56 37 38 Don't know 26 16 20 26 15 California’s public college and university system? Approve 31 36 21 27 29 Disapprove 44 41 60 54 53 Don't know 25 23 19 20 18 One in four Californians (25%) approve of the California Legislature ; 55 percent disapprove. Likely voters are even more disapproving (17% approve, 70% disapprove). Approval has rebounded from record low s in March and November 2010 (14%), but has been below 30 percent since April 2008. Most Republicans (75%), independents (66%) , and Democrats (59% ) disapprove, as do at least half across regions . Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (69%) are most disapproving (59% blacks, 49% Asians, 37% Latinos). Californians hold similar opinions of the legislature for its handling of the state’s public college and university system (21% approve, 59% disapprove), with likely voters once again more disapproving (14% approve, 71% disapprove). Solid majorities across parties disapprove, as do majorities across regions. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling…” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Its job? Approve 25% 26% 11% 16% 17% Disapprove 55 59 75 66 70 Don't know 19 15 14 18 13 California’s public college and university system? Approve 21 20 11 12 14 Disapprove 59 64 72 69 71 Don't know 20 16 17 19 15 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 8 OVERALL OUTLOOK When it comes to the direction of the public higher education system in California today, most Californians say it is heading in the wrong direction (62%), while 28 percent say it is heading in the right direction. Six in 10 or more across regions say the system is heading in the wrong direction , with resid ents in the San Francisco Bay Area most negative (68% wrong direction). More than seven in 10 across parties hold this view (71% Democrats, 73% independents, 75% Republicans). Solid majorities of Asians (60%), blacks (61%), and whites (74%) say the system is heading in the wrong direction, while Latinos are divided (42% right direction, 48% wrong direction). More than seven in 10 of those with at least some college education say the state’s higher education system is heading in the wrong direction compared to far fewer of those with a high school education or less (48%). Women (67%) are more likely than men (58%) to say wrong direction. Six in 10 California parents of children 18 or younger say the system is heading in the wrong direction and parents with ch ildren currently attending a California public college or university are even more pessimistic (69% wrong direction). The perception that the higher education system is heading in the wrong direction is even higher among current students (73%) and alumni ( 76%) of California public colleges and universities. “Thinking about the public higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction?” All Adults Education Parents of Children 18 or Younger High School or Less Some College College Graduate Right direction 28% 40% 19% 17% 33% Wrong direction 62 48 71 76 60 Don’t know 10 12 10 7 7 When asked to think about California’s higher education system compared to other states, just one in five say it is among the best in the country (4% best, 16% one of the best). Another 27 percent think it is above average, 31 percent consider it average, and 15 percent below average. Likely voters hold similar opinions. Likely voters hold similar opinions. Democrats (54%) are more likely than independents (47%) or Republicans (42%) to say the system is at least above average. Across regions, only in the Sa n Francisco Bay Area does the perception that the system is at least above average garner a majority (56%). Just under half of parents of children 18 or younger (48%) or parents with children currently attending a California public college or university (4 8%) say the system is at least above average. The perception that the higher education system is at least above average is higher among its current students (58%), while half of alumni (50%) hold this view. “Compared with other states, how would you rate the quality of the public higher education system in California today? Do you think it is the best in the country, one of the best in the country, above average, average, or below average?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind The best in the country 4% 4% 3% 3% 4% One of the best in the country 16 20 15 15 18 Above average 27 30 24 29 29 Average 31 27 29 31 27 Below average 15 13 23 16 17 Don’t know 6 6 7 5 5 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 9 PROBLEM SERIOUSNESS With the possibility of more cuts to California’s higher education system looming, most Californians continue to call the overall affordability of education for students and the overall state budget situation big problems —but far fewer say so about the overall quality of education. Seven in 10 Californians (69%) say that the state budget situation is a big problem (down 5 points from 2010 and similar to 2009). Sixty -one percent of Californians call the overall affordability of education for students a big problem. Findings about affordability today are similar to 2010 (60%) and 2009 (57%), but higher than in 2008 (52%) and 2007 (53%). Twenty -four percent of Californians say the quality of education is a big problem, up slightly since 2007 (18% 2007, 18% 2008, 21% 2009, 22% 2010, 24% today). “I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s higher education system today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem. How about…” The overall state budget situation? The overall affordability of education for students? The overall quality of education? Big problem 69% 61% 24% Somewhat of a problem 17 25 36 Not much of a problem 8 11 34 Don’t know 5 4 6 More than s even in 10 across parties and at least two in three across regions think the state budget situation is a big problem for higher education. Whites (81%) and blacks (79%) are much more likely than Asians (64%) and far more likely than Latinos (54%) to hold t his view. Those with at least some college or who live in a household making at least $40,000 annually are more likely than others to hold this view. The affordability of higher education is viewed as a big problem by more than six in 10 across parties, an d majorities across regions agree. Differences emerge across racial /ethnic groups , with blacks (67%) and whites (66%) the most likely to say big problem followed by Latinos (56%) and Asians (50%). Majorities across income groups consi der affordability a big problem, as do six in 10 parents of children 18 or younger and two in three parents of children now attending a California public college or university. When it comes to the overall quality of education, fewer than three in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups say this is a big problem, but some differences do emerge. Asians (18%) are the least likely racial/ethnic group to say big problem , while more educated and affluent Californians are less likely than others to hold this view. One in four parents of children currently attending a California public college or university and students currently attending one of these branches say quality is a big problem. Percent saying big problem Overall state budget situation Overall affordability Overall quality All Adults 69% 61% 24% Likely Voters 78 65 24 Parents of Children 18 or Younger 65 59 24 Race/Ethnicity Asians 64 50 18 Blacks 79 67 29 Latinos 54 56 26 Whites 81 66 23 Household Income Under $40,000 60 59 26 $40,000 to under $80,000 77 66 26 $80,000 or more 80 61 18 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 10 RATINGS OF THE THREE BRANCHES Californians give positive ratings to each branch of California’s higher education system: California Community College s (10% excellent, 52% good), California State University (6% excellent, 50% good), U niversity of C alifornia (11% excellent, 48% good). Since 2007, there has been a slow drop in positive ratings of the CSU system (down 10 points) and UC system (down 8 points ), while ratings of the CCC system have been similar over time . “As you may know, California’s higher education system has three branches—the California Community College system, the California State University system, and the University of California system. Overall, is the … d oing an excellent, good, not-so -good, or poor job?” California Community College system California State University system University of California system Excellent 10% 6% 11% Good 52 50 48 Not -so -good 21 25 23 Poor 8 6 6 Don’t know 9 13 12 Solid majorities of Californians (62%) and parents of children attending a California public college or university (67 %) consider the CCC system to be excellent or good, as do more than six in 10 across parties. Residents in the Inland Empire (68%), Orange/San Diego Counties (6 4%), and the Central Valley (63%) are more likely than adults elsewhere to hold positive views. Whites (66 %) are the most likely racial/ethnic group to give positive ratings (58 % Asians, 59% Latinos, 52% blacks). Majorities of adults (56%) , voters across parties, and parents of children attending a California public college or university (59%) give excellent or good ratings to the CSU system. Orange/San Diego residents (62%) are the most likely —and San Francisco Bay Area residents (51%) the least likely —to give positive ratings. Findings are similar across racial/ethnic groups and positive ratings rise with increasing income. Majorities of Californians (59 %) and parents of children attending a California public college or university (6 2%) rate the University of California system as excellent or good. Democrats (66%) are more positive than independents (58%) and Republicans (55%). Majorities across regions and racial/ethnic groups give positive ratings , wit h residents of Los Angeles (62%) and Asians (69%) most likely to do so. Percent saying excellent or good California Community College system California State University system University of California system All Adults 62% 56% 59% Likely Voters 66 59 59 Parents of Children Attending California Public College or University 67 59 62 Race/Ethnicity Asians 58 57 69 Blacks 52 56 52 Latinos 59 53 56 Whites 66 58 58 Region Central Valley 63 54 58 San Francisco Bay Area 59 51 54 Los Angeles 57 58 62 Orange/San Diego 64 62 59 Inland Empire 68 59 58 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 11 LEVEL OF STATE FUNDING When it comes to the level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities, Californians continue to say state funding is not enough. Today, 74 percent of Californians say funding is not enough, while far fewer say it is more than enough (7%) or just enough (14%). The view that there is not enough funding was the same last year (74%), but was much lower in 2007 (57% not enough, 28% just enough). Today, Democrats (82%) are the most likely to say there is not enough funding , followed by independents (71%) and Republicans (58%). More than two in three across regions and demographic groups think there is not enough funding, but some differences do emerge. Inland Empire (79%) and San Francisco Bay Area residents (78%) are the mo st likely—and Central Valley residents (67%) are the least likely —to say that state funding is not enough. Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (85%) are the most likely to say that there is not enough funding , followed by Latinos (78%), Asians (74%), and w hites (69%). Among those who are currently students in one of California’s public colleges or universities, most (84%) say that funding is not enough. Most parents of children 18 or younger (79%) and those with children currently attending a California col lege (72%) also say that funding is not enough. “D o you think the current level of state funding f or California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 7% 3% 18% 11% 12% Just enough 14 12 18 14 14 Not enough 74 82 58 71 71 Don’t know 5 2 6 4 4 Solid majorities of Californians (65%) and likely voters (68%) say that the state’s public colleges and universities have been affected a lot by recent state budget cuts. Democrats (77%) are far more likely than Republicans or independents (56% each) to say so. Residents in the Inland Empire (71%) and Los Angeles (69%) are the most likely to say colleges and universities have been affected a lot , followed by those in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%), Orange/San Diego Counties (61%), and the Central Valley ( 59%). More than 60 percent of men, women, and all age, education, and income groups say that colleges and universities have been affected a lot . Among those who are current students of California public colleges or universities, 77 percent say that schools have been affected a lot, while 70 percent of parents of current students hold this view. “Would you say the state’s public colleges and universities have or have not been affected by recent state budget cuts? (if they have: Have they been affected a lot or somewhat?)” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Affected a lot 65% 77% 56% 56% 68% Affected somewhat 25 17 33 34 24 Not affected 5 3 7 6 4 Don’t know 5 3 4 4 4 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 12 SPECIFIC CONCERNS ABOUT STATE BUDGET CUTS Californians are concerned about a number of ways that public colleges and universities have dealt with decreased funding, but they express the most concern about increasing tuition and fees for students. Two in three Californians are very concerned about increasing tuition (65%), compared to just over half who are very concerned about schools offering fewer college classes (55%) or about admitting fewer students (53%). The share very concerned about increasing tuition and fees and offering fewer classes has been similar since 2009. There has been a decrease since last year in the percentage who are very concerned about admitting fewer students (57% 2009, 62% 2010, 53% very concerned today). “There are a number of ways California’s public colleg es and universities have dealt with decreased funding. Please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concern ed about each of the following. How about… ” Increasing tuition and fees for students? Offering fewer college classes? Admitting fewer college students? Very concerned 65% 55% 53% Somewhat concerned 24 31 31 Not too concerned 5 7 8 Not at all concerned 5 5 6 Don’t know 1 1 2 Democrats (73%) are more likely than independents (62%) and Republicans (53%) to be very concerned about rising tuition and fees for students. More than six in 10 across regions and demographic groups are very concerned about increasing tuition. Among parents of current students at California public colleges or universities, 77 percent are very concerned, as are 70 percent of current students. When it comes to offering fewer college courses or admitting fewer college students, majorities of parents of children attending a California public college or university are very concerned about colleges offering fewer classes (64%) and about admitting fewer students (57%). Current students are more concerned about class offerings (71%) than student ad missions (58%). Blacks are the most likely to be very concerned about class offerings, while Latinos are most likely to be very concerned about student admissions. Central Valley residents are the least likely to be very concerned about either issue. Percent saying very concerned Increasing tuition and fees for students Offering fewer college classes Admitting fewer college students All Adults 65% 55% 53% Likely Voters 66 57 54 Parents of Children Attending California Public College or University 77 64 57 Race/Ethnicity Asians 66 53 53 Blacks 81 67 75 Latinos 68 62 53 Whites 62 51 50 Region Central Valley 61 47 49 San Francisco Bay Area 70 59 53 Los Angeles 65 59 52 Orange/San Diego 64 53 56 Inland Empire 61 51 53 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 13 STATE BUDGET CHOICES Seven in 10 Californian s place a high (29%) or very high (41%) priority on state spending for higher education. The percentage who consider spending in this area to be a very high priority has risen 15 points since 2008 (26% 2008, 26% 2009, 36% 201 0, 41% today). Although majorities across parties say spending on higher education is a high or very high priority, Democrats (50%) are the most likely to say this should be a very high priority for the state (36% independents, 31% Republicans). Reflecting the importance they place on higher education, most Californians (59%) and likely voters (57%) favor the state government spending more on public colleges and universities, even if it means less for other state programs. Support was similar last year (57% adults, 57% likely voters). Most Democrats (65%) favor spending more on higher education, while Republicans are divided (49% favor, 45% oppose). Independents are more likely to favor (52%) than oppose (39%) this idea. Asians (70%) are more likel y than Latinos (60%), whites (56%), and blacks (54%) to favor increased spending even at the expense of other programs. Among parents of children attending a California publ ic college or university, 67 percent favor this idea. Among students now attending one of these schools, 71 percent express support. “Do you favor or oppose the state government spending more money on public colleges and universities, even if it means less money for other state programs?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 59% 65% 49% 52% 57% Oppose 33 27 45 39 35 Don’t know 8 8 6 9 8 If the state government makes budget cuts in higher education (which could happen again as soon as January), most Californians (63%) say the quality of education will suffer. Far fewer (32%) say the state could make cuts and still maintain a high quality of education. Results were similar last year (66 % quality will suffer, 29% quality could be maintained). Solid majorities of Democrats (74%) and independents (60%) say quality will suffer under budget cuts, while Republicans are divided (48% quality will suffer, 47% quality could be maintained). Majorities across regions and racial/ethnic and other demographic groups believe educational quality will suffer if more cuts are made. This concern is especially pronounced among students currently attending one of the state’s public colleges or universities (76%). “Which comes closer to your view? If the state government makes budget cuts in higher education, the quality of education will suffer, or the state government could make budget cuts in higher education and st ill maintain a high quality of education.” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Quality will suffer 63% 74% 48% 60% 62% Quality could be maintained 32 23 47 35 34 Don’t know 5 2 5 4 4 To improve educational quality significantly , most Californians (50%) say the amount of state funding needs to be increased and that existing funds need to be used more wisely. Thirty-four percent say just using funds more wisely would improve quality, while only 12 percent say increasing funding alone is the key. Results were similar last year. This issue continues to divide voters along party lines: Democrats (63%) say both things are needed; Republicans (58%) say existing funds need to be used more wisel y. PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 14 RAISING REVENUES Although most Californians express deep concerns about the fiscal situation of the higher education system, half say they are unwilling to pay higher taxes to maintain current funding for public colleges and universities . Meanwhile, there is widespread opposition to increasing student fees for this purpose. Fifty -two percent of Californians would not pay higher taxes to maintain current funding levels for higher education; 45 percent would. Likely voters are divided (49% yes, 49% no). Last year, Californians and likely voters were evenly divided (49% yes, 49% no); in 2009, adults (41% yes, 56% no) and likely voters (43% yes, 54% no) were more likely to oppose than favor the idea. Most Democrats (63%) would pay higher taxes; most Republicans (71%) would not. Independents are opposed (41% yes, 55% no). Strong majorities of Californians (69%) and likely voters (65%) oppose increasing student fees to maintai n current funding for public colleges and universities. Each branch of the higher education system has significantly increased student fees over the past several years. Opposition has increased 7 points among all adults since last year (from 62% to 69%) an d 5 points among likely voters (from 60% to 65%). At least six in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups oppose increasing student fees. “W hat if the state said it needed more money just to maintain current funding for public colleges and universities. Would you be willing to…” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Pay higher taxes for this purpose, or not? Yes 45% 63% 29% 41% 49% No 52 35 71 55 49 Don't know 3 2 1 4 2 Increase student fees for this purpose, or not? Yes 28 29 38 28 32 No 69 68 60 69 65 Don't know 3 2 2 3 3 To maintain current funding for higher education, Californians favor admitting more out-of -state students who pay higher tuition, but support declines if that would mean fewer California admissions (20% yes, even if fewer in -state students, 32% yes, but not if fewer in -state students, 42% no). Support for out -of - state admissions at the expense of California admissions has declined slightly (26% 2010, 20% today). One idea that generates majority support among Californians is a hypothetical bond measure to pay for construction projects in the state’s higher education system. Fifty- eight percent of all adults would vote yes and 34 percent would vote no. Among likely voters, 52 perce nt would vote yes and 41 percent no. This type of statewide bond would require a simple majority vote to pass. Support for a hypothetical bond measure among all adults was higher in 2007 (64%), but slightly lower in 2009 (53%). This idea divides voters alo ng party lines (68% of Democrats would vote yes and 55% of Republicans would vote no) and independents are about evenly split (47% yes, 45% no). “If there was a bond measure on the state ballot in 2012 to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Yes 58% 68% 39% 47% 52% No 34 25 55 45 41 Don’t know 8 8 6 8 7 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 15 PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE Nearly all Californians say that the state’s higher education system is very (73%) or somewhat (23%) important to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years. Results have been similar since this question was first asked in 2007. More than six in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups say the higher education system is very important to the state’s future. Democrats , at 82 percent , are the most likely party group to express this view (70% independents, 64% Republicans). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (84%) and Latinos (80%) are more likely than whites (70%) and Asians (64%) to say the system is very important to the state’s future. Across education groups, those with college degrees are the most likely to consider the system very important. A plurality of Cal ifornians (49%) also recognize that the state will face a shortage of college -educated residents needed for the jobs of the future. About one in three think the state will have just enough college -educated workers and 13 percent think it will have more than enough. PPIC research has shown that the state will have a shortage of 1 million college -educated workers by 2025. The percentage who say the state will face a shortage is down 7 points from last year (56% 2010, 49% today), but is similar to 2009 (49%), 2008 (47%), and 2007 (52%). Across parties, majorities of Democrats (59%) and independents (55%) anticipate a shortage of college- educated workers, compared to 41 percent of Republicans. Across regions and demographic groups, pluralities say there will not be enough. “In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have more than enough, not enough, or just enough college-educated residents needed for the jobs and skills likely to be in demand?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 13% 8% 20% 10% 11% Just enough 32 28 33 30 30 Not enough 49 59 41 55 53 Don’t know 6 5 6 5 7 Just under half of Californians (47%) express at least some confidence in the state government to plan for the future of higher education: 10 percent have a great deal of confidence and 37 percent only some. The other half of Californians have very little (34%) or no confidence (16%) in the state government to plan. Confidence was much higher when we first asked this question in 2007 (57%), but had dropped significantly by 2010 (52% 2008, 41% 2009, 40% 2010). Today, confidence has inched back up to 47 perce nt. Among those who believe the state will face a shortage of college- educated workers, 58 percent have very little or no confidence in the state to plan accordingly. Across parties, Democrats (56%) are much more likely to express confidence than independents (39%) or Republicans (38%) . “How much confidence do you have in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of California’s higher education system— a great deal, only some, very little, or none?” All Adults Party Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind A great deal 10% 9% 6% 7% 6% Only some 37 47 32 32 37 Very little 34 32 37 36 35 None 16 10 26 24 21 Don’t know 2 2 – – 1 November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 16 OVERALL PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES KEY FINDINGS  A majority of Californians say that a college education is necessary for success in today’s work world; Latinos are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to say this. ( page 17 )  Solid majorities of Californians —including those across racial/ethnic, income, and education groups —agree that the price of college limits access and that students have to borrow too much to pay for college . ( page 18 )  Seven in 10 Californians say that many qualified people lack the opportunity to go to college. The share of residents holding this view declines with rising income and education levels. (page 19 )  Although 86 percent of Californians consider it very important for the state’s K –12 public schools to prepare students for college, only 44 percent say the y are doing an excellent or good job of it . (page 21)  Seven in 10 Californians say it is very important for community colleges to include career technical or vocational education , but less than half say a two- year degree can greatly help a person to be successful in the work world. (page 22)  Most parents would like their children to obtain a four -year or postgraduate degree; however, many are worried about being able to pay for that education, with concern especially high among Latino parents and lower -income parents. (page 23) 7973 55 0 20 40 60 80 100 Under$40,000$40,000 to$80,000$80,000or more Percent all adults Percent Who Say Many Qualified People Lack the Opportunity to Attend College 29 39 55 43 0 20 40 60 80 AsiansBlacksLatinosWhites Percent all adults HowMuch a Two-Year Degree Helps a Person Be Successful % saying a lot 310 38 45 3 High school or less Two-year degree/technical training Four-year degree Postgraduate degree Don't know Parents' Educational Hopes for Their Children Percent parents PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 17 IMPORTANCE AND PURPOSE OF COLLEGE Most Californians (58%) b elieve that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world , while 39 percent believe there are many ways to succeed without a college education. Since we first ask ed this question in 2007, the percentage saying college is necessary has hit a low point (64% 2007, 68% 2008, 66% 2009, 63% 2010, 58% today). There are considerable differences across demographic groups about the perceived necessity of college. Nearly three in four Latinos (73%) say success depends on a college education, compared to fewer Asians (63%) , blacks (53%), and whites (46%). Women are much more likely than men (64% to 52%) to consider college a necessity. Los Angeles (63%), San Francisco Bay Area (62%), and Inland Empire (61%) residents are more likely than those in the Central Valley (53%) and Orange/San Diego Counties (51%) to express this view. Two in three parents (65%) view college as a necessity. “Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites College is necessary 58% 63 % 53% 73% 46% 65 % Many ways to succeed 39 34 47 25 50 32 Don’t know 3 3 – 1 4 3 Californians offer mixed opinions about the purpose of college. A plurality (46%) say that the main purpose of college is to teach specific skills and knowledge that can be used in the workplace, while 35 percent say the main purpose should be to help an i ndividual grow personally and intellectually. Another 18 percent volunteer that the main purpose of college is both of these goals. This question was asked in a nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center in March. Results were similar among adults nationwide (39% personal/intellectual growth, 47% skills/knowledge, 12% both). Across most regions and demographic groups, greater shares choose skills and knowledge for the workplace over personal and intellectual growth. There are some exceptions , however. College graduates are somewhat more likely to value personal and intellectual growth over specific skills and knowledge for the workplace (43% to 37%). A plurality of Asians (48%) choose personal and intellectual growth, while pluralities in other racial/ethnic groups (49% blacks, 48% whites, 45% Latinos) choose skills and knowledge that can be applied in the workplace. Those age d 18 to 34 are more divided between the two goals but residents who are older believe it is more important to learn skil ls for the workplace. Those with incomes of $80,000 or more are divided about evenly between these goals , while those with lower incomes name workforce skills. “W hich comes closer to your view, even if neither is exactly right? The main purpose of college should be to help an individual grow personally and intellectually , or to teach specific skills and knowledge that can be used in the workplace.” All Adults Education Parents of Children 18 or Younger High school or less Some college College graduate Personal, intellectual growth 35% 32 % 33% 43% 34 % Specific skills, knowledge 46 53 44 37 46 Both equally (volunteered) 18 14 22 19 17 Don’t know 1 2 1 1 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 18 HIGHER EDUCATION AFFORDABILITY Reflecting their belief that affordability is a big problem, a strong majority of Californians (70%) say that the price of college keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so; 27 percent disagree. Since 2007, at least two in three Californians have said that the pr ice is a barrier to entry (66% 2007, 69% 2009, 73% 2010, 70% today). There is widespread agreement among Californians , with more than six in 10 across parties, regions, and demographic groups saying the price of college is keeping qualified students out. R epublicans (61%) are less likely than independents (74%) and Democrats (75%) to express this view, as are Latinos (64%) compared with other racial/ethnic groups (72% whites, 75% Asians, 79% blacks). “P lease say if you agree or disagree with the following statements. The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so.” All Adults Household Income Parents of Children 18 or Younger Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Agree 70% 70 % 73 % 69 % 68 % Disagree 27 28 25 30 30 Don’t know 2 2 2 2 2 Although most Californians perceive the price of college as a barrier to attendance, many (55%) believe that loans and financial aid are available to those who need it; 40 percent disagree. Results have been similar since this question was first asked in 2008. Democrats are somewhat more likely to disagree (50%) than agree (44 %) that loans and financial aid are available to those who need help. Most Republicans (57%) and independen ts (51%) think financial help is available. Nearly two in three of those with incomes under $40,000 (63%) and those without any college education (65%) say financial help is available , compared to about half of other groups ( 49 % $ 40,000 or more, 47 % some college, and 49 % college graduates ). Latinos (6 7%) and Asians (61%) are much more likely than whites (48%) and blacks (44%) to agree that financial help is available. Among current students, 47 percent agree and 50 percent disagree that there is financial help for those who need it. Many Californians may believe that loans and financial aid are there for those who need it, but a strong majority (75%) also believe that students have to borrow too much money to pay for their college education; 23 percent disag ree. Findings have been nearly identical each year since 2007. Majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups believe students have to borrow too much to go to college, but there are some interesting differences. For example, middle - (81%) and upper -income (80%) residents are much more likely than lower -income residents (68%) to think students have to borrow too much. College graduates (80%) and those with some college education (83%) are much more likely than those without any college education (65%) to hold this view. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (57%) are the least likely to consider this a problem (82% Asians, 83% whites, 90% blacks). “P lease say if you agree or disagree with the following statements. Students have to borrow too much money to pay for their college education.” All Adults Household Income Parents of Children 18 or Younger Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Agree 75% 68 % 81 % 80 % 71 % Disagree 23 30 17 17 27 Don’t know 3 2 2 3 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 19 STUDENT PREPAREDNESS AND ACCESS Underscoring their views of affordability as a barrier to entry, seven in 10 Californians (70%) say that many qualified people do not have the opportunity to go to college; one in four (26%) say the vast majority of those wh o are qualified and motivated have the opportunity to go. Since 2007, strong majorities have expressed the view that many qualified people lack the opportunity to go to college (65% 2007, 68% 2008 and 2009, 71% 2010, 70% today). Majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups say that there are qualified candidates who have no access to college , but there are some key differences. Those who are not college graduates (77% high school or less, 73% some college) are much more likely than college g raduates (56%) to say there is an access problem. Along similar lines, more than seven in 10 of those with incomes under $40,000 (79%) or between $40,000 and $80,000 (73%) hold this view , compared to 55 percent of those making $80,000 or more. Democrats (75%) are much more likely than independents (62%) and Republicans (60%) to consider access a problem for qualified potential applicants. Across regions, San Francisco Bay Area residents (64%) are the least likely to hold this view (69% Orange/San Diego Counties, 72% Los Angeles, 73% Inland Empire, 74% Central Valley). And across racial/ethnic groups, whites (61%) are the least likely to say that many qualified people lack the opportunity to go to college (68% Asians, 76% blacks, 82% Latinos). Among those who view college as necessary for success in the workplace, 74 percent believe many qualified people lack the opportunity to attend. “Do you think that currently, the vast majority of people who are qualified to go to college have the opportunity to do so, or do you think there are many people who are qualified to go but don’t have the opportunity to do so? ” All Adults Education Parents of Children 18 or Younger High School or Less Some College College Graduate Majority have the opportunity 26% 20 % 24 % 39 % 24 % Many don’t have the opportunity 70 77 73 56 72 Don’t know 4 3 4 5 3 Californians believe there are many qualified people who do not get the chance to go to college, but they also think that many of those who do enter college are unprepared. Just 23 percent say that most students are prepared for college -level work when they enter college, while 69 percent say that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college. Seven in 10 voters across parties believe many students need remedial help. Across regions, Inland Empire residents (81%) are the most likely to hold this view, followed by those in the San Francisco Bay Area (73%), Orange/San Diego Counties (69%) , Los Angeles (66%), and the Central Valley (65%). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (84%) are much more likely than Latinos (70%), whites (69%), and Asians (57%) to say many students need remedia tion. Among those currently attending a California public college or university, 75 percent think many students require basic skills and remedial education. “Do you think that most students are prepared for college-level work when they enter college, or do you think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Most are prepared 23% 32% 13% 23% 23% 23% Many require remediation 69 57 84 70 69 69 Don’t know 8 11 3 8 8 8 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 20 IMPORTANCE OF STUDENT DIVERSITY Three in four Californians believe that it is very (53%) or somewhat important (22%) for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body, with one in four saying it is not too important (11%) or not at all important (13%). Results have been nearly identical in past years (55% very, 23% somewhat 2008; 54% very, 23% somewhat 2009; 54% very, 23% somewhat 2010). Californians’ views on economic diversity are similar. E ight in 10 say that it is very (54%) or somewhat important (27 %), while one in five say it is not too important (10%) or not at all important (9%). Findings have been similar each time we asked this question (57% very, 25% somewhat 2008; 54% very, 26% somewhat 2009; 57% very, 26% somewhat 2010). “How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have…” A racially diverse student body—that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minorities? An economically diverse student body—that is, a mix of students from lower-, middle-, and upper-income backgrounds? Very important 53% 54 % Somewhat important 22 27 Not too important 11 10 Not at all important 13 9 Don’t know 1 1 Half of likely voters (50%) and about six in 10 parents of children 18 or younger (58%) say that a racially diverse student body is very important . Blacks (83%) are by far the most likely racial/ethnic group to say that racial diversity is very important; a so lid majority of Latinos agree (63%) while fewer Asians (50%) and whites (44%) hold this view. The perception that racial diversity is very important declines with income. Democrats (67%) are far more likely than independents (45%) and Republicans (33%) to have this view. Just over half of current students, parents of current students, and residents across age groups consider this very important. About half of likely voters (52%) and 56 percent of parents of children 18 or younger say economic diversity is v ery important. An overwhelming majority of b lacks (80%) and six in 10 Latinos (60%) say economic diversity is very important , compared to fewer Asians (50%) and whites (48%) . Those earning $80,000 or more (47%) are less likely than others (59% under $40,00 0, 55% $40,000 to $80,000) to say an economically diverse student body is very important. Democrats (67%) are far more likely than independents (47%) and Republicans (39%) to hold this view. Six in 10 current higher education students (60%) say economic diversity is very important, compared to 49 percent of parents of current students . Percent saying very important A racially diverse student body An economically diverse student body All Adults 53% 54 % Likely Voters 50 52 Parents of Children 18 or Younger 58 56 Race/Ethnicity Asians 50 50 Blacks 83 80 Latinos 63 60 Whites 44 48 Household Income Under $40,000 61 59 $40,000 to under $80,000 52 55 $80,000 or more 44 47 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 21 ROLE OF K–12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS An overwhelming majority of adults (86%) say that it is ve ry important for California’s K–12 public schools to prepare students for college, while 11 percent say it is somewhat important and 2 percent not too important. In surveys on K –12 education, strong majorities held this view (81% Apr il 2007, 76% April 2009 ). Blacks (96%) and Latinos (94%) are more likely than whites (84%) and Asians (72%) to say so. “How important to y ou is it that California’s K –12 public schools prepare students for college ?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very important 86% 72 % 96% 94% 84% 9 0% Somewhat important 11 25 2 5 13 9 Not too important 2 3 2 1 2 1 Don’t know 1 1 – – 1 1 Californians consider college preparation very important, but 51 percent say the K –12 public schools are doing a not -so -good (33%) or poor job (18%) at this. Forty -four percent say excellent (8%) or good (36%) job. Parents hold a more favorable view than all ad ults (11% excellent, 43% good, 29% not so good, 15% poor). In surveys on K –12 education, about half have given negative ratings to K –12 public schools when it comes to preparing students for college (53% April 2006, 48% April 2009, 53% April 2010, 52% April 2011). Latinos are much more likely ( 62%) than Asians ( 48%), or whites (31% ) and blacks (30%) to have a favorable opinion. Among those who say many college students require remediation, just 37 percent say K –12 public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing students for college. “Are California's K –12 public schools doing an excellent, good, not- so-good, or poor job in preparing students for college?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Excellent 8% 6 % 2% 17% 3% 1 1% Good 36 42 28 45 28 43 Not -so -good 33 33 46 25 37 29 Poor 18 7 22 10 26 15 Don’t know 5 12 2 3 5 3 ROLE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES A plurality of Californians (35%) say the most important goal of the state’s community colleges is preparing students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities. Three in 10 (29%) say career technical or vocational education and 17 percent say lifelong learning. Far fewer say providing basic skills or remedial education (7%) or providing associate degrees (6%). In 2010, 41 percent said transfer preparation was the most important goal and 25 percent said career technical or vocational education. To day, pluralities across parties and regions favor transfer preparation, and this view rises with income. Residents age 55 and older are less likely than younger Californians to have this view. Asians are more likely to choose career technical or vocational education over transfer preparation (38% to 31%) , while p luralities of whites (35%), Latinos (39%), and blacks (38%) view transfer preparation as the main goal of community colleges. PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 22 ROLE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES (CONTINUED) Almost all Californians say that it is very (73%) or somewhat (23%) important that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities. The percentage saying this is very important has declined somewhat since 2007 (81% 2007, 78% 2010, 73% today). Democrats (76%) are more likely than independents (68%) and Republicans (66%) to hold this view. Blacks (87%) and Latinos (80%) are more likely than whites (70%) and Asians (60%) to view transfer preparation as very important. Solid majorities across regions and demographic groups say including classes to prepare students to transfer is very important. About three in four adults currently attending (77%) and those who attended (75%) a California public college or university share this view. Nearly all residents say including career technical or vocational education in community colleges is very (72%) or somewhat (24%) important. A similar share thought this was very important in past years (76 % 2007, 73 % 2010). Majorities across parties, regions, and demographic groups say this is very important. Still, b lacks (83%) are more likely than Latinos and wh ites (74% each), and are far more likely than Asians (54%) to hold this view. Seven in 10 current higher education students (70%) and 76 percent of alumni say including career technical or vocational education is very important. “How important to you is i t that community colleges include career technical or vocational education ?” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Parents of Children 18 or Younger Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very important 72% 54 % 83% 74% 74% 74 % Somewhat important 24 41 14 23 22 22 Not too important 3 3 3 2 3 2 Not at all important 1 2 – 1 1 1 How do Californians view a two- year community college degree or technical training when it comes to helping a person be successful in today’s work world? Fewer than half say it helps a lot (45%), 42 percent say it helps some, while just one in 10 say not too much (9%) or not at all (2%) . Latinos (55%) are much more likely than whites (43%) or blacks (39%) and far more likely than Asians (29%) to say a two -year degree hel ps a lot to be successful in the workplace. Inland Empire residents (52%) are the most likely to say a two -year degree helps a lot, followed by those in Orange/San Diego Counties (46%), the San Francisco Bay Area (46%), the Central Valley (43%) , and Los Angeles (42%). The view that a two -year community college degree or technical training is very helpful for the workplace declines with income and education . Among those who believe that it is very important for community colleges to include career technical or vocational education, 52 percent say that a two-year degree helps a person a lot to succeed in today’s work world. “How much does a two-year community college degree or technical training help a person to be successful in today’s work world? ” All Adults Household Income Parents of Children 18 or Younger Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more A lot 45% 49 % 45 % 38 % 49 % Some 42 37 43 50 40 Not too much 9 10 7 10 9 Not at all 2 2 3 1 1 Don’t know 2 2 2 2 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 23 PARENTS’ PERSPECTIVES Parents of children age 18 or younger express high hopes that their youngest child will be a four -year college graduate (38%) or have a graduate degree (45%). Fewer parents hope their child will achieve a two -year college degree or technical training (10%) , or a high school education or less (3%). In eight surveys since 2005, at least 83 percent have said a four-year college graduate or a graduate degree. In this survey, we used the “two- year community college graduate or career technical training” category, f or which the response is higher (10%) than in November 2010 (5%) when we used “some college or career technical training” or in surveys from April 2005 to April 2010 (less than 5%) when we used “some college.” Latino parents (44%) are somewhat m ore likely than whites (35%) to say four -year college graduate , while white parents (55%) are far more likely than Latinos (29%) to say graduate degree. (Sample sizes for Asian and black parents are too small for separate analysis.) Regardless of whether t hey graduated from college themselves, the vast majority of parents would like their children to obtain a four -year or graduate degree. Still, parents who are college graduates (73%) are more than twice as likely as those who are not (35%) to hope their yo ungest child completes a graduate degree . “What do you hope will be the highest grade level that your youngest child will achieve: some high school; high school graduate; two-year community college graduate or career technical training; four- year college graduate; or a graduate degree after college?” Parents of Children 18 or Younger Only All Parents of Children 18 or Younger Race/Ethnicity Education Latinos Whites Not a college graduate College graduate High school or less 3% 5 % 1 % 5 % – Two-year college graduate/technical training 10 17 6 14 1 % Four -year college graduate 38 44 35 43 26 Graduate degree after college 45 29 55 35 73 Don’t know 3 5 3 4 1 About seven in 10 parents say they are very (32%) or somewhat confident (39%) that they have the resources and information needed for their child to reach the grade level they hope for. The share saying they are very confident in having the needed resources and information has declined since 2005 (56% April 2005, 50% April 2009, 46% April 2010, 32% today). White parents are far more likely to say they are very confident (50%) than are Latino parents (20%). About half of parents say they are very worried about being able to afford a college education for their youngest child, down 5 points since last year, but higher than in earlier years (43% 2007, 46% 2008, 51% 2009, 57% 2010, 52% today). Concern is twice as high among Latinos (66% very worried) than whites (37%). Parents earning $80,000 or more (32%) are far less likely than those earning less to be very worried (53% $40,000 to under $80,000 and 65% under $40,000). Still, those with high incomes are far more likely to say they are very or somewhat worried (67%) than not too or not at all worried (33%) . “How worried are you about being able to afford a college education for your youngest child?” Parents of Children 18 or Younger Only All Parents of Children 18 or Younger Race/Ethnicity Household Income Latinos Whites Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Very worried 52% 66 % 37 % 65 % 53 % 32 % Somewhat worried 29 22 34 25 25 35 Not too worried 10 9 13 5 15 15 Not at all worried 9 4 16 4 7 18 November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 25 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from Sonja Petek, project manager for this survey, and survey research associates Dean Bonner and Jui Shrestha. This survey was conducted with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. We benefited from discussions with Irvine program staff and PPIC staff; however, the methods, questions, and content of this report were determined solely by Mark Baldassare and the survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 2,5 03 California adult residents, including 2, 003 interviewed on landline telephones and 50 0 interviewed on cell phones. Live interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days from October 25 –November 8, 2011. Interviews took an average of 20 minutes to complete. Landl ine interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were included in this survey to account for the growing number of Californians who use them. These interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers wi th California area codes were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a California resident, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the potential cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Landline and cell phone interviewing was conducted in English, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin or Cantonese), Vietnamese, and Korean, according to respondents’ preferences. We chose these languages because Spanish is the dominant language among non -English -speaking adults in California, followed in prevalence by the three Asian languages. Accent on Languages, Inc. translated the survey into Spanis h, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI Inc. translated the survey into Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean, and conducted all telephone interviewing. With assistance from Abt SRBI we used recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2006– 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) for California to compare certain demo graphic characteristics of the survey sample— region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was comparable to the ACS figures. Abt SRBI used data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey and data from the 2006– 2008 ACS for California, both to estimate landline and cell phone service in California and to compare the data against landline and cell phone service reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party affiliation of registered voters in our sample to statewide party registration. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight , while sample balancing adjusted for any differences across region al, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone service, and party registration groups. PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 26 The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±3.1 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total sample of 2,50 3 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 3.1 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger: For the 1,618 registered voters, it is ±3.3 percent; for the 1,161 likely voters, it is ±3.6 percent; for the 1,059 parents of children 18 or younger, it is ± 5 percent. Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. Throughout the report, w e refer to five geographic regions that account for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sut ter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Cost a, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents from other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to report separately. We present sp ecific results for no n-Hispanic whites and for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. We also present results for non- Hispanic Asians, who make up about 14 percent of the state’s adult popu lation, and non- Hispanic blacks, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in another party are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated by their responses to survey questions on voter registration, previous election participation, and current interest in politics . The percentages presented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to results from a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center. Additional details about our methodology can be found at http://www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request with an email to surveys@ppic.org . November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 27 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND HIGHER EDUCATION October 25– November 8 , 2011 2,503 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietname se MARGIN OF ERROR ±3.1% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE PERCENTAGES MAY NOT ADD TO 100 D UE TO ROUNDING 1. First, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 44% approve 30 disapprove 26 don’t know 2. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Governor Brown is handling California’s public college and university system? 31% approve 44 disapprove 25 don’t know 3. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 25% approve 55 disapprove 19 don’t know 4. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling California’s public college and university system? 21% approve 59 disapprove 20 don’t know 5. Thinking about the p ublic higher education system overall in California today, do you think it is generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 28% right direction 62 wrong direction 10 don’t know I’m going to read you a list of issues people have mentioned when talking about California’s higher education system today. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem. First… [rotate questions 6 to 8] 6. How about the overall quality of educatio n in California’s public colleges and universities today ? 24% big problem 36 somewhat of a problem 34 not much of a problem 6 don’t know 7. How about the overall affordability of education for students in California’s public colleges and universities t oday? 61% big problem 25 somewhat of a problem 11 not much of a problem 4 don’t know 8. How about the overall state budget situation for California’s public colleges and universities today? 69% big problem 17 somewhat of a problem 8 not much of a problem 5 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 28 As you may know, California’s higher education system has three branches—the California Community College system, the California State University system , and the University of California system. [rotate questions 9 to 11] 9. Overall , is the California Community College system doing an excellent, good, not -so - good, or poor job? 10% excellent 52 good 21 not so good 8 poor 9 don’t know 10. Overall, is the California State University system doing an excellent, good, not -so - good, o r poor job? 6% excellent 50 good 25 not so good 6 poor 13 don’t know 11. Overall, is the University of California system doing an excellent, good, not -so -good, or poor job? 11% excellent 48 good 23 not s o good 6 poor 12 don’t know 12. Next, do you think the current level of state funding for California’s public colleges and universities is more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 7% more than enough 14 just enough 74 not enough 5 don’t know 13. To significantly improve Calif ornia’s higher education system, which of the following statements do you agree with the most ? [rotate responses 1 and 2] (1) We need to use existing state funds more wisely, [or] (2) We need to increase the amount of state funding, [or] (3) We need to use existing state funds more wisely and increase the amount of state funding. 34% use funds more wisely 12 increase state funding 50 use funds more wisely and increase funding 3 don’t know 14. Which comes closer to your view? [rotate ] (1 ) If the state government makes budget cuts in higher education, the quality of education will suffer, [or] ( 2 ) the state government could make budget cuts in higher education and still mainta in a high quality of education. 63% if state makes cuts, quality will suffer 32 state could make cuts and maintain quality 5 don’t know As you may know, in an effort to close the gap between state spending and revenues over the past few years, the governor and legislature have made cuts in all major budget areas, including higher education. There are a number of ways California’s public colleges and universities have dealt with decreased funding. Please tell me if you are very concerned, somewhat concerned, not too concerned, or not at all concerned about each of the following. [rotate questions 15 to 17] 15. How about increasing tuition and fees for college students to deal with decreased state funding ? 65% very concerned 24 somewhat concerned 5 not too concerned 5 not at all concerned 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 29 16. How about admitting fewer college students to deal with decreased state funding ? 53% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 8 not too concerned 6 not at all concerned 2 don’t know 17. How about offering fewer college classes to deal with decreased state funding ? 55% very concerned 31 somewhat concerned 7 not too concerned 5 not at all concerned 1 don’t know Next, please say if you agree or disagree with the following statements. [rotate questions 18 to 20] 18. The price of a college education keeps students who are qualified and motivated to go to college from doing so. 70% agree 27 disagree 2 don’t know 19. Almost anyone who needs financial help to go to college can get loans or financial aid. 55% agree 40 disagree 5 don’t know 20. Students have to borrow too m uch money to pay for their college education. 75% agree 23 disagree 3 don’t know 21. Next, do you think that most students are prepared for college -level work when they enter college, or do you think that many students require basic skills and remedial education when they enter college? 23% most students are prepared 69 many require basic skills and remedial education 8 don’t know 22. Which comes closer to your view, even if neither is exactly right? The mai n purpose of college should be [rotate ] (1 ) to help an individual grow personally and intellectually [or] (2) to teach specific skills and knowledge that can be used in the workplace. 35% to help an individual grow personally and intellectually 46 to teach specific skills and knowledge that can b e used in the workplace 18 both equally (volunteered) 1 don’t know [rotate questions 23 and 24] 23. Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world, or do you think that there are many ways to succeed in today’s work world without a college education? 58% college is necessary 39 many ways to succeed without a college education 3 don’t know 24. Do you think that currently, the vast majority of people who are qualified to go to college have the oppor tunity to do so, or do you think there are many people who are qualified to go but don’t have the opportunity to do so? 26% majority have the opportunity 70 many people don’t have the opportunity 4 don’t know [rotate questions 25 and 26] 25. How importa nt do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have a racially diverse student body —that is, a mix of blacks, whites, Asians, Hispanics, and other minorities? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all import ant? 53% very important 22 somewhat important 11 not too important 13 not at all important 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 30 26. How important do you think it is for public colleges and universities to have an economically diverse student body —that is, a mix of students from lower -, middle -, and upper -income backgrounds? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 54% very important 27 somewhat important 10 not too important 9 not at all important 1 don’t know Next, please t hink about the state’s kindergarten through 12th grade public schools. 27. How important to y ou is it that California’s K –12 public schools prepare students for college —very important, somewhat important, or not too important? 86% very important 11 somew hat important 2 not too important 1 don’t know 28. And are California's K –12 public schools doing an excellent, good, not so good, or poor job in preparing students for college? 8% excellent 36 good 33 not so good 18 poor 5 don’t know 29. On another topic, California’s community colleges have several important goals. From among the following, which do you think is the most important goal? [read list, rotate responses] 35% pr eparing students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities 29 providing career technical or vocational education 17 providing courses for lifelong learning and personal enrichment 7 providing basic skills or remedial education 6 providing associate degrees 5 don’t know [rotate questions 30 and 31] 30. How important to you is it that community colleges include career technical or vocational education —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 72% very important 24 somewhat important 3 not too important 1 not at all im portant – don’t know 31. How important to you is it that community colleges include classes that prepare students to transfer to four -year colleges and universities —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 73% very important 23 somewhat important 2 not too important 1 not at all important 1 don’t know 32. How much does a two- year community college degree or technical training help a person to be successful in today’s work world —a lot, some, not too much, or not at all? 45% a lot 42 some 9 not too much 2 not at all 2 don’t know 33. On another topic, given the state’s current budget situation, on a scale of 1 to 5 —with 1 being a very low priority and 5 being a very high priority —what priority should be given to spending for California’s public colleges and universities? 3% very low priority 5 low priority 21 medium priority 29 high priority 41 very high priority 2 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 31 34. Do you favor or oppose the state government spending more money on public colleges and universities, even if it means less money for other state programs? 59% favor 33 oppose 8 don’t know 35. Would you say the state’s public colleges and universities have or have not been affect ed by recent state budget cuts? ( if they have: H ave they been affected a lot or somewhat?) 65% affected a lot 25 affected somewhat 5 not affected 5 don’t know Next, what if the state said it needed more money just to maintain current funding for public colleges and universities. [rotate questions 36 and 37] 36. Would you be willing to pay higher taxes for this purpose, or not? 45% yes 52 no 3 don’t know 37. Would you be willing to increase student fees for this purpose, or not? 28% yes 69 no 3 don’t know 38. Would you be willing to admit more out -of - state students paying higher tuit ion for this purpose, or not? ( if yes: Would you still support this even if it meant adm itting fewer in -state students?) 20% yes, even if it meant admitting fewer in-state students 32 yes, but not if it meant admitting fewer in -state students 42 no 6 don’t know 39. If there was a bond measure on the state ballot in 2012 to pay for construction projects in California’s higher education system, would you vote yes or no? 58% yes 34 no 8 don’t know 40. Changing topics, compared with other states, how would you rate the quality of the public higher education system in California today? Do you think it is [rotate order] (1 ) the best in the country, ( 2) one of the best in the country, ( 3) above ave rage, (4 ) average, [or] (5 ) below average? 4% the best in the country 16 one of the best in the country 27 above average 31 average 15 below average 6 don’t know 41. In general, how important is California’s higher education system to the quality of life and economic vitality of the state over the next 20 years —very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 73% very important 23 some what important 2 not too important 1 not at all important 1 don’t know 42. In thinking ahead 20 years, if current trends continue, do you think California will have [rotate 1 and 2] (1) more than enough, (2) not enough, [or] just enough college- educated residents needed for the jobs and skills likely to be in demand? 13% more than enough 49 not enough 32 just enough 6 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey November 2011 Californians and Higher Education 32 43. How much confidence do you have in the state government’s ability to plan for the future of California’s higher education system? 10% a great deal 37 only some 34 very little 16 none 2 don’t know 44. Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 65% yes [ask q44a] 35 no [skip to q45b] 44a.Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or are you registered as a decline -to -state or independent voter? 44% Democrat [ask q45] 32 Republican [skip to q45a] 3 another party (specify ) [skip to q46] 21 independe nt [skip to q45b] 45. Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 55% strong 42 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q46] 45a.Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 55% strong 41 not very strong 5 don’t know [skip to q46] 45b.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 20% Republican Party 46 Democratic Party 28 neither (volunteered) 6 don’t know 46. Would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 12% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 29 middle -of -the -road 23 somewhat conservative 13 very conservative 3 don’t know 47. Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics ? 24% great deal 34 fair amount 32 only a little 10 none – don’t know D4d. [parents of children 18 or younger only] What do you hope will be the highest grade level that your youngest child will achieve? – some high school 3% high school graduate 10 two-year community college graduate or career technical training 38 four -year college graduate 45 a graduate degree after college 3 don’t know D4e.[parents of children 18 or younger only] How worried are you about being able to afford a college education for your youngest child? Are you very worried, somewhat worried, not too worried, or not at all worried? 52% very worried 29 somewhat worried 10 not too worried 9 not at all worried – don’t know D4 f. [parents of children 18 or younger only] How confident are you that you have the resources and information needed for this child to reach that grade level ? 32% very conf ident 39 somewhat confident 28 not too confident 1 not at all confident (volunteered) – don’t know [d1–d4c and d 4g–d16: demographic questions]" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:41:06" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(9) "s_1111mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:41:06" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:41:06" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(51) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_1111MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }