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This is the 135th PPIC Statewide Sur vey in a series that was inaugurated in April 1998 and has generated a database of responses from more than 284,000 Californians. This sur vey is the four th in a series focusing on information technology issues and is funded with grants from the California Emerging Technology Fund and ZeroDivide. This series seeks to inform decisionmakers, raise public awareness, and stimulate policy discussions and debate about a variety of information technology issues. We draw upon earlier PPIC Statewide Sur veys for California trends over time and upon recent sur veys by the Pew Internet & American Life Project for national comparisons. While broadband Internet is becoming more ubiquitous, there are still many Californians who are not “connected. ” This sur vey seeks to inform the impor tant public policy discussion about the changing nature of connectedness and differences between Californians who are and are not connected. We examine access to and use of information technology, the evolving role of mobile devices —including tablets —as well as what people are doing online and what devices they are using for these activities. We also examine the impor tance of information technology in education and the public’s perceptions of and attitudes toward these issues. This sur vey presents the responses of 2 ,502 adult residents throughout the state, inter viewed in multiple languages and contacted by landline or cell phone. It includes findings on these topics:  Information technology access and us age, including a profile of who uses the Internet and who has a broadband connection at home; overall use of computers; ownership of a variety of ele ctronic devices , including cell phones and tablet computers; specific online activities and whether they are carried out on laptops, desktops, cell phones , or tablets; how often respondents access the Internet or email, and what kind of Internet connection they have at home. We also ask about mobile devices and how people use them , and about non- Internet users’ interest in the Internet and their reasons for not using the Internet or email .  Perceptions and attitudes toward information technology, including the role of government in expanding the access and availability of high-speed Internet technology; whether broadband Internet should be considered a public utility or a luxur y; suppor t for a government program funded by telecommunications providers to increase access for lower-income and rural residents; and attitudes about possible disadvantages faced by those without high -speed broadband access at home. We also examine the impor tance of teaching Internet skills in public schools and education- related activities that parents engage in online.  Time trends, national comparisons, and the extent to which Californians may differ in their perceptions, attitudes, and preferences based on political par ty affiliation, likelihood of voting, region of residence, race/ethnicity, and other demographics. This repor t may be downloaded free of charge from our website ( www.ppic.org). For questions about the sur vey, please contact sur vey@ppic.org . Tr y our PPIC Statewide Sur vey interactive tools online at http://www.ppic.org/main/sur vAdvancedSearch.asp. PPIC Statewide Survey June 2013 Calif ornians and Information Technology 5 MOST PARENTS VISIT SCHOOL WEBSITES, FAR FEWER GET SCHOOLWORK ONLINE Nearly all Californians say it is very important (77%) or somewhat important (19%) for the state’s public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills. Overwhelming majorities across parties, regions, ages, education levels, and incomes consider teaching these skills very important. Baldassare notes: “Californians believe that success for the future generation is tied to access and knowledge of information technology, with consensus that teaching computer and Internet skills is very import ant for public school students. Many say that children are at a disadvantage if they are without high -speed access to the Internet at home.” A majority of parents of children age 18 or younger visit the website of their child’s school (30% often, 33 % sometimes), and 37 percent do not. Among those who do not, 59 percent say the school has a website, 15 percent say it does not, an d 26 percent are unsure. Higher-income parents are more likely to visit the school website, and white parents (45% often, 38% sometimes) are far more likely than Latino parents (17% often, 26% sometimes) to do so. Overall, the percentage of parents who receive their child’s homework assignments by email or on the Internet has changed little since 2008 (28% 2008, 34% 2009, 32% 2011, 33% today). Most parents (67%) do not receive their child’s homework assignments online, while 15 percent do so often and 18 percent sometimes do so. Among those who do not, 16 percent say teachers do send assignments online, 74 percent say teachers do not, and 10 percent are unsure. About half of parents say they use email to communicate with their child’s teacher s (20% often, 28% sometimes), and half (52%) say they don’t. Among those who do not, 24 percent say the teacher uses email to communicate with parents, 62 percent say the teacher does not, and 14 percent are unsure. Demographic distinctions are sharp: 79 percent of upper -income parents and 69 percent of middle -income parents communicate with a teacher by email, while 75 percent of lower -income parents don’t. And 73 percent of whites do so, while 72 percent of Latino parents do not. More than half of parents say they go online (22% often, 33% sometimes) to help their child with schoolwork, and 44 percent say they don’t. About half of Latino parents say they go online (20% often, 30% sometimes) to do so. The share of parents who go online to help with schoolwork increases with income. Asked whether their child uses the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone, 84 percent of parents say yes. More than three-quarters of parents across income groups and a strong majority of Latinos (78%) say their child uses the Internet. With Internet use widespread among children, how concerned are parents about online safety? Most parents of young Internet users ( 67%) say they are very worried (33 %) or somewhat worried ( 34%) about their child’s safety online. More than half (54%) say they have used parental controls or other ways of blocking, filtering, or monitoring their child’s online activities, and 45 percent say they have not. MINORITY SAY GOVERNMENT SHOULD DO MORE TO IMPROVE ACCESS Given their views of the importance of broadband access, what do Californians think about the government’s role in improving access to high -speed Internet technology? Most say the government is doing just enough (39%) or more than enough (16%), while 26 percent say it is not doing enough and 18 percent are unsure. While most Californians say it is important for the federal government to expand affordable high -speed Internet access to everyone in the nation, just 17 percent consider it a top priority. M ost (66%) nevertheless view having a high-speed Internet connection as a public utility that everyone should be able to access, while 28 percent view it as a luxury that some people may not be able to access. Two -thirds (67%) would favor a government program funded by telecommunications providers to increase broadband access for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies. June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 6 ACCESS AND USE KEY FINDINGS  Eighty -six percent of Californians use the Internet and 69 percent have broadband at home. But there are still disparities across subgroups . (page 7)  Californians who own certain devices are more likely to access the Internet with their laptop computer (57%) or cell phone (56%) than via their desktop computer (48%) or tablet computer (32%). Internet access via a cell phone has increased 3 7 points since 2008, while using a tablet to access the Interne t has increased 21 points since 2011 . (page 8)  What do Californians do when they are online ? More than half of adults shop, do social networking, get health information, or do banking when they go online. Since 2008, the share of Californians going online to access social networking sites has increased 31 points . (page s 9, 10 )  Most Californians have broadband at home , including 26 percent who use a cable modem, 20 percent who connect wirelessly, and 17 pe rcent who use DSL . Just 4 percent report having a dial -up connection and 18 percent have no home access. (page 12 )  Fifty -eight percent of cell phone users say their phone is a smartphone , a 19-point increase since 2011 . Eighty -two percent of cell phone users say they send or receive text messages , and 56 percent send or receive email messages . Among cell -phone Internet users, 37 percent say they connect mostly via their phone, while 52 percent say the y do so mostly on another device. ( pages 13, 14 ) 26 37 5257 0 20 40 60 80 2008200920112013 Percent all adults Percent UsingSocial Networking Sites 19 26 40 56 0 20 40 60 80 2008200920112013 Percent all adults Percent Using a Cell Phone to Access the Internet 8586 7069 0 20 40 60 80 100 Adults nationwide*Californians Percent all adults Use the Internet Have broadband at home Internet Users and Broadband at Home *Pew Internet & American Life Project PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 7 INTERNET USE AND HOME ACCESS Most Californians access the Internet at least occasionally (86%). Internet use was similar last year (87%) and has increased 21 points since 2000 (65% 2000, 70% 2008, 76% 2009, 81% 2010, 84% 2 011, 87% 2012, and 86% today). Today, 69 percent of Californians have a broadband Internet connection at home (including DSL, cable, wireless, T -1, or fiber optic) . Home broadband connectivity is up 14 points since 2008, although findings today are similar to recent years ( 55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% 2011, 73% 2012, and 69% today). The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project tracks Internet use at the national level. In s pring surveys dating back to 2008 , Internet use among adults nationwide (73% 2008, 79% 2009, 79% 2010, 78% 2011, 82% 2012, and 85% today) has been fairly similar to Californians in our surveys . Pew has also seen a gradual climb in broadband adoption (55% 2008, 63 % 2009, 66% 2010, 62% 2011, 66% 2012, and 70% today) , which has largely tracked the increase found in our surveys since 2008 . While a strong majority of Californians have broadband at home, the differences across regional and demographic groups are still big enough to result in a “digital divide.” Stark differences can be seen across income (53% under $40,000, 84% $40,000 to under $80,000, 92% $80,000 or more) and education groups (47% high school diploma s or less, 83% some college, 88% college graduate s). Across racial/ethnic groups, half of Latinos (52%) have broadband at home, compared to more than seven in 10 among other groups (71% blacks, 75% Asians, 81% whites). Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (80%) and Orange/San Diego (77%) are more likely than residents in the Inland Empire (68%), Los Angeles (64%), or the Central Valley (60%) to have a broadband Internet connection at home. Among most groups, the share with broadband is either similar to or lower than last year. For example, broadband adoption dropped 11 points among Central Valley residents (71% to 60%) and 9 points among less -educated (56% to 47%) Californians . Percent saying yes Internet users* Broadband connection at home ** All adults 86 % 69% Age 18 –34 95 74 35–54 88 71 55 and over 77 63 Household income Under $40,000 77 53 $40,000 to $80,000 94 84 $80,000 or more 99 92 Race/Ethnicity Asians 89 75 Blacks 91 71 Latinos 77 52 Whites 93 81 Region Central Valley 81 60 San Francisco Bay Area 92 80 Los Angeles 86 64 Orange/San Diego 89 77 Inland Empire 86 68 *See page 26 for questions 4- 4b used in determining who is an Internet user. ** See page 32 for question 36 used in determining who has a broadband connection at home. PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 8 DEVICES AND INTERNET USE Californians own a variety of electronic devices and connect to the Internet on many of them. Nearly all Californians report having a cell phone (92%), and about six in 10 have a desktop computer (58%) or a laptop computer or netbook (63%). Fewer Californians have a game console (45%), a tablet (36%), or an electronic device used primarily for e -book reading (19%). Ownership of devices today is similar to June 2011, except when it comes to desktop computers (65% 2011, 58% today) and tablet computers (14% 2011, 36% today). While most Californians have a cell phone, there are differences among racial/ethnic groups and across age, education, and income groups in the ownership of other devices. When it comes to owning a device and using it to access the Internet , Californians are more likely to use a laptop computer (57%) or a cell phone (56%) than a desktop computer (48%) or tablet computer (32%). Fewer use a game console (16%) or e- book reader (11%). Since 2011, the percentage of Californians accessing the Internet on a desk top computer has dropped 8 points, while access via cell phone (40% to 56%) and tablet (11% to 32%) has increased by double digit s. Using a laptop to connect to the Internet declines with age, increases with income, and is most prevalent among Asians and residents in the San Francisco Bay Area. The percentage of Californians accessing the Internet via a cell phone declines with age, increases with income, and is much more prevalent among blacks than other racial/ethnic groups. The share of Californians con necting to the Internet on a tablet computer increases with income and education. Internet access via tablet is less common among older Californians ; it is more prevalent among Asians and whit es than other racial/ethnic groups, and among San Francisco Bay Area residents compared to residents in the state’s other regions. “Do you have a ___________? (and) Do you ever access the Internet or email using your ___________?” Percent saying yes and access the Internet using this device Laptop computer Cell phone Desktop computer Tablet computer Game console E-book reader All adults 57% 56% 48% 32% 16% 11% Age 18 –34 68 78 44 39 30 10 35–54 59 60 50 34 15 13 55 and over 42 30 50 22 5 11 Household income Under $40,000 43 46 35 18 15 6 $40,000 to $80,000 67 58 51 35 17 15 $80,000 or more 80 76 70 58 21 19 Race/Ethnicity Asians 70 55 45 38 15 11 Blacks 51 73 52 28 23 12 Latinos 43 52 34 23 18 6 Whites 64 59 58 37 16 15 Region Central Valley 45 51 47 28 18 13 San Francisco Bay Area 69 63 49 42 15 11 Los Angeles 56 57 44 31 14 11 Orange/San Diego 58 58 51 34 20 13 Inland Empire 57 62 52 29 18 13 Internet users 66 65 55 37 19 13 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 9 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES When Californians go online they engage in a variety of activities, from purchasing goods to using social networking sites to contacting a medical professional. More than half of Californians go online to purchase goods (60%, up 8 points since 2008), use a social networking site (57%, up 31 points), get health or medical information (55%, up 5 points) , or to do banking (53%, up 6 points). Slightly less than half of Californians (48%, up 3 points since 20 09) report looking online for information about a job. O lder and less -affluent Californians and Latinos are less likely than others to engage in most of these activities. Resident s in the San Francisco Bay Area, Orange/San Diego, and the Inland Empire are among the most likely to engage in most of the activities. There are disparities across groups —for example, younger Californians are twice as likely as older Californians to do online social networking, and more- affluent Californians are far more likely to do it than lower-income adults . An important reason accounting for some of these disparities is that certain groups are less likely to be Internet users. When it comes to the specific devices used for these activi ties, interesting patterns emerge. Californians are as likely to use a tablet computer as a desktop or laptop for social networking, but they are far less likely to use a tablet or cell phone to do online banking. Cell-phone users are more likely to use a phone for social networking than for the other four activities. “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things. ” Percent saying yes Purchase goods and services Use a social networking site Get health or medical information Do any banking or manage your finances L ook for information about a job All adults 60% 57% 55% 53% 48% Internet u sers 69 66 63 62 55 Age 18 –34 63 76 51 62 71 35–54 60 59 59 54 51 55 and over 56 35 55 44 21 Household income Under $40,000 38 50 38 38 46 $40,000 to $80,000 74 60 68 64 51 $80,000 or more 91 72 79 78 57 Race/Ethnicity Asians 65 54 54 59 55 Blacks 41 67 44 45 66 Latinos 37 51 39 39 46 Whites 77 62 68 63 46 Region Central Valley 60 53 45 43 43 San Francisco Bay Area 72 62 66 64 55 Los Angeles 53 53 51 50 45 Orange/San Diego 61 63 60 57 50 Inland Empire 58 62 54 56 51 Desktop or laptop users who do this activity on their desktop or laptop 67 58 59 58 52 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 24 40 24 27 22 Tablet users who do this activity on their tablet 50 55 48 37 33 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 10 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES (CONTINUED) Slightly less than half of Californians (47%, up 4 points since 2008) report going online to access government resources, while four in 10 have gone online to apply for a job (40%) or for educational purposes (39%, up 12 points since 2008). Fewer go online to use Twitter (33%, up 15 points since 2009) or to contact a health insurance provider or medical professional (32%). Once again, Latinos and older and less -affluent Californians are less likely than others to engage in many of these activities. And res idents in the San Francisco Bay Area and Orange/San Diego are among the most likely to do many of these activities. For instance, more-affluent Californ ians are three times more likely than lower-income residents to contact a medical professional online, a nd Latinos are the least likely among racial/ethnic groups to do so. Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area are much more likely than others to do so . Going online to access government resources is far more common among adults with h ousehold incomes of $4 0,000 or more. D esktop or laptops are used more often than other devices to perform these activities —except when it comes to Twitter , for which using a cell phone is as common as using a desktop, laptop, or tablet. Few people use the Internet via cell phone to access government resources, apply for a job, contact a medical professional , or for educational purposes; this is especially important since 37 percent of cell-phone Internet users connect mostly using a cell phone. “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things.” Percent saying yes Access government resources A pply for a job For educational purposes Use Twitter Contact health insurance provider or doctor All adults 47% 40% 39% 33% 32% Internet u sers 54 47 46 38 37 Age 18 –34 52 65 52 53 29 35–54 48 41 40 31 33 55 and over 41 15 27 13 35 Household income Under $40,000 31 39 28 29 17 $40,000 to $80,000 60 45 47 36 43 $80,000 or more 72 43 61 40 53 Race/ Ethnicity Asians 55 43 47 36 36 Blacks 46 59 45 35 27 Latinos 32 40 30 34 19 Whites 56 38 44 33 41 Region Central Valley 44 36 34 32 23 San Francisco Bay Area 55 45 49 37 47 Los Angeles 40 40 37 34 26 Orange/San Diego 56 45 42 31 36 Inland Empire 50 40 36 36 31 Desktop or laptop users who do this activity on their desktop or laptop 53 44 44 31 35 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 12 11 10 27 12 Tablet users who do this activity on their tablet 26 22 24 33 19 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 11 FREQUENCY OF INTERNET USAGE Most Internet users report goi ng online either several times a day (52%) or about once a day (19%); fewer report going online less than once a day (11% 3 to 5 days a week, 8% 1 to 2 days a week, 10% every few weeks/less often/never). Results were similar in 2011 (49% several times a day, 19% about once a day, 10% 3 to 5 days a week, 11% 1 to 2 days a week, 9% every few weeks/less often/never ). Internet users in the San Francisco Bay Area (61%) and Orange/San Diego (58%) are somewhat more likely than those in the Inland Empire (49%), Los Angeles (49%), or the Central Valley (44%) to go online several times a day. A majority of whites (57%) report going online several times a day, compared to four in 10 Latinos (41%). Going online several times a day increase s with education and income and decreases with age. Four in 10 Internet users report going online several times a day (29%) or about once a day (10%) from someplace other than home or work ; fewer do this less than once a day (8% 3 to 5 days a week, 9% 1 to 2 days a week, 6% every few weeks, 9% less often). Thirty percent never go online away from home or work , compared to 42 percent in 2011 . M ore Internet users today are going online several times a day than in 2011 (29% today, 17% 2011) from someplace other than home or work. Younger C alifornians under age 35 (38%), those with college degree s (43%), and those with household incomes more than $80,000 (46%) are more than twice as likely as Californians age 55 and older (17%), those with high school diplomas or less (18%), and those with household incomes under $40,000 (21%) to go online several times a day from someplace other than home or work. “About how often do you use the Internet or email from… ?” Internet users only All Internet users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–34 35 –54 55 and over Latinos Whites Home Several times a day 52% 61% 50% 43% 41% 57% About once a day 19 15 19 22 16 19 3–5 days a week 11 10 11 11 15 10 1–2 days a week 8 5 9 12 11 6 Every few weeks 3 3 2 4 4 3 Less often 3 3 4 2 5 2 Never 4 4 4 5 8 3 Someplace other than home or work Several times a day 29 38 30 17 26 31 About once a day 10 10 11 7 9 9 3–5 days a week 8 9 8 7 6 9 1–2 days a week 9 10 9 7 11 8 Every few weeks 6 7 6 4 5 5 Less often 9 9 8 11 11 8 Never/ Don’t know 30 16 29 47 31 31 INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME Sixty- nine percent of Californians have a broadband Internet connection at home, including more than four in 10 who have either a DSL connection (17%) or a cable modem (26 %); 20 percent use a wireless connection. The remaining broadband users have a fiber optic, T-1, or another type of connection (6%). Just 4 percent connect via a dial -up telephone line ; 8 percent are unsure what type of connection they PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 12 INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME (CONTINUED) have, and 18 percent are not Internet user s or report not having an Internet connection or computer at home. Broadband access at home increased from 2008 to 2010 but has leveled off somewhat since then ( 55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% 2011, 73% 2012, and 69% today). R esident s across regions are more likely to have a cable modem than DSL. C able modem use is higher among Orange/San Diego (38%) and San Francisco Bay Area (32%) residents. Inland Empire residents (14%) are the most likely to connect via fiber optic or T-1; Central Valley residents (25%) are the most likely to not have Internet. Latinos are more than twice as likely as any other racial/ethnic group to have no Internet access at home. Older, less -educated , and less-affluent Californians are far more likely than other s to have no access. “What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL-enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fiber optic connection such as FiOS, or a T-1?” All adults All adults Household income Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more DSL-enabled phone line 17% 14% 18% 22% Cable modem 26 17 34 41 Wireless connection 20 17 24 21 Fiber optic, T- 1, or other broadband 6 5 9 7 Dial-up telephone line 4 6 2 1 No home access, connect via cell phone or tablet computer (volunteered) 1 2 – – No Internet, computer at home 18 30 8 2 Don’t know /Refuse 8 8 5 5 A majority of Californians (56%) report having had a high -speed broadband connection for more than six years, while four in 10 (39%) report having had a connection for one to five years; only 2 percent say they have had a broadband connection less than one year. In 2011, more people said they had been connected for one to five years and fewer reported a connection for six or more years (2% less than 1 year, 50% 1 to 5 years, 45% 6 or more years). Most Latino broadband users have adopted broadband within the l ast five years, whereas most whites have had it six o r more years . Less -affluent and less - educated residents are more recent adopters t han more-affluent and more-educated Californians. “About how many years have you been using a high-speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home?” Broadband users only All broadband users Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Less than 1 year 2% 5% 1% 1% 4% 1% 1 to 5 years 39 55 38 23 61 30 6 or more years 56 37 58 74 33 66 Don’t know 3 3 2 3 2 3 Among non -Internet and non -broadband users, 64 percent say that high -speed broadband Internet access is available in their neighborhood, while 15 percent say it is not and 21 percent are unsure. The percentage reporting broadband availability today (64%) is similar to 2009 (66%), but slightly higher than in 2011 (58 %). PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 13 MOBILE DEVICES Among the 92 percent of Californians who have cell phone s, 58 percent say they have a smartphone, similar to results nationwide (55% in Pew’s latest Internet survey). Smartphones are much more prevalent now (58%) than in June 2011 (39%) and the use of smartphones has increased across all political, regional, and demographic groups. Still, some groups are more likely than others to have one. For example, age plays a big role : those age 18 to 34 (78%) are much more likely than those age 35 to 54 (59%) or 55 and older (33%) to have a smartphone. The share who have smartphones increases with income and education levels. Half (51%) of cell phone users say they pay for a data plan while 44 percent say they do not, and another 3 percent volunteer that someone else pays their bill or that their dat a plan is not billed separately. “Some phones are called ‘ smartphones’ because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartph one or not, or are you not sure ?” Cell phone users only All cell phone users Household i ncome Broadband users Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Yes, it is a smartphone 58% 47% 60% 73% 69% No, it is not a smartphone 35 40 37 24 26 Not sure 8 12 3 3 5 Eight in 10 cell phone users (82%) say they use their phone to send or receive text messages, up 8 points since 2011 (74%) and 24 points since 2008 (58%) ; 56 percent use a cell phone to send or receive email, up 14 points since 2011 and 30 points since 2008 (26%), and 53 percent download software “apps,” up 20 points since 2011 (33%). Among those who have downloaded apps, 49 percent have paid for an app and 50 percent have downloaded only free apps. “Do you ever use your cell phone to… ?” Cell phone users only Percent saying yes Send or receive text messages Send or receive email messages Download a software application All cell phone users 82% 56% 53% Age 18 –34 97 73 75 35–54 88 58 55 55 and older 57 34 26 Household income Under $40,000 78 45 45 $40,000 to $80,000 84 55 51 $80,000 or more 90 74 69 Race/Ethnicity Asians 77 58 54 Blacks 90 64 63 Latinos 84 51 48 Whites 81 58 55 Region Central Valley 75 48 48 San Francisco Bay Area 82 62 57 Los Angeles 81 55 54 Orange/San Diego 84 61 57 Inland Empire 87 60 56 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 14 MOBILE DEVICES (CONTINUED) With nearly all Californians using cell phones and smartphones much more than in the past, what would life be like without cell phones? Thirty -six percent of cell phone users say they could live without their phone, 33 percent would miss it but could proba bly do without, and 29 percent say it is something they can’t imagine living without. In a March 2012 Pew survey, a plurality of cell phone users nationwide (45%) said they’d miss their phone but could do without (29% could live without, 26% can’t imagine living without). Among the 56 percent of Californians who access the Internet on their cell phones, 37 percent say that when they use the Internet, they do so mostly on their cell phone , while 52 percent say they do so mostly on another device, such as a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer. Of those who access the Internet mostly via their cell phone, 27 percent say their cell phone is the only way they access the Internet. Since June 2011, there has been a 12 point increase (from 25% to 37%) in the share of cell-phone Internet users who say they access the Internet mostly with their cell phone. There are sizeable differences between Latinos (60%) and whites (22%) who say they access the Internet mostly via cell phone, as well as across income groups (55% under $40,000, 27% $40,000 to $80,000, 20% $80,000 or more). The share using mostly cell phones to access the Internet also declines sharply with rising age (51% 18– 34, 31% 35–54, 12% 55 and older) and education (61% high school or less, 32% some college, 20% college graduates). “Overall, when you use the Internet, do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desk top, laptop, or tablet computer?” Cell-phone Internet users only All cell-phone Internet users Household income Race/Ethnicity* Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Mostly on cell phone 37% 55% 27% 20% 60% 22% Mostly on something else 52 34 58 69 30 66 Both e qually (volunteered) 10 9 13 10 8 10 Depends (volunteered)/ Don’t know 2 3 2 1 2 2 *Sample sizes for Asian and black cell -phone Internet users are too small for separate analysis. Three in four cell-phone Internet users access the Internet on their cell phone on a daily basis— 61 percent several times a day and 14 percent about once a day. Most others do so weekly (6% three to five days a week and 10% one to two days a week) and just 6 percent do so less frequently. Results were similar in June 2011, but the proportion accessing the Internet several times a day using their cell phone has doubled since 2009 (from 30% to 61%). Those age 18 to 34 are the most likely (73%) among demographic groups to say they access the Internet from their cell phone several times a day. “About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone?” Cell-phone Internet users only All cell-phone Internet users Age Race/Ethnicit y* 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Latinos Whites Several times a day 61% 73% 56% 41% 66% 59% About once a day 14 10 15 22 12 14 3–5 days a week 6 4 6 12 5 9 1–2 days a week 10 7 13 9 8 10 Every few weeks 3 2 3 7 3 4 Less often 3 2 4 5 4 2 Never 2 1 1 4 2 1 *Sample sizes for Asian and black cell -phone Internet users are too small for separate analysis. PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 15 NON-INTERNET USERS Among the 14 percent of Californians who do not use the Internet, 35 percent offer reasons having to do with inability (14% it’s too difficult, 13% don’t know how, 5% too old to learn, 3% physically unable) , and a similar 34 percent cite reasons reflecting a general lack of interest (20% not interested, 8% it’s a waste of time, 6% just don’t have the time). Twenty- three percent mention cost or access as the reason they don’t use the Internet (11% don’t have a computer, 9% the cost/it’s too expensive, 3% don’t have access). Those over 55 are most likely to cite inability while those under 55 are most likely to cite lack of interest . The majority of non- Internet users report household incomes under $20,000; among this group, 38 percent name inability, 28 percent a lack of interest, and 28 percent cost and access as reasons for not using the Internet. “And, what is the main reason you don't use the Internet or email?” Non-Internet users only * All non-Internet users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–54 55 and older Latinos Whites Inability 35% 28% 42% 34% 30% It’s too difficult/frustrating 14 12 16 14 7 Just don’t know how 13 12 15 15 9 Too old to learn 5 1 8 3 8 Physically unable 3 3 3 2 6 Lack of interest 34 35 32 30 44 Not interested 20 18 20 18 24 It's a waste of time/ Don’t need it 8 10 7 8 8 Just don’t have the time 6 7 5 4 12 Cost or access 23 29 17 30 13 Don’t have a computer 11 12 10 14 11 Cost/ Too expensive 9 13 5 12 1 Don't have access 3 4 2 4 1 Worried about computer viruses/spyware/adware/spam 3 5 2 3 4 Other 5 2 6 2 9 Don’t know 1 1 1 – – *Because there are so few non -Internet users, only subgroups with adequate sample sizes are reported separately. Relatively few non -Internet users (17%) would like to use the Internet or start using it again (14% of non - Internet users had said they used it in the past). There is more interest in using the Internet among those age 18 to 54 (24%) and Latinos (23%) than among those age 55 and older (12%) and whites (10%). Most non- Internet users (67%) say they would need help to get started. “Would you like to start using the Internet or email (again), or isn’t that something you’re interested in?” Non-Internet users onl y* All non-Internet users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–54 55 and older Latinos Whites Yes, interested 17% 24% 12% 23% 10% No, not interested 82 76 86 75 90 Don’t know 1 – 2 2 – *Because there are so few non -Internet users, only subgroups with adequate sample sizes are reported separately. June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 16 PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES KEY FINDINGS  A plurality of Californians (39%) say the government is doing just enough to improve the access and availability of broadband Internet; 17 percent think expanding affordable broadband a ccess should be a top federal priority. (page 17)  Nevertheless, t wo in three Californians think broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility rather tha n a luxury and would favor a government program funded by telecommunications providers to inc rease access for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies . (page 18)  A majority of Californians (56%) say people without high -speed broadband Internet access are at a major disadvantage when it comes to finding information about job opportunities; 44 percent say children who do not have broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage. ( page 19 )  Three in four Californians view teaching computer and Internet skills to the state’s public school students as very important . ( page 20)  Sixty -three percent of parents report visiting the website of their child’s school and 55 percent go online to help their child with schoolwork . Half (48%) communicate via email with their child’s teachers, and one in three (33%) receive their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email . Racial/ethnic and income disparities are e vident . (page s 20 , 21 )  Nearly all parents (84%) report that their child uses the Internet . A majority (54%) of these parents report using parental controls and two in three are worried about the ir child’s safety on the Internet . (page 22) 636874 61 292620 34 0 20 40 60 80 100 AsiansBlacksLatinosWhites Percent all adults Should be viewed as a public utility Should be viewed as a luxury Perception of High-SpeedBroadband Access 34 39 52 59 32 27 24 19 020406080100 Asians Whites Latinos Blacks Percent all adults Major disadvantage Minor disadvantage Perception that Children Without Broadband Are at a Disadvantage 81 13 32 Very important Somewhat important Not too important Not at all important Importance of Teaching Computer and Internet Skills in K‒12 Public Schools Public schoolparents PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 17 ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN ACCESS AND ADOPTION When asked about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high- speed broadband Internet technology, most Californians say the government is doing just enough (39%) or more than enough (16%). About one in four (26%) say it is not doing enough and 18 percent are unsure. S imilar shares of Californians have said the government is doing just enough or not enough since June 2008 . Across most political, regional, and demographic groups, fewer than three in 10 say the government has not been doing enough. The exceptions? Democrats (31%), San Francisco Bay Area (34%) and Los Angeles (31%) residents, blacks (31%), college graduates (33%), and those with household incomes of $80,000 or more (34%). Even among these groups, about half or more believe the government is doing just enough or more than enough to improve access to high-speed Internet. “Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high- speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not enough?” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 16% 13% 22% 22% 17% 18% Just enough 39 39 35 35 40 37 Not enough 26 31 23 26 29 27 Don’t know 18 17 20 17 14 18 A majority of Californians think it is important for the federal government to expand affordable high- speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country, but just 17 percent consider it a top priority; 38 percent consider it an important but lower priority. Another 38 percent say it is not too important (20%) or should not be done (18%). Attitudes toward the federal government’s role in expanding broadband access were nearly identical in June 2011. At least half of residents across most political, regional, and demographic groups consider expanding access important, but fewer than one in three consider it a top priority. Democrats (21% top priority, 42% important but lower priority) are far more likely than Republicans (10% top priority, 26% important) to think it should be an important or top priority for the federal government. Among independents, 54 percent hold this view (15% top priority, 39% important). Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (50%) are less likely than Asians (57%), Latinos (62%), and blacks (63%) to say expanding Internet access should be an important or a top priority for the federal government. “Do you think that expanding affordable high-speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done?” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Top priority 17% 21% 10% 15% 17% 14% Important but lower priority 38 42 26 39 40 39 Not too important 20 20 21 23 22 19 Should not be done 18 11 36 20 18 23 Don’t know 7 6 7 4 3 5 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 18 ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN ACCESS AND ADOPTION (CONTINUED) Although the expansion of high -speed Internet access is not viewed as a top government priority, most Californians (66%) think it should be viewed as a public utility that everyone should have access to while 28 percent think it should be viewed as a luxur y that some people may not be able to access. Attitudes were nearly identical when we first asked this question in June 2011 (66% utility, 27% luxury). Majorities of Californians across political, regional, and demographic groups think of high- speed Internet as more of a public utility than luxury, although Democrats (74%) are much more likely than Republicans (52%) to hold this view. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (74%) are the most likely to say high- speed Internet is more like a utility that everyone should have access to, followed by blacks (68%), Asians, (63%), and whites (61%). Those age 55 and older (56%) are less likely than younger residents to hold this view (69% 18 to 34, 71% 35 to 54). More than six in 10 across income and education groups say broadband should be viewed as a utility rather than a luxury. Among those who say the government is not doing enough to improve access, 80 percent say broadband should be viewed as a public utility and among those who say the government is doing just enough to improve access, 66 percent hold this view. Those who say government is doing more than enough are divided ( 48% utility, 47% luxury). “Which of the following comes closest to your view, even if neither is exactly right. High- speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility that everyone should have access to, or High- speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury that some people may not be able to access.” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Should be viewed as a public utility 66% 74% 52% 62% 68% 61% Should be viewed as a luxury 28 22 44 31 29 34 Don’t know 6 4 4 7 3 5 Two in three Californians (67%) would favor a government program funded by telecommunications providers to increase access to broadband for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies; 28 percent would oppose this type of program. Among likely voters, 60 percent would favor and 35 percent would oppose this program. There is a wide partisan divide: 81 percent of Democrats are in favor of a subsidy program to provide broadband to lower -income and rural residents and 56 percent of Republicans are opposed. Among independents, 56 percent would favor such a program. Majorities across regions and demographic groups would favor a program to increase high -speed access, but there are differences in the level of support. Latinos (79%), blacks (78%), and Asians (76%) for example, are much more likely than whites (56%) to say they would favor this program . More than seven in 10 under age 55 express support , compared with 54 percent of those age 55 and older. And support is somewhat higher in Los Angeles (73%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (72%) than in the Central Valley (66%), Orange /San Diego (62%), and the Inland Empire (62%). Among those who say broadband should be viewed as a public utility, 80 percent favor using subsidies to increase access for lower -income and rural residents. Among those who say it should be viewed as a luxury, 43 percent express support and 53 percent are opposed. “What if there was a government program funded by telecommunications providers that sought to increase access to high- speed broadband Internet for lower-income and rural residents through subsidies? Would you favor or oppose this program?” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 67% 81% 39% 56% 66% 60% Oppose 28 15 56 38 30 35 Don’t know 5 3 5 6 4 6 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 19 DISADVANTAGES OF NOT HAVING BROADBAND When it comes to finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills, eight in 10 adults say non -broadband users are at a major (56%) or minor (25%) disadvantage. Results among broadband users are similar. In 2011, a slightly higher s hare said non-users were at a major disadvantage (62%). Blacks (70%) and Latinos (68%) are much more likely than whites (51%) and Asians (42%) to say non- broadband users are at a major disadvantage. Those age 55 and older are less likely than younger Californians to say so. Democrats (70%) are much more likely than independents (54%) and Republicans ( 40%) to hold this view. “Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people… Do you think that people who do not have high-speed broa dband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following? How about finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband users Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Major disadvantage 56% 42% 70% 68% 51% 57% Minor disadvantage 25 38 17 18 26 25 Not at disadvantage 16 15 11 11 19 16 Don't know 4 5 3 2 4 2 Three in four Californians say non -broadband users are at a major (45%) or minor (31%) disadvantage when it comes to getting health information. In 2011, half (50%) said they are at a major disadvantage. Latinos (62%) and blacks (52%) are much more likely than Asians and whites (36% each) to consider this a major disadvantage. Democrats (58 %) are more likely than independents ( 42%) and Republicans ( 25%) to hold this view. When it comes to using government services, 73 percent of Californians think non- broadband users are at a major (40%) or minor (33%) disadvantage. In 2011, a similar 42 percent said major disadvantage. Majorities of blacks (55%) and Latinos (53%) again say major disadvantage, compared to three in 10 Asians (31%) and whites (32%). “How about…?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband users Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Getting health information Major disadvantage 45% 36% 52% 62% 36% 45% Minor disadvantage 31 36 30 23 35 33 Not at disadvantage 21 24 16 13 25 20 Don’t know 4 4 2 3 4 2 Using government services Major disadvantage 40 31 55 53 32 41 Minor disadvantage 33 46 25 27 35 34 Not at disadvantage 21 19 18 14 26 21 Don’t know 5 4 2 6 6 3 Seven in 10 Californians say children without broadband access are at a major (44%) or minor (26%) disadvantage. Majorities of blacks (59%) and Latinos (52%) again say these children are at a major disadvantage, compared to fewer whites (39%) and Asians (3 4%). Half of Democrats (53%) say they are at a major disadvantage, compared to fewer independents (44 %) and Republicans (29 %). PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 20 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION Nearly all Californians say that it is very (77%) or somewhat (19%) important for the state’s K –12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills. Views were similar in 2011 (76% very, 18% somewhat important). Eight in 10 bl acks (82%), Latinos (81%), and whites (79%) say teaching computer skills is very important, compared to six in 10 Asians (60%). Overwhelming majorities across parties, regions, age, education, and income groups consider teaching computer skills very important. “How important is it for California’s K–12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills?” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very important 77% 79% 77% 79% 60% 82% 81% 79% Somewhat important 19 17 20 16 36 15 15 16 Not too important 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 Not at all important 2 1 2 3 1 – 1 2 Don’t know – – – 1 – – – 1 We asked parents of children 18 or younger a series of questions about Internet use in their child’s education. Sixty -three percent say they visit their child’s school website often (30%) or sometimes (33%), 37 percent say they do not. Among those who do not, 59 percent say their child’s school has a website, 15 percent say it does not, and 26 percent ar e unsure. The share who visit their child’s school website is slightly higher than in 2008 (56% 2008, 61% 2009, 63% 2011, 63% today). The share reporting website visits rises with income. White parents (45% often, 38% sometimes) are far more likely than Latino parents (17% often, 26% sometimes ) to visit their child’s school website ( sample sizes for Asian and black parents are too small for separate analysis). Majorities of those earning under $40,000 (58%) and Latinos (57%) do not visit their child’s website. Parents with a high school education or less are far less likely than those with higher levels of education to visit their child’s school website. Thirty -three percent of parents say they receive their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email (15% often, 18% sometimes), 67 percent say they do not. Among those who do not, 16 percent say the teachers send assignments by email, 74 percent say they do not, and 10 percent are unsure. The share of parents receiving homework assignments online has been similar since 2008 (28% 2008, 34% 2009, 32% 2011, 33% 2013). The share of parents receiving assignments online increases with education and income levels. Forty -six percent of white parents receive assignments online, compared to only 19 percent of Latino parents. Among public school parents, 61 percent visit their child’s school website and 34 percent receive assignments online. “Do you ever…?” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Visit the website of your child’s school Yes, often 30% 15% 50% 48% 17% 45% Yes, sometimes 33 28 28 45 26 38 No 37 58 22 7 57 16 Receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email Yes, often 15 8 18 29 8 24 Yes, sometimes 18 14 23 22 11 22 No 67 77 59 49 80 53 Don't know 1 1 – – – 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 21 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION (CONTINUED) About half of parents of children 18 years or younger say they use email to communicate with their child’s teachers (20% often, 28% sometimes), and half say they do not (52%). Among those who say they do not, 24 percent say their child’s teacher s use email to communicate with parents, 62 percent say they do not, and 14 percent are unsure. Three in four lower -income parents say they do not email their child’s teachers, while seven in 10 middle -income (69%) and eight in 10 upper -income parents (79%) say they do email teachers. Frequency of contact via email also increases with income: those earning $80,000 or more (37%) are more likely than those earning less to say they often use email to communicate with their child’s teachers (9% under $40,000, 26% $40,000 to $80,000). Seventy -two percent of Latino parents say they do not email teachers, while 73 percent of white parents do email teachers. Forty -eight percent of public school parents report this activity. Fifty -five percent of parents say they go online (22% often, 33% sometimes) to help their child with schoolwork, 44 percent say they don’t. The share of parents using the Internet to help children with schoolwork increases with income. Half of Latino parents say they go online (20% often, 30% sometimes) to help their child with schoolwork , while half say they do not. Sixty-five percent of white parents go online (25% often, 40% sometimes) and 35 percent don’t go online to help their child with schoolwork. Among public school parents, 55 percent say they go on line (23% often, 32% sometimes) and 45 percent say they do not. “Do you ever…?” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household i ncome Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Use email to communicate with your child’s teachers Yes, often 20% 9% 26% 37% 10% 30% Yes, sometimes 28 15 43 42 17 43 No 52 75 31 21 72 27 Go online to help your child with their schoolwork Yes, often 22 18 31 27 20 25 Yes, sometimes 33 30 31 42 30 40 No 44 52 37 31 50 35 CHILDREN AND THE INT ERNET More than eight in 10 parents (84%) say their child uses the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone; only 16 percent say their child does not. More than three in four parents across income groups say their child uses the Internet, though parents earning under $40,000 are less likely than those earning more to say their child uses the Internet. Seventy -eight percent of Latino parents say their child is an Internet user, compared to 93 percent of white parents. Eighty -three percent of public school parents say their child use s the Internet. In a 2012 Pew Internet & American Life Project national survey of parents of 12- to 17 -year -olds, 96 percent said their child uses the Internet. “Does your child use the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone?” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Yes 84% 76% 93% 90% 78% 93% No 16 24 7 10 22 7 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 22 CHILDREN AND THE INTERNET (CONTINUED) With a high share of parents of children 18 years or younger across demographic groups saying their child use s the Internet, how concerned are they about their child’s safety online? Sixty- seven percent of parents whose children go online say they are very (33%) or somewhat (34 %) worried about the safety of their child on the Internet, 33 percent say they are not too (23%) or not at all (10 %) worried. Parents earning less than $40,000 ( 39%) are more likely to be very worried than parents earning more ( 29% $40,000 to $80,000, 28% $80, 000 or more). Latino parents (41%) are much more likely than white parents (24 %) to say they are very worried about their child’s safety online. “How worried are you about the safety of your child when using the Internet?” Parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Very worried 33% 39% 29% 28% 41% 24% Somewhat worried 34 33 35 32 36 37 Not too worried 23 18 30 28 14 29 Not at all worried 10 9 6 12 9 10 Don’t know 1 1 – – – – When parents whose children use the I nternet are asked about parental controls or other means of blocking, filtering, or monitoring their child’s online activities, 54 percent say they have used these and 45 percent say they have not. Among parents earning under $40,000, 46 percent say they have monitored and 52 percent say they have not monitor ed their child’s online activities. Majorities of middle - and upper -income parents have used such controls. White parents (63%) are much more likely than Latino parents (44%) to have monitored their child’s online activities. Parents with a high school education or less are much less likely than those with at least some college education to have monitored their child. In Pew’s national survey of parents of 12 - to 17 -year -olds, 50 percent said they had used parental controls, and 50 percent said they had not. “Still thinking about your child's use of technology, have you ever used parental controls or other means of blocking, filtering, or monitoring your child's online activities?” Parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Yes 54% 46% 70% 60% 44% 63% No 45 52 30 40 56 35 Don't know 1 3 – – 1 1 June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 23 REGIONAL MAP June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 26 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY June 4–18, 2013 2,502 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese MARGIN OF ERROR ±2.9% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE PERCENTAGES MAY N OT ADD TO 100 DUE TO ROUNDING 1. First, do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 45% right direction 42 wrong direction 13 don’t know 2. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 46% good times 42 bad times 12 don’t know 3. Do you yourself ever use a computer at home, at work, at school, or anywhere else? 79% yes 21 no – don’t know 4 /4a/4b .Next, do you use the Internet, at least occasionally? [or] Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally? [or] Do you access the Internet on a cell phone, tablet, or other mobile handheld device, at least occasionally? 86% yes [skip to q6] 14 no [ask q5] 5. [non -Internet users] Did you ever at some point use the Internet or email, but have since stopped for some reason? 14% yes 85 no 1 don’t know 5a. [non -Internet users] Would you like to start using the Internet or email ( if q5=yes: again) , or isn’t that something you’re interested in? 17% yes, interested 82 no, not interested 1 don’t know 5b. [non -Internet users] And, what is the main reason you don’t use the Internet or email? [ code, don’t read ] 20% not interested 14 it is too difficult/frustrating 13 just don’t know how 11 don’t have a computer 9 cost/too expensive 8 it’s a waste of time/don’t need it 6 just don’t have the time 5 too old to learn 3 don’t have access 3 physically unable 3 worried about computer viruses, spyware, adware, spam 5 other 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 27 5c. [non -Internet users] If you wanted to start using the Internet or email ( if q5=yes: again) , do you feel that you know enough about computers and technology to be able to do that on your own, or would you need someone to help you? 11% know enough to go online (again) on my own 67 would need someone to help me 17 would not want to start using the Internet (volunteered) 5 don’t know 6 . [Internet users] Did you happen to use the Internet yesterday? 81% yes 19 no – don’t know 7. [Internet users] About how many years have you been an Internet user? [code, don’t read] 3% less than 1 year 19 1– 5 years 27 6– 10 years 25 11– 15 years 24 more than 15 years 2 don’t know 8. [Internet users] About how often do you use the Internet or email from home—several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 52% several times a day [skip to q10] 19 about once a day [skip to q10] 11 3– 5 days a week [skip to q10] 8 1– 2 days a week [skip to q10] 3 every few weeks [skip to q10] 3 less often [ask q9] 4 never [ask q9] – don’t know [skip to q10] 9. [Internet users who never or don’t often use the Internet at home] Wha t is the main reason you don’t ( if q8 =less often: often) use the Internet at home? [code, don’t read] 20% computer is too expensive/ don’t have a computer 13 Interne t connection is too expensive / cheaper to get it elsewhere 12 d on’t know how to set up access at home 10 not interested, don’t need it, don’t like it 8 d on’t need to go online at home very often or at all 6 u se my cell phone or o ther mobile device to go online 5 s ervice not available where I live 3 c an go online from somewhere else 2 c omputer is broken or too old 15 o ther 6 don’t know 10 . [Internet users] About how often do you use the Internet or email from someplace other than home or work —several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 29 % several times a day 10 about once a day 8 3– 5 days a week 9 1– 2 days a week 6 every few weeks 9 less often 29 never 1 don’t know 11. [Internet users] Do you ever access the Internet using a computer at a public library? 23 yes 77 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 28 As I read the following list of items, please tell me if you happen to have each one, or not. 12. [all adults] Do you have a desktop computer? 58% yes [ask q12a] 42 no [skip to q13] – don’t know [skip to q13] 12a. [Internet users who have a desktop] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your desktop computer? 86% yes 14 no – don’t know 13. [all adults] Do you have a laptop computer or netbook? 63% yes [ask q13a] 37 no [skip to q14] – don’t know [skip to q14] 1 3a . [Internet users who have a laptop or netbook] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your laptop computer or netbook ? 93% yes 7 no – don’t know 14 . [all adults] Do you have a working cell phone? 92% yes [ask q14a] [includes those who completed interview on cell phone] 8 no [skip to q15] – don’t know [skip to q15] 14a. [Internet users who have a cell phone] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your cell phone? 69% yes 31 no – don’t know 15. [all adults] Do you have a game console like Xbox or Play Station in your home? 45% yes [ask q15a] 54 no [skip to q16] – don’t know [skip to q16] 15a. [Internet users who have a game console] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your game console? 39% ye s 61 no – don’t know 16. [all adults] Do you have a handheld device made primarily for e- book reading, such as a Nook or Kindle e -reader? 19% yes [ask q16a] 81 no [skip to q17] – don’t know [skip to q17] 16a. [ Internet users who have an electronic book device] Do you ever access the Internet or email using this handheld device? [ If necessary : this handheld device that is ma de primarily for e -book reading. ] 61% yes 37 no 2 don’t know 17 . [all adults] Do you have a tablet computer like an iPad, Sa msung Galaxy, or Motorola Xoom or Kindle Fire? 36% yes [ask q17a] 64 no [skip to q18] – don’t know [skip to q18] 17a. [Internet users who have a tablet computer] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your tablet computer? 90% yes 10 no 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 29 Thinking now just about your cellphone… 18. [cell phone users] Some phones are called “smartphones” because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartphone or not, or are you not sure? [ If necessary: A smartphone is a mobile device like an iPhone, Blackberry or Android that offers more advanced computing ability and connectiv ity than a standard cell phone.] 58% yes, it is a smartphone 35 no, is not a smartphone 8 not sure 19. [cell phone users] Thinking about your cell phone plan, do you currently pay for any kind of data plan on your phone, or not? [ If necessary : A data plan from your cell phone provider allows you to send and receive emails and surf the Internet from your mobile device. ] 51% yes 44 no 2 someone else pays for phone (volunteered) 1 data plan is not broken out separately (volunteered) 3 don’t know Please tell me if you ever use your cell phone to do any of the following things. 20. [cell phone users] What about using your cell phone to send or receive text messages? 82% yes 18 no – don’t know 21. [cell phone users] What about using your cell phone to send or receive email messages? 56% yes 44 no – don’t know 22. [cell phone users] What about using your cell phone to download a software application or “app ?” 53% yes [ask q22a] 47 no [skip to q23] – don’t know [skip to q23] 2 2a. [cell phone users who download apps] Thinking about all of the apps you have downloaded, h ave you ever paid for an app, or have you only downloaded apps that are free? 49% yes, have paid for app 50 only download apps that are f ree – don’t know 23. [cell phone Internet users] Overall, when you use the Internet, do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer? 37% mostly on cell phone [ ask q23a] 52 mostly on something else [ skip to q24 ] 10 both equally (volunteered) [ skip to q24] 1 depends (volunteered) [skip to q24 ] 1 don’t know [ skip to q24] 23a. [c ell phone Internet users who use the Internet mostly on their cell phone] And is your cell phone the only way that you connect to the Internet? 27% yes 73 no – don’t know 24. [cell phone users] Thinking about your cell phone, do you think you could live without it, or is it something you would miss having but could probably do without, or is it something you can't imagine living without? 36% could live without it 33 would miss having but could do without 29 s omething you can’t imagine living without 2 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 30 25. [cell phone Internet users] About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone— several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few we eks, less often , or never? 61% several times a day 14 about once a day 6 3– 5 days a week 10 1– 2 days a week 3 every few weeks 3 less often 2 never – don’t know Next, please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things. [rot ate questions 26 to 35 keeping a’s, b’s, and c ’s with respective number and in order] 26. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others? 33% yes, do th is 67 no, do not do this – don’t know 26a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 31% yes 69 no – don’t know 26b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 27% yes 73 no – don’t know 26c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 33% yes 67 no – don’t know 27. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to look for information about a job? 48% yes, do this 52 no, do not do this – don’t know 27a. [ desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 52% yes 48 no – don’t know 27b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 22% yes 78 no – don’t know 27c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 33% yes 67 no – don’t know 28. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to purchase goods and services? 60% yes, do this 40 no, do not do this – do n’t know 28a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 67% yes 33 no – don’t know 28b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 24% yes 76 no – don’t know 28c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 50% yes 50 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 31 29. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to apply for a job? 40% yes, do this 60 no, do not do this – don’t know 29a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 44% yes 56 no – don’t know 29b. [ cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 11% yes 89 no – don’t know 29c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 22% yes 78 no – don’t know 30. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook, or LinkedIn? 57% yes, do this 43 no, do not do this – don’t know 30a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 58% yes 42 no – don’t know 30b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 40% yes 60 no – don’t know 30c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 55% yes 45 no – don’t know 31. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online for educational purposes, such as online training or for taking a class? 39% yes, do this 60 no, do not do this – don’t know 31a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 44% yes 56 no – don’t know 31b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 10% yes 90 no – don’t know 31c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 24% yes 75 no – don’t know 32. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to get health or medical information? 55 % yes, do this 45 no, do not do this – don’t know 32a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 59% yes 41 no – don’t know 32b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 24% yes 76 no – don’t know 32c. [ tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 48% yes 52 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 32 33.[reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to contact your health insurance provider, a doctor, or other health care professional? 32% yes, do this 68 no, do not do this – don’t know 33a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 35% yes 65 no – don’t know 33b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 12% yes 88 no – don’t know 33c. [ tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 19% yes 81 no – don’t know 34. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to access government resources, such as obtaining forms, making payments, or registering to vote? 47% yes, do this 53 no, do not do this – don’t know 34a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 53% yes 47 no – don’t know 34b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 12 yes 88 no – don’t know 34c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 26% yes 74 no – don’t know 35. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to do any banking or manage your finances? 53% yes, do this 47 no, do not do this – don’t know 35a. [ desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 58% yes 42 no – don’t know 35b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 27% yes 73 no – don’t know 35c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tabl et computer? 37% yes 63 no – don’t know 36. [reported for all adults] What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL -enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fibe r optic connection such as FIOS, or a T -1? 2 6% ca ble modem [skip to q40] 20 wireless con nection (either aircard, land -based or satellite) [skip to q40] 17 DSL -enabled phone line [skip to q40] 6 fiber optic or T -1 or other broadband connection [skip to q40] 4 dial-up telephone line [ask q37] 1 connect to Internet via a cell phone, no home service (volunteered) [ask 37] 18 do not have Internet access/ computer at home [ask q37] 8 don’t know /refuse [ask q37] PPIC Statewide Survey 33 37. [non -Internet users or non -broadband users] As far as you know, i s high-speed Internet service available in your neighborhood from a telephone company, a cable company, or any other company? 64% yes 15 no 21 don’t know [questions 38 and 39 deleted] 40. [broadband users] About how many years have you been using a high -speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home? [code, don’t read] 2% less than 1 year 39 1– 5 years 42 6– 10 years 11 11– 15 years 3 more than 15 years 3 don’t know [questions 41 to 50 asked of all adults ] Changing topics, 41. Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high -speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 16% more than enough 39 just enough 26 not enough 18 don’t know 42. Do you think that expanding affordable high- speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done? 17% a top priority 38 important but a lower priority 20 not too important 18 should not be done 7 don’t know 43. Which of the following comes closest to your view, ev en if neither is exactly right [rotate ] (1) high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility that everyone sh ould have access to [or] (2) high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury that some people may not be able to access. 66% high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility 28 high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury 6 don’t know 44. What if there was a government program funded by telecommunications providers that sought to increase access to high- speed broadband Internet for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies? Would you favor or oppose th is program? 67% favor 28 oppose 5 don’t know 45. How important is it for California’s K–12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 77% very important 19 somewhat important 2 not too important 2 not at all important – don’t know Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people, do you think that people who do not have high -speed broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following. [ rotate questions 46 to 48 ] PPIC Statewide Survey 34 46. How about finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 56% major disadvantage 25 minor disadvantage 16 not at a disadvantage 4 don’t know 47.How about using government services? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 40% major disadvantage 33 minor disadvantage 21 not at a disadvantage 5 don’t know 48. How about getting health information? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 45% major disadvantage 31 minor disadvantage 21 not at a disadvantage 4 don’t know 49. And, how about children who do not have high -speed broadband Internet access at home, are they at a disadvantage because of this? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a min or disadvantage?) 44% major disadvantage 26 minor disadvantage 27 not at a disadvantage 3 don’t know 50.Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are reg istered to vote in California? 70% yes [ask q 50a] 30 no [skip to q51b ] 50a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or are you registered as a decline -to -state or independent voter? 44% Democrat [ask q 51] 29 Republican [skip to q51 a] 5 another party (specify) [skip to q52] 22 i ndependent [skip to q51b] 51 . Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 55% strong 42 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q52] 51a.Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 56% strong 41 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q52] 51b.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 23% Republican Party 39 Democratic Party 26 neither (volunteer ed) 12 do n’t know 52 . Next, would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 12% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 28 middle -of -the -road 21 somewhat conservative 13 very conservative 5 don’t know 53 . Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics —a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 23% great deal 34 fair amount 32 only a little 11 none 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 35 [d1 –d4a: demographic questions] D4b.[parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever visit the website of your child’s school? ( if yes: Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 30% yes, often [skip to d4d] 33 yes, sometimes [skip to d4d] 37 no [ask d4c ] – don’t know [ask d4c ] D4c. [parents who do not visit school website] And, as far as you know, does your child’s school have a website? 59% yes 15 no 26 don’t know D4d. [parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email? ( if yes: Do you do this often or only some times?) 15% yes , often [skip to d 4f] 18 yes, sometimes [skip to d4f ] 67 no [ask d4e] 1 don’t know [ask d4e] D4e. [parents who do not receive homework via Internet, email] And, as far as you know, do your child’s teachers send homework assignments via the Internet or email? 16% yes 74 no 10 don’t know D4f. [parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever use email to communicate with your child’s teachers? ( if yes: Do you d o tihs often o r only sometimes?) 20% yes, often [skip to d4h] 28 yes, sometimes [skip to d4h] 52 no [ask d4g] – don’t know [ask d4g] D4g. [ parents who do not communicate with child’s teacher via email ] And, as far as you know, do your child’s teachers communicate with parents via email? 24% yes 62 no 14 don’t know D4h. [parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever go online to help your child with their schoolwork? ( if yes: Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 22% yes, often 33 yes, sometimes 44 no – don’t know D4i. [parents of children 18 or younger] Does your child use the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone? 84% yes [skip to d4j] 16 no [ask d4k] – don’t know [ask d4j] D4j. [parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet] Still thinking about your child's use of technology, have you ever used parental controls or other means of blocking, filtering, or monitoring your child's online activities? 54% yes 45 no 1 don’t know D4k. [parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet ] How worried are you about the safety of your child when using the Internet —very worried, somewhat worried, not too worried, or not at all worried? 33% v ery worried 34 somewhat worried 23 not too worried 10 not at all worried 1 don’t know [d5–d20: demographic questions]" } ["___content":protected]=> string(102) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(114) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-information-technology-june-2013/s_613mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8878) ["ID"]=> int(8878) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:41:42" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4296) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(8) "S 613MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "s_613mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_613MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1047641" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(78268) "CONTENTS About the Survey 2 Press Release 3 Access and Use 6 Perceptions and Attitudes 16 Regional Map 2 3 Methodology 24 Questionnaire and Results 2 6 information technolog y JUNE 2013 & P P I C S TAT E W I D E S U R V E Y Californians Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner Sonja Petek Jui Shrestha i C June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 2 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Survey provides policymakers, the media, and the public with objective, advocacy- free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of Calif ornia residents. This is the 135th PPIC Statewide Sur vey in a series that was inaugurated in April 1998 and has generated a database of responses from more than 284,000 Californians. This sur vey is the four th in a series focusing on information technology issues and is funded with grants from the California Emerging Technology Fund and ZeroDivide. This series seeks to inform decisionmakers, raise public awareness, and stimulate policy discussions and debate about a variety of information technology issues. We draw upon earlier PPIC Statewide Sur veys for California trends over time and upon recent sur veys by the Pew Internet & American Life Project for national comparisons. While broadband Internet is becoming more ubiquitous, there are still many Californians who are not “connected. ” This sur vey seeks to inform the impor tant public policy discussion about the changing nature of connectedness and differences between Californians who are and are not connected. We examine access to and use of information technology, the evolving role of mobile devices —including tablets —as well as what people are doing online and what devices they are using for these activities. We also examine the impor tance of information technology in education and the public’s perceptions of and attitudes toward these issues. This sur vey presents the responses of 2 ,502 adult residents throughout the state, inter viewed in multiple languages and contacted by landline or cell phone. It includes findings on these topics:  Information technology access and us age, including a profile of who uses the Internet and who has a broadband connection at home; overall use of computers; ownership of a variety of ele ctronic devices , including cell phones and tablet computers; specific online activities and whether they are carried out on laptops, desktops, cell phones , or tablets; how often respondents access the Internet or email, and what kind of Internet connection they have at home. We also ask about mobile devices and how people use them , and about non- Internet users’ interest in the Internet and their reasons for not using the Internet or email .  Perceptions and attitudes toward information technology, including the role of government in expanding the access and availability of high-speed Internet technology; whether broadband Internet should be considered a public utility or a luxur y; suppor t for a government program funded by telecommunications providers to increase access for lower-income and rural residents; and attitudes about possible disadvantages faced by those without high -speed broadband access at home. We also examine the impor tance of teaching Internet skills in public schools and education- related activities that parents engage in online.  Time trends, national comparisons, and the extent to which Californians may differ in their perceptions, attitudes, and preferences based on political par ty affiliation, likelihood of voting, region of residence, race/ethnicity, and other demographics. This repor t may be downloaded free of charge from our website ( www.ppic.org). For questions about the sur vey, please contact sur vey@ppic.org . Tr y our PPIC Statewide Sur vey interactive tools online at http://www.ppic.org/main/sur vAdvancedSearch.asp. PPIC Statewide Survey June 2013 Calif ornians and Information Technology 5 MOST PARENTS VISIT SCHOOL WEBSITES, FAR FEWER GET SCHOOLWORK ONLINE Nearly all Californians say it is very important (77%) or somewhat important (19%) for the state’s public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills. Overwhelming majorities across parties, regions, ages, education levels, and incomes consider teaching these skills very important. Baldassare notes: “Californians believe that success for the future generation is tied to access and knowledge of information technology, with consensus that teaching computer and Internet skills is very import ant for public school students. Many say that children are at a disadvantage if they are without high -speed access to the Internet at home.” A majority of parents of children age 18 or younger visit the website of their child’s school (30% often, 33 % sometimes), and 37 percent do not. Among those who do not, 59 percent say the school has a website, 15 percent say it does not, an d 26 percent are unsure. Higher-income parents are more likely to visit the school website, and white parents (45% often, 38% sometimes) are far more likely than Latino parents (17% often, 26% sometimes) to do so. Overall, the percentage of parents who receive their child’s homework assignments by email or on the Internet has changed little since 2008 (28% 2008, 34% 2009, 32% 2011, 33% today). Most parents (67%) do not receive their child’s homework assignments online, while 15 percent do so often and 18 percent sometimes do so. Among those who do not, 16 percent say teachers do send assignments online, 74 percent say teachers do not, and 10 percent are unsure. About half of parents say they use email to communicate with their child’s teacher s (20% often, 28% sometimes), and half (52%) say they don’t. Among those who do not, 24 percent say the teacher uses email to communicate with parents, 62 percent say the teacher does not, and 14 percent are unsure. Demographic distinctions are sharp: 79 percent of upper -income parents and 69 percent of middle -income parents communicate with a teacher by email, while 75 percent of lower -income parents don’t. And 73 percent of whites do so, while 72 percent of Latino parents do not. More than half of parents say they go online (22% often, 33% sometimes) to help their child with schoolwork, and 44 percent say they don’t. About half of Latino parents say they go online (20% often, 30% sometimes) to do so. The share of parents who go online to help with schoolwork increases with income. Asked whether their child uses the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone, 84 percent of parents say yes. More than three-quarters of parents across income groups and a strong majority of Latinos (78%) say their child uses the Internet. With Internet use widespread among children, how concerned are parents about online safety? Most parents of young Internet users ( 67%) say they are very worried (33 %) or somewhat worried ( 34%) about their child’s safety online. More than half (54%) say they have used parental controls or other ways of blocking, filtering, or monitoring their child’s online activities, and 45 percent say they have not. MINORITY SAY GOVERNMENT SHOULD DO MORE TO IMPROVE ACCESS Given their views of the importance of broadband access, what do Californians think about the government’s role in improving access to high -speed Internet technology? Most say the government is doing just enough (39%) or more than enough (16%), while 26 percent say it is not doing enough and 18 percent are unsure. While most Californians say it is important for the federal government to expand affordable high -speed Internet access to everyone in the nation, just 17 percent consider it a top priority. M ost (66%) nevertheless view having a high-speed Internet connection as a public utility that everyone should be able to access, while 28 percent view it as a luxury that some people may not be able to access. Two -thirds (67%) would favor a government program funded by telecommunications providers to increase broadband access for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies. June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 6 ACCESS AND USE KEY FINDINGS  Eighty -six percent of Californians use the Internet and 69 percent have broadband at home. But there are still disparities across subgroups . (page 7)  Californians who own certain devices are more likely to access the Internet with their laptop computer (57%) or cell phone (56%) than via their desktop computer (48%) or tablet computer (32%). Internet access via a cell phone has increased 3 7 points since 2008, while using a tablet to access the Interne t has increased 21 points since 2011 . (page 8)  What do Californians do when they are online ? More than half of adults shop, do social networking, get health information, or do banking when they go online. Since 2008, the share of Californians going online to access social networking sites has increased 31 points . (page s 9, 10 )  Most Californians have broadband at home , including 26 percent who use a cable modem, 20 percent who connect wirelessly, and 17 pe rcent who use DSL . Just 4 percent report having a dial -up connection and 18 percent have no home access. (page 12 )  Fifty -eight percent of cell phone users say their phone is a smartphone , a 19-point increase since 2011 . Eighty -two percent of cell phone users say they send or receive text messages , and 56 percent send or receive email messages . Among cell -phone Internet users, 37 percent say they connect mostly via their phone, while 52 percent say the y do so mostly on another device. ( pages 13, 14 ) 26 37 5257 0 20 40 60 80 2008200920112013 Percent all adults Percent UsingSocial Networking Sites 19 26 40 56 0 20 40 60 80 2008200920112013 Percent all adults Percent Using a Cell Phone to Access the Internet 8586 7069 0 20 40 60 80 100 Adults nationwide*Californians Percent all adults Use the Internet Have broadband at home Internet Users and Broadband at Home *Pew Internet & American Life Project PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 7 INTERNET USE AND HOME ACCESS Most Californians access the Internet at least occasionally (86%). Internet use was similar last year (87%) and has increased 21 points since 2000 (65% 2000, 70% 2008, 76% 2009, 81% 2010, 84% 2 011, 87% 2012, and 86% today). Today, 69 percent of Californians have a broadband Internet connection at home (including DSL, cable, wireless, T -1, or fiber optic) . Home broadband connectivity is up 14 points since 2008, although findings today are similar to recent years ( 55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% 2011, 73% 2012, and 69% today). The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project tracks Internet use at the national level. In s pring surveys dating back to 2008 , Internet use among adults nationwide (73% 2008, 79% 2009, 79% 2010, 78% 2011, 82% 2012, and 85% today) has been fairly similar to Californians in our surveys . Pew has also seen a gradual climb in broadband adoption (55% 2008, 63 % 2009, 66% 2010, 62% 2011, 66% 2012, and 70% today) , which has largely tracked the increase found in our surveys since 2008 . While a strong majority of Californians have broadband at home, the differences across regional and demographic groups are still big enough to result in a “digital divide.” Stark differences can be seen across income (53% under $40,000, 84% $40,000 to under $80,000, 92% $80,000 or more) and education groups (47% high school diploma s or less, 83% some college, 88% college graduate s). Across racial/ethnic groups, half of Latinos (52%) have broadband at home, compared to more than seven in 10 among other groups (71% blacks, 75% Asians, 81% whites). Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (80%) and Orange/San Diego (77%) are more likely than residents in the Inland Empire (68%), Los Angeles (64%), or the Central Valley (60%) to have a broadband Internet connection at home. Among most groups, the share with broadband is either similar to or lower than last year. For example, broadband adoption dropped 11 points among Central Valley residents (71% to 60%) and 9 points among less -educated (56% to 47%) Californians . Percent saying yes Internet users* Broadband connection at home ** All adults 86 % 69% Age 18 –34 95 74 35–54 88 71 55 and over 77 63 Household income Under $40,000 77 53 $40,000 to $80,000 94 84 $80,000 or more 99 92 Race/Ethnicity Asians 89 75 Blacks 91 71 Latinos 77 52 Whites 93 81 Region Central Valley 81 60 San Francisco Bay Area 92 80 Los Angeles 86 64 Orange/San Diego 89 77 Inland Empire 86 68 *See page 26 for questions 4- 4b used in determining who is an Internet user. ** See page 32 for question 36 used in determining who has a broadband connection at home. PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 8 DEVICES AND INTERNET USE Californians own a variety of electronic devices and connect to the Internet on many of them. Nearly all Californians report having a cell phone (92%), and about six in 10 have a desktop computer (58%) or a laptop computer or netbook (63%). Fewer Californians have a game console (45%), a tablet (36%), or an electronic device used primarily for e -book reading (19%). Ownership of devices today is similar to June 2011, except when it comes to desktop computers (65% 2011, 58% today) and tablet computers (14% 2011, 36% today). While most Californians have a cell phone, there are differences among racial/ethnic groups and across age, education, and income groups in the ownership of other devices. When it comes to owning a device and using it to access the Internet , Californians are more likely to use a laptop computer (57%) or a cell phone (56%) than a desktop computer (48%) or tablet computer (32%). Fewer use a game console (16%) or e- book reader (11%). Since 2011, the percentage of Californians accessing the Internet on a desk top computer has dropped 8 points, while access via cell phone (40% to 56%) and tablet (11% to 32%) has increased by double digit s. Using a laptop to connect to the Internet declines with age, increases with income, and is most prevalent among Asians and residents in the San Francisco Bay Area. The percentage of Californians accessing the Internet via a cell phone declines with age, increases with income, and is much more prevalent among blacks than other racial/ethnic groups. The share of Californians con necting to the Internet on a tablet computer increases with income and education. Internet access via tablet is less common among older Californians ; it is more prevalent among Asians and whit es than other racial/ethnic groups, and among San Francisco Bay Area residents compared to residents in the state’s other regions. “Do you have a ___________? (and) Do you ever access the Internet or email using your ___________?” Percent saying yes and access the Internet using this device Laptop computer Cell phone Desktop computer Tablet computer Game console E-book reader All adults 57% 56% 48% 32% 16% 11% Age 18 –34 68 78 44 39 30 10 35–54 59 60 50 34 15 13 55 and over 42 30 50 22 5 11 Household income Under $40,000 43 46 35 18 15 6 $40,000 to $80,000 67 58 51 35 17 15 $80,000 or more 80 76 70 58 21 19 Race/Ethnicity Asians 70 55 45 38 15 11 Blacks 51 73 52 28 23 12 Latinos 43 52 34 23 18 6 Whites 64 59 58 37 16 15 Region Central Valley 45 51 47 28 18 13 San Francisco Bay Area 69 63 49 42 15 11 Los Angeles 56 57 44 31 14 11 Orange/San Diego 58 58 51 34 20 13 Inland Empire 57 62 52 29 18 13 Internet users 66 65 55 37 19 13 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 9 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES When Californians go online they engage in a variety of activities, from purchasing goods to using social networking sites to contacting a medical professional. More than half of Californians go online to purchase goods (60%, up 8 points since 2008), use a social networking site (57%, up 31 points), get health or medical information (55%, up 5 points) , or to do banking (53%, up 6 points). Slightly less than half of Californians (48%, up 3 points since 20 09) report looking online for information about a job. O lder and less -affluent Californians and Latinos are less likely than others to engage in most of these activities. Resident s in the San Francisco Bay Area, Orange/San Diego, and the Inland Empire are among the most likely to engage in most of the activities. There are disparities across groups —for example, younger Californians are twice as likely as older Californians to do online social networking, and more- affluent Californians are far more likely to do it than lower-income adults . An important reason accounting for some of these disparities is that certain groups are less likely to be Internet users. When it comes to the specific devices used for these activi ties, interesting patterns emerge. Californians are as likely to use a tablet computer as a desktop or laptop for social networking, but they are far less likely to use a tablet or cell phone to do online banking. Cell-phone users are more likely to use a phone for social networking than for the other four activities. “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things. ” Percent saying yes Purchase goods and services Use a social networking site Get health or medical information Do any banking or manage your finances L ook for information about a job All adults 60% 57% 55% 53% 48% Internet u sers 69 66 63 62 55 Age 18 –34 63 76 51 62 71 35–54 60 59 59 54 51 55 and over 56 35 55 44 21 Household income Under $40,000 38 50 38 38 46 $40,000 to $80,000 74 60 68 64 51 $80,000 or more 91 72 79 78 57 Race/Ethnicity Asians 65 54 54 59 55 Blacks 41 67 44 45 66 Latinos 37 51 39 39 46 Whites 77 62 68 63 46 Region Central Valley 60 53 45 43 43 San Francisco Bay Area 72 62 66 64 55 Los Angeles 53 53 51 50 45 Orange/San Diego 61 63 60 57 50 Inland Empire 58 62 54 56 51 Desktop or laptop users who do this activity on their desktop or laptop 67 58 59 58 52 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 24 40 24 27 22 Tablet users who do this activity on their tablet 50 55 48 37 33 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 10 SPECIFIC INTERNET ACTIVITIES (CONTINUED) Slightly less than half of Californians (47%, up 4 points since 2008) report going online to access government resources, while four in 10 have gone online to apply for a job (40%) or for educational purposes (39%, up 12 points since 2008). Fewer go online to use Twitter (33%, up 15 points since 2009) or to contact a health insurance provider or medical professional (32%). Once again, Latinos and older and less -affluent Californians are less likely than others to engage in many of these activities. And res idents in the San Francisco Bay Area and Orange/San Diego are among the most likely to do many of these activities. For instance, more-affluent Californ ians are three times more likely than lower-income residents to contact a medical professional online, a nd Latinos are the least likely among racial/ethnic groups to do so. Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area are much more likely than others to do so . Going online to access government resources is far more common among adults with h ousehold incomes of $4 0,000 or more. D esktop or laptops are used more often than other devices to perform these activities —except when it comes to Twitter , for which using a cell phone is as common as using a desktop, laptop, or tablet. Few people use the Internet via cell phone to access government resources, apply for a job, contact a medical professional , or for educational purposes; this is especially important since 37 percent of cell-phone Internet users connect mostly using a cell phone. “Please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things.” Percent saying yes Access government resources A pply for a job For educational purposes Use Twitter Contact health insurance provider or doctor All adults 47% 40% 39% 33% 32% Internet u sers 54 47 46 38 37 Age 18 –34 52 65 52 53 29 35–54 48 41 40 31 33 55 and over 41 15 27 13 35 Household income Under $40,000 31 39 28 29 17 $40,000 to $80,000 60 45 47 36 43 $80,000 or more 72 43 61 40 53 Race/ Ethnicity Asians 55 43 47 36 36 Blacks 46 59 45 35 27 Latinos 32 40 30 34 19 Whites 56 38 44 33 41 Region Central Valley 44 36 34 32 23 San Francisco Bay Area 55 45 49 37 47 Los Angeles 40 40 37 34 26 Orange/San Diego 56 45 42 31 36 Inland Empire 50 40 36 36 31 Desktop or laptop users who do this activity on their desktop or laptop 53 44 44 31 35 Cell phone users who do this activity on their cell phone 12 11 10 27 12 Tablet users who do this activity on their tablet 26 22 24 33 19 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 11 FREQUENCY OF INTERNET USAGE Most Internet users report goi ng online either several times a day (52%) or about once a day (19%); fewer report going online less than once a day (11% 3 to 5 days a week, 8% 1 to 2 days a week, 10% every few weeks/less often/never). Results were similar in 2011 (49% several times a day, 19% about once a day, 10% 3 to 5 days a week, 11% 1 to 2 days a week, 9% every few weeks/less often/never ). Internet users in the San Francisco Bay Area (61%) and Orange/San Diego (58%) are somewhat more likely than those in the Inland Empire (49%), Los Angeles (49%), or the Central Valley (44%) to go online several times a day. A majority of whites (57%) report going online several times a day, compared to four in 10 Latinos (41%). Going online several times a day increase s with education and income and decreases with age. Four in 10 Internet users report going online several times a day (29%) or about once a day (10%) from someplace other than home or work ; fewer do this less than once a day (8% 3 to 5 days a week, 9% 1 to 2 days a week, 6% every few weeks, 9% less often). Thirty percent never go online away from home or work , compared to 42 percent in 2011 . M ore Internet users today are going online several times a day than in 2011 (29% today, 17% 2011) from someplace other than home or work. Younger C alifornians under age 35 (38%), those with college degree s (43%), and those with household incomes more than $80,000 (46%) are more than twice as likely as Californians age 55 and older (17%), those with high school diplomas or less (18%), and those with household incomes under $40,000 (21%) to go online several times a day from someplace other than home or work. “About how often do you use the Internet or email from… ?” Internet users only All Internet users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–34 35 –54 55 and over Latinos Whites Home Several times a day 52% 61% 50% 43% 41% 57% About once a day 19 15 19 22 16 19 3–5 days a week 11 10 11 11 15 10 1–2 days a week 8 5 9 12 11 6 Every few weeks 3 3 2 4 4 3 Less often 3 3 4 2 5 2 Never 4 4 4 5 8 3 Someplace other than home or work Several times a day 29 38 30 17 26 31 About once a day 10 10 11 7 9 9 3–5 days a week 8 9 8 7 6 9 1–2 days a week 9 10 9 7 11 8 Every few weeks 6 7 6 4 5 5 Less often 9 9 8 11 11 8 Never/ Don’t know 30 16 29 47 31 31 INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME Sixty- nine percent of Californians have a broadband Internet connection at home, including more than four in 10 who have either a DSL connection (17%) or a cable modem (26 %); 20 percent use a wireless connection. The remaining broadband users have a fiber optic, T-1, or another type of connection (6%). Just 4 percent connect via a dial -up telephone line ; 8 percent are unsure what type of connection they PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 12 INTERNET CONNECTION AT HOME (CONTINUED) have, and 18 percent are not Internet user s or report not having an Internet connection or computer at home. Broadband access at home increased from 2008 to 2010 but has leveled off somewhat since then ( 55% 2008, 62% 2009, 70% 2010, 72% 2011, 73% 2012, and 69% today). R esident s across regions are more likely to have a cable modem than DSL. C able modem use is higher among Orange/San Diego (38%) and San Francisco Bay Area (32%) residents. Inland Empire residents (14%) are the most likely to connect via fiber optic or T-1; Central Valley residents (25%) are the most likely to not have Internet. Latinos are more than twice as likely as any other racial/ethnic group to have no Internet access at home. Older, less -educated , and less-affluent Californians are far more likely than other s to have no access. “What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL-enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fiber optic connection such as FiOS, or a T-1?” All adults All adults Household income Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more DSL-enabled phone line 17% 14% 18% 22% Cable modem 26 17 34 41 Wireless connection 20 17 24 21 Fiber optic, T- 1, or other broadband 6 5 9 7 Dial-up telephone line 4 6 2 1 No home access, connect via cell phone or tablet computer (volunteered) 1 2 – – No Internet, computer at home 18 30 8 2 Don’t know /Refuse 8 8 5 5 A majority of Californians (56%) report having had a high -speed broadband connection for more than six years, while four in 10 (39%) report having had a connection for one to five years; only 2 percent say they have had a broadband connection less than one year. In 2011, more people said they had been connected for one to five years and fewer reported a connection for six or more years (2% less than 1 year, 50% 1 to 5 years, 45% 6 or more years). Most Latino broadband users have adopted broadband within the l ast five years, whereas most whites have had it six o r more years . Less -affluent and less - educated residents are more recent adopters t han more-affluent and more-educated Californians. “About how many years have you been using a high-speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home?” Broadband users only All broadband users Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Less than 1 year 2% 5% 1% 1% 4% 1% 1 to 5 years 39 55 38 23 61 30 6 or more years 56 37 58 74 33 66 Don’t know 3 3 2 3 2 3 Among non -Internet and non -broadband users, 64 percent say that high -speed broadband Internet access is available in their neighborhood, while 15 percent say it is not and 21 percent are unsure. The percentage reporting broadband availability today (64%) is similar to 2009 (66%), but slightly higher than in 2011 (58 %). PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 13 MOBILE DEVICES Among the 92 percent of Californians who have cell phone s, 58 percent say they have a smartphone, similar to results nationwide (55% in Pew’s latest Internet survey). Smartphones are much more prevalent now (58%) than in June 2011 (39%) and the use of smartphones has increased across all political, regional, and demographic groups. Still, some groups are more likely than others to have one. For example, age plays a big role : those age 18 to 34 (78%) are much more likely than those age 35 to 54 (59%) or 55 and older (33%) to have a smartphone. The share who have smartphones increases with income and education levels. Half (51%) of cell phone users say they pay for a data plan while 44 percent say they do not, and another 3 percent volunteer that someone else pays their bill or that their dat a plan is not billed separately. “Some phones are called ‘ smartphones’ because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartph one or not, or are you not sure ?” Cell phone users only All cell phone users Household i ncome Broadband users Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Yes, it is a smartphone 58% 47% 60% 73% 69% No, it is not a smartphone 35 40 37 24 26 Not sure 8 12 3 3 5 Eight in 10 cell phone users (82%) say they use their phone to send or receive text messages, up 8 points since 2011 (74%) and 24 points since 2008 (58%) ; 56 percent use a cell phone to send or receive email, up 14 points since 2011 and 30 points since 2008 (26%), and 53 percent download software “apps,” up 20 points since 2011 (33%). Among those who have downloaded apps, 49 percent have paid for an app and 50 percent have downloaded only free apps. “Do you ever use your cell phone to… ?” Cell phone users only Percent saying yes Send or receive text messages Send or receive email messages Download a software application All cell phone users 82% 56% 53% Age 18 –34 97 73 75 35–54 88 58 55 55 and older 57 34 26 Household income Under $40,000 78 45 45 $40,000 to $80,000 84 55 51 $80,000 or more 90 74 69 Race/Ethnicity Asians 77 58 54 Blacks 90 64 63 Latinos 84 51 48 Whites 81 58 55 Region Central Valley 75 48 48 San Francisco Bay Area 82 62 57 Los Angeles 81 55 54 Orange/San Diego 84 61 57 Inland Empire 87 60 56 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 14 MOBILE DEVICES (CONTINUED) With nearly all Californians using cell phones and smartphones much more than in the past, what would life be like without cell phones? Thirty -six percent of cell phone users say they could live without their phone, 33 percent would miss it but could proba bly do without, and 29 percent say it is something they can’t imagine living without. In a March 2012 Pew survey, a plurality of cell phone users nationwide (45%) said they’d miss their phone but could do without (29% could live without, 26% can’t imagine living without). Among the 56 percent of Californians who access the Internet on their cell phones, 37 percent say that when they use the Internet, they do so mostly on their cell phone , while 52 percent say they do so mostly on another device, such as a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer. Of those who access the Internet mostly via their cell phone, 27 percent say their cell phone is the only way they access the Internet. Since June 2011, there has been a 12 point increase (from 25% to 37%) in the share of cell-phone Internet users who say they access the Internet mostly with their cell phone. There are sizeable differences between Latinos (60%) and whites (22%) who say they access the Internet mostly via cell phone, as well as across income groups (55% under $40,000, 27% $40,000 to $80,000, 20% $80,000 or more). The share using mostly cell phones to access the Internet also declines sharply with rising age (51% 18– 34, 31% 35–54, 12% 55 and older) and education (61% high school or less, 32% some college, 20% college graduates). “Overall, when you use the Internet, do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desk top, laptop, or tablet computer?” Cell-phone Internet users only All cell-phone Internet users Household income Race/Ethnicity* Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Mostly on cell phone 37% 55% 27% 20% 60% 22% Mostly on something else 52 34 58 69 30 66 Both e qually (volunteered) 10 9 13 10 8 10 Depends (volunteered)/ Don’t know 2 3 2 1 2 2 *Sample sizes for Asian and black cell -phone Internet users are too small for separate analysis. Three in four cell-phone Internet users access the Internet on their cell phone on a daily basis— 61 percent several times a day and 14 percent about once a day. Most others do so weekly (6% three to five days a week and 10% one to two days a week) and just 6 percent do so less frequently. Results were similar in June 2011, but the proportion accessing the Internet several times a day using their cell phone has doubled since 2009 (from 30% to 61%). Those age 18 to 34 are the most likely (73%) among demographic groups to say they access the Internet from their cell phone several times a day. “About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone?” Cell-phone Internet users only All cell-phone Internet users Age Race/Ethnicit y* 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Latinos Whites Several times a day 61% 73% 56% 41% 66% 59% About once a day 14 10 15 22 12 14 3–5 days a week 6 4 6 12 5 9 1–2 days a week 10 7 13 9 8 10 Every few weeks 3 2 3 7 3 4 Less often 3 2 4 5 4 2 Never 2 1 1 4 2 1 *Sample sizes for Asian and black cell -phone Internet users are too small for separate analysis. PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 15 NON-INTERNET USERS Among the 14 percent of Californians who do not use the Internet, 35 percent offer reasons having to do with inability (14% it’s too difficult, 13% don’t know how, 5% too old to learn, 3% physically unable) , and a similar 34 percent cite reasons reflecting a general lack of interest (20% not interested, 8% it’s a waste of time, 6% just don’t have the time). Twenty- three percent mention cost or access as the reason they don’t use the Internet (11% don’t have a computer, 9% the cost/it’s too expensive, 3% don’t have access). Those over 55 are most likely to cite inability while those under 55 are most likely to cite lack of interest . The majority of non- Internet users report household incomes under $20,000; among this group, 38 percent name inability, 28 percent a lack of interest, and 28 percent cost and access as reasons for not using the Internet. “And, what is the main reason you don't use the Internet or email?” Non-Internet users only * All non-Internet users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–54 55 and older Latinos Whites Inability 35% 28% 42% 34% 30% It’s too difficult/frustrating 14 12 16 14 7 Just don’t know how 13 12 15 15 9 Too old to learn 5 1 8 3 8 Physically unable 3 3 3 2 6 Lack of interest 34 35 32 30 44 Not interested 20 18 20 18 24 It's a waste of time/ Don’t need it 8 10 7 8 8 Just don’t have the time 6 7 5 4 12 Cost or access 23 29 17 30 13 Don’t have a computer 11 12 10 14 11 Cost/ Too expensive 9 13 5 12 1 Don't have access 3 4 2 4 1 Worried about computer viruses/spyware/adware/spam 3 5 2 3 4 Other 5 2 6 2 9 Don’t know 1 1 1 – – *Because there are so few non -Internet users, only subgroups with adequate sample sizes are reported separately. Relatively few non -Internet users (17%) would like to use the Internet or start using it again (14% of non - Internet users had said they used it in the past). There is more interest in using the Internet among those age 18 to 54 (24%) and Latinos (23%) than among those age 55 and older (12%) and whites (10%). Most non- Internet users (67%) say they would need help to get started. “Would you like to start using the Internet or email (again), or isn’t that something you’re interested in?” Non-Internet users onl y* All non-Internet users Age Race/Ethnicity 18–54 55 and older Latinos Whites Yes, interested 17% 24% 12% 23% 10% No, not interested 82 76 86 75 90 Don’t know 1 – 2 2 – *Because there are so few non -Internet users, only subgroups with adequate sample sizes are reported separately. June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 16 PERCEPTIONS AND ATTITUDES KEY FINDINGS  A plurality of Californians (39%) say the government is doing just enough to improve the access and availability of broadband Internet; 17 percent think expanding affordable broadband a ccess should be a top federal priority. (page 17)  Nevertheless, t wo in three Californians think broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility rather tha n a luxury and would favor a government program funded by telecommunications providers to inc rease access for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies . (page 18)  A majority of Californians (56%) say people without high -speed broadband Internet access are at a major disadvantage when it comes to finding information about job opportunities; 44 percent say children who do not have broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage. ( page 19 )  Three in four Californians view teaching computer and Internet skills to the state’s public school students as very important . ( page 20)  Sixty -three percent of parents report visiting the website of their child’s school and 55 percent go online to help their child with schoolwork . Half (48%) communicate via email with their child’s teachers, and one in three (33%) receive their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email . Racial/ethnic and income disparities are e vident . (page s 20 , 21 )  Nearly all parents (84%) report that their child uses the Internet . A majority (54%) of these parents report using parental controls and two in three are worried about the ir child’s safety on the Internet . (page 22) 636874 61 292620 34 0 20 40 60 80 100 AsiansBlacksLatinosWhites Percent all adults Should be viewed as a public utility Should be viewed as a luxury Perception of High-SpeedBroadband Access 34 39 52 59 32 27 24 19 020406080100 Asians Whites Latinos Blacks Percent all adults Major disadvantage Minor disadvantage Perception that Children Without Broadband Are at a Disadvantage 81 13 32 Very important Somewhat important Not too important Not at all important Importance of Teaching Computer and Internet Skills in K‒12 Public Schools Public schoolparents PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 17 ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN ACCESS AND ADOPTION When asked about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high- speed broadband Internet technology, most Californians say the government is doing just enough (39%) or more than enough (16%). About one in four (26%) say it is not doing enough and 18 percent are unsure. S imilar shares of Californians have said the government is doing just enough or not enough since June 2008 . Across most political, regional, and demographic groups, fewer than three in 10 say the government has not been doing enough. The exceptions? Democrats (31%), San Francisco Bay Area (34%) and Los Angeles (31%) residents, blacks (31%), college graduates (33%), and those with household incomes of $80,000 or more (34%). Even among these groups, about half or more believe the government is doing just enough or more than enough to improve access to high-speed Internet. “Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high- speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not enough?” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind More than enough 16% 13% 22% 22% 17% 18% Just enough 39 39 35 35 40 37 Not enough 26 31 23 26 29 27 Don’t know 18 17 20 17 14 18 A majority of Californians think it is important for the federal government to expand affordable high- speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country, but just 17 percent consider it a top priority; 38 percent consider it an important but lower priority. Another 38 percent say it is not too important (20%) or should not be done (18%). Attitudes toward the federal government’s role in expanding broadband access were nearly identical in June 2011. At least half of residents across most political, regional, and demographic groups consider expanding access important, but fewer than one in three consider it a top priority. Democrats (21% top priority, 42% important but lower priority) are far more likely than Republicans (10% top priority, 26% important) to think it should be an important or top priority for the federal government. Among independents, 54 percent hold this view (15% top priority, 39% important). Across racial/ethnic groups, whites (50%) are less likely than Asians (57%), Latinos (62%), and blacks (63%) to say expanding Internet access should be an important or a top priority for the federal government. “Do you think that expanding affordable high-speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done?” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Top priority 17% 21% 10% 15% 17% 14% Important but lower priority 38 42 26 39 40 39 Not too important 20 20 21 23 22 19 Should not be done 18 11 36 20 18 23 Don’t know 7 6 7 4 3 5 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 18 ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN ACCESS AND ADOPTION (CONTINUED) Although the expansion of high -speed Internet access is not viewed as a top government priority, most Californians (66%) think it should be viewed as a public utility that everyone should have access to while 28 percent think it should be viewed as a luxur y that some people may not be able to access. Attitudes were nearly identical when we first asked this question in June 2011 (66% utility, 27% luxury). Majorities of Californians across political, regional, and demographic groups think of high- speed Internet as more of a public utility than luxury, although Democrats (74%) are much more likely than Republicans (52%) to hold this view. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (74%) are the most likely to say high- speed Internet is more like a utility that everyone should have access to, followed by blacks (68%), Asians, (63%), and whites (61%). Those age 55 and older (56%) are less likely than younger residents to hold this view (69% 18 to 34, 71% 35 to 54). More than six in 10 across income and education groups say broadband should be viewed as a utility rather than a luxury. Among those who say the government is not doing enough to improve access, 80 percent say broadband should be viewed as a public utility and among those who say the government is doing just enough to improve access, 66 percent hold this view. Those who say government is doing more than enough are divided ( 48% utility, 47% luxury). “Which of the following comes closest to your view, even if neither is exactly right. High- speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility that everyone should have access to, or High- speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury that some people may not be able to access.” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Should be viewed as a public utility 66% 74% 52% 62% 68% 61% Should be viewed as a luxury 28 22 44 31 29 34 Don’t know 6 4 4 7 3 5 Two in three Californians (67%) would favor a government program funded by telecommunications providers to increase access to broadband for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies; 28 percent would oppose this type of program. Among likely voters, 60 percent would favor and 35 percent would oppose this program. There is a wide partisan divide: 81 percent of Democrats are in favor of a subsidy program to provide broadband to lower -income and rural residents and 56 percent of Republicans are opposed. Among independents, 56 percent would favor such a program. Majorities across regions and demographic groups would favor a program to increase high -speed access, but there are differences in the level of support. Latinos (79%), blacks (78%), and Asians (76%) for example, are much more likely than whites (56%) to say they would favor this program . More than seven in 10 under age 55 express support , compared with 54 percent of those age 55 and older. And support is somewhat higher in Los Angeles (73%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (72%) than in the Central Valley (66%), Orange /San Diego (62%), and the Inland Empire (62%). Among those who say broadband should be viewed as a public utility, 80 percent favor using subsidies to increase access for lower -income and rural residents. Among those who say it should be viewed as a luxury, 43 percent express support and 53 percent are opposed. “What if there was a government program funded by telecommunications providers that sought to increase access to high- speed broadband Internet for lower-income and rural residents through subsidies? Would you favor or oppose this program?” All adults Party Broadband users Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 67% 81% 39% 56% 66% 60% Oppose 28 15 56 38 30 35 Don’t know 5 3 5 6 4 6 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 19 DISADVANTAGES OF NOT HAVING BROADBAND When it comes to finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills, eight in 10 adults say non -broadband users are at a major (56%) or minor (25%) disadvantage. Results among broadband users are similar. In 2011, a slightly higher s hare said non-users were at a major disadvantage (62%). Blacks (70%) and Latinos (68%) are much more likely than whites (51%) and Asians (42%) to say non- broadband users are at a major disadvantage. Those age 55 and older are less likely than younger Californians to say so. Democrats (70%) are much more likely than independents (54%) and Republicans ( 40%) to hold this view. “Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people… Do you think that people who do not have high-speed broa dband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following? How about finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband users Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Major disadvantage 56% 42% 70% 68% 51% 57% Minor disadvantage 25 38 17 18 26 25 Not at disadvantage 16 15 11 11 19 16 Don't know 4 5 3 2 4 2 Three in four Californians say non -broadband users are at a major (45%) or minor (31%) disadvantage when it comes to getting health information. In 2011, half (50%) said they are at a major disadvantage. Latinos (62%) and blacks (52%) are much more likely than Asians and whites (36% each) to consider this a major disadvantage. Democrats (58 %) are more likely than independents ( 42%) and Republicans ( 25%) to hold this view. When it comes to using government services, 73 percent of Californians think non- broadband users are at a major (40%) or minor (33%) disadvantage. In 2011, a similar 42 percent said major disadvantage. Majorities of blacks (55%) and Latinos (53%) again say major disadvantage, compared to three in 10 Asians (31%) and whites (32%). “How about…?” All adults Race/Ethnicity Broadband users Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Getting health information Major disadvantage 45% 36% 52% 62% 36% 45% Minor disadvantage 31 36 30 23 35 33 Not at disadvantage 21 24 16 13 25 20 Don’t know 4 4 2 3 4 2 Using government services Major disadvantage 40 31 55 53 32 41 Minor disadvantage 33 46 25 27 35 34 Not at disadvantage 21 19 18 14 26 21 Don’t know 5 4 2 6 6 3 Seven in 10 Californians say children without broadband access are at a major (44%) or minor (26%) disadvantage. Majorities of blacks (59%) and Latinos (52%) again say these children are at a major disadvantage, compared to fewer whites (39%) and Asians (3 4%). Half of Democrats (53%) say they are at a major disadvantage, compared to fewer independents (44 %) and Republicans (29 %). PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 20 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION Nearly all Californians say that it is very (77%) or somewhat (19%) important for the state’s K –12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills. Views were similar in 2011 (76% very, 18% somewhat important). Eight in 10 bl acks (82%), Latinos (81%), and whites (79%) say teaching computer skills is very important, compared to six in 10 Asians (60%). Overwhelming majorities across parties, regions, age, education, and income groups consider teaching computer skills very important. “How important is it for California’s K–12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills?” All adults Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Asians Blacks Latinos Whites Very important 77% 79% 77% 79% 60% 82% 81% 79% Somewhat important 19 17 20 16 36 15 15 16 Not too important 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 Not at all important 2 1 2 3 1 – 1 2 Don’t know – – – 1 – – – 1 We asked parents of children 18 or younger a series of questions about Internet use in their child’s education. Sixty -three percent say they visit their child’s school website often (30%) or sometimes (33%), 37 percent say they do not. Among those who do not, 59 percent say their child’s school has a website, 15 percent say it does not, and 26 percent ar e unsure. The share who visit their child’s school website is slightly higher than in 2008 (56% 2008, 61% 2009, 63% 2011, 63% today). The share reporting website visits rises with income. White parents (45% often, 38% sometimes) are far more likely than Latino parents (17% often, 26% sometimes ) to visit their child’s school website ( sample sizes for Asian and black parents are too small for separate analysis). Majorities of those earning under $40,000 (58%) and Latinos (57%) do not visit their child’s website. Parents with a high school education or less are far less likely than those with higher levels of education to visit their child’s school website. Thirty -three percent of parents say they receive their child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email (15% often, 18% sometimes), 67 percent say they do not. Among those who do not, 16 percent say the teachers send assignments by email, 74 percent say they do not, and 10 percent are unsure. The share of parents receiving homework assignments online has been similar since 2008 (28% 2008, 34% 2009, 32% 2011, 33% 2013). The share of parents receiving assignments online increases with education and income levels. Forty -six percent of white parents receive assignments online, compared to only 19 percent of Latino parents. Among public school parents, 61 percent visit their child’s school website and 34 percent receive assignments online. “Do you ever…?” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Visit the website of your child’s school Yes, often 30% 15% 50% 48% 17% 45% Yes, sometimes 33 28 28 45 26 38 No 37 58 22 7 57 16 Receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email Yes, often 15 8 18 29 8 24 Yes, sometimes 18 14 23 22 11 22 No 67 77 59 49 80 53 Don't know 1 1 – – – 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 21 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION (CONTINUED) About half of parents of children 18 years or younger say they use email to communicate with their child’s teachers (20% often, 28% sometimes), and half say they do not (52%). Among those who say they do not, 24 percent say their child’s teacher s use email to communicate with parents, 62 percent say they do not, and 14 percent are unsure. Three in four lower -income parents say they do not email their child’s teachers, while seven in 10 middle -income (69%) and eight in 10 upper -income parents (79%) say they do email teachers. Frequency of contact via email also increases with income: those earning $80,000 or more (37%) are more likely than those earning less to say they often use email to communicate with their child’s teachers (9% under $40,000, 26% $40,000 to $80,000). Seventy -two percent of Latino parents say they do not email teachers, while 73 percent of white parents do email teachers. Forty -eight percent of public school parents report this activity. Fifty -five percent of parents say they go online (22% often, 33% sometimes) to help their child with schoolwork, 44 percent say they don’t. The share of parents using the Internet to help children with schoolwork increases with income. Half of Latino parents say they go online (20% often, 30% sometimes) to help their child with schoolwork , while half say they do not. Sixty-five percent of white parents go online (25% often, 40% sometimes) and 35 percent don’t go online to help their child with schoolwork. Among public school parents, 55 percent say they go on line (23% often, 32% sometimes) and 45 percent say they do not. “Do you ever…?” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household i ncome Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Use email to communicate with your child’s teachers Yes, often 20% 9% 26% 37% 10% 30% Yes, sometimes 28 15 43 42 17 43 No 52 75 31 21 72 27 Go online to help your child with their schoolwork Yes, often 22 18 31 27 20 25 Yes, sometimes 33 30 31 42 30 40 No 44 52 37 31 50 35 CHILDREN AND THE INT ERNET More than eight in 10 parents (84%) say their child uses the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone; only 16 percent say their child does not. More than three in four parents across income groups say their child uses the Internet, though parents earning under $40,000 are less likely than those earning more to say their child uses the Internet. Seventy -eight percent of Latino parents say their child is an Internet user, compared to 93 percent of white parents. Eighty -three percent of public school parents say their child use s the Internet. In a 2012 Pew Internet & American Life Project national survey of parents of 12- to 17 -year -olds, 96 percent said their child uses the Internet. “Does your child use the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone?” Parents of children 18 or younger only Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Yes 84% 76% 93% 90% 78% 93% No 16 24 7 10 22 7 PPIC Statewide S urvey June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 22 CHILDREN AND THE INTERNET (CONTINUED) With a high share of parents of children 18 years or younger across demographic groups saying their child use s the Internet, how concerned are they about their child’s safety online? Sixty- seven percent of parents whose children go online say they are very (33%) or somewhat (34 %) worried about the safety of their child on the Internet, 33 percent say they are not too (23%) or not at all (10 %) worried. Parents earning less than $40,000 ( 39%) are more likely to be very worried than parents earning more ( 29% $40,000 to $80,000, 28% $80, 000 or more). Latino parents (41%) are much more likely than white parents (24 %) to say they are very worried about their child’s safety online. “How worried are you about the safety of your child when using the Internet?” Parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Very worried 33% 39% 29% 28% 41% 24% Somewhat worried 34 33 35 32 36 37 Not too worried 23 18 30 28 14 29 Not at all worried 10 9 6 12 9 10 Don’t know 1 1 – – – – When parents whose children use the I nternet are asked about parental controls or other means of blocking, filtering, or monitoring their child’s online activities, 54 percent say they have used these and 45 percent say they have not. Among parents earning under $40,000, 46 percent say they have monitored and 52 percent say they have not monitor ed their child’s online activities. Majorities of middle - and upper -income parents have used such controls. White parents (63%) are much more likely than Latino parents (44%) to have monitored their child’s online activities. Parents with a high school education or less are much less likely than those with at least some college education to have monitored their child. In Pew’s national survey of parents of 12 - to 17 -year -olds, 50 percent said they had used parental controls, and 50 percent said they had not. “Still thinking about your child's use of technology, have you ever used parental controls or other means of blocking, filtering, or monitoring your child's online activities?” Parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet Parents Household income Race/Ethnicity Under $40,000 $40,000 to $80,000 $80,000 or more Latinos Whites Yes 54% 46% 70% 60% 44% 63% No 45 52 30 40 56 35 Don't know 1 3 – – 1 1 June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 23 REGIONAL MAP June 2013 Californians and Information Technology 26 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY June 4–18, 2013 2,502 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese MARGIN OF ERROR ±2.9% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE PERCENTAGES MAY N OT ADD TO 100 DUE TO ROUNDING 1. First, do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 45% right direction 42 wrong direction 13 don’t know 2. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 46% good times 42 bad times 12 don’t know 3. Do you yourself ever use a computer at home, at work, at school, or anywhere else? 79% yes 21 no – don’t know 4 /4a/4b .Next, do you use the Internet, at least occasionally? [or] Do you send or receive email, at least occasionally? [or] Do you access the Internet on a cell phone, tablet, or other mobile handheld device, at least occasionally? 86% yes [skip to q6] 14 no [ask q5] 5. [non -Internet users] Did you ever at some point use the Internet or email, but have since stopped for some reason? 14% yes 85 no 1 don’t know 5a. [non -Internet users] Would you like to start using the Internet or email ( if q5=yes: again) , or isn’t that something you’re interested in? 17% yes, interested 82 no, not interested 1 don’t know 5b. [non -Internet users] And, what is the main reason you don’t use the Internet or email? [ code, don’t read ] 20% not interested 14 it is too difficult/frustrating 13 just don’t know how 11 don’t have a computer 9 cost/too expensive 8 it’s a waste of time/don’t need it 6 just don’t have the time 5 too old to learn 3 don’t have access 3 physically unable 3 worried about computer viruses, spyware, adware, spam 5 other 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 27 5c. [non -Internet users] If you wanted to start using the Internet or email ( if q5=yes: again) , do you feel that you know enough about computers and technology to be able to do that on your own, or would you need someone to help you? 11% know enough to go online (again) on my own 67 would need someone to help me 17 would not want to start using the Internet (volunteered) 5 don’t know 6 . [Internet users] Did you happen to use the Internet yesterday? 81% yes 19 no – don’t know 7. [Internet users] About how many years have you been an Internet user? [code, don’t read] 3% less than 1 year 19 1– 5 years 27 6– 10 years 25 11– 15 years 24 more than 15 years 2 don’t know 8. [Internet users] About how often do you use the Internet or email from home—several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 52% several times a day [skip to q10] 19 about once a day [skip to q10] 11 3– 5 days a week [skip to q10] 8 1– 2 days a week [skip to q10] 3 every few weeks [skip to q10] 3 less often [ask q9] 4 never [ask q9] – don’t know [skip to q10] 9. [Internet users who never or don’t often use the Internet at home] Wha t is the main reason you don’t ( if q8 =less often: often) use the Internet at home? [code, don’t read] 20% computer is too expensive/ don’t have a computer 13 Interne t connection is too expensive / cheaper to get it elsewhere 12 d on’t know how to set up access at home 10 not interested, don’t need it, don’t like it 8 d on’t need to go online at home very often or at all 6 u se my cell phone or o ther mobile device to go online 5 s ervice not available where I live 3 c an go online from somewhere else 2 c omputer is broken or too old 15 o ther 6 don’t know 10 . [Internet users] About how often do you use the Internet or email from someplace other than home or work —several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few weeks, less often, or never? 29 % several times a day 10 about once a day 8 3– 5 days a week 9 1– 2 days a week 6 every few weeks 9 less often 29 never 1 don’t know 11. [Internet users] Do you ever access the Internet using a computer at a public library? 23 yes 77 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 28 As I read the following list of items, please tell me if you happen to have each one, or not. 12. [all adults] Do you have a desktop computer? 58% yes [ask q12a] 42 no [skip to q13] – don’t know [skip to q13] 12a. [Internet users who have a desktop] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your desktop computer? 86% yes 14 no – don’t know 13. [all adults] Do you have a laptop computer or netbook? 63% yes [ask q13a] 37 no [skip to q14] – don’t know [skip to q14] 1 3a . [Internet users who have a laptop or netbook] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your laptop computer or netbook ? 93% yes 7 no – don’t know 14 . [all adults] Do you have a working cell phone? 92% yes [ask q14a] [includes those who completed interview on cell phone] 8 no [skip to q15] – don’t know [skip to q15] 14a. [Internet users who have a cell phone] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your cell phone? 69% yes 31 no – don’t know 15. [all adults] Do you have a game console like Xbox or Play Station in your home? 45% yes [ask q15a] 54 no [skip to q16] – don’t know [skip to q16] 15a. [Internet users who have a game console] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your game console? 39% ye s 61 no – don’t know 16. [all adults] Do you have a handheld device made primarily for e- book reading, such as a Nook or Kindle e -reader? 19% yes [ask q16a] 81 no [skip to q17] – don’t know [skip to q17] 16a. [ Internet users who have an electronic book device] Do you ever access the Internet or email using this handheld device? [ If necessary : this handheld device that is ma de primarily for e -book reading. ] 61% yes 37 no 2 don’t know 17 . [all adults] Do you have a tablet computer like an iPad, Sa msung Galaxy, or Motorola Xoom or Kindle Fire? 36% yes [ask q17a] 64 no [skip to q18] – don’t know [skip to q18] 17a. [Internet users who have a tablet computer] Do you ever access the Internet or email using your tablet computer? 90% yes 10 no 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 29 Thinking now just about your cellphone… 18. [cell phone users] Some phones are called “smartphones” because of certain features they have. Is your cell phone a smartphone or not, or are you not sure? [ If necessary: A smartphone is a mobile device like an iPhone, Blackberry or Android that offers more advanced computing ability and connectiv ity than a standard cell phone.] 58% yes, it is a smartphone 35 no, is not a smartphone 8 not sure 19. [cell phone users] Thinking about your cell phone plan, do you currently pay for any kind of data plan on your phone, or not? [ If necessary : A data plan from your cell phone provider allows you to send and receive emails and surf the Internet from your mobile device. ] 51% yes 44 no 2 someone else pays for phone (volunteered) 1 data plan is not broken out separately (volunteered) 3 don’t know Please tell me if you ever use your cell phone to do any of the following things. 20. [cell phone users] What about using your cell phone to send or receive text messages? 82% yes 18 no – don’t know 21. [cell phone users] What about using your cell phone to send or receive email messages? 56% yes 44 no – don’t know 22. [cell phone users] What about using your cell phone to download a software application or “app ?” 53% yes [ask q22a] 47 no [skip to q23] – don’t know [skip to q23] 2 2a. [cell phone users who download apps] Thinking about all of the apps you have downloaded, h ave you ever paid for an app, or have you only downloaded apps that are free? 49% yes, have paid for app 50 only download apps that are f ree – don’t know 23. [cell phone Internet users] Overall, when you use the Internet, do you do that mostly using your cell phone or mostly using some other device like a desktop, laptop, or tablet computer? 37% mostly on cell phone [ ask q23a] 52 mostly on something else [ skip to q24 ] 10 both equally (volunteered) [ skip to q24] 1 depends (volunteered) [skip to q24 ] 1 don’t know [ skip to q24] 23a. [c ell phone Internet users who use the Internet mostly on their cell phone] And is your cell phone the only way that you connect to the Internet? 27% yes 73 no – don’t know 24. [cell phone users] Thinking about your cell phone, do you think you could live without it, or is it something you would miss having but could probably do without, or is it something you can't imagine living without? 36% could live without it 33 would miss having but could do without 29 s omething you can’t imagine living without 2 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 30 25. [cell phone Internet users] About how often do you access the Internet using your cell phone— several times a day, about once a day, 3– 5 days a week, 1– 2 days a week, every few we eks, less often , or never? 61% several times a day 14 about once a day 6 3– 5 days a week 10 1– 2 days a week 3 every few weeks 3 less often 2 never – don’t know Next, please tell me if you ever use the Internet to do any of the following things. [rot ate questions 26 to 35 keeping a’s, b’s, and c ’s with respective number and in order] 26. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to use Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others? 33% yes, do th is 67 no, do not do this – don’t know 26a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 31% yes 69 no – don’t know 26b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 27% yes 73 no – don’t know 26c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 33% yes 67 no – don’t know 27. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to look for information about a job? 48% yes, do this 52 no, do not do this – don’t know 27a. [ desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 52% yes 48 no – don’t know 27b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 22% yes 78 no – don’t know 27c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 33% yes 67 no – don’t know 28. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to purchase goods and services? 60% yes, do this 40 no, do not do this – do n’t know 28a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 67% yes 33 no – don’t know 28b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 24% yes 76 no – don’t know 28c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 50% yes 50 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 31 29. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to apply for a job? 40% yes, do this 60 no, do not do this – don’t know 29a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 44% yes 56 no – don’t know 29b. [ cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 11% yes 89 no – don’t know 29c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 22% yes 78 no – don’t know 30. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook, or LinkedIn? 57% yes, do this 43 no, do not do this – don’t know 30a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 58% yes 42 no – don’t know 30b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 40% yes 60 no – don’t know 30c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 55% yes 45 no – don’t know 31. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online for educational purposes, such as online training or for taking a class? 39% yes, do this 60 no, do not do this – don’t know 31a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 44% yes 56 no – don’t know 31b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 10% yes 90 no – don’t know 31c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 24% yes 75 no – don’t know 32. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to get health or medical information? 55 % yes, do this 45 no, do not do this – don’t know 32a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 59% yes 41 no – don’t know 32b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 24% yes 76 no – don’t know 32c. [ tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 48% yes 52 no – don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 32 33.[reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to contact your health insurance provider, a doctor, or other health care professional? 32% yes, do this 68 no, do not do this – don’t know 33a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 35% yes 65 no – don’t know 33b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 12% yes 88 no – don’t know 33c. [ tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 19% yes 81 no – don’t know 34. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to access government resources, such as obtaining forms, making payments, or registering to vote? 47% yes, do this 53 no, do not do this – don’t know 34a. [desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 53% yes 47 no – don’t know 34b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 12 yes 88 no – don’t know 34c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tablet computer? 26% yes 74 no – don’t know 35. [reported for all adults] Do you ever go online to do any banking or manage your finances? 53% yes, do this 47 no, do not do this – don’t know 35a. [ desktop or laptop users] Do you do this on your desktop, laptop, or netbook computer? 58% yes 42 no – don’t know 35b. [cell phone users] Do you do this on your cell phone? 27% yes 73 no – don’t know 35c. [tablet users] Do you do this on your tabl et computer? 37% yes 63 no – don’t know 36. [reported for all adults] What kind of Internet connection do you have at home? Do you use a dial -up telephone line, or do you have some other type of connection, such as a DSL -enabled phone line, a cable TV modem, a wireless connection, a fibe r optic connection such as FIOS, or a T -1? 2 6% ca ble modem [skip to q40] 20 wireless con nection (either aircard, land -based or satellite) [skip to q40] 17 DSL -enabled phone line [skip to q40] 6 fiber optic or T -1 or other broadband connection [skip to q40] 4 dial-up telephone line [ask q37] 1 connect to Internet via a cell phone, no home service (volunteered) [ask 37] 18 do not have Internet access/ computer at home [ask q37] 8 don’t know /refuse [ask q37] PPIC Statewide Survey 33 37. [non -Internet users or non -broadband users] As far as you know, i s high-speed Internet service available in your neighborhood from a telephone company, a cable company, or any other company? 64% yes 15 no 21 don’t know [questions 38 and 39 deleted] 40. [broadband users] About how many years have you been using a high -speed broadband connection to connect to the Internet at home? [code, don’t read] 2% less than 1 year 39 1– 5 years 42 6– 10 years 11 11– 15 years 3 more than 15 years 3 don’t know [questions 41 to 50 asked of all adults ] Changing topics, 41. Overall, thinking about the government’s role in improving the access and availability of high -speed broadband Internet technology, do you think the government is doing more than enough, just enough, or not enough? 16% more than enough 39 just enough 26 not enough 18 don’t know 42. Do you think that expanding affordable high- speed broadband Internet access to everyone in the country should be a top priority for the federal government, important but a lower priority, not too important, or should it not be done? 17% a top priority 38 important but a lower priority 20 not too important 18 should not be done 7 don’t know 43. Which of the following comes closest to your view, ev en if neither is exactly right [rotate ] (1) high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility that everyone sh ould have access to [or] (2) high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury that some people may not be able to access. 66% high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a public utility 28 high -speed broadband Internet should be viewed as a luxury 6 don’t know 44. What if there was a government program funded by telecommunications providers that sought to increase access to high- speed broadband Internet for lower -income and rural residents through subsidies? Would you favor or oppose th is program? 67% favor 28 oppose 5 don’t know 45. How important is it for California’s K–12 public schools to teach students computer and Internet skills? Is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 77% very important 19 somewhat important 2 not too important 2 not at all important – don’t know Thinking about all of the different information sources available to people, do you think that people who do not have high -speed broadband Internet access at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to each of the following. [ rotate questions 46 to 48 ] PPIC Statewide Survey 34 46. How about finding information about job opportunities or gaining new career skills? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 56% major disadvantage 25 minor disadvantage 16 not at a disadvantage 4 don’t know 47.How about using government services? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 40% major disadvantage 33 minor disadvantage 21 not at a disadvantage 5 don’t know 48. How about getting health information? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a minor disadvantage?) 45% major disadvantage 31 minor disadvantage 21 not at a disadvantage 4 don’t know 49. And, how about children who do not have high -speed broadband Internet access at home, are they at a disadvantage because of this? ( If yes: Would you say it is a major disadvantage or a min or disadvantage?) 44% major disadvantage 26 minor disadvantage 27 not at a disadvantage 3 don’t know 50.Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are reg istered to vote in California? 70% yes [ask q 50a] 30 no [skip to q51b ] 50a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or are you registered as a decline -to -state or independent voter? 44% Democrat [ask q 51] 29 Republican [skip to q51 a] 5 another party (specify) [skip to q52] 22 i ndependent [skip to q51b] 51 . Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 55% strong 42 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q52] 51a.Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 56% strong 41 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q52] 51b.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 23% Republican Party 39 Democratic Party 26 neither (volunteer ed) 12 do n’t know 52 . Next, would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 12% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 28 middle -of -the -road 21 somewhat conservative 13 very conservative 5 don’t know 53 . Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics —a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 23% great deal 34 fair amount 32 only a little 11 none 1 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey 35 [d1 –d4a: demographic questions] D4b.[parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever visit the website of your child’s school? ( if yes: Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 30% yes, often [skip to d4d] 33 yes, sometimes [skip to d4d] 37 no [ask d4c ] – don’t know [ask d4c ] D4c. [parents who do not visit school website] And, as far as you know, does your child’s school have a website? 59% yes 15 no 26 don’t know D4d. [parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever receive your child’s homework assignments via the Internet or email? ( if yes: Do you do this often or only some times?) 15% yes , often [skip to d 4f] 18 yes, sometimes [skip to d4f ] 67 no [ask d4e] 1 don’t know [ask d4e] D4e. [parents who do not receive homework via Internet, email] And, as far as you know, do your child’s teachers send homework assignments via the Internet or email? 16% yes 74 no 10 don’t know D4f. [parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever use email to communicate with your child’s teachers? ( if yes: Do you d o tihs often o r only sometimes?) 20% yes, often [skip to d4h] 28 yes, sometimes [skip to d4h] 52 no [ask d4g] – don’t know [ask d4g] D4g. [ parents who do not communicate with child’s teacher via email ] And, as far as you know, do your child’s teachers communicate with parents via email? 24% yes 62 no 14 don’t know D4h. [parents of children 18 or younger] Do you ever go online to help your child with their schoolwork? ( if yes: Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 22% yes, often 33 yes, sometimes 44 no – don’t know D4i. [parents of children 18 or younger] Does your child use the Internet, either on a computer or cell phone? 84% yes [skip to d4j] 16 no [ask d4k] – don’t know [ask d4j] D4j. [parents of children 18 or younger who use the Internet] Still thinking about your child's use of technology, have you ever used parental controls or other means of blocking, filtering, or monitoring your child's online activities? 54% yes 45 no 1 don’t know D4k. 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