Donate
Independent, objective, nonpartisan research

S 611MBS

Authors

S 611MBS

Tagged with:

Publication PDFs

Database

This is the content currently stored in the post and postmeta tables.

View live version

object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_611MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "531652" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(82015) "& p p i c s tat e w i d e s u r v e y Californians Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner Sonja Petek Jui Shrestha in collaboration with California Emerging Technology Fund and ZeroDivide CONTENTS About the Survey 2 Press Release 3 Access and Use 6 Perceptions and Attitudes 18 Regional Map 23 Methodology 24 Questionnaire and Results 26 information technology JUNE 2011 June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 2 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Sur vey series provide policymakers, the media, and the public with objective, advocacy-free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of California residents. Inaugurated in April 1998, this is the 118 th PPIC Statewide Sur vey in a series that has generated a database of responses from more than 250,000 Californians. This sur vey is the third in a series focusing on information technology issues and is funded with grants from the California Emerging Technology Fund and ZeroDivide. This series seeks to inform decisionmakers, raise public awareness, and stimulate policy discussions and debate about a variety of information technology issues. We draw upon earlier PPIC Statewide Sur veys for California trends over time and upon recent sur veys by the Pew Internet & American Life Project for national comparisons . Although broadband Internet availability has become more common, t here are still many California ns who are not connected. This sur vey seeks to inform the impor tant public policy issues around the changing nature of “connectedness” and differences between Californians who are and are not “connected.” We examine access to and use of information technology, the evolving role of mobile devices, as well as t he public’s perceptions and attitudes toward these issues . This sur vey presents the responses of 2,502 adult residents throughout the state, inter viewed in multiple languages and contacted by landline or cell phone. It includes findings on these topics:  Information technology access and use, including a profile of who uses the Internet and has a broadband connection at home, overall use of computers, and ownership of a variety of electronic devices ; specific activities that are conducted on the Internet and whether a cell phone is also used to do these; how often res pondents access the Internet or email, and what kind of Internet connection they have at home. We ask about mobile devices and access to the I nternet, laptop or netbook Internet access, and non- Internet users’ interest in the Internet and reasons for not using the Internet or email.  Perceptions and attitudes toward information technology, including the impor tance of laptop and cell phone communications , the role of government in the access and availability of high- speed Internet technology; the perception of broadband I nternet as a public utility or as a luxur y; the impor tance of information technology in education; and attitudes about possible disadvantages faced by those without high -speed Internet access at home.  Time trends, national comparisons, and variations in findings across racial/ethnic groups (Asians, blacks, Latinos, and non-Hispanic whites), across five major regions of the state (Central Valley, San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles County, Inland Empire, and Orange/San Diego Counties), across socioeconomic and political groups, and among those with and wit hout broadband access at home. This repor t may be downloaded free of charge from our website ( www.ppic.org). For questions about the sur vey, please contact sur vey@ppic.org . Tr y our PPIC Statewide Sur vey interactive tools online at http://www.ppic.org/main/sur vAdvancedSearch.asp. PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 7 INTERNET USE AND HOME ACCESS Vast majorities of Californians access the Internet at least occasionally (84%). Since 2000, the percentage of Californians using the Internet has grown (65% 2000, 70% 2008, 76% 2009, 81% 2010, 84% today). Today, 76 percent of Californians have an Internet connection at home, up from 63 percent in June 2008. Seventy -two percent of Californians have a broadband Internet connection at home (including DSL, cable, wireless, T -1, or fiber optic); home broadband use is up 19 points since 2007 (53% 2007, 55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% today). The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life project tracks Internet use at the national level. In a late 2010 survey, Pew found that 77 percent of adults nationwide reported using the Internet, somewhat lower than the 84 percent of Californians in our survey. Californians in our survey are also more likely than adults nationwide to have Internet access at home (76% to 68%) and to have a broadband connection at home (72% to 61%) , compared to Pew’s May 2011 survey. Broadband use among adults nationwide has leveled off somewhat in recent years ( 55% 2008, 63% 2009, 66% 2010, 61% 2011). There are differences across California’s regional and demographic groups when it comes to the use of technology, resulting in a “digital divide.” For example, the percentage saying they have a broadband connection at home declines with age (81% 18 –34, 72% 35 –54, 61% 55 and older) and rises sharply with income and education. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (55%) are the least likely to have a broadband connection (74% blacks, 76% Asians, 81% whites) or to use the Internet (70% Latinos, 85% blacks, 86% Asians, 92% whites). Still, the share of Latinos who have a home broadband connection has nearly doubled since 2007 (from 28% to 55% today). Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (78%) and Orange/San Diego Counties (76%) are the most likely to have a home broadband connection, followed by those in the Central Valley (70%), Los Angeles (68%), and the Inland Empire (66%). Percent saying yes Internet Use Internet Access at Home Do you access the Internet, at least occasionally? or Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally? Internet connection at home Broadband connection at home All Adults 84% 76% 72% Age 18 –34 92 84 81 35–54 84 77 72 55 and over 74 66 61 Household Income Under $40,0 0 0 72 63 58 $40,000 to under $80,000 94 86 82 $80,000 or more 98 94 93 Race/Ethnicity Asians 86 81 76 Blacks 85 77 74 Latinos 70 60 55 Whites 92 85 81 Region Central Valley 85 77 70 San Francisco Bay Area 89 82 78 Los Angeles 79 72 68 Orange/San Diego 89 80 76 Inland Empire 83 70 66 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 8 DEVICES AND INTERNET USE Californians have a variety of electronic devices and connect to the Internet more on some than others. When it comes to various devices, nearly all Californians have a cell phone (93%), and more than six in 10 Californians have a desktop computer (65%) or a laptop computer or netbook (61%); far fewer have a game console (41%), a tablet computer such as an i Pad (14%), or a n electro nic book reader (11%). While most Californians across demographic groups have a cell phone, ownership of the other devices differ s among racial/ethnic groups, and var ies across age groups and education and income levels. Californians are more likely to own and access the Internet with desktop (56%) or laptop computers (5 5%) than with cell phones (40 %). Far fewer own and connect to the I nternet using a game console (14 %), a tablet computer (11%), or an e -book reader (7%). Using a desktop to connect to the Internet is more common among whites (64%) and Asians (58%) than among blacks (49%) and L atinos (42%). The percentage of adults connecting via a desktop increases sharply with income and education. Use of a laptop to connect to the Internet is higher among A sians (65%), whites (62%), and blacks (57%) than among Latinos (38 %). Again, the percentage using a laptop to access the Internet rises sharply with income and education. The percentage of adults using cell phones to connect to the Internet declines sharpl y with age, and increases sharply with education and income. Use of a cell phone to access the Internet is highest among blacks (57 %), followed by whites (43%), Asians ( 41%), and Latinos ( 32%). Connecting to the Internet using a game console is done by one in four younger Californians, and one in five more affluent Californians. Ownership of a tablet computer or a e-book reader and using them to connect to the Internet is less likely among less affluent and less educated Californians. Do you have a ___________? (and) Do you ever access the Internet or email using your ___________? Percent saying yes and access the Internet using this device Desktop computer Laptop computer Cell phone Game console Tablet Computer Electronic book reader All Adults 56% 55% 40% 14% 11% 7% Age 18 –34 53 65 57 26 9 8 35–54 58 57 43 13 15 8 55 and over 56 39 17 3 7 4 Household Income Under $40,000 40 40 32 10 6 3 $40,000 to under $80,000 69 61 41 16 9 6 $80,000 or more 73 81 60 21 24 15 Race/Ethnicity Asians 58 65 41 16 11 8 Blacks 49 57 57 21 12 4 Latinos 42 38 32 14 6 4 Whites 64 62 43 13 14 9 Region Central Valley 50 52 37 14 8 8 San Francisco Bay Area 62 63 46 15 18 11 Los Angeles 50 51 41 13 9 4 Orange/San Diego 64 58 42 18 12 7 Inland Empire 57 50 39 12 8 4 Internet Users 67 65 48 17 13 8 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 9 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES Californians go online to do a variety of activities , ranging from purchasing goods and services to working on their blog s, and are doing so at increasing rates. Half or more of Californians go online to get news on current events (66%, up 11 points from 200 8), to make purchases (64%, up 12 points), to get health information (61%, up 11 points), to get community information (59%, up 12 points) , to visit a government website (53%, similar to 2008 ), or to use social networking (52%, up 26 points). Similar to overall I nternet use, older, less -educated, and lower -income Californians, along with Latinos, are less likely than others to do all of the se activities. Across regions, residents in the San Francisco Bay Area and Orange/San Diego Counties are generally more likely than those in other regions to do these activities. Californians with health insurance are much more likely than those without insurance to go online to get health or medical information (66% to 47%). Cell phone u sers connecting to the I nternet via those cell phone are doing many of these activities. One in four or more cell phone users go online to get news (28%) , use social netwo rking sites (28%) , or get community information (25%) on their cell phones. Fewer cell phone users go online to get health information (18%), purchase goods and services (16%), or to visit a government website (12%). “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things . How about going online …” Percent saying yes …to get news on current events? …to purchase goods and services? …to get health or medical information? …to get information about your community? …to visit a government website? …to use a social networking site? All Adults 66% 64% 61% 59% 53% 52% Internet Users 79 76 73 70 63 62 Age 18 –34 78 69 68 68 53 71 35–54 65 65 62 63 57 53 55 and over 54 57 53 44 48 30 Household Income Under $40,000 51 45 49 47 36 45 $40,000 to under $80,000 76 77 71 67 63 58 $80,000 or more 89 91 77 80 79 65 Race/Ethnicity Asians 69 72 63 56 49 60 Blacks 71 61 56 63 54 54 Latinos 48 40 44 42 34 42 Whites 76 78 72 71 66 56 Region Central Valley 64 62 60 57 49 52 San Francisco Bay Area 71 69 66 67 59 53 Los Angeles 60 59 57 54 50 52 Orange/San Diego 73 72 69 62 59 55 Inland Empire 65 57 54 55 47 46 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 28 16 18 25 12 28 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 10 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES (CONTINUED) Some Californians also go online to access government resources (51%, up 8 points from 2008 ), to look for job information (49%, same as 2008), for educational purposes , such as online training or taking a class (45% ), to get real estate information (45%, up 5 points), to use Twitter (30%, up 12 points from 2009 ), and to work on their own blog s (15%, similar to 2009). Once again, older, less -educated, and lower -income Californians, along with Latinos, are less likely than others to do most of these activities. Going online to use Twitter is done by nearly half of those aged 18– 34 (48%) , while only 12 percent of those 55 and older use Twitter. When it comes to accessing government resources online, whites (64%) and Asians (53%) are much more likely than blacks (39%) and Latinos (35%) to do most of these activities . Relatively few Californians are using their cell phone s to connect to the I nternet for these activities. Seventeen percent of cell phone users connect to use Twitter, and 14 percent to look for job information (14%), while one in 10 or fewer are doing so to get real estate information (10%), for educational purposes (9%) , to access government resources (9%), or to work on a blog (6%). “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things . How about going online …” Percent saying yes …to access government resources? …to look for information about a job? …for educational purposes? …to get housing or real estate information? …to use Twitter? …to work on your own blog? All Adults 51% 49% 45% 45% 30% 15% Internet Users 61 59 54 53 36 18 Age 18 –34 57 75 60 49 48 25 35–54 53 50 46 50 28 13 55 and over 42 21 26 33 12 6 Household Income Under $40,000 35 48 36 33 28 13 $40,000 to under $80,000 64 55 51 52 33 16 $80,000 or more 73 54 59 63 35 18 Race/ Ethnicity Asians 53 60 52 51 45 24 Blacks 39 70 59 49 30 16 Latinos 35 44 36 29 26 9 Whites 64 47 46 52 29 15 Region Central Valley 46 50 44 45 28 12 San Francisco Bay Area 58 53 51 46 34 17 Los Angeles 49 46 45 40 29 17 Orange/San Diego 58 50 46 50 28 13 Inland Empire 44 48 38 44 29 13 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 9 14 9 10 17 6 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 11 FREQUENCY OF INTERNET USAGE Nearly seven in 10 Internet users in California access the I nternet from home at least once a day (19%) or several times a day (49%). Fewer than half of Internet users (45%) access the Internet about once a day (8%) or several times a day (37%) from work, while about one in four (23%) access the Internet from somep lace other than work or home (6% about once a day, 17% several times a day). Frequent use (at least once a day) of the Internet at home has been similar since we began asking this question in 2008 (66% 2008, 65% 2009, 68% today).The frequency of Internet use from work has declined slightly since 2008 (52% 2008, 50% 2009, 45% today) , while use from someplace other than home or work has increased somewhat (14% 2008, 15% 2009, 23% today). Use of the Internet from home at least once a day is highest among Inte rnet users in the San Francisco Bay Area (75%) , followed by those in Orange/San Diego Counties (70%), Los Angeles (66%), Inland Empire (64%) , and the Central Valley (63%). Younger and more affluent residents are more frequent home Internet users than others. A cross regions, residents of the San Francisco Bay Area (55%) are the most likely to use the Internet at work on a daily basis. Internet users age d 35 to 54 (57%) are much more frequent users than younger (43%) or older (29%) Internet users to go online at work daily. Internet use from someplace other than home or work is highe st in the San Francisco Bay Area (31%) and Los Angeles (28%) followed by Orange/San Diego Counties (24%), the Central Valley (19%), and the Inland Empire (15%). Frequent use away home or work declines with age and is higher among upper -income residents . Latino Internet users are the least frequent Internet users across racial/ethnic groups, regardless of location. California Internet users and those nationwi de use the Internet at similar rates at home or work according to a November 2010 survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. “About how often do you use the Internet or email from…” Internet users only …home? …work? …some place other than home or work? Several times a day 49% 37% 17% About once a day 19 8 6 3–5 days a week 10 3 5 1–2 days a week 11 4 9 Every few weeks 3 2 6 Less often 2 3 14 Never 4 44* 42 *Includes 12 percent of I nternet users who volunteer that they do not work or are retired . INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME Seven in 10 California adults have a broadband Internet connection at home, including half who have either a DSL connection (25%) or a cable modem (25%); 16 percent use a direct wireless connection such as via satellite. The remainder of broadband users connect via a fiber optic or T –1 connection (5%) or some other type of broadband connection. Four percent of Californians have Internet access via a dial -up telephone line, while 21 percent do not have Internet or a computer at home. Broadband access at home had increased each year since 2008, but this year we find results similar to last year (55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% today). Use of a DSL connection is highest in Los Angeles (29%), while cable modem use is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (35%). Inland Empire residents (15%) are at least three times more likely than PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 12 INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME (CONTINUED) residents elsewhere to report having a fiber optic or T –1 connection. Lack of Internet access of any kind is highest in the Inland Empire and Los Angeles (25% each). As reported earlier, Latinos are the most likely racial/ethnic group to lack a computer or Internet access in the home. Absence of a home connection varies gr eatly across education groups (39% high school or less, 11% some college, 4% college graduate) and annual income levels (35% $40,000 or less, 10% $40,000 to under $80,000, 3% $80,000 or more) . “What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL-enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fiber optic connection such as FiOS, or a T-1?” All adults All Adults Household I ncome Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more DSL-enabled phone line 25% 22% 29% 28% Cable modem 25 17 30 37 Wireless connection 16 14 17 19 Fiber optic or T-1 5 4 5 9 Dial- up telephone line 4 5 4 2 No Internet/computer at home 21 35 10 3 No home access, connect via cell phone or tablet computer (volunteered) 1 – 1 1 Unspecified broadband connection 1 1 1 1 Don’t know 3 2 3 2 Nearly all broadband users in California have had this high-speed access for more than one year (50% 1 to 5 years, 38% 5 to 10 years, 7% 11 years or longer). Two percent of Californians with broadband access have had the service for less than a year. Latinos (64%) are more likely than Asians (45%) and whites (44%) to have been a broadband user between one and five years, while the opposite is true for being a broadband user for six years or longer (52% whites, 51% Asians, and 29% Latinos). (In the analyse s of subgroups such as broadband users, the sample sizes for blacks are too small for separate analysis .) Broadband users age d 18 to 34 (59 %), those with a high school diploma or less (66%), and those making $40,000 or less (63%) are more likely than older, more educated, and more affluent broadband users to have had a high-speed connection between one and five years. “About how many years have you been using a high-speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home?” Broadband users only All Broadband Users Household Income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 or more Asians Latinos Whites Less than 1 year 2% 3% 2% 1% – 3% 1% 1 to 5 years 50 60 54 36 45% 64 44 6 or more years 45 34 43 61 51 29 52 Don’t know 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 Among non -Internet and non -broadband users, 58 percent say that high -speed broadband Internet access is available to them in their neighborhood , while 21 percent say it is not and 21 percent are unsure. In 2009, 66 percent said that broadband was available and 18 percent said it was not . PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 13 MOBILE DEVICES Among Californians with cell phones, 39 percent report that their phone is a smartphone , which offers advanced features and connectivity; 49 percent say their phone is not a smartphone, and 12 percent are not sure. Similarly, 41 percent say they pay for a data plan for their cell phone, while 55 percent do not. The share of Californians with a smartphone rises sharply with household income (29% under $40,000, 42% $40,000– $80,000, 57% $80,000 or more). Those in the upper -income group are also much more likely to pay for a data plan. The percentage with a smartphone or data plan increases with education level and declines with age. Among thos e who have a broadband connection at home, 46 percent also have a smartphone and 49 percent pay for a data plan. “Some phones are called “smartphones” because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartph one or not, or are you not sure ?” Cel l phone users only All Cell Phone Users Household Income Broadband Users Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Yes, it is a smartphone 39% 29% 42% 57% 46% No, it is not a smartphone 49 53 49 40 46 Not sure 12 17 9 3 7 Among cell phone users, most (74%) use it to send or receive text messages. Far fewer use their cell phones to send or receive email messages (42%), download software apps (33%), or make charitable donations (10%). The share of cell phone users who text has risen 16 points since 2008 (58% to 74% today), and the share who email via cell phone is also up 16 points (26% to 42% today). In Pew surveys, the national share of cell phone users doing each of these activities is similar (74% text, 38% email, 29% down load apps, 10% make donations). “Do you ever use your cell phone to…” Cell phone users only Percent saying yes …send or receive text messages? … send or receive email messages ? …to download a software application? … to make a charitable donation by text message? All Cell Phone Users 74% 42% 33% 10% Age 18 –34 91 55 50 13 35–54 80 46 33 11 55 and older 44 20 12 5 Household Income Under $40,000 70 34 26 9 $40,000 to under $80,000 77 43 35 13 $80,000 or more 81 58 47 13 Race/Ethnicity Asians 68 46 40 10 Latinos 73 34 25 10 Whites 75 44 34 10 Region Central Valley 70 37 33 9 San Francisco Bay Area 74 45 38 11 Los Angeles 74 45 33 12 Orange/San Diego 76 42 30 11 Inland Empire 75 38 33 10 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 14 MOBILE DEVICES (CONTINUED) Younger Californians (aged 18–34) are most likely to report doing each of these activities on their cell phone. Latinos are less likely than Asians and whites to use their cell phones for email or to download apps , but they are as likely as others to text or make charitable donations. The percentage using a cell phone to text, email, or to download apps rises with income. Among Californians who download apps, 52 percent say they pay for apps, while 47 percent mostly use free apps. The percentage paying for apps rises as income and education levels rise . Among Californians who use cell phones to access the Internet, 25 percent say that when they use the Internet, they do so mostly on their cell phone s, while 62 percent do so mostly on some other devi ce such as a desktop or laptop computer. Twelve percent volunteer that they use a cell phone or other device to access the Internet about equally. Thirty -six percent of those with household incomes of less than $40,000 mostly use their cell phones to access the Internet ; 29 percent of middle -income residents and just 13 percent of upper -income residents do so . Similar trends emerge across education groups. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos are twice as likely as whites (40% to 21%) to say they mostly use their cell phone to access the Internet. Two in three whites mostly use other devices compared to 44 percent of Latinos. “Overall, when you use the Internet , do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desk top, laptop, or tablet computer?” Cell phone Internet users only All Cell Phone Internet Users Household Income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Mostly on cell phone 25% 36% 29% 13% 40% 21% Mostly on something else 62 51 53 76 44 66 Equally (volunteered) 12 12 16 8 13 11 Depends (volunteered) / Don’t know 2 1 1 3 3 1 Among those who access the Internet via their cell phone s, 59 percent do so several times a day and another 13 percent do so about once a day. Since June 2009, there has been a sharp rise in the share accessing the Internet through a cell phone several times per day (from 30% to 59%). In June 2009, 35 percent accessed the Internet via cell phone every few weeks, less often, or never, compared to only 9 percent today. Those age d 18 to 34 are nearly three times as likely as those aged 5 5 and older to access the Internet via cell phone several times per day. “About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone?” Cell phone Internet users only All Cell Phone Internet Users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–34 35 –54 5 5 and older Latinos Whites Several times a day 59% 74% 52% 26% 60% 56% About once a day 13 9 17 14 15 14 3–5 days a week 9 8 10 12 8 8 1–2 days a week 10 7 11 23 11 13 Every few weeks 3 1 3 9 1 4 Less often 4 1 6 12 4 4 Never 2 – 2 4 2 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 15 LAPTOP USE Among those who access the Internet via laptop s or netbooks, 85 percent use WiFi or other wireless connection to do so. In the Pew November 2010 survey, a similar 88 percent of laptop Internet users nationwide used WiFi to connect to the Internet. Across regions and demographic groups, at least 80 percent of laptop Internet users access the Internet wirelessly. Fewer laptop Internet users access the Internet with mobile wireless broadband, such as an aircard. Just 23 percent overall and fewer than three in 10 across regions and demographic groups access the Internet this way. In Pew’s survey, 27 percent of laptop Internet users accessed the Internet using mobile wireless broadband. “On your laptop computer or netbook, do you use …” Laptop Internet users only All Laptop Internet Users Age Race /Ethnicity 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Latinos Whites …WiFi or a wireless connection to access the Internet ? Yes 85% 90% 83% 81% 80% 89% No 15 10 17 18 19 10 Don't know 1 1 1 1 1 1 …mobile wireless broadband, such as an aircard , to access the Internet ? Yes 23 20 26 23 25 24 No 72 78 67 70 71 71 Don't know 5 2 6 7 5 5 Among Californians who use their laptops to access the Internet wirelessly (through WiFi or mobile wireless broadband), 86 percent do so at home, while 39 percent do so at work. A majority — 55 percent —do so at some place other than home or work. More than eight in 10 across regions and demographic groups use their laptop wirelessly at home. When it comes to using their laptop wirelessly at work, those aged 35 to 54 (45%) are more likely than others to do this. The percentage doing this at work rises with income and education level s and is somewhat higher among whites than Latinos. At least half across most demographic groups use their laptops to access the Internet wirelessly outside of home and work, the exception being Latinos (46%) and those with a high school education or less (42%). “Thinking about when you access the Internet wireles sly on your laptop or netbook — e ither using WiFi or mobile wireless broadband, do you ever do this at… ” Wireless laptop users only Percent saying yes …home? …work? …someplace other than home or work? All Wireless L aptop Users 86% 39% 55% Age 18 –34 84 39 57 35–54 89 45 53 55 and over 85 27 52 Household Income Under $40,000 84 26 53 $40,000 to under $80,000 87 39 50 $80,000 or more 89 51 59 Race/Ethnicity Latinos 82 31 46 Whites 87 40 57 Region Central Valley 82 32 52 San Francisco Bay Area 86 49 61 Los Angeles 88 39 56 Orange/San Diego Inland Empire 85 37 52 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 16 WORK-RELATED ACTIVITIES A WAY FROM WORK Among all cell phone users, 32 percent use their cell phone for work -related activities away from work, while 59 percent do not. There are some differences across the state’s regions and demographic groups in work habits outside the workplace. In the San Francisco Bay Area —home of the Silicon Valley— 41 percent of cell phone users use their phone for work outside of the office. By comparison, 34 percent in the Inland Empire, 33 percent in Orange/San Diego Counties, 31 percent in Los Angeles, and 24 percent in the Central Valley do so. Across racial/ethnic groups, Asians (40%) are the most likely to use their cell phones for work, compared to three in 10 whites (32%) and Latinos (30%). The percentage using their cell phone to do work -related activities away from a work location increases with education level (23% high school or less, 35% some college, 43% college graduates) and income level (26% under $40,000, 32 % $40,000 to $80,000, 47% $80,000 or more). Men are much more likely than women (39% to 26%) to do work on their cell phones ; parents of children 18 or younger are more likely to do so than other group s (40% to 27%). “What about using your cell phone to do work-related activities when you are not at work?” Cell phone users only All Cell Phone Users Education Broadband Users High school or less Some college College graduate Yes, do this 32% 23% 35% 43% 37% No, do not do this 59 69 54 50 54 Don’t work/retired (volunteered) 9 8 11 7 9 Don’t know – – – – – Among wireless laptop users, 43 percent use this technology to do work -related activities when they are away from the workplace. Again, San Francisco Bay Area residents (53%) are the most likely to do so followed by those in the Other Southern California region (which includes Orange/San Diego Counties and the Inland Empire: 45%), Los Angeles (42%), and the Central Valley (37%). A cross racial/ethnic groups, Asians (48%) and whites (45%) are more likely than Latinos (32%) to do work -related activities on their laptop away from the workplace. The percentage doing so increases with education level (31% high school or less, 43% some college, 52% college graduates) and income level (31% under $40,000, 42% $40,000 to $80,000, 56% $80,000 or more). Men are more likely than women to do work on their laptops with a wireless connection away from the office (50% to 37%). Across age groups, those age 35 to 54 are more likely than others to work this way (43% 18 –34, 50% 35 –54, 31% 55 and older). “Thinking about when you access the Internet wireles sly on your laptop or netbook —either using Wi Fi or mobile wireless broadband, do you ever do this away from work for work -related activities?” Wireless laptop users only Percent saying yes All Wireless Laptop Users Education Broadband Users High school or less Some college College graduate Yes 43% 31% 43% 52% 44% No 49 63 45 42 48 Don’t work/retired (volunteered) 8 5 12 6 7 Don’t know – 1 – – – PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 17 NON-INTERNET USERS Currently, 16 percent of California ns do not use the I nternet, down from 24 percent in 2009 . Of non - Internet users , 86 percent have never used the Internet or email, while 14 percent were Internet users previously. Of non -Internet users, an overwhelming majority (79%) are not interested in using the Internet. Overwhelming majorities among age groups (77% age 18 –54, 8 4% age 55 and older) and eight in 10 Latino non -Internet users say they are not interested in using the Internet or email. A majority (67%) would need help in starting to use the Internet, while 15 percent say they know enough on their own to begin using and 15 percent volunteer they do not want to use the Internet. “Would you like to start using the Internet or email (again), or isn’t that something you’re interested in?” Non -Internet users only All Non-Internet Users Age Latinos 18–54 55 and older Yes, interested 19% 21% 15% 17% No, not interested 79 77 84 81 Don’t know 2 2 1 2 When asked about the main reason for not using the Internet, 17 percent say they are not interested (down 13 points since 2009), 16 percent report not having a computer ( similar to 2009 ), 12 percent say they don’t know how to use it, and 11 percent mention cost (down 4 points since 2009 ). O ther reas ons given include: it’s a waste of time, it’s frustrating, too old to learn, not having access or the time, and concern over computer viruses. Those under 55 years old are somewhat more likely than older residents (19% to 11%) to mention not having a computer as the main reason. One in five Latinos cite not having a computer (21%) and one in five cite lack of interest (21%) as the main reason for not using the Internet. “And, what is the main reason you don't use the Internet or email? ” Non -Internet users only All Non-Internet Users Age Latinos 18–54 55 and older Not interested 17% 17% 19% 21% Don’t have a computer 16 19 11 21 Just don’t know how 12 14 10 13 Cost/ too expensive 11 11 11 9 It's a waste of time /don’t need it 9 6 11 5 It’s too difficult/frustrating 8 9 8 9 Don't have access 6 8 4 3 Just don’t have the time 5 4 7 6 Too old to learn 4 1 7 3 Physically unable 2 2 2 2 Worried about computer viruses/spyware/adware/spam 2 1 3 1 Other 5 5 6 4 Don’t know 2 4 – 4 June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 18 PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES KEY FINDINGS  Half or more cell phone users or laptop Internet users say staying in touch with others and having easy access to information online are very important; about a third say it is very imp ortant to be able to do work -related activities . (page 19)  A plurality of Californians (41%) think the government is doing just enough to improve the access and availability of high- speed broadband, and one in five say expanding affordable broadband acces s should be a top priority for the federal government. Two in three say high -speed broadband should be viewed as a public utility, not as a luxury . ( page 20)  Most Californians and public school parents say it is very important for California’s K –12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills. Nearly two in three parents report visiting the website of their child’s school, while nearly one in t hree report receiving their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email. ( page 21)  Most Californians think people without high - speed broadband Internet access are at a major disadvantage when it comes to finding information about job opportunit ies or health information . (page 22) 66 73 42 69 2721 52 25 0 20 40 60 80 100 All adultsDemRepInd Percent all adults Should be viewed as a public utility Should be viewed as a luxury Perception of High-SpeedBroadband Access 76 63 90 7877 0 20 40 60 80 100 AlladultsAsiansBlacksLatinosWhites Percent all adults Importance of K--12 SchoolsTeaching Computer and Internet Skills Percentsaying very important 11 19 30 37 272326 16 0 20 40 60 80 United States* California Percent all adults A top priority Important but a lower priority Not too important Should not be done Federal Government Priority for Expanding Affordable High-Speed Broadband Access *Pew Internet & American Life Project, May 2010 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 19 IMPORTANCE OF LAPTOP AND CELL PHONE COMMUNICATION For Californians who have cell phones or use the Internet on their laptop, over half find staying in touch easily with other people (59%) and having easy access to information online (52%) to be very important when staying connected outside of home or work . Far fewer consider being able to do work -related activities (35%) and sharing or posting content online (13%) very important. Findings were similar in June 2009, with 55 percent saying staying in touch, 52 percent saying having easy access to information online, and 13 percent saying sharing or posting content online were very important while staying connected outside home or work. This i s the first time we have asked about the importance of being able to do work -related activities. Older residents (age 55 and over) are less likely than younger Californians (age 18 to 34) to find all four items asked in the survey to be very important. The two groups differ most over having easy access to information online (28 point difference) and differ least in their opinion of sharing or posting content online ( 9 point difference). Residents earning less than $40,000 are slightly more likely than those with higher incomes to find staying in touch easily to be very important. Those earning $80,000 or more place greater importance on easy access to information online (60%) and being able to do work -related activities (45%) than do those with lower incomes . Whites (56%) are slightly less likely than Latinos (62%) and Asians (65%) to say staying in touch easily is very important . About six in 10 across regions say staying in touch easily is very important when connecting outside of home or work. “Thinking now about how you get information and communicate with others using a cell phone or laptop when you are away from home and work, please tell me if each of the following is very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important. How about…” Cell phone users or laptop Internet users only Percent saying very important …staying in touch easily with other people? …having easy access to information online? …being able to do work -related activities? …sharing or posting content online? All Cell Phone Users or Laptop Internet Users 59% 52% 35% 13% Age 18 –34 68 62 38 18 35–54 61 55 43 13 55 and over 46 34 19 9 Household Income Under $40,000 64 48 30 14 $40,000 to under $80,000 55 53 33 14 $80,000 or more 58 60 45 12 Race/Ethnicity Asians 65 48 39 16 Latinos 62 53 35 16 Whites 56 52 31 10 Region Central Valley 58 51 32 8 San Francisco Bay Area 62 58 38 19 Los Angeles 63 49 36 14 Orange/San Diego 57 53 32 12 Inland Empire 59 48 37 14 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 20 ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN ACCESS AND ADOPTION A majority of adults (56%) say that expanding high -speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a priority for the federal government : 19 percent say it should be a top priority and 37 percent call it an important but lower priority. Twenty-three percent say it’s not too important and 16 percent say it should not be done. Findings among broadband users are similar to those for all adults. According to a May 201 0 Pew survey , fewer adults nationwide consider broadband expansion a priority (11% top priority, 30% important but low, 27% not too important, 26% should not be done ). Democrats and independents (60% each) are far more likely than Republicans (38 %) to say that providing affordable high -speed Internet should be a federal government priority. Across regions and demographic groups at least half agree. Whites, older residents, those without children , renters, and those who have lived at their current residence for five years or more are less likely than others to believe that expanding affordable high -speed Internet access is a federal government priority. “Do you think that expanding affordable high-speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done ?” All Adults Party Broadband Users Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Top priority 19% 20% 8% 18% 19% 13% Important but lower priority 37 40 30 42 40 37 Not too important 23 25 22 20 24 23 Should not be done 16 10 37 17 16 24 Don’t know 5 5 3 2 2 3 When asked whether they view high- speed Internet as a public utility to which everyone should have access or a luxury that some people may not be able to access, solid majorities (66% adults, 61% likely voters, 68% broadband users) say broadband should be viewed as a public utility. Democrats (73%) and independents (69%) are far mor e likely than Republicans (42%) to hold this view. At least six in 10 across racial/ethnic groups say it should be a public utility, with Latinos (75%) especially likely to hold this view . Californians continue to be divided about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high -speed broadband Internet technology. About four in 10 adults (41%) believe that the government is doing just enough, 27 percent say not enough, 15 percent say more than enough , and about one in five (17%) are unsure. Findings are similar among broadband users and likely voters. Since this question was asked in 2008, about four in 10 have said the government was doing just enough. “Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and avai lability of high-speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not enough ?” All Adults Party Broadband Users Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 15% 12% 24% 18% 15% 18% Just enough 41 43 38 36 45 39 Not enough 27 30 17 26 27 25 Don’t know 17 15 21 20 13 17 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 21 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION An overwhelming ma jority of adults say it is very important (76%) or somewhat important ( 18%) for K–12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills . Across political parties, demographic groups, and regions , more than six in 10 think teaching computer and Internet skills is very important. Ninety percent of blacks think it is very important, followed by Latinos (78%), whites (77%), and Asians (63%). Among public school parents, 79 percent consider this issue very important. “How important is it for California’s K –12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills?” All Adults Education Broadband Users Public school parents High school or less Some college College graduate Very important 76% 75% 74% 79% 76% 79% Somewhat important 18 18 19 17 18 15 Not too important 3 4 3 2 2 3 Not at all important 3 2 4 2 3 2 Don’t know 1 1 – – – 1 Parents of children 18 or younger use the Internet to communicate about their child’s education. Sixty -three percent of these parents report visiting their child’s school website often or sometimes (61% in 2009, 56% in 2008). Findings among public school parents are similar. Half of Latino parents say they visit their child’s school website, a slight 5-point increase from 2009. Still, white parents are far more likely (76%) than La tino parents (50%) to do so. The differences are much greater between income groups —parents earning $80,000 or more (89%) are twice as likely as parents earning under $40,000 (44%) to visit their child’s school website. Among those who do not visit their child’s school website, 63 percent say the school does have a website as far as they know. Thirty -two percent of parents say they receive their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email (34% in 2009, 28% in 2008). Again, white parents (41%) a re much more likely than Latino parents (23%) to use the Internet or email for this purpose. The disparity is great between inco me groups: parents earning $80,000 or more (50%) are nearly three times as likely as parents earning $40,000 or less (18%) to use the Internet or email to obtain their child’s homework. Among those who do not receive their child’s assignments via the Internet or email, 71 percent say their child’s teachers do not send assignments this way as far as they know. “Do you ever …” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household Income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Latino White …visit the website of your child’s school? Yes, often 31% 17% 32% 54% 23% 40% Yes, sometimes 32 27 38 35 27 36 No 36 56 29 10 49 24 Don't know – 1 – – 1 – …receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email? Yes, often 19 10 21 33 14 24 Yes, sometimes 13 8 19 17 9 17 No 65 79 57 48 76 58 Don't know 2 3 3 1 1 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 22 DISADVANTAGES OF NOT HAVING BROADBAND When it comes to finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills , 82 percent of Californians think non-broadband users are at a major (62%) or minor (20%) disadvantage. In an April 2010 Pew survey adults nationwide were much less likely to hold this view ( 43% major, 23% minor). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (71%) and Latinos (68%) are more likely to say non -broadband users are at a major disadvantage, followed by Asians (62%) and wh ites (57%). Younger Californians (70%) are far more likely than older Californians (49%) to hold this view. Seventy percent of Democrats , 60 percent of independents , and 47 percent of Republicans hold this view when it comes to job opportunities. When it c omes to getting health information , Californians are again far more likely than adults nationwide to think non -broadband users are at a disadvantage (80% to 62 %). Latinos (64%) and blacks ( 59%) are more likely than Asians (47%) and whites (42 %) to think there is a major disadvantage. Democrats (55%) are more likely than independents (42%) and Republicans (34%) to think there is a major disadvantage when it comes to getting health information online. “Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people… Do you think that people who do not have high-speed broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following? How about…” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband User Asians Blacks Latinos Whites …finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills ? Major disadvantage 62% 62% 71% 68% 57% 63% Minor disadvantage 20 26 15 16 22 21 Not at disadvantage 14 10 14 12 17 13 Don't know 4 2 – 4 4 2 …getting health information? Major disadvantage 50 47 59 64 42 49 Minor disadvantage 30 34 27 21 34 33 Not at disadvantage 17 17 13 12 21 17 Don’t know 3 2 1 3 3 1 Three in four Californians think non -broadband users are at a major (42%) or minor (35%) disadvantage when it comes to using online government services, compared to 56 percent nationwide in Pew’s survey. Seventy- four percent of Californians think non -broadband users are at a major (38%) or minor (36%) disadvantage when it comes to keeping up with news online, but far fewer adults nationwide (50%) in the Pew survey think non -broadband users are at a disadvantage. “How about…” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband User Asians Blacks Latinos Whites …using government services ? Major disadvantage 42% 38% 54% 49% 39% 43% Minor disadvantage 35 43 29 30 36 38 Not at disadvantage 17 17 9 14 20 16 Don’t know 5 2 7 7 4 3 …keeping up with news and information? Major disadvantage 38 37 50 49 30 37 Minor disadvantage 36 40 28 30 40 39 Not at disadvantage 23 20 17 17 28 22 Don’t know 3 3 5 3 2 1 June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 23 REGIONAL MAP June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 24 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from Dean Bonner, project manager for this survey, survey research associates Sonja Petek and Jui Shrestha, and survey intern Elisa Baeza. This survey was conducted with funding from the California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF) and ZeroDivide 1 as part of a multi -year project on public opinion and information technology issues . We benefited from discussions with the CETF leadership and other experts and from consultation with researchers at the Pew Internet & American Life Project; however, the methods, questions, and content of this report were determined solely by Mark Baldassare and the survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 2,502 California adult residents, including 2,001 interviewed on landline telephones and 50 1 interviewed on cell phones. Live interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days from June 1–14 , 2011. Interviews took an average of 18 minutes to complete. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were included in this survey to account for the growing number of Californians who use them. These interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection and the sample telephone num bers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the potential cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone a nd landline service in the household. Landline and cell phone interviewing was conducted in English, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin or Cantonese), Vietnamese, and Korean, according to respondents’ preferences. We chose these languages because Spanish is the dominant language among non -English -speaking adults in California, followed in prevalence by the three Asian languages. Accent on Languages, Inc. translated the survey into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI Inc. translated the survey i nto Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean, and conducted all telephone interviewing. With assistance from Abt SRBI we used recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2006– 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) for California to compare certain demographic charact eristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was comparable to the ACS figures. Abt SRBI used data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey and data from the 2006– 2008 ACS for California, both to estimate landline and cell phone service in California and to compare the data against landline and cell phone servi ce reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary 1 This research was made possible by a grant from the Community Partnership Committee through its Applied Research Initiative on access to telecommunications services in California’s underserved communities, with support from ZeroDivide. The Community Partnership Committee was formed by eight coalitions of 134 community -based organizations and SBC (now AT&T), to serve underserved communities throughout Califor nia after the SBC/Pacific Telesis merger in 1997. PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 C alifornians and Information Technology 25 of State to compare the party registration of registered voters in our sample to party registration in the state. The landline and cell phone samples were then i ntegrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing adjusts for any differences across region al, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone service, and party registration groups. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±2.8 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total sample of 2,50 2 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2.8 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger: For the 1, 609 registered voters, it is ±3.1 percent; for the 1,132 likely voters, it is ±3.6 percent; for the 2 ,099 Internet users, it is ±3 percent; and for the 1,793 users of broadband at home , it is 3.3% . Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. Throughout the report, w e refer to five geographic regions that account for approximately 90 percent of the state’s population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sut ter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “ San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orang e/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents from other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to r eport separately We present specific results for non- Hispanic whites and for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. We also present results for non- Hispanic Asians, who make up about 13 percent of the state’s adult population, and non- Hispanic blacks, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in another party are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated by their responses to survey questions on voter registration, past voting, and current interest in politics. In addition, we present the responses of Internet users , who are defined, consistent with national surveys , as those who answered yes to one or both questions: “Do you use the Internet, at least occasionally?” or “Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally?” We al so present the responses of broadband users, who are defined, consistent with national surveys, as those who have a high -speed connection at home (including DSL, cable, wireless, T -1, or fiber optic). The percentages presented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to results from the Pew Internet & American Life Project . Additional details about our methodology can be found at http://www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 26 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY June 1–14, 2011 2,502 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese MARGIN OF ERROR ±2.8% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE PERCENTAGES MAY N OT ADD TO 100 DUE TO ROUNDING 1. First, do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 28% right direction 60 wrong direction 12 don’t know 2. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 26% good times 63 bad times 11 don’t know 3. Do you yourself ever use a computer at home, at work, at school, or anywhere else? 81% yes 19 no – don’t know 4 /4a. Next, do you use the Internet, at least occasionally? [or] Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally? 84% yes 16 no – don’t know 4b. [non -Internet users only] Did you ever at some point use the Internet or email, but have since stopped for some reason? 14% yes 86 no – don’t know 4c. [non -Internet users only] Would you like to start using the Internet or email ( if q 4b=yes : again), or isn’t that something you’re interested in? 19% yes, interested 79 no, not interested 2 don’t know 4d. [non -Internet users only] And, what is the main reason you don’t use the Internet or email? [code, don’t read ] 17% not interested 16 d on’t have a computer 12 just don’t know how 11 cost/too expensive 9 it’s a waste of time/don’t need it 8 it is too difficult/frustrating 6 don’t have access 5 just don’t have the time 4 too old to learn 2 physically unable 2 worried about computer viruses , spyware, adware, spam 5 other 2 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 27 4e. [non -Internet users only] If you wanted to start usin g the Internet or email ( if q4b=yes: again), do you feel that you know enough about computers and technology to be able to do that on your own, or would you need someone to help you? 15% know enough to go online (again) on my own 67 would need someone to help me 15 would not want to start using the Internet (volunteered) 2 don’t know 5. [Internet users only] Did you happen to use the Internet yesterday? 79% yes 20 no 1 don’t know 6. [Internet users only] About how many years have you been an Internet user? [code, don’t read] 2% less than 1 year 21 1– 5 years 33 6– 10 years 27 11– 15 years 15 more than 15 years 2 don’t know 7. [Internet users only] About how often do you use the Internet or email from home — several times a day, about once a day, 3 –5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 49% several times a day 19 about once a day 10 3– 5 days a week 11 1– 2 days a week 3 every few weeks 2 less often 4 never 1 don’t know 8. [Internet users only] About how often do you use the Internet or email from work —several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 37% several times a day 8 about once a day 3 3– 5 days a week 4 1– 2 days a week 2 every few weeks 3 less often 32 never 12 don’t work/ retired (volunteered) – don’t know 9. [Internet users only] About how often do you use the Internet or email from someplace other than home or work —several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 17% several times a day 6 about once a day 5 3– 5 days a week 9 1– 2 days a week 6 every few weeks 14 les s often 42 never 1 don’t know 10. [Internet users only] Do you ever access the Internet using a computer at a public library? 24% yes 76 no – don’t know As I read the following list of items, please tell me if you happen to have each one, or not. 11. [all adults ] Do you have a desktop computer? 65% yes [ask q11a] 35 no [skip to q12] – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 28 11a. [Internet users who have a desktop] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your desktop computer? 92% yes 8 no – don’t know 12. [all adults ] Do you have a laptop computer or netbook ? 61% yes [ask q1 2a] 39 no [skip to q1 3] – don’t know 12a. [ Internet users who have a laptop or netbook] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your laptop computer or netbook ? 94% yes 6 no – don’t know 12b. [non -desktop, laptop, or netbook owners] And , what is the main reason you don’t have a computer at home? [code, don’t read ] 37% c ost/too expensive 24 not interested 17 don’t know how to use it 6 don’t really know about computers 3 sufficient access elsewhere 13 other – don’t know 13 . [all adults ] Do you have a working cell phone? 93% yes [ask q1 3a] [includes those who completed interview on cell phone] 7 no [skip to q1 4] – don’t know 13a. [ Internet users who have a cell phone] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your cell phone? 50% yes 50 no – don’t know 14. [all adults ] Do you have a game console like Xbox or Play Station in your home? 41% yes [ask q1 4a] 58 no [skip to q1 5] – don’t know 14a. [ Internet users who have a game console] Do yo u ever access the Internet or email using your game console? 38% yes 61 no 1 don’t know 15. [all adults ] Do you have an electronic book device or e -book reader, such as a Kindle or Nook? 11% yes [ask q1 5a] 89 no [skip to q1 6] – don’t know 15a. [ Internet users who have an electronic book device] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your electronic book device? 61% y es 39 no – don’t know 16. [all adults ] Do you have a tablet computer like an iPad, Sa msung Galaxy, or Motorola Xoom? 1 4% yes [ask q1 6a] 86 no [skip to q1 7] 1 don’t know [skip to q1 7] 16a. [ Internet users who have a tablet computer] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your tablet computer? 83% yes 17 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 29 Thinking now just about your cell phone… 17. [cell phone users only] Some phones are called “smartphones” because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartphone or not, or are you not sure? [ If necessary : A smartphone is a mobile device like an iPhone, Blackberry or Android that offers more advanced computing ability and connectivity than a standard cell phone.] 39% yes, it is a smartphone 49 no, is not a smartphone 12 not sure 18. [cell phone users only] Thinking about your cell phone plan, do you currently pay for any kind of data plan on your phone, or not ? [ If necessary : A data plan from your cell phone provider allows you to send and receive emails and surf the Internet from your mobile device.] 41% yes 55 no 2 someone else pays for phone (volunteered) 2 don’t know Please tell me if you ever use your cell phone to do any of the following things. 19. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to send or receive text messages? 74% yes 26 no – don’t know 20. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to send or receive email messages? 42% yes 58 no – don’t know 21. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to do work -related activities when you ar e not at work? 32% yes 59 no 9 don’t work/ retired (volunteered) – don’t know 22. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to make a charitable donation by text message? 10% yes 89 no – don’t know 23. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to download a software application or “app ?” 33% yes [ask q 24] 67 no [skip to q25 ] – don’t know 24. [cell phone users who download apps] Thinking about all of the apps you have downloaded, have you ever paid for an app, or have you only downloaded apps that are free? 52% yes, have paid for app 47 only download apps that are f ree 1 don’t know 25. [cell phone Internet use rs only] Overall, when you use the Internet, do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer? 25% mostly on cell phone 62 mostly on something else 12 both equally (volunteered) 2 depends (volunteered) – don’t know 26. [cell phone Internet use rs only] About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone— several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often , or never? 59% s everal times a day 13 about once a day 9 3– 5 days a week 10 1– 2 days a week 3 every few weeks 4 less often 2 never – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 30 27. [laptop Internet use rs only] On your laptop computer or netbook, do you use WiFi or a wireless connection to access the Internet? [ If necessary: WiFi is a short range wireless internet connection] 85% yes 15 no 1 d on’t know 28. [laptop Internet use rs only] On your laptop computer or netbook, do you use mobile wireless broadband, such as an a ircard, to access the Internet? [ If necessary: Wireless broadband is a longer -range wireless connection, offered by many telephone companies and others] 23% yes 72 no 5 don’t know Thinking about when you access the Internet wirelessly on your laptop or netbook —either using WiFi or mobile wireless broadband… 29. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this at home? 86% yes 13 no 1 don’t know 30. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this at work? 39% yes 60 no 1 don’t know 31. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this someplace other than home or work? 55% yes 45 no – don’t know 32. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this away from work to do work -related activities? 43% yes 49 no 8 don’t work/ retired (volunteered) – don’t know Thinking now about how you get information and communicate with others using a cell phone or laptop when you are away from home and work, please tell me if each of the following is very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all import ant. [rotate questions 33 to 36] 33. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about staying in touch easily with other people? 59% very important 27 somewhat important 7 not too important 6 not at all important 1 does not apply (volunteered) 1 don’t know 34. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about having easy access to information online? 52% very important 26 somewhat important 8 not too important 12 not at all important 1 does not apply (volunteered) 1 don’t know 35. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about sharing or posting content online? 13% v ery important 22 somewhat important 28 not too important 32 not at all important 2 does not apply (volunteered) 2 don’t know 36. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about being able to do work -related activities? 35% very important 21 somewhat important 13 not too important 21 not at all important 4 does not apply (volunteered) 6 don’t work/retired (volunteered) 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 31 Next, please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things. [questions 37 to 48 reported for all adults] [ rotate q uestions 37 to 48] 37. Do you ever go online to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others? 30% yes, do this 70 no, do not do this – don’t know 3 8. Do you ever go online to look for information about a job? 49% yes, do this 51 no, do not do this – don’t know 39. Do you ever go online to purchase goods and services? 64% yes, do this 36 no, do not do this – don’t know 40. Do you ever go online to get news and information on current events, public issues, or politics? 66% yes, do this 34 no, do not do this – don’t know 41. Do you ever go online to use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook , or LinkedIn? 52% yes, do this 48 no, do not do this – don’t know 42. Do you ever go online for educational purposes, such as online training or for taking a class? 45% yes, do this 54 no, do not do this – don’t know 43. Do you ever go online to get health or medical information? 61% yes, do this 39 no, do not do this – don’t know 44. Do you ever go online to create or work on y our own online journal or blog? 15% yes, do this 85 no, do not do this – don’t know 45. Do you ever go online to visit a local, state, or federal governme nt website? 53% yes, do this 47 no, do not do this – don’t know 46. Do you ever go online to access government resources, such as obtaining forms, making payments, or registering to vote? 51% yes, do this 49 no, do not do this – don’t know 47. Do you ever go online to get housing or real estate information? 45% yes, do this 55 no, do not do this – don’t know 48. Do you ever go online to get information about activities or events in your community? 59% yes, do this 41 no, do not do this – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 32 Next, I am going to ask you about the same Internet activities, but please tell me if you ever use your cell phone to go online to do any of them. [questions 49 to 60 reported for all cell phone users ] [ rotate questions 49 to 60 in same order as q uestions 37 to 48] 49. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others? 17% yes, do this 82 no, do not do this – don’t know 50. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to look for information about a job? 14% yes, do this 86 no, do not do this – don’t know 51. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to purchase goods and services? 16% yes, do this 84 no, do not do this – don’t know 52. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to get news and information on current events, public issues, or politics? 28% yes, do this 72 no, do not do this – don’t know 53. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook , or LinkedIn? 28% yes, do this 72 no, do not do this – don’t know 54. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online for educational purposes, such as online training or for taking a class? 9% yes, do this 91 no, do not do this – don’t know 55. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to get health or medical information? 18% yes, do this 82 no, do not do this – don’t know 56. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to create or work on your own online journal or blog? 6% yes, do this 94 no, do not do this – don’t know 57. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to visit a local, state, or federal government website? 12% yes, do this 88 no, do not do this – don’t know 58. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to access government resources, such as obtaining f orms, making payments, or registering to vote? 9% yes, do this 91 no, do not do this – don’t know 59. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to get housing or real estate information? 10% yes, do this 90 no, do not do this – don’t know 60. Do y ou ever use your cell phone to go online to get information about activities or events in your community? 25% y es, do this 75 no, do not do this – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 33 61. What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL -enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fiber optic connection such as FIOS, or a T-1? [ question 61 reported for all adults] 25% DSL -enabled phone line [skip to q65] 25 cable modem [skip to q65] 16 wireless connection (either air card, land -based or satellite) [skip to q65] 5 fiber optic or T -1 [skip to q65] 4 dial-up telephone line [ask q62] 1 no home service, connect to Internet via a cell phone (volunteered) [ask q 62] 21 do not have Internet access/ computer at home [ask q 62] 1 unspecified broadband connection 3 don’t know [ask q62] 62. [non -Internet users or non -broadband users only] Do you happen to know whether high -speed Internet service is available in your neighborhood from a telephone company, a cable company, or any other company? 58% yes 21 no 21 don’t know [sample sizes for questions 63 and 64 are too small to report] 65. [broadband users only] About how many years have you been using a high -speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home ? [code, don’t read] 2% less than 1 year 50 1– 5 years 38 6– 10 years 6 11–15 years 1 more than 15 years 3 don’t know [questions 66 to 74 asked of all adults] 66. Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high -speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not eno ugh? 15% more than enough 41 just enough 27 not enough 17 don’t know 67. Do you think that expanding affordable high- speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done? 19% a top priority 37 important but a lower priority 23 not too important 16 should not be done 5 don’t know 68. Which of the following comes closest to your view, even if neither is exactly right [ rotate ] [1] high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility that everyone should have access to [ or ] [2] high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury that some people may not be able to access. 66% should be viewed as a public utility 27 should be viewed as a luxury 7 don’t know 69. How important is it for California’s K –12 public schools to teach students com puter and Internet skills? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 76% very important 18 somewhat important 3 not too important 3 not at all important 1 d on’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 34 Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people…Do you think that people who do not have high -speed broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following : [rotate q uestions 70 to 73] 70. How about keeping up with news and information? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 38% major disadvantage 36 minor disadvantage 23 not at a disadvantage 3 don’t know 71. How about finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage? ) 62% major disadvantage 20 minor disadvantage 14 not at a disadvantage 4 don’t know 72. How about using government services? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage? ) 42% major disadvantage 35 minor disadvantage 17 not at a disadvantage 5 don’t know 73. How about getting health information? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage? ) 50% major disadvantage 30 minor disadvantage 17 not at a disadvantage 3 don’t know 74. Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in C alifornia? 66% yes [ask q 74a] 34 no [skip to q 75b] 74a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or are you registered as a decline -to -state or independent voter ? 45% Democrat [ask to q75] 32 Republican [skip to q75a] 3 another party [specify] [skip to q76] 20 independent [skip to q75b] 75. Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 54% strong 43 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q76 ] 75a. Would you call yourself a strong Republi can or not a very strong Republican? 53% strong 43 not very strong 4 don’t know [skip to q76 ] 75b. Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 19% R epublican Party 37 Democratic P arty 33 neither (volunteered) 11 don’t know 76. Would you consider yourself to be politically: [ read list, rotate order top to bottom] 12% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 26 middle -of -the -road 21 somewhat conservative 14 very conservative 6 don’t know 77. Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics —a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 21% great deal 37 fair amount 26 only a little 15 none 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 35 D4b. [parents of children 18 or younger only] Do you ever visit the website of your child’s school? ( if yes : Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 31% yes, often [skip to d4d] 32 yes, sometimes [skip to d4d] 36 no [ask d4c ] – don’t know [ask d4c ] D4c. [parents who do not visit school website ] And, as far as you know, does your child’s school have a website? 62% yes 10 no 27 don’t know D4d. [parents of children 18 or younger only] Do you ever receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email? ( if yes : Do you do receive these often or only sometimes?) 19% yes , often [skip to d5] 13 yes, sometimes [skip to d5] 65 no [ask d4e ] 2 don’t know [ask d4e ] D4e. [parents who do not receive homework via Internet, email] And, as far as you know, do your child’s teachers send homework assignments via the Internet or email? 14% yes 71 no 15 don’t know [d1 –d4 a and d5–d20: demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Angela Blackwell Founder and CEO PolicyLink Paul Brest President The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Executive Director University of California Washington Center James E. Canales President The James Irvine Foundation Jon Cohen Director of Polling The Washington Post Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network William Hauck President California Business Roundtable Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Senior Scholar School of Policy, P lanning, and Development University of Southern California Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Monica Lozano Publisher and CEO La Opinión Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Lisa Pitney Vice President, Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Dan Rosenheim News Director KPIX -TV Robert K. Ross, M.D. President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Cathy Taylor Vice President and Editorial Commentary Director Orange County Register Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Emeritus Great Valley Center The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS John E. Bryson, Chair Retired Chairman and CEO Edison International Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Marí a Blanco Vice President, Civic Engagement California Community Foundation Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Education State of California Robert M. Hertzberg Partner Mayer Brown, LLP Walter B. Hewlett Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs David Mas Masumoto Author and farmer Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni , LLP Constance L. Rice Co-Director The Advancement Project Thomas C. Sutton Retired Chairman and CEO Pacific Life Insurance Company The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research on major economic, social, and political issues. The institute’s goal is to raise public awareness and to give elected representatives and other decisionmakers a more informed basis for developing policies and programs. The institute’s research focuses on the underlying forces shaping California’s future, cutting across a wide range of public policy concerns, including economic development, education, environment and resources, governance, population, public finance, and social and health policy. PPIC is a private operating foundation. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. PPIC was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. Mark Baldassare is President and CEO of PPIC. John E. Bryson is Chair of the Board of Directors. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source and the copyright notice below is included. Copyright © 201 1 Public Policy Institute of California All rights reserved. San Francisco, CA PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, California 94111 phone : 415.291.4400 fax: 415.291.4401 PPIC SACRAMENTO CENT ER Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 phone: 916.440.1120 fax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org survey@ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(102) "

S 611MBS

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(114) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-information-technology-june-2011/s_611mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8803) ["ID"]=> int(8803) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:41:00" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4154) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(8) "S 611MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "s_611mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_611MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "531652" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(82015) "& p p i c s tat e w i d e s u r v e y Californians Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner Sonja Petek Jui Shrestha in collaboration with California Emerging Technology Fund and ZeroDivide CONTENTS About the Survey 2 Press Release 3 Access and Use 6 Perceptions and Attitudes 18 Regional Map 23 Methodology 24 Questionnaire and Results 26 information technology JUNE 2011 June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 2 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Sur vey series provide policymakers, the media, and the public with objective, advocacy-free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of California residents. Inaugurated in April 1998, this is the 118 th PPIC Statewide Sur vey in a series that has generated a database of responses from more than 250,000 Californians. This sur vey is the third in a series focusing on information technology issues and is funded with grants from the California Emerging Technology Fund and ZeroDivide. This series seeks to inform decisionmakers, raise public awareness, and stimulate policy discussions and debate about a variety of information technology issues. We draw upon earlier PPIC Statewide Sur veys for California trends over time and upon recent sur veys by the Pew Internet & American Life Project for national comparisons . Although broadband Internet availability has become more common, t here are still many California ns who are not connected. This sur vey seeks to inform the impor tant public policy issues around the changing nature of “connectedness” and differences between Californians who are and are not “connected.” We examine access to and use of information technology, the evolving role of mobile devices, as well as t he public’s perceptions and attitudes toward these issues . This sur vey presents the responses of 2,502 adult residents throughout the state, inter viewed in multiple languages and contacted by landline or cell phone. It includes findings on these topics:  Information technology access and use, including a profile of who uses the Internet and has a broadband connection at home, overall use of computers, and ownership of a variety of electronic devices ; specific activities that are conducted on the Internet and whether a cell phone is also used to do these; how often res pondents access the Internet or email, and what kind of Internet connection they have at home. We ask about mobile devices and access to the I nternet, laptop or netbook Internet access, and non- Internet users’ interest in the Internet and reasons for not using the Internet or email.  Perceptions and attitudes toward information technology, including the impor tance of laptop and cell phone communications , the role of government in the access and availability of high- speed Internet technology; the perception of broadband I nternet as a public utility or as a luxur y; the impor tance of information technology in education; and attitudes about possible disadvantages faced by those without high -speed Internet access at home.  Time trends, national comparisons, and variations in findings across racial/ethnic groups (Asians, blacks, Latinos, and non-Hispanic whites), across five major regions of the state (Central Valley, San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles County, Inland Empire, and Orange/San Diego Counties), across socioeconomic and political groups, and among those with and wit hout broadband access at home. This repor t may be downloaded free of charge from our website ( www.ppic.org). For questions about the sur vey, please contact sur vey@ppic.org . Tr y our PPIC Statewide Sur vey interactive tools online at http://www.ppic.org/main/sur vAdvancedSearch.asp. PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 7 INTERNET USE AND HOME ACCESS Vast majorities of Californians access the Internet at least occasionally (84%). Since 2000, the percentage of Californians using the Internet has grown (65% 2000, 70% 2008, 76% 2009, 81% 2010, 84% today). Today, 76 percent of Californians have an Internet connection at home, up from 63 percent in June 2008. Seventy -two percent of Californians have a broadband Internet connection at home (including DSL, cable, wireless, T -1, or fiber optic); home broadband use is up 19 points since 2007 (53% 2007, 55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% today). The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life project tracks Internet use at the national level. In a late 2010 survey, Pew found that 77 percent of adults nationwide reported using the Internet, somewhat lower than the 84 percent of Californians in our survey. Californians in our survey are also more likely than adults nationwide to have Internet access at home (76% to 68%) and to have a broadband connection at home (72% to 61%) , compared to Pew’s May 2011 survey. Broadband use among adults nationwide has leveled off somewhat in recent years ( 55% 2008, 63% 2009, 66% 2010, 61% 2011). There are differences across California’s regional and demographic groups when it comes to the use of technology, resulting in a “digital divide.” For example, the percentage saying they have a broadband connection at home declines with age (81% 18 –34, 72% 35 –54, 61% 55 and older) and rises sharply with income and education. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (55%) are the least likely to have a broadband connection (74% blacks, 76% Asians, 81% whites) or to use the Internet (70% Latinos, 85% blacks, 86% Asians, 92% whites). Still, the share of Latinos who have a home broadband connection has nearly doubled since 2007 (from 28% to 55% today). Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (78%) and Orange/San Diego Counties (76%) are the most likely to have a home broadband connection, followed by those in the Central Valley (70%), Los Angeles (68%), and the Inland Empire (66%). Percent saying yes Internet Use Internet Access at Home Do you access the Internet, at least occasionally? or Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally? Internet connection at home Broadband connection at home All Adults 84% 76% 72% Age 18 –34 92 84 81 35–54 84 77 72 55 and over 74 66 61 Household Income Under $40,0 0 0 72 63 58 $40,000 to under $80,000 94 86 82 $80,000 or more 98 94 93 Race/Ethnicity Asians 86 81 76 Blacks 85 77 74 Latinos 70 60 55 Whites 92 85 81 Region Central Valley 85 77 70 San Francisco Bay Area 89 82 78 Los Angeles 79 72 68 Orange/San Diego 89 80 76 Inland Empire 83 70 66 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 8 DEVICES AND INTERNET USE Californians have a variety of electronic devices and connect to the Internet more on some than others. When it comes to various devices, nearly all Californians have a cell phone (93%), and more than six in 10 Californians have a desktop computer (65%) or a laptop computer or netbook (61%); far fewer have a game console (41%), a tablet computer such as an i Pad (14%), or a n electro nic book reader (11%). While most Californians across demographic groups have a cell phone, ownership of the other devices differ s among racial/ethnic groups, and var ies across age groups and education and income levels. Californians are more likely to own and access the Internet with desktop (56%) or laptop computers (5 5%) than with cell phones (40 %). Far fewer own and connect to the I nternet using a game console (14 %), a tablet computer (11%), or an e -book reader (7%). Using a desktop to connect to the Internet is more common among whites (64%) and Asians (58%) than among blacks (49%) and L atinos (42%). The percentage of adults connecting via a desktop increases sharply with income and education. Use of a laptop to connect to the Internet is higher among A sians (65%), whites (62%), and blacks (57%) than among Latinos (38 %). Again, the percentage using a laptop to access the Internet rises sharply with income and education. The percentage of adults using cell phones to connect to the Internet declines sharpl y with age, and increases sharply with education and income. Use of a cell phone to access the Internet is highest among blacks (57 %), followed by whites (43%), Asians ( 41%), and Latinos ( 32%). Connecting to the Internet using a game console is done by one in four younger Californians, and one in five more affluent Californians. Ownership of a tablet computer or a e-book reader and using them to connect to the Internet is less likely among less affluent and less educated Californians. Do you have a ___________? (and) Do you ever access the Internet or email using your ___________? Percent saying yes and access the Internet using this device Desktop computer Laptop computer Cell phone Game console Tablet Computer Electronic book reader All Adults 56% 55% 40% 14% 11% 7% Age 18 –34 53 65 57 26 9 8 35–54 58 57 43 13 15 8 55 and over 56 39 17 3 7 4 Household Income Under $40,000 40 40 32 10 6 3 $40,000 to under $80,000 69 61 41 16 9 6 $80,000 or more 73 81 60 21 24 15 Race/Ethnicity Asians 58 65 41 16 11 8 Blacks 49 57 57 21 12 4 Latinos 42 38 32 14 6 4 Whites 64 62 43 13 14 9 Region Central Valley 50 52 37 14 8 8 San Francisco Bay Area 62 63 46 15 18 11 Los Angeles 50 51 41 13 9 4 Orange/San Diego 64 58 42 18 12 7 Inland Empire 57 50 39 12 8 4 Internet Users 67 65 48 17 13 8 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 9 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES Californians go online to do a variety of activities , ranging from purchasing goods and services to working on their blog s, and are doing so at increasing rates. Half or more of Californians go online to get news on current events (66%, up 11 points from 200 8), to make purchases (64%, up 12 points), to get health information (61%, up 11 points), to get community information (59%, up 12 points) , to visit a government website (53%, similar to 2008 ), or to use social networking (52%, up 26 points). Similar to overall I nternet use, older, less -educated, and lower -income Californians, along with Latinos, are less likely than others to do all of the se activities. Across regions, residents in the San Francisco Bay Area and Orange/San Diego Counties are generally more likely than those in other regions to do these activities. Californians with health insurance are much more likely than those without insurance to go online to get health or medical information (66% to 47%). Cell phone u sers connecting to the I nternet via those cell phone are doing many of these activities. One in four or more cell phone users go online to get news (28%) , use social netwo rking sites (28%) , or get community information (25%) on their cell phones. Fewer cell phone users go online to get health information (18%), purchase goods and services (16%), or to visit a government website (12%). “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things . How about going online …” Percent saying yes …to get news on current events? …to purchase goods and services? …to get health or medical information? …to get information about your community? …to visit a government website? …to use a social networking site? All Adults 66% 64% 61% 59% 53% 52% Internet Users 79 76 73 70 63 62 Age 18 –34 78 69 68 68 53 71 35–54 65 65 62 63 57 53 55 and over 54 57 53 44 48 30 Household Income Under $40,000 51 45 49 47 36 45 $40,000 to under $80,000 76 77 71 67 63 58 $80,000 or more 89 91 77 80 79 65 Race/Ethnicity Asians 69 72 63 56 49 60 Blacks 71 61 56 63 54 54 Latinos 48 40 44 42 34 42 Whites 76 78 72 71 66 56 Region Central Valley 64 62 60 57 49 52 San Francisco Bay Area 71 69 66 67 59 53 Los Angeles 60 59 57 54 50 52 Orange/San Diego 73 72 69 62 59 55 Inland Empire 65 57 54 55 47 46 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 28 16 18 25 12 28 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 10 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES (CONTINUED) Some Californians also go online to access government resources (51%, up 8 points from 2008 ), to look for job information (49%, same as 2008), for educational purposes , such as online training or taking a class (45% ), to get real estate information (45%, up 5 points), to use Twitter (30%, up 12 points from 2009 ), and to work on their own blog s (15%, similar to 2009). Once again, older, less -educated, and lower -income Californians, along with Latinos, are less likely than others to do most of these activities. Going online to use Twitter is done by nearly half of those aged 18– 34 (48%) , while only 12 percent of those 55 and older use Twitter. When it comes to accessing government resources online, whites (64%) and Asians (53%) are much more likely than blacks (39%) and Latinos (35%) to do most of these activities . Relatively few Californians are using their cell phone s to connect to the I nternet for these activities. Seventeen percent of cell phone users connect to use Twitter, and 14 percent to look for job information (14%), while one in 10 or fewer are doing so to get real estate information (10%), for educational purposes (9%) , to access government resources (9%), or to work on a blog (6%). “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things . How about going online …” Percent saying yes …to access government resources? …to look for information about a job? …for educational purposes? …to get housing or real estate information? …to use Twitter? …to work on your own blog? All Adults 51% 49% 45% 45% 30% 15% Internet Users 61 59 54 53 36 18 Age 18 –34 57 75 60 49 48 25 35–54 53 50 46 50 28 13 55 and over 42 21 26 33 12 6 Household Income Under $40,000 35 48 36 33 28 13 $40,000 to under $80,000 64 55 51 52 33 16 $80,000 or more 73 54 59 63 35 18 Race/ Ethnicity Asians 53 60 52 51 45 24 Blacks 39 70 59 49 30 16 Latinos 35 44 36 29 26 9 Whites 64 47 46 52 29 15 Region Central Valley 46 50 44 45 28 12 San Francisco Bay Area 58 53 51 46 34 17 Los Angeles 49 46 45 40 29 17 Orange/San Diego 58 50 46 50 28 13 Inland Empire 44 48 38 44 29 13 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 9 14 9 10 17 6 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 11 FREQUENCY OF INTERNET USAGE Nearly seven in 10 Internet users in California access the I nternet from home at least once a day (19%) or several times a day (49%). Fewer than half of Internet users (45%) access the Internet about once a day (8%) or several times a day (37%) from work, while about one in four (23%) access the Internet from somep lace other than work or home (6% about once a day, 17% several times a day). Frequent use (at least once a day) of the Internet at home has been similar since we began asking this question in 2008 (66% 2008, 65% 2009, 68% today).The frequency of Internet use from work has declined slightly since 2008 (52% 2008, 50% 2009, 45% today) , while use from someplace other than home or work has increased somewhat (14% 2008, 15% 2009, 23% today). Use of the Internet from home at least once a day is highest among Inte rnet users in the San Francisco Bay Area (75%) , followed by those in Orange/San Diego Counties (70%), Los Angeles (66%), Inland Empire (64%) , and the Central Valley (63%). Younger and more affluent residents are more frequent home Internet users than others. A cross regions, residents of the San Francisco Bay Area (55%) are the most likely to use the Internet at work on a daily basis. Internet users age d 35 to 54 (57%) are much more frequent users than younger (43%) or older (29%) Internet users to go online at work daily. Internet use from someplace other than home or work is highe st in the San Francisco Bay Area (31%) and Los Angeles (28%) followed by Orange/San Diego Counties (24%), the Central Valley (19%), and the Inland Empire (15%). Frequent use away home or work declines with age and is higher among upper -income residents . Latino Internet users are the least frequent Internet users across racial/ethnic groups, regardless of location. California Internet users and those nationwi de use the Internet at similar rates at home or work according to a November 2010 survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. “About how often do you use the Internet or email from…” Internet users only …home? …work? …some place other than home or work? Several times a day 49% 37% 17% About once a day 19 8 6 3–5 days a week 10 3 5 1–2 days a week 11 4 9 Every few weeks 3 2 6 Less often 2 3 14 Never 4 44* 42 *Includes 12 percent of I nternet users who volunteer that they do not work or are retired . INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME Seven in 10 California adults have a broadband Internet connection at home, including half who have either a DSL connection (25%) or a cable modem (25%); 16 percent use a direct wireless connection such as via satellite. The remainder of broadband users connect via a fiber optic or T –1 connection (5%) or some other type of broadband connection. Four percent of Californians have Internet access via a dial -up telephone line, while 21 percent do not have Internet or a computer at home. Broadband access at home had increased each year since 2008, but this year we find results similar to last year (55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% today). Use of a DSL connection is highest in Los Angeles (29%), while cable modem use is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (35%). Inland Empire residents (15%) are at least three times more likely than PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 12 INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME (CONTINUED) residents elsewhere to report having a fiber optic or T –1 connection. Lack of Internet access of any kind is highest in the Inland Empire and Los Angeles (25% each). As reported earlier, Latinos are the most likely racial/ethnic group to lack a computer or Internet access in the home. Absence of a home connection varies gr eatly across education groups (39% high school or less, 11% some college, 4% college graduate) and annual income levels (35% $40,000 or less, 10% $40,000 to under $80,000, 3% $80,000 or more) . “What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL-enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fiber optic connection such as FiOS, or a T-1?” All adults All Adults Household I ncome Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more DSL-enabled phone line 25% 22% 29% 28% Cable modem 25 17 30 37 Wireless connection 16 14 17 19 Fiber optic or T-1 5 4 5 9 Dial- up telephone line 4 5 4 2 No Internet/computer at home 21 35 10 3 No home access, connect via cell phone or tablet computer (volunteered) 1 – 1 1 Unspecified broadband connection 1 1 1 1 Don’t know 3 2 3 2 Nearly all broadband users in California have had this high-speed access for more than one year (50% 1 to 5 years, 38% 5 to 10 years, 7% 11 years or longer). Two percent of Californians with broadband access have had the service for less than a year. Latinos (64%) are more likely than Asians (45%) and whites (44%) to have been a broadband user between one and five years, while the opposite is true for being a broadband user for six years or longer (52% whites, 51% Asians, and 29% Latinos). (In the analyse s of subgroups such as broadband users, the sample sizes for blacks are too small for separate analysis .) Broadband users age d 18 to 34 (59 %), those with a high school diploma or less (66%), and those making $40,000 or less (63%) are more likely than older, more educated, and more affluent broadband users to have had a high-speed connection between one and five years. “About how many years have you been using a high-speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home?” Broadband users only All Broadband Users Household Income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 or more Asians Latinos Whites Less than 1 year 2% 3% 2% 1% – 3% 1% 1 to 5 years 50 60 54 36 45% 64 44 6 or more years 45 34 43 61 51 29 52 Don’t know 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 Among non -Internet and non -broadband users, 58 percent say that high -speed broadband Internet access is available to them in their neighborhood , while 21 percent say it is not and 21 percent are unsure. In 2009, 66 percent said that broadband was available and 18 percent said it was not . PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 13 MOBILE DEVICES Among Californians with cell phones, 39 percent report that their phone is a smartphone , which offers advanced features and connectivity; 49 percent say their phone is not a smartphone, and 12 percent are not sure. Similarly, 41 percent say they pay for a data plan for their cell phone, while 55 percent do not. The share of Californians with a smartphone rises sharply with household income (29% under $40,000, 42% $40,000– $80,000, 57% $80,000 or more). Those in the upper -income group are also much more likely to pay for a data plan. The percentage with a smartphone or data plan increases with education level and declines with age. Among thos e who have a broadband connection at home, 46 percent also have a smartphone and 49 percent pay for a data plan. “Some phones are called “smartphones” because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartph one or not, or are you not sure ?” Cel l phone users only All Cell Phone Users Household Income Broadband Users Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Yes, it is a smartphone 39% 29% 42% 57% 46% No, it is not a smartphone 49 53 49 40 46 Not sure 12 17 9 3 7 Among cell phone users, most (74%) use it to send or receive text messages. Far fewer use their cell phones to send or receive email messages (42%), download software apps (33%), or make charitable donations (10%). The share of cell phone users who text has risen 16 points since 2008 (58% to 74% today), and the share who email via cell phone is also up 16 points (26% to 42% today). In Pew surveys, the national share of cell phone users doing each of these activities is similar (74% text, 38% email, 29% down load apps, 10% make donations). “Do you ever use your cell phone to…” Cell phone users only Percent saying yes …send or receive text messages? … send or receive email messages ? …to download a software application? … to make a charitable donation by text message? All Cell Phone Users 74% 42% 33% 10% Age 18 –34 91 55 50 13 35–54 80 46 33 11 55 and older 44 20 12 5 Household Income Under $40,000 70 34 26 9 $40,000 to under $80,000 77 43 35 13 $80,000 or more 81 58 47 13 Race/Ethnicity Asians 68 46 40 10 Latinos 73 34 25 10 Whites 75 44 34 10 Region Central Valley 70 37 33 9 San Francisco Bay Area 74 45 38 11 Los Angeles 74 45 33 12 Orange/San Diego 76 42 30 11 Inland Empire 75 38 33 10 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 14 MOBILE DEVICES (CONTINUED) Younger Californians (aged 18–34) are most likely to report doing each of these activities on their cell phone. Latinos are less likely than Asians and whites to use their cell phones for email or to download apps , but they are as likely as others to text or make charitable donations. The percentage using a cell phone to text, email, or to download apps rises with income. Among Californians who download apps, 52 percent say they pay for apps, while 47 percent mostly use free apps. The percentage paying for apps rises as income and education levels rise . Among Californians who use cell phones to access the Internet, 25 percent say that when they use the Internet, they do so mostly on their cell phone s, while 62 percent do so mostly on some other devi ce such as a desktop or laptop computer. Twelve percent volunteer that they use a cell phone or other device to access the Internet about equally. Thirty -six percent of those with household incomes of less than $40,000 mostly use their cell phones to access the Internet ; 29 percent of middle -income residents and just 13 percent of upper -income residents do so . Similar trends emerge across education groups. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos are twice as likely as whites (40% to 21%) to say they mostly use their cell phone to access the Internet. Two in three whites mostly use other devices compared to 44 percent of Latinos. “Overall, when you use the Internet , do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desk top, laptop, or tablet computer?” Cell phone Internet users only All Cell Phone Internet Users Household Income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Mostly on cell phone 25% 36% 29% 13% 40% 21% Mostly on something else 62 51 53 76 44 66 Equally (volunteered) 12 12 16 8 13 11 Depends (volunteered) / Don’t know 2 1 1 3 3 1 Among those who access the Internet via their cell phone s, 59 percent do so several times a day and another 13 percent do so about once a day. Since June 2009, there has been a sharp rise in the share accessing the Internet through a cell phone several times per day (from 30% to 59%). In June 2009, 35 percent accessed the Internet via cell phone every few weeks, less often, or never, compared to only 9 percent today. Those age d 18 to 34 are nearly three times as likely as those aged 5 5 and older to access the Internet via cell phone several times per day. “About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone?” Cell phone Internet users only All Cell Phone Internet Users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–34 35 –54 5 5 and older Latinos Whites Several times a day 59% 74% 52% 26% 60% 56% About once a day 13 9 17 14 15 14 3–5 days a week 9 8 10 12 8 8 1–2 days a week 10 7 11 23 11 13 Every few weeks 3 1 3 9 1 4 Less often 4 1 6 12 4 4 Never 2 – 2 4 2 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 15 LAPTOP USE Among those who access the Internet via laptop s or netbooks, 85 percent use WiFi or other wireless connection to do so. In the Pew November 2010 survey, a similar 88 percent of laptop Internet users nationwide used WiFi to connect to the Internet. Across regions and demographic groups, at least 80 percent of laptop Internet users access the Internet wirelessly. Fewer laptop Internet users access the Internet with mobile wireless broadband, such as an aircard. Just 23 percent overall and fewer than three in 10 across regions and demographic groups access the Internet this way. In Pew’s survey, 27 percent of laptop Internet users accessed the Internet using mobile wireless broadband. “On your laptop computer or netbook, do you use …” Laptop Internet users only All Laptop Internet Users Age Race /Ethnicity 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Latinos Whites …WiFi or a wireless connection to access the Internet ? Yes 85% 90% 83% 81% 80% 89% No 15 10 17 18 19 10 Don't know 1 1 1 1 1 1 …mobile wireless broadband, such as an aircard , to access the Internet ? Yes 23 20 26 23 25 24 No 72 78 67 70 71 71 Don't know 5 2 6 7 5 5 Among Californians who use their laptops to access the Internet wirelessly (through WiFi or mobile wireless broadband), 86 percent do so at home, while 39 percent do so at work. A majority — 55 percent —do so at some place other than home or work. More than eight in 10 across regions and demographic groups use their laptop wirelessly at home. When it comes to using their laptop wirelessly at work, those aged 35 to 54 (45%) are more likely than others to do this. The percentage doing this at work rises with income and education level s and is somewhat higher among whites than Latinos. At least half across most demographic groups use their laptops to access the Internet wirelessly outside of home and work, the exception being Latinos (46%) and those with a high school education or less (42%). “Thinking about when you access the Internet wireles sly on your laptop or netbook — e ither using WiFi or mobile wireless broadband, do you ever do this at… ” Wireless laptop users only Percent saying yes …home? …work? …someplace other than home or work? All Wireless L aptop Users 86% 39% 55% Age 18 –34 84 39 57 35–54 89 45 53 55 and over 85 27 52 Household Income Under $40,000 84 26 53 $40,000 to under $80,000 87 39 50 $80,000 or more 89 51 59 Race/Ethnicity Latinos 82 31 46 Whites 87 40 57 Region Central Valley 82 32 52 San Francisco Bay Area 86 49 61 Los Angeles 88 39 56 Orange/San Diego Inland Empire 85 37 52 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 16 WORK-RELATED ACTIVITIES A WAY FROM WORK Among all cell phone users, 32 percent use their cell phone for work -related activities away from work, while 59 percent do not. There are some differences across the state’s regions and demographic groups in work habits outside the workplace. In the San Francisco Bay Area —home of the Silicon Valley— 41 percent of cell phone users use their phone for work outside of the office. By comparison, 34 percent in the Inland Empire, 33 percent in Orange/San Diego Counties, 31 percent in Los Angeles, and 24 percent in the Central Valley do so. Across racial/ethnic groups, Asians (40%) are the most likely to use their cell phones for work, compared to three in 10 whites (32%) and Latinos (30%). The percentage using their cell phone to do work -related activities away from a work location increases with education level (23% high school or less, 35% some college, 43% college graduates) and income level (26% under $40,000, 32 % $40,000 to $80,000, 47% $80,000 or more). Men are much more likely than women (39% to 26%) to do work on their cell phones ; parents of children 18 or younger are more likely to do so than other group s (40% to 27%). “What about using your cell phone to do work-related activities when you are not at work?” Cell phone users only All Cell Phone Users Education Broadband Users High school or less Some college College graduate Yes, do this 32% 23% 35% 43% 37% No, do not do this 59 69 54 50 54 Don’t work/retired (volunteered) 9 8 11 7 9 Don’t know – – – – – Among wireless laptop users, 43 percent use this technology to do work -related activities when they are away from the workplace. Again, San Francisco Bay Area residents (53%) are the most likely to do so followed by those in the Other Southern California region (which includes Orange/San Diego Counties and the Inland Empire: 45%), Los Angeles (42%), and the Central Valley (37%). A cross racial/ethnic groups, Asians (48%) and whites (45%) are more likely than Latinos (32%) to do work -related activities on their laptop away from the workplace. The percentage doing so increases with education level (31% high school or less, 43% some college, 52% college graduates) and income level (31% under $40,000, 42% $40,000 to $80,000, 56% $80,000 or more). Men are more likely than women to do work on their laptops with a wireless connection away from the office (50% to 37%). Across age groups, those age 35 to 54 are more likely than others to work this way (43% 18 –34, 50% 35 –54, 31% 55 and older). “Thinking about when you access the Internet wireles sly on your laptop or netbook —either using Wi Fi or mobile wireless broadband, do you ever do this away from work for work -related activities?” Wireless laptop users only Percent saying yes All Wireless Laptop Users Education Broadband Users High school or less Some college College graduate Yes 43% 31% 43% 52% 44% No 49 63 45 42 48 Don’t work/retired (volunteered) 8 5 12 6 7 Don’t know – 1 – – – PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 17 NON-INTERNET USERS Currently, 16 percent of California ns do not use the I nternet, down from 24 percent in 2009 . Of non - Internet users , 86 percent have never used the Internet or email, while 14 percent were Internet users previously. Of non -Internet users, an overwhelming majority (79%) are not interested in using the Internet. Overwhelming majorities among age groups (77% age 18 –54, 8 4% age 55 and older) and eight in 10 Latino non -Internet users say they are not interested in using the Internet or email. A majority (67%) would need help in starting to use the Internet, while 15 percent say they know enough on their own to begin using and 15 percent volunteer they do not want to use the Internet. “Would you like to start using the Internet or email (again), or isn’t that something you’re interested in?” Non -Internet users only All Non-Internet Users Age Latinos 18–54 55 and older Yes, interested 19% 21% 15% 17% No, not interested 79 77 84 81 Don’t know 2 2 1 2 When asked about the main reason for not using the Internet, 17 percent say they are not interested (down 13 points since 2009), 16 percent report not having a computer ( similar to 2009 ), 12 percent say they don’t know how to use it, and 11 percent mention cost (down 4 points since 2009 ). O ther reas ons given include: it’s a waste of time, it’s frustrating, too old to learn, not having access or the time, and concern over computer viruses. Those under 55 years old are somewhat more likely than older residents (19% to 11%) to mention not having a computer as the main reason. One in five Latinos cite not having a computer (21%) and one in five cite lack of interest (21%) as the main reason for not using the Internet. “And, what is the main reason you don't use the Internet or email? ” Non -Internet users only All Non-Internet Users Age Latinos 18–54 55 and older Not interested 17% 17% 19% 21% Don’t have a computer 16 19 11 21 Just don’t know how 12 14 10 13 Cost/ too expensive 11 11 11 9 It's a waste of time /don’t need it 9 6 11 5 It’s too difficult/frustrating 8 9 8 9 Don't have access 6 8 4 3 Just don’t have the time 5 4 7 6 Too old to learn 4 1 7 3 Physically unable 2 2 2 2 Worried about computer viruses/spyware/adware/spam 2 1 3 1 Other 5 5 6 4 Don’t know 2 4 – 4 June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 18 PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES KEY FINDINGS  Half or more cell phone users or laptop Internet users say staying in touch with others and having easy access to information online are very important; about a third say it is very imp ortant to be able to do work -related activities . (page 19)  A plurality of Californians (41%) think the government is doing just enough to improve the access and availability of high- speed broadband, and one in five say expanding affordable broadband acces s should be a top priority for the federal government. Two in three say high -speed broadband should be viewed as a public utility, not as a luxury . ( page 20)  Most Californians and public school parents say it is very important for California’s K –12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills. Nearly two in three parents report visiting the website of their child’s school, while nearly one in t hree report receiving their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email. ( page 21)  Most Californians think people without high - speed broadband Internet access are at a major disadvantage when it comes to finding information about job opportunit ies or health information . (page 22) 66 73 42 69 2721 52 25 0 20 40 60 80 100 All adultsDemRepInd Percent all adults Should be viewed as a public utility Should be viewed as a luxury Perception of High-SpeedBroadband Access 76 63 90 7877 0 20 40 60 80 100 AlladultsAsiansBlacksLatinosWhites Percent all adults Importance of K--12 SchoolsTeaching Computer and Internet Skills Percentsaying very important 11 19 30 37 272326 16 0 20 40 60 80 United States* California Percent all adults A top priority Important but a lower priority Not too important Should not be done Federal Government Priority for Expanding Affordable High-Speed Broadband Access *Pew Internet & American Life Project, May 2010 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 19 IMPORTANCE OF LAPTOP AND CELL PHONE COMMUNICATION For Californians who have cell phones or use the Internet on their laptop, over half find staying in touch easily with other people (59%) and having easy access to information online (52%) to be very important when staying connected outside of home or work . Far fewer consider being able to do work -related activities (35%) and sharing or posting content online (13%) very important. Findings were similar in June 2009, with 55 percent saying staying in touch, 52 percent saying having easy access to information online, and 13 percent saying sharing or posting content online were very important while staying connected outside home or work. This i s the first time we have asked about the importance of being able to do work -related activities. Older residents (age 55 and over) are less likely than younger Californians (age 18 to 34) to find all four items asked in the survey to be very important. The two groups differ most over having easy access to information online (28 point difference) and differ least in their opinion of sharing or posting content online ( 9 point difference). Residents earning less than $40,000 are slightly more likely than those with higher incomes to find staying in touch easily to be very important. Those earning $80,000 or more place greater importance on easy access to information online (60%) and being able to do work -related activities (45%) than do those with lower incomes . Whites (56%) are slightly less likely than Latinos (62%) and Asians (65%) to say staying in touch easily is very important . About six in 10 across regions say staying in touch easily is very important when connecting outside of home or work. “Thinking now about how you get information and communicate with others using a cell phone or laptop when you are away from home and work, please tell me if each of the following is very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important. How about…” Cell phone users or laptop Internet users only Percent saying very important …staying in touch easily with other people? …having easy access to information online? …being able to do work -related activities? …sharing or posting content online? All Cell Phone Users or Laptop Internet Users 59% 52% 35% 13% Age 18 –34 68 62 38 18 35–54 61 55 43 13 55 and over 46 34 19 9 Household Income Under $40,000 64 48 30 14 $40,000 to under $80,000 55 53 33 14 $80,000 or more 58 60 45 12 Race/Ethnicity Asians 65 48 39 16 Latinos 62 53 35 16 Whites 56 52 31 10 Region Central Valley 58 51 32 8 San Francisco Bay Area 62 58 38 19 Los Angeles 63 49 36 14 Orange/San Diego 57 53 32 12 Inland Empire 59 48 37 14 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 20 ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN ACCESS AND ADOPTION A majority of adults (56%) say that expanding high -speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a priority for the federal government : 19 percent say it should be a top priority and 37 percent call it an important but lower priority. Twenty-three percent say it’s not too important and 16 percent say it should not be done. Findings among broadband users are similar to those for all adults. According to a May 201 0 Pew survey , fewer adults nationwide consider broadband expansion a priority (11% top priority, 30% important but low, 27% not too important, 26% should not be done ). Democrats and independents (60% each) are far more likely than Republicans (38 %) to say that providing affordable high -speed Internet should be a federal government priority. Across regions and demographic groups at least half agree. Whites, older residents, those without children , renters, and those who have lived at their current residence for five years or more are less likely than others to believe that expanding affordable high -speed Internet access is a federal government priority. “Do you think that expanding affordable high-speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done ?” All Adults Party Broadband Users Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind Top priority 19% 20% 8% 18% 19% 13% Important but lower priority 37 40 30 42 40 37 Not too important 23 25 22 20 24 23 Should not be done 16 10 37 17 16 24 Don’t know 5 5 3 2 2 3 When asked whether they view high- speed Internet as a public utility to which everyone should have access or a luxury that some people may not be able to access, solid majorities (66% adults, 61% likely voters, 68% broadband users) say broadband should be viewed as a public utility. Democrats (73%) and independents (69%) are far mor e likely than Republicans (42%) to hold this view. At least six in 10 across racial/ethnic groups say it should be a public utility, with Latinos (75%) especially likely to hold this view . Californians continue to be divided about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high -speed broadband Internet technology. About four in 10 adults (41%) believe that the government is doing just enough, 27 percent say not enough, 15 percent say more than enough , and about one in five (17%) are unsure. Findings are similar among broadband users and likely voters. Since this question was asked in 2008, about four in 10 have said the government was doing just enough. “Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and avai lability of high-speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not enough ?” All Adults Party Broadband Users Likely Voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 15% 12% 24% 18% 15% 18% Just enough 41 43 38 36 45 39 Not enough 27 30 17 26 27 25 Don’t know 17 15 21 20 13 17 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 21 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION An overwhelming ma jority of adults say it is very important (76%) or somewhat important ( 18%) for K–12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills . Across political parties, demographic groups, and regions , more than six in 10 think teaching computer and Internet skills is very important. Ninety percent of blacks think it is very important, followed by Latinos (78%), whites (77%), and Asians (63%). Among public school parents, 79 percent consider this issue very important. “How important is it for California’s K –12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills?” All Adults Education Broadband Users Public school parents High school or less Some college College graduate Very important 76% 75% 74% 79% 76% 79% Somewhat important 18 18 19 17 18 15 Not too important 3 4 3 2 2 3 Not at all important 3 2 4 2 3 2 Don’t know 1 1 – – – 1 Parents of children 18 or younger use the Internet to communicate about their child’s education. Sixty -three percent of these parents report visiting their child’s school website often or sometimes (61% in 2009, 56% in 2008). Findings among public school parents are similar. Half of Latino parents say they visit their child’s school website, a slight 5-point increase from 2009. Still, white parents are far more likely (76%) than La tino parents (50%) to do so. The differences are much greater between income groups —parents earning $80,000 or more (89%) are twice as likely as parents earning under $40,000 (44%) to visit their child’s school website. Among those who do not visit their child’s school website, 63 percent say the school does have a website as far as they know. Thirty -two percent of parents say they receive their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email (34% in 2009, 28% in 2008). Again, white parents (41%) a re much more likely than Latino parents (23%) to use the Internet or email for this purpose. The disparity is great between inco me groups: parents earning $80,000 or more (50%) are nearly three times as likely as parents earning $40,000 or less (18%) to use the Internet or email to obtain their child’s homework. Among those who do not receive their child’s assignments via the Internet or email, 71 percent say their child’s teachers do not send assignments this way as far as they know. “Do you ever …” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household Income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Latino White …visit the website of your child’s school? Yes, often 31% 17% 32% 54% 23% 40% Yes, sometimes 32 27 38 35 27 36 No 36 56 29 10 49 24 Don't know – 1 – – 1 – …receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email? Yes, often 19 10 21 33 14 24 Yes, sometimes 13 8 19 17 9 17 No 65 79 57 48 76 58 Don't know 2 3 3 1 1 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 22 DISADVANTAGES OF NOT HAVING BROADBAND When it comes to finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills , 82 percent of Californians think non-broadband users are at a major (62%) or minor (20%) disadvantage. In an April 2010 Pew survey adults nationwide were much less likely to hold this view ( 43% major, 23% minor). Across racial/ethnic groups, blacks (71%) and Latinos (68%) are more likely to say non -broadband users are at a major disadvantage, followed by Asians (62%) and wh ites (57%). Younger Californians (70%) are far more likely than older Californians (49%) to hold this view. Seventy percent of Democrats , 60 percent of independents , and 47 percent of Republicans hold this view when it comes to job opportunities. When it c omes to getting health information , Californians are again far more likely than adults nationwide to think non -broadband users are at a disadvantage (80% to 62 %). Latinos (64%) and blacks ( 59%) are more likely than Asians (47%) and whites (42 %) to think there is a major disadvantage. Democrats (55%) are more likely than independents (42%) and Republicans (34%) to think there is a major disadvantage when it comes to getting health information online. “Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people… Do you think that people who do not have high-speed broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following? How about…” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband User Asians Blacks Latinos Whites …finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills ? Major disadvantage 62% 62% 71% 68% 57% 63% Minor disadvantage 20 26 15 16 22 21 Not at disadvantage 14 10 14 12 17 13 Don't know 4 2 – 4 4 2 …getting health information? Major disadvantage 50 47 59 64 42 49 Minor disadvantage 30 34 27 21 34 33 Not at disadvantage 17 17 13 12 21 17 Don’t know 3 2 1 3 3 1 Three in four Californians think non -broadband users are at a major (42%) or minor (35%) disadvantage when it comes to using online government services, compared to 56 percent nationwide in Pew’s survey. Seventy- four percent of Californians think non -broadband users are at a major (38%) or minor (36%) disadvantage when it comes to keeping up with news online, but far fewer adults nationwide (50%) in the Pew survey think non -broadband users are at a disadvantage. “How about…” All Adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband User Asians Blacks Latinos Whites …using government services ? Major disadvantage 42% 38% 54% 49% 39% 43% Minor disadvantage 35 43 29 30 36 38 Not at disadvantage 17 17 9 14 20 16 Don’t know 5 2 7 7 4 3 …keeping up with news and information? Major disadvantage 38 37 50 49 30 37 Minor disadvantage 36 40 28 30 40 39 Not at disadvantage 23 20 17 17 28 22 Don’t know 3 3 5 3 2 1 June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 23 REGIONAL MAP June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 24 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from Dean Bonner, project manager for this survey, survey research associates Sonja Petek and Jui Shrestha, and survey intern Elisa Baeza. This survey was conducted with funding from the California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF) and ZeroDivide 1 as part of a multi -year project on public opinion and information technology issues . We benefited from discussions with the CETF leadership and other experts and from consultation with researchers at the Pew Internet & American Life Project; however, the methods, questions, and content of this report were determined solely by Mark Baldassare and the survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 2,502 California adult residents, including 2,001 interviewed on landline telephones and 50 1 interviewed on cell phones. Live interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days from June 1–14 , 2011. Interviews took an average of 18 minutes to complete. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Cell phone interviews were included in this survey to account for the growing number of Californians who use them. These interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection and the sample telephone num bers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the potential cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone a nd landline service in the household. Landline and cell phone interviewing was conducted in English, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin or Cantonese), Vietnamese, and Korean, according to respondents’ preferences. We chose these languages because Spanish is the dominant language among non -English -speaking adults in California, followed in prevalence by the three Asian languages. Accent on Languages, Inc. translated the survey into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI Inc. translated the survey i nto Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean, and conducted all telephone interviewing. With assistance from Abt SRBI we used recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2006– 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) for California to compare certain demographic charact eristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was comparable to the ACS figures. Abt SRBI used data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey and data from the 2006– 2008 ACS for California, both to estimate landline and cell phone service in California and to compare the data against landline and cell phone servi ce reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary 1 This research was made possible by a grant from the Community Partnership Committee through its Applied Research Initiative on access to telecommunications services in California’s underserved communities, with support from ZeroDivide. The Community Partnership Committee was formed by eight coalitions of 134 community -based organizations and SBC (now AT&T), to serve underserved communities throughout Califor nia after the SBC/Pacific Telesis merger in 1997. PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 C alifornians and Information Technology 25 of State to compare the party registration of registered voters in our sample to party registration in the state. The landline and cell phone samples were then i ntegrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing adjusts for any differences across region al, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone service, and party registration groups. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±2.8 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total sample of 2,50 2 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2.8 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger: For the 1, 609 registered voters, it is ±3.1 percent; for the 1,132 likely voters, it is ±3.6 percent; for the 2 ,099 Internet users, it is ±3 percent; and for the 1,793 users of broadband at home , it is 3.3% . Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. Throughout the report, w e refer to five geographic regions that account for approximately 90 percent of the state’s population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sut ter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “ San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orang e/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. Residents from other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to r eport separately We present specific results for non- Hispanic whites and for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. We also present results for non- Hispanic Asians, who make up about 13 percent of the state’s adult population, and non- Hispanic blacks, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups —such as Native Americans —are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in another party are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated by their responses to survey questions on voter registration, past voting, and current interest in politics. In addition, we present the responses of Internet users , who are defined, consistent with national surveys , as those who answered yes to one or both questions: “Do you use the Internet, at least occasionally?” or “Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally?” We al so present the responses of broadband users, who are defined, consistent with national surveys, as those who have a high -speed connection at home (including DSL, cable, wireless, T -1, or fiber optic). The percentages presented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to results from the Pew Internet & American Life Project . Additional details about our methodology can be found at http://www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 26 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY June 1–14, 2011 2,502 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese MARGIN OF ERROR ±2.8% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE PERCENTAGES MAY N OT ADD TO 100 DUE TO ROUNDING 1. First, do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 28% right direction 60 wrong direction 12 don’t know 2. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 26% good times 63 bad times 11 don’t know 3. Do you yourself ever use a computer at home, at work, at school, or anywhere else? 81% yes 19 no – don’t know 4 /4a. Next, do you use the Internet, at least occasionally? [or] Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally? 84% yes 16 no – don’t know 4b. [non -Internet users only] Did you ever at some point use the Internet or email, but have since stopped for some reason? 14% yes 86 no – don’t know 4c. [non -Internet users only] Would you like to start using the Internet or email ( if q 4b=yes : again), or isn’t that something you’re interested in? 19% yes, interested 79 no, not interested 2 don’t know 4d. [non -Internet users only] And, what is the main reason you don’t use the Internet or email? [code, don’t read ] 17% not interested 16 d on’t have a computer 12 just don’t know how 11 cost/too expensive 9 it’s a waste of time/don’t need it 8 it is too difficult/frustrating 6 don’t have access 5 just don’t have the time 4 too old to learn 2 physically unable 2 worried about computer viruses , spyware, adware, spam 5 other 2 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 27 4e. [non -Internet users only] If you wanted to start usin g the Internet or email ( if q4b=yes: again), do you feel that you know enough about computers and technology to be able to do that on your own, or would you need someone to help you? 15% know enough to go online (again) on my own 67 would need someone to help me 15 would not want to start using the Internet (volunteered) 2 don’t know 5. [Internet users only] Did you happen to use the Internet yesterday? 79% yes 20 no 1 don’t know 6. [Internet users only] About how many years have you been an Internet user? [code, don’t read] 2% less than 1 year 21 1– 5 years 33 6– 10 years 27 11– 15 years 15 more than 15 years 2 don’t know 7. [Internet users only] About how often do you use the Internet or email from home — several times a day, about once a day, 3 –5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 49% several times a day 19 about once a day 10 3– 5 days a week 11 1– 2 days a week 3 every few weeks 2 less often 4 never 1 don’t know 8. [Internet users only] About how often do you use the Internet or email from work —several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 37% several times a day 8 about once a day 3 3– 5 days a week 4 1– 2 days a week 2 every few weeks 3 less often 32 never 12 don’t work/ retired (volunteered) – don’t know 9. [Internet users only] About how often do you use the Internet or email from someplace other than home or work —several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 17% several times a day 6 about once a day 5 3– 5 days a week 9 1– 2 days a week 6 every few weeks 14 les s often 42 never 1 don’t know 10. [Internet users only] Do you ever access the Internet using a computer at a public library? 24% yes 76 no – don’t know As I read the following list of items, please tell me if you happen to have each one, or not. 11. [all adults ] Do you have a desktop computer? 65% yes [ask q11a] 35 no [skip to q12] – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 28 11a. [Internet users who have a desktop] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your desktop computer? 92% yes 8 no – don’t know 12. [all adults ] Do you have a laptop computer or netbook ? 61% yes [ask q1 2a] 39 no [skip to q1 3] – don’t know 12a. [ Internet users who have a laptop or netbook] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your laptop computer or netbook ? 94% yes 6 no – don’t know 12b. [non -desktop, laptop, or netbook owners] And , what is the main reason you don’t have a computer at home? [code, don’t read ] 37% c ost/too expensive 24 not interested 17 don’t know how to use it 6 don’t really know about computers 3 sufficient access elsewhere 13 other – don’t know 13 . [all adults ] Do you have a working cell phone? 93% yes [ask q1 3a] [includes those who completed interview on cell phone] 7 no [skip to q1 4] – don’t know 13a. [ Internet users who have a cell phone] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your cell phone? 50% yes 50 no – don’t know 14. [all adults ] Do you have a game console like Xbox or Play Station in your home? 41% yes [ask q1 4a] 58 no [skip to q1 5] – don’t know 14a. [ Internet users who have a game console] Do yo u ever access the Internet or email using your game console? 38% yes 61 no 1 don’t know 15. [all adults ] Do you have an electronic book device or e -book reader, such as a Kindle or Nook? 11% yes [ask q1 5a] 89 no [skip to q1 6] – don’t know 15a. [ Internet users who have an electronic book device] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your electronic book device? 61% y es 39 no – don’t know 16. [all adults ] Do you have a tablet computer like an iPad, Sa msung Galaxy, or Motorola Xoom? 1 4% yes [ask q1 6a] 86 no [skip to q1 7] 1 don’t know [skip to q1 7] 16a. [ Internet users who have a tablet computer] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your tablet computer? 83% yes 17 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 29 Thinking now just about your cell phone… 17. [cell phone users only] Some phones are called “smartphones” because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartphone or not, or are you not sure? [ If necessary : A smartphone is a mobile device like an iPhone, Blackberry or Android that offers more advanced computing ability and connectivity than a standard cell phone.] 39% yes, it is a smartphone 49 no, is not a smartphone 12 not sure 18. [cell phone users only] Thinking about your cell phone plan, do you currently pay for any kind of data plan on your phone, or not ? [ If necessary : A data plan from your cell phone provider allows you to send and receive emails and surf the Internet from your mobile device.] 41% yes 55 no 2 someone else pays for phone (volunteered) 2 don’t know Please tell me if you ever use your cell phone to do any of the following things. 19. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to send or receive text messages? 74% yes 26 no – don’t know 20. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to send or receive email messages? 42% yes 58 no – don’t know 21. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to do work -related activities when you ar e not at work? 32% yes 59 no 9 don’t work/ retired (volunteered) – don’t know 22. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to make a charitable donation by text message? 10% yes 89 no – don’t know 23. [cell phone users only] What about using your cell phone to download a software application or “app ?” 33% yes [ask q 24] 67 no [skip to q25 ] – don’t know 24. [cell phone users who download apps] Thinking about all of the apps you have downloaded, have you ever paid for an app, or have you only downloaded apps that are free? 52% yes, have paid for app 47 only download apps that are f ree 1 don’t know 25. [cell phone Internet use rs only] Overall, when you use the Internet, do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer? 25% mostly on cell phone 62 mostly on something else 12 both equally (volunteered) 2 depends (volunteered) – don’t know 26. [cell phone Internet use rs only] About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone— several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often , or never? 59% s everal times a day 13 about once a day 9 3– 5 days a week 10 1– 2 days a week 3 every few weeks 4 less often 2 never – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 30 27. [laptop Internet use rs only] On your laptop computer or netbook, do you use WiFi or a wireless connection to access the Internet? [ If necessary: WiFi is a short range wireless internet connection] 85% yes 15 no 1 d on’t know 28. [laptop Internet use rs only] On your laptop computer or netbook, do you use mobile wireless broadband, such as an a ircard, to access the Internet? [ If necessary: Wireless broadband is a longer -range wireless connection, offered by many telephone companies and others] 23% yes 72 no 5 don’t know Thinking about when you access the Internet wirelessly on your laptop or netbook —either using WiFi or mobile wireless broadband… 29. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this at home? 86% yes 13 no 1 don’t know 30. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this at work? 39% yes 60 no 1 don’t know 31. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this someplace other than home or work? 55% yes 45 no – don’t know 32. [wireless laptop users only] Do you ever do this away from work to do work -related activities? 43% yes 49 no 8 don’t work/ retired (volunteered) – don’t know Thinking now about how you get information and communicate with others using a cell phone or laptop when you are away from home and work, please tell me if each of the following is very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all import ant. [rotate questions 33 to 36] 33. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about staying in touch easily with other people? 59% very important 27 somewhat important 7 not too important 6 not at all important 1 does not apply (volunteered) 1 don’t know 34. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about having easy access to information online? 52% very important 26 somewhat important 8 not too important 12 not at all important 1 does not apply (volunteered) 1 don’t know 35. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about sharing or posting content online? 13% v ery important 22 somewhat important 28 not too important 32 not at all important 2 does not apply (volunteered) 2 don’t know 36. [cell phone users or laptop Internet users] How about being able to do work -related activities? 35% very important 21 somewhat important 13 not too important 21 not at all important 4 does not apply (volunteered) 6 don’t work/retired (volunteered) 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 31 Next, please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things. [questions 37 to 48 reported for all adults] [ rotate q uestions 37 to 48] 37. Do you ever go online to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others? 30% yes, do this 70 no, do not do this – don’t know 3 8. Do you ever go online to look for information about a job? 49% yes, do this 51 no, do not do this – don’t know 39. Do you ever go online to purchase goods and services? 64% yes, do this 36 no, do not do this – don’t know 40. Do you ever go online to get news and information on current events, public issues, or politics? 66% yes, do this 34 no, do not do this – don’t know 41. Do you ever go online to use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook , or LinkedIn? 52% yes, do this 48 no, do not do this – don’t know 42. Do you ever go online for educational purposes, such as online training or for taking a class? 45% yes, do this 54 no, do not do this – don’t know 43. Do you ever go online to get health or medical information? 61% yes, do this 39 no, do not do this – don’t know 44. Do you ever go online to create or work on y our own online journal or blog? 15% yes, do this 85 no, do not do this – don’t know 45. Do you ever go online to visit a local, state, or federal governme nt website? 53% yes, do this 47 no, do not do this – don’t know 46. Do you ever go online to access government resources, such as obtaining forms, making payments, or registering to vote? 51% yes, do this 49 no, do not do this – don’t know 47. Do you ever go online to get housing or real estate information? 45% yes, do this 55 no, do not do this – don’t know 48. Do you ever go online to get information about activities or events in your community? 59% yes, do this 41 no, do not do this – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 32 Next, I am going to ask you about the same Internet activities, but please tell me if you ever use your cell phone to go online to do any of them. [questions 49 to 60 reported for all cell phone users ] [ rotate questions 49 to 60 in same order as q uestions 37 to 48] 49. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others? 17% yes, do this 82 no, do not do this – don’t know 50. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to look for information about a job? 14% yes, do this 86 no, do not do this – don’t know 51. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to purchase goods and services? 16% yes, do this 84 no, do not do this – don’t know 52. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to get news and information on current events, public issues, or politics? 28% yes, do this 72 no, do not do this – don’t know 53. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook , or LinkedIn? 28% yes, do this 72 no, do not do this – don’t know 54. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online for educational purposes, such as online training or for taking a class? 9% yes, do this 91 no, do not do this – don’t know 55. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to get health or medical information? 18% yes, do this 82 no, do not do this – don’t know 56. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to create or work on your own online journal or blog? 6% yes, do this 94 no, do not do this – don’t know 57. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to visit a local, state, or federal government website? 12% yes, do this 88 no, do not do this – don’t know 58. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to access government resources, such as obtaining f orms, making payments, or registering to vote? 9% yes, do this 91 no, do not do this – don’t know 59. Do you ever use your cell phone to go online to get housing or real estate information? 10% yes, do this 90 no, do not do this – don’t know 60. Do y ou ever use your cell phone to go online to get information about activities or events in your community? 25% y es, do this 75 no, do not do this – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 33 61. What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL -enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fiber optic connection such as FIOS, or a T-1? [ question 61 reported for all adults] 25% DSL -enabled phone line [skip to q65] 25 cable modem [skip to q65] 16 wireless connection (either air card, land -based or satellite) [skip to q65] 5 fiber optic or T -1 [skip to q65] 4 dial-up telephone line [ask q62] 1 no home service, connect to Internet via a cell phone (volunteered) [ask q 62] 21 do not have Internet access/ computer at home [ask q 62] 1 unspecified broadband connection 3 don’t know [ask q62] 62. [non -Internet users or non -broadband users only] Do you happen to know whether high -speed Internet service is available in your neighborhood from a telephone company, a cable company, or any other company? 58% yes 21 no 21 don’t know [sample sizes for questions 63 and 64 are too small to report] 65. [broadband users only] About how many years have you been using a high -speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home ? [code, don’t read] 2% less than 1 year 50 1– 5 years 38 6– 10 years 6 11–15 years 1 more than 15 years 3 don’t know [questions 66 to 74 asked of all adults] 66. Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high -speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not eno ugh? 15% more than enough 41 just enough 27 not enough 17 don’t know 67. Do you think that expanding affordable high- speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done? 19% a top priority 37 important but a lower priority 23 not too important 16 should not be done 5 don’t know 68. Which of the following comes closest to your view, even if neither is exactly right [ rotate ] [1] high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility that everyone should have access to [ or ] [2] high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury that some people may not be able to access. 66% should be viewed as a public utility 27 should be viewed as a luxury 7 don’t know 69. How important is it for California’s K –12 public schools to teach students com puter and Internet skills? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 76% very important 18 somewhat important 3 not too important 3 not at all important 1 d on’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 34 Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people…Do you think that people who do not have high -speed broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following : [rotate q uestions 70 to 73] 70. How about keeping up with news and information? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 38% major disadvantage 36 minor disadvantage 23 not at a disadvantage 3 don’t know 71. How about finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage? ) 62% major disadvantage 20 minor disadvantage 14 not at a disadvantage 4 don’t know 72. How about using government services? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage? ) 42% major disadvantage 35 minor disadvantage 17 not at a disadvantage 5 don’t know 73. How about getting health information? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage? ) 50% major disadvantage 30 minor disadvantage 17 not at a disadvantage 3 don’t know 74. Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in C alifornia? 66% yes [ask q 74a] 34 no [skip to q 75b] 74a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or are you registered as a decline -to -state or independent voter ? 45% Democrat [ask to q75] 32 Republican [skip to q75a] 3 another party [specify] [skip to q76] 20 independent [skip to q75b] 75. Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 54% strong 43 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q76 ] 75a. Would you call yourself a strong Republi can or not a very strong Republican? 53% strong 43 not very strong 4 don’t know [skip to q76 ] 75b. Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 19% R epublican Party 37 Democratic P arty 33 neither (volunteered) 11 don’t know 76. Would you consider yourself to be politically: [ read list, rotate order top to bottom] 12% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 26 middle -of -the -road 21 somewhat conservative 14 very conservative 6 don’t know 77. Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics —a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 21% great deal 37 fair amount 26 only a little 15 none 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey June 2011 Californians and Information Technology 35 D4b. [parents of children 18 or younger only] Do you ever visit the website of your child’s school? ( if yes : Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 31% yes, often [skip to d4d] 32 yes, sometimes [skip to d4d] 36 no [ask d4c ] – don’t know [ask d4c ] D4c. [parents who do not visit school website ] And, as far as you know, does your child’s school have a website? 62% yes 10 no 27 don’t know D4d. [parents of children 18 or younger only] Do you ever receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email? ( if yes : Do you do receive these often or only sometimes?) 19% yes , often [skip to d5] 13 yes, sometimes [skip to d5] 65 no [ask d4e ] 2 don’t know [ask d4e ] D4e. [parents who do not receive homework via Internet, email] And, as far as you know, do your child’s teachers send homework assignments via the Internet or email? 14% yes 71 no 15 don’t know [d1 –d4 a and d5–d20: demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Angela Blackwell Founder and CEO PolicyLink Paul Brest President The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Executive Director University of California Washington Center James E. Canales President The James Irvine Foundation Jon Cohen Director of Polling The Washington Post Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network William Hauck President California Business Roundtable Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Senior Scholar School of Policy, P lanning, and Development University of Southern California Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Monica Lozano Publisher and CEO La Opinión Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Lisa Pitney Vice President, Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Dan Rosenheim News Director KPIX -TV Robert K. Ross, M.D. President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Cathy Taylor Vice President and Editorial Commentary Director Orange County Register Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Emeritus Great Valley Center The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS John E. Bryson, Chair Retired Chairman and CEO Edison International Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Marí a Blanco Vice President, Civic Engagement California Community Foundation Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Education State of California Robert M. Hertzberg Partner Mayer Brown, LLP Walter B. Hewlett Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs David Mas Masumoto Author and farmer Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni , LLP Constance L. Rice Co-Director The Advancement Project Thomas C. Sutton Retired Chairman and CEO Pacific Life Insurance Company The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research on major economic, social, and political issues. The institute’s goal is to raise public awareness and to give elected representatives and other decisionmakers a more informed basis for developing policies and programs. The institute’s research focuses on the underlying forces shaping California’s future, cutting across a wide range of public policy concerns, including economic development, education, environment and resources, governance, population, public finance, and social and health policy. PPIC is a private operating foundation. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. PPIC was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. Mark Baldassare is President and CEO of PPIC. John E. Bryson is Chair of the Board of Directors. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source and the copyright notice below is included. Copyright © 201 1 Public Policy Institute of California All rights reserved. San Francisco, CA PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, California 94111 phone : 415.291.4400 fax: 415.291.4401 PPIC SACRAMENTO CENT ER Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 phone: 916.440.1120 fax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org survey@ppic.org" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:41:00" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(8) "s_611mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:41:00" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:41:00" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(50) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_611MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }