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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(13) "S_1210MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "555264" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(91685) "& p p i c s tat e w i d e s u r v e y Californians Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner Sonja Petek Nicole Willcoxon in collaboration with The James Irvine Foundation CONTENTS About the Survey 2 Press Release 3 November 2010 Election 6 State and National Political Context 14 Regional Map 24 Methodology 25 Questionnaire and Results 27 their government DECEMBER 2010 December 2010 Californians and Their Government 3 PPIC Statewide Survey CONTACT Linda Strean 415-291-4412 Andrew Hattori 415- 291-4417 NEWS RELEASE EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PST on Wednesday , December 1 , 2010. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: http://www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT Post-election Survey: Marijuana, Climate Change, Budget Reform Captured Voters’ Attention INDEPENDENTS KEY TO DOUBLE-DIGIT WINS FOR BROWN AND BOXER SAN FRANCISCO , December 1 , 2010 —Of the nine propositions on the November statewide ballot, Proposition 19 —the unsuccessful measure to legalize marijuana —attracted the mo st interest among voters, and those who voted against it felt more strongly about the out come than those who voted yes. These are among the key findings of a post -election survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) with support from The James Irvine Foundation. In the PPIC survey of 2,003 voters who reported par ticipating in the election, 38 percent say they were most interested in Proposition 19, followed by 16 percent who name Proposition 23, the measure to suspend the state’s air pollution law (AB 32) . And, similar to Proposition 19, those who voted no on Prop osition 23 are much more likely than those who voted yes to call the outcome of the vote on the measure important. Ten percent say they were most interested in Proposition 25 —the measure to lower the legislative vote threshold for state budget passage —whil e 5 percent were most interested in Proposition 21, which would have raised the vehicle license fee to pay for parks. Despite concerns about a lack of enthusiasm about this national midterm election, California voters were engaged: Most report being more enthusiastic about voting than usual (46%) or equally enthusiastic (23%), while just 29 percent say they were less enthusiastic. Most (76%) say they followed news of the nine ballot propositions either very or fairly closely, down only slightly from PPIC’s December 2008 post - election survey. Republicans, Democrats, and independents report similar levels of attention, with Republicans more likely to say they paid very close attention to news about the propositions (37% Republicans, 29% Democrats, 26% indepen dents). “Californians did see important reasons to vote,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. “They are not in a mood to spend money— but the vote on Proposition 25 shows that they are in a mood to make change. In the candidate races, a president who is popular in California helped Democrats here.” INDEPENDENTS GAVE BOOST TO BROWN, BOXER In the candidate contests at the top of the ballot, the support of independents was key for winners Jerry Brown and Barbara Boxer. In the g overnor’s race, Democrat Brown beat Republican Meg Whitman by 13 points (54% to 41%) with the support of 86 percent of Democrats and 56 percent of independents . Latinos (75%) and women (59%) voted for Brown. Whitman got the votes of 85 percent of Republicans. Men (50% Brown, 4 6% Whitman) and whites (47% Brown, 49% Whitman) were more divided. Voters age 18– 34 (65%) supported Brown, as did half of older voters (52%, ages 35 and over). PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 4 Boxer was re -elected to her U.S. Senate seat by 10 points (52% to 42%) with the support of most Democrats (86%) and indepe ndents (53%). Most women (58%) and Latinos (62%) voted for Boxer. Republican challenger Carly Fiorina had the support of most Republicans (88%). Whites (48% Boxer, 49% Fiorina) and men (49% Boxer, 47% Fiorina) were divided. Younger voters (62%) favored Boxer. At a time when more voters are casting ballots by mail, those who voted this way were more divided ( 50% Brown, 46 % Whitman) than those who went to the polls (57 % Brown , 40 % Whitman) . In the Senate race, t hose who vote d by mai l (52% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) and those who voted in person (54% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) favored Boxer. PROPOSITION 19 FAILS AMONG GOP, LATINO, W HITE, WOMEN, OLDER VOTERS Proposition 19 lost by 6 points (47% yes, 53% no). Republicans (73%), Latinos (60%), whites (53%), women (58%), and older voters (58% ages 35 and older) voted no . Majorities of Democrats (56%) and independents (55%) voted yes, as did voters ages 18– 34 (62%). Most voters say the outcome of the vote was very important (35%) or somewhat important ( 35%) to them. Just 18 percent of those who voted yes call the outcome very important, while 51 percent of those who voted no feel the same way. Asked the open -ended question of why they voted for or against the measure, the top reason given by those voting yes is that it would have allowed marijuana to be taxed (29%) . The next most frequently cited reasons: marijuana use is a personal issue or not a big deal (12%) and passage would have freed the police/courts to do other things (11%) or would have led to l ess crime and drug violence (10%). The top reasons given by those who voted against the measure are that drugs should be illegal (33%) and legalization is not good for the state (12%). But on the general issue of legalization voters are more evenly divided than the vote on Proposition 19 indicate s. When voters are asked more generally about whether they think marijuana should be made legal or not, 49 percent are in favor and 49 percent are opposed. Among those who voted no on the ballot measure, 11 percent favor legalization in general . PROPOSITION 23: HALF OF VOTERS VIEW OUTCOME AS VERY IMPORTANT The partisan differences among voters on Proposition 19 are also apparent in the vote on Proposition 23, which would have suspended the state’s air pollution law until unemployment remained at 5.5 percent for a year. The proposition failed by 24 points (38% yes, 62% no). Most Democrats (72%) and independents (64%) voted against the measure . More than half of Republicans (54%) voted yes. The measure was opposed by whites (62%), Latinos (60%), women (66%), and men (56% ). Those voting yes most frequently cite economic reasons (22%) or saving jobs (20%) for their decision, and 11 percent say global warming does not exist. Those voting no cite increased air pollution (18 %), support of the measure by big oil companies or polluters (12%) , or a belief that the measure’s 5.5 percent unemployment requirement would essentially end implementation of California’s air quality law (10%) . How important was the outcome of this proposition? Most call it very important (49%) or somewhat important (31%); 58 percent of those voting no call the outcome very important, while 47 percent of those voting yes say so. Proponents of Proposition 23 said the state’s air pollution law would cost th e state large numbers of jobs at a time of high unemployment, but this was not an argument that resonated with most voters. Asked what effect state action to reduce global warming would have on jobs, a plurality (41%) say it would result in more jobs, 26 percent say fewer jobs, and 26 percent say jobs would not be affected. PARTISANS SPLIT SHAR PLY ON PROPOSITION 25 Proposition 25 passed by 10 points (55% to 45%). Across party lines, differences are once again stark: 71 percent of Democrats and 57 percent of independents voted yes and 66 percent of Republicans PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 5 voted no. Majorities of Latinos (68%), whites (53%), and both women (58%) and men (52%) report voting yes. By far, the top reason voters cite for supporting the measure is that Proposition 25 will make it easier to pass the state budget (50%). And the top reason for voting no is that the legislature should be required to get a two- thirds vote to pass the budget (49%). Most say the outcome of the vote on this proposition is very important (43%) or somewhat important (35%), with those who voted for it (55%) much more likely than those who voted against it (44%) to call the outcome very important. PPIC also asked voters about Proposition 24, which failed by 16 points (42% to 58%). Majorities of voters acro ss parties report voting no (64% Democrats, 54% Republicans, 54% independents) on the measure to repeal recent legislation allowing businesses to lower their tax liability. Proponents of Proposition 24 argued that its passage would help small business and 34 percent of voters cite this reason for voting yes. Among those who voted no, 16 percent say it would be unfair to businesses, but the greatest proportion —22 percent —say they don’t know why they voted no. MANY SAY INITIATIVES WERE TOO CONFUSING Two-thir ds of voters say the wording of the initiatives on the ballot was too complicated or confusing (32% strongly agree, 35% somewhat agree). And for the first time in a PPIC post-election survey, less than half say they have confidence in their fellow voters t o make public policy decisions at the ballot box (35% a fair amount of confidence, 9% a great deal). But most also say they were very happy (18%) or somewhat happy (42%) that they had to vote on nine ballot propositions. This is similar to November 2008, w hen there were 12 propositions on the ballot, and November 2006, when there were 13. And two-thirds of voters are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working (13% very satisfied, 53% somewhat satisfied), although many believe the system needs major changes (42%) or minor ones (34%). MORE KEY FINDINGS  Voter information guide still top information source—pag e 8 The state’s voter information guide and sample ballot is the most helpful source of information about statewide ballot propositions , according to 34 percent of voters. Just 19 percent say the Internet is the most helpful information source —but this is up 6 points since 2008 (13%) and more than double the 2005 percentage (8%).  Californians’ concerns a stark contrast to last gubernatorial e lection—pag e 15 A s a measure of how much conditions have changed since November 2006, concerns about jobs and the economy have skyrocketed 50 points (64% today, 14% 2006) when state voters are asked to name the most important is sue facing people in California.  Low marks for state’s leaders, little trust in government —p ages 16, 17 Just 13 percent of general election voters approve of the way the legislature and governor work together to make public policy , and only 12 percent approve of the job done by the legislature— where all incumbents on the ballot were re -elec ted. An overwhelming majority (84%) say they can trust state government to do what is right only some of the time (68%) or none of the time (16%).  Obama approval rating at 53 percent —p age 22 A slim majority of voters approves of the way President Barack Obama is handling his job. Far fewer ( 21 %) approve of the way Congress is doing its job.  Switch to a GOP -controlled U.S. House: 41 percent say it’s a good thing —pag e 23 State voters are somewhat more likely to say they wanted the midterm election to result in a Congress controlled by Democrats (45%) than by Republicans (39%). But they are also more likely to see the switch in control of the House of Representatives from D emocrats to Republicans as a good thing (41%) than a bad thing (34%), and 21 percent say it won’t make a difference . December 2010 Californians and Their Government 6 NOVEMBER 2010 ELECTION KEY FINDINGS  Three in four California voters were closely following news about the nine state propositions. Proposition 19, which would have legalized m arijuana in the state, garnered the most interest from voter s.  A plurality of California voters (34%) continue to name the state’s Official Voter Information Guide as the most helpful information source in deciding how to vote on the propositions . Forty -five percent say they receive d news and information about the nine state propositions through email or the I nternet. Most voters were satisfied with the information available to them on the propositions . ( page 7)  There were large partisan differences in support for Propositions 19, 23 , and 25, while Democrats and Republicans both opposed Proposition 24. Those who voted no on Propositions 19 and 23 placed more importance than yes-voters on the outcomes , while those who voted yes on Propositions 24 and 25 placed more importance than no-voters on the outcomes . ( page 8)  (page s 9–12) Democrats Jerry Brown and U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer won on Election Day with the help of more than eight in 10 Democrats and over half of independents. Brown gained support from six in 10 women and three in four Latinos, while Boxer had the support of six in 10 women and Latinos . (p age 1 3) 354045 0 20 40 60 200620082010 Percent voters Received Proposition News, Information on Internet or by Email Percentsaying "yes" 38 1610 16 8 12 Prop 19 Prop 23 Prop 25 Other None/All (vol) Don't know Proposition ReceivingMost Voter Interest 35 49 22 43 35 31 38 35 0 20 40 60 80 100 Prop 19Prop 23Prop 24Prop 25 Percent voters Somewhat important Very important Importance of the Outcome of the Vote On... Percent voters PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 7 VOTER INTERESTS California voters approved four of nine propositions on the ballot in the November 2 General Election, and elected a new governor. Most voters who participated in the election report being more enthusiastic than usual about voting (46%) ; fewer say they were less enthusiastic (29%) or had the same level of enthusiasm (23%). Republicans (54%) were much more likely than Democrats (44%) or independents (40%) to be very enthusiastic . Most voters followed news about the nine measures either very (31%) or fairly (45%) closely, down slightly from 2008 (81%), when 12 propositions were on the ballot . Attention was lower than in the November 2005 special election (85%), which included eight propositions but no candidate s. Still, results are similar to November 2006 —the last midterm election— when 77 percent followed news about those 13 propositions at least fairly closely. Today, independents (73%), Democrats (76%), and Republicans (78%) report similar levels of attention— but Republicans are more likely than Democrats and independents to say they paid very close attention. Whites (78%), Latinos (76%), men (77%), and women (76%) report similar levels of attenti on. Following news very closely increases with age (15% age 18 –34 , 31% age 35–54, 40% age 55 an d older ). “Regardless of how you voted, before deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions, how closely were you following news about these measures?” V ery closely Fairly closely Not too closely Not at all closely Don't know General Election Voters 31% 45 % 16 % 7 % 1 % Party Democrats 29 47 18 6 – Republicans 37 41 14 7 1 Independents 26 47 17 10 – Region Central Valley 32 46 15 6 1 San Francisco Bay Area 29 47 17 6 1 Los Angeles 32 45 15 8 – Other Southern California 33 43 15 7 2 Of the nine ballot propositions, a plurality of voters (38%) say they were most interested in Proposition 19 (marijuana legalization); 16 percent say Proposition 23 (AB 32 suspension), 10 percent say Proposition 25 (majority budget vote), and 5 percent say Proposition 21 (vehicle license fee for parks ). Fewer than 5 percent mention any other single proposition. Of these four, only Proposition 25 passed. Across party and demographic groups, voters express the most interest in Proposition 19 and then Proposition 23. Latinos (48%) are much more likely than whites (34%) to say Proposition 19 . Half of voters ages 18 to 34 express the most interest in Proposition 19 ; interest declines as age, education, and income rise. “Which one of the nine state propositions on the November 2nd ballot were you most interested in? ” Top f our propositions mentioned Proposition 19 Proposition 23 Proposition 25 Proposition 21 General Election Voters 38% 16 % 10 % 5 % Party Democrat s 42 16 9 6 Republican s 34 16 12 3 Independent s 37 16 10 4 Region Central Valley 38 13 14 4 San Francisco Bay Area 35 15 12 5 Los Angeles 41 18 9 5 Other Southern California 38 18 8 3 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 8 VOTER INFORMATION SOURCES California voters continue to name the Secretary of State’s Official Voter Information Guide (34%) as most helpful in deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions, followed by the Internet (19%), advertisements (14%), and news and media coverage (12%). Mention of the voter information guide was similar in 2008 (37%) and 2005 (31%), but was higher in 2006 (42%). Use of the Internet increased by 6 points since 2008 and has more than doubled since 2005 (8% 2005, 8% 2006, 13% 2008, 19% today). Today, pluralities of Democrats (33%), Republicans (34 %), and independents (35%) see the voter information guide as most helpful. Across regions, voters in the Central Valley (42%) are the most likely and Los Angeles voters (28%) least likely to find the voter guide most helpful. Whites (37%) are more likely than Latinos (28%) to name the voter guide, while Latinos are more likely th an whites to name advertisements (21% to 12%). The percentage finding the voter information guide most helpful is higher among those age 35 and older . Mention of the I nternet decreases sharply with age, but increases slightly with education. “People learned about the ballot propositions a number of different ways. Which way did you find the most helpful in deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions?” Top four sources mentioned General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Official Voter Information G uide and sample ballot 34% 33 % 34 % 35 % Internet 19 17 17 23 Advertisements 14 15 15 13 News and media coverage 12 14 11 10 Although the Internet was not the most helpful source of information for most voters, 45 percent of voters report receiving news or information about the nine state propositions on the November election ballot on the Internet or through email ; 54 percent say they did not . The percentage reporting Internet use marks a new hi gh in our post -election surveys, up 5 point s since 2008 (40%) and 10 points since 2006 (35%). Across parties, independents (50%) are the most likely to say they obtained information through the Internet or email, followed by Republic ans (46%) and Democrats (42%). Men are much more likely than women (51% to 40%) to report receiving electronic information; the percentage reporting they received information online decreases sharply with age , but increases sharply with education and income. F or making choices on the ballot propositions, nearly eight in 10 California voters were very (28%) or somewhat (50%) satisfied with the information they had. Satisfaction with information was slightly higher in 2008 (84%) and similar in 2006 (81%). Today, three in four or more across all political, regional, and demographic groups report they were at least somewhat satisfied with the information available; still, fewer than a third across these groups are very satisfied. “Overall, how satisfied were you with the information you had to make choices on the ballot propositions?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Very satisfied 28% 27 % 30 % 26 % Somewhat satisfied 50 51 49 50 Not too satisfied 15 15 14 16 Not at all satisfied 6 5 6 6 D on't know 1 2 1 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 9 PROPOSITION 19—MARIJUANA LEGALIZATI ON Proposition 19, which would have legalized marijuana in California and allow ed it to be regulated and taxed, failed by 6 points (47 % yes, 53% no). Partisan differences are clear , with majorities of Democrats (56%) and independents (55%) voting yes, and 73 percent of Republicans voting no. There are also differences across ideological groups, with seven in 10 liberals (69%) supporting the measure, and three in four conservati ves (74%) opposing it . Moderates were divided (48% yes, 52% no). Voters age s 18 to 34 are far more likely than older voters to have vote d yes. Majorities of Latinos (60%) and whites (53%) report voting no , as do a solid majority of women (58%). M en were divided (50% yes, 50% no). The top reason given for voting yes on the measure, i n an open-ended question , is that it would have allowed for the taxation of marijuana (29%). Yes-voters also say that marijuana use is a personal issue or not a big deal (12%), that it would have freed up the police/courts to do other things (11%), or that it would lead to less crime an d drug violence (10%). Among no-voters, the top reasons given for opposition are that drugs should be illegal (33%), and that legalization is not goo d for the state (12%). Fewer cite child safety (8%), the potential conflict with federal law (7%), or that the initiative was poorly written (7%). “Proposition 19 was called the ‘Legalizes Marijuana Under California but Not Federal Law. Permits Local Governments to Regulate and Tax Commercial Production, Distribution, and Sale of Marijuana. Initiative Statute. ’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure?” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 56% 27 % 55 % 40 % 47 % 62 % 42 % 42 % Voted no 44 73 45 60 53 38 58 58 Seven in 10 voters say the outcome of the vote on Proposition 19 was very (35%) or somewhat (35%) important. No -voters are far more likely than yes -voters to consider the outcome very important (51% to 18%). Republican s (44%) are much more likely than Democrats (32%) or independents (27%) to say very important. Latinos (45%) are much more likely than whites (33%) to hold this view and the percentage saying very important decr eases with education and income and is similar across age groups. “As you may know, Proposition 19 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 19 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 1 9 V oted yes Voted no Very important 35% 18 % 51 % Somewhat important 35 41 30 Not too important 21 32 12 Not at all important 8 9 5 D on't know 1 – 2 When asked more generally about whether they think marijuana should be legal or not , voters are divided (49% legal, 49% illegal). Similar to the vote on Proposition 19, Democrats (59%) and independents (57%) favor legalization, while most Republicans (69%) oppose it. Most Latinos (59%) think marijuana should not be legal, while whites ar e divided (50% legal, 47% illegal). Half of men favor legalization (52% legal, 45% illegal) , while half of women say marijuana should be illegal (45% legal, 52% illegal). Similar to the vote o n Proposition 19, voters age 18– 34 (65%) favor legalization, while older voters prefer keeping it illegal. Among no-voters on Proposition 19 , 11 percent favor legalization in general . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 10 PROPOSITION 23—AB 32 SUSPENSION Proposition 23—which would have suspended California’s air pollution control law (AB 32) until unemployment fell to at least 5.5 percent for a full year —failed by 24 points (38% yes, 62% no). A wide partisan divide is present , with seven in 10 Democrats (72%) and 64 percent of independents voting no, while over half of Republicans (54%) vot ed yes. Liberals (77%) and moderates (67%) report voting no, while 56 percent of conservatives were in support. Majorities of whites (62%), Latinos (60%), women (66%), and men (56%) were opposed, as were majorities across age, education, and income groups. The top reasons for voting yes? Four in 10 voters cite economic reasons (22%) or saving jobs (20%) ; 11 percent say global warming does not exist . Among n o-voters, 18 percent say air pollution would increase, 12 percent say big oil companies/Texas oil companies/ big polluters supported it, and 10 percent say the 5.5 percent unemployment requirement would essentially end AB 32. Fewer mention that it was important to counter global warming (7%) or support for AB 32 (7%). “Proposition 23 was called the ‘Suspends Implementation of Air Pollution Control Law (AB 32) Requiring Major Sources of Emissions to Report and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions That Cause Global Warming, Until Unemployment Drops to 5.5 Percent or Less for Full Year. Initiative Statute.’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure?” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 28% 54 % 36 % 40 % 38 % 41 % 36 % 40 % Voted no 72 46 64 60 62 59 64 60 Eight in 10 voters say the outcome of Proposition 23 was very (49%) or somewhat (31%) important. No -voters (58%) are much more likely than yes -voters (47%) to say very important and Democrats (53%) are somewhat more likely than independents (47%) and Republicans (44%) to hold this view. About half of Latinos (52%), whites (49%), men (49%) , and women (49%) say the outcome was very important and the percentage saying the outcome was very important increases somewhat with age . “As you may know, Proposition 23 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 23 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 23 Voted yes Voted no Very important 49% 47 % 58 % Somewhat important 31 36 30 Not too important 11 12 8 N ot at all important 5 2 3 D on't know 4 3 1 Proponents of Proposition 23 ar gued that AB 32 would cost the state large numbers of jobs in a time of economic insecurity, while opponents said AB 32 is spurring growth in green jobs. When asked what effect state action to reduce global warming would have on jobs, a plurality o f voters (41%) say it would result in more jobs, 26 percent say fewer jobs and 26 percent say jobs would not be affected. Half of those who voted no on Proposition 23 (52%) say more jobs would result; half of yes-voter s (49%) say fewer jobs would result. More than eight in 10 Democrats say state action would result in more jobs (58%) or have no effect (25%). W hile nearly half of Republicans (47%) say it would result in fewer jobs , the same share say no effect (26%) or more jobs (20%) . Independents do not think job loss would result (37% more jobs, 30% no effect , 27% fewer jobs). Half of Latinos (49%) say more jobs, compared to fewer whites (37%) . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 11 PROPOSITION 24—BUSINESS TAX LIABILI TY Proposition 24 , which would have repealed recent legislation allowing businesses to reduce their tax liability, failed by 16 points (42% to 58%). Majorities of v oters across parties report voting no (64% Democrats, 54% Republicans, 54% independents), as do at least half across demographic groups. Latinos (66%) were more likely to vote no than whites (57%), while six in 10 men (59%) and women (58%) voted no. Suppor t for Proposition 24 is lower among voters age s 18 to 34 and decline s as education level s rise . Proponents of Proposition 24 argued that it would help small business and one in three voters (34%) cite this reason for voting yes . O ne in 10 say that it would be good for the economy (11%) ; f ewer cite ending unfair tax loopholes (7%) or mak ing corporations pay their fair share (6%). Among no-voters, 22 percent say they are not sure why they voted no; 16 percent say it would have been unfair to businesses, while fewer say the measure would hurt small businesses (6%) or that it taxed em ployers for creating jobs (6%) . “Proposition 24 is called the ‘ Repeals Recent Legislation That Would Allow Businesses to Lower Their Tax Liability. Initiative Statute.’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure? ” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 36% 46 % 46 % 34 % 43 % 36 % 42 % 43 % Voted no 64 54 54 66 57 64 58 57 Six in 10 voters say the outcome of Proposition 24 is very (22%) or somewhat (38%) important. Yes -voters (34%) are somewhat more likely than no -voters (26%) to say the outcome is very important. About one in five Democrats (18%) and about o ne in four independents (24%) and Republicans (27%) hold this view. Relatively few Latinos (22%), whites (23%), men (22%), or women (23%) say the outcome is very important , and fewer than three in 10 across age, education, and income groups hold this view. “As you may know, Proposition 24 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 24 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 24 Voted yes Voted no Very important 22% 34 % 26 % Somewhat important 38 46 44 Not too important 22 14 21 Not at all important 11 3 8 D on't know 7 3 1 According to the Legislative Analyst ’s Office, Proposition 24 would have repealed legislation set to take effect in 2011, thereby raising state revenues through higher taxes paid by corporations. In a separate question , just over half of voters (53%) oppose raising taxes on corporations to address the state budget deficit . Six in 10 yes - (59%) and half of no-voters (51%) on Proposition 24 oppose raising corporate taxes . Six in 10 Democrats (61%) are in favor, while three in four Republicans (77%) and six in 10 independents (59%) are in opposition. Half of Latinos (52%) favor raising corporate taxes , while over half of whites (55%) oppose this idea. Half of voters age s 18 to 34 are in favor, but over half of older voters are opposed. A solid majority of voters in households earning at least $80,000 annually oppose raising corporate taxes; those with l ower incomes are divided . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 12 PROPOSITION 25—MAJORITY BUDGET VOTE Proposition 25, which lowers the legislative requirement to pass a state budget from a two -thirds threshold to a simple majority vote —while retaining a two- thirds vote for new taxes —passed by 10 points (55% yes, 45% no). Seven in 10 Democrats (71%) and 57 percent of independents voted yes, while two in three Republ icans (66%) voted no. There was also an ideological divide, with liberal s (76%) and moderates (56%) voting yes and six in 10 conservatives (63%) voting no. Nearly s even in 10 Latinos (68%) report voting yes , as do just over half of whites (53%); both women (58%) and men (52%) also report voting yes. At least half across age, education, and income groups report voting yes. By far, the top reason for voting yes on Proposition 25 is that it would be easier to pass the budget (50%). Fewer mention that it preser ved the two-thirds vote to raise taxes (7%) or that a small minority would not be able to hold up the budget (6%). By far t he top reason given for voting no is that the legislature should be required to get two -thirds of legislators to pass a budget (49%). Fewer say that one party should not control the budget (10%) or that it would make it easier to raise taxes (7%). “Proposition 25 was called the ‘ Changes Legislative Vote Requirement to Pass Budget and Budget- related Legislation From Two- Thirds to a Simple Majority. Retains Two -Thirds Vote Requirement for Taxes. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure? ” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 71% 34 % 57 % 68 % 53 % 57 % 54 % 54 % Voted no 29 66 43 32 47 43 46 46 Nearly eight in 10 voters say the outcome of the vote on Proposition 25 is very (43%) or somewhat (35%) important. Yes -voters (55%) are much more likely than n o-voters (44%) to say the outcome is very important. Fewer than half across parties say the outcome is very important (47% Republicans, 43% i ndependents, 41% Democrats). Whites (46%) are somewhat more likely than Latinos (38%) to hold this view and the perce ntage saying very important increases with age, education, and income. “As you may know, Proposition 25 pass ed. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 25 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 25 Voted yes Voted no Very important 43% 55 % 44 % Somewhat important 35 37 35 Not too important 11 6 12 Not at all important 6 1 5 D on't know 5 1 4 When asked whether the vote requirement for passing both a state budget and state taxes should be reduced from a two -thirds vote to a simple majority, voters are divided (46% good idea, 48% bad idea) . Seven in 10 yes -voters (72%) on Proposition 25 say it is a good idea, while eight in 10 no-voters (81%) say it’s a bad idea. A strong majority of Democrats (63 %) say good idea, while a strong majority of Republicans ( 69%) say reducing the two -thirds vote requirement is a bad idea. I ndependents are somewhat more likely to say bad idea (49%) than good idea (41%). Latinos (56%) are much more likely than whites (44%) to say it’s a good idea; men , women , and voters across age groups are divided . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 13 GOVERNOR AND U.S. SENATE ELECTIONS Democrat Jerry Brown won the governor ship by 13 points (54% to 41%) over Republican Meg Whitman with the support of Democrats (86%) , independents (56%), Latin os (75%) , and women (59%). Eighty-five percent of Republicans voted for Whitman. Men (50% Brown, 46% Whitman) and whites (47% Brown, 49% Whitman) were more divided. V oters ages 18 to 34 (65%) supported Brown, compared to half of older vo ters. Support for B rown declines a t higher income levels. Those who voted at their local polling place preferred Brown over Whitman (57 % to 40%), while those who voted by mail ballot were more divided ( 50% Brown, 46% Whitman). “For governor, did you happen to vote for Meg Whitman, the Republican, or Jerry Brown, the Democrat?” General Election Voters Jerry Brown Meg Whitman Someone else General Election Results 54% 41% 5% Party Democrat s 86 12 2 Republican s 12 85 3 Independent s 56 38 6 Gender Men 50 46 4 Women 59 39 2 Race/Ethnicity Latinos 75 22 3 Whites 47 49 4 Household Income Under $40,000 66 29 5 $40,000 to under $80,000 53 44 3 $80,000 or more 50 48 2 Senator Barbara Boxer won re -election by a 10 -point margin (52% to 42 %) with support from Democrats (86%), independents (53%), Latinos (62%), and women (58%) . Carly Fiorina had the support of most Republicans (88%). Whites (48% Boxer, 49% Fiorina) and m en (49% Boxer, 47% Fiorina) were divided. S upport for Boxer decreas ed as incomes rose ; voters ages 18 to 34 (62%) favored Boxer. Boxer won both mail -in voters (52% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) and those who voted at the polls (54% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) . “For U.S. Senator, did you happen to vote for Carly Fiorina , the Republican, or Barbara Boxer , the Democrat ?” General Election Voters Barbara Boxer Carly Fiorina Someone else General Election Results 52% 43% 5% Party Democrat s 86 13 1 Republican s 1 0 88 2 Independent s 53 41 6 Gender Men 49 47 4 Women 58 40 2 Race/Ethnicity Latinos 62 35 3 Whites 48 49 3 Household Income Under $40,000 60 36 4 $40,000 to under $80,000 54 43 3 $80,000 or more 49 49 2 December 2010 Californians and Their Government 14 STATE AND NATIONAL POLITICAL CONTEXT KEY FINDINGS  Strong majorities of voters (64%) mention jobs and the economy as the most important issue facing the state. Strong majorities also say the state is headed in the wrong direction (68 %) and can expect bad economic times (61%).  One in three voters approve of the governor’s job performance, one in 10 approve of the legislature’s job performance, and eight in 10 disapprove of the way that the governor and legislature are working t ogether in making public policy . ( page 15)  Overwhelming majorities of California voters say they can trust state government only some or none of the time. When it comes to making policy , only one in three have confidence in their elected officials (33%); fewer than half have confi dence in their fellow voters (44 %). ( page 16)  A strong majority of voters are at least somewhat happy about having to vote on the nine state propositions. Six in 10 sa y that voting on the propositions did not make them feel any different about California politics . ( page s 17 , 18 )  Two in three voters are at least somewhat satisfied with the initiative process, but three in four say the process needs at least minor changes. ( page 19)  Most voters approve of President Obama, but only one in five appro ve of Congress, and seven in 10 disapprove of the way that the two are working together . A plurality think the switch to Republican control of the House of Representatives is a good thing (41%), 34 percent say it is a bad thing and 21 percent say it makes no difference. ( page 20 ) 505252 44 41 52 3733 0 20 40 60 80 100 2005200620082010 Percent voters California's voters State's elected officials Confidence In ...to Make Public Policy Percent saying “a great deal” or “a fair amount ” 14 53 23 13 76 36 66 79 0 20 40 60 80 100 2005200620082010 Percent voters Approve Disapprove Approval of theWay the Legislature and Governor are Working Together 6413 21 2 Jobs, economy State budget, taxes Other Don't know Mos tImportant Issue Facing California Today Percent voters (page s 22, 23 ) PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 15 OVERALL MOOD Heading into the midterm elections, California voters were faced with a persistent economic downturn, high unemployment, and a state fiscal crisis. These conditions are refle cted in voters’ naming of jobs and the economy (64%) the most important issue facing California; 13 percent mention the state budget. Fewer name education (4%) or other issues. In December 2008, voters also said the economy (59%) and state budget (13%) were the top issues, followed by gay rights and same -sex marriage (4%). Mention of jobs and the economy is up an astounding 50 points since November 2006 (20% immigration, 14% economy, and 13% education). Today, the economy is the top concern across parties, with Democrats (68%) most likely to say so , followed by Republicans (62%) and independents (59%). At least six in 10 across region s and demographic groups cite the economy as the most important issue. “Thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today?” Top three issues mentioned Jobs, economy State budget, deficit, taxes Education, schools General Election Voters 64% 13 % 4 % Party Democrats 68 10 6 Republicans 62 15 2 Independents 59 15 4 Region Central Valley 69 13 2 San Francisco Bay Area 60 13 6 Los Angeles 65 10 4 Other Southern California 63 14 5 With the economy as the top concern on voters’ minds, six in 10 think bad economic times are ahead in California; only 27 percent anticipate good times. Although the percent saying bad times is down 14 points from 2008 (17% good, 75% bad), the mood is starkly different from 2006, when more voters (51%) said good times were ahead than said bad times (36%). In November 2005, the outlook was less pessimistic than today (35% good times, 50% bad times). Today, strong majorities of Republicans (78%) and independents (66%) say bad times are ahead, compared to 46 percent of Democrats. Voters in the Central Valley (69%) and Other Southern California region (68%) are much more likely than San Francisco Bay Area (56%) and Los Angeles voters (53%) to say bad times. Whites (66%) are far m ore likely than Latinos (49%) to say bad times are ahead; the share saying so rises as education and income levels rise . “Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? ” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Good times 27% 39 % 14 % 23 % Bad times 61 46 78 66 Don't know 12 15 8 11 A strong majority of voters (68%) also say California is heading in the wrong direction; just 22 percent say right direction —nearly identical to 2008 (19% right, 68% wrong), but in stark contrast t o 2006 (53% right, 39% wrong). Nearly all Republicans (87%) and seven in 10 independents (71%) say wrong direction , compared to half of Democrats (51%) . Solid majorities across regions and demographic groups say the state is headed in the wrong direction. PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 16 APPROVAL RATINGS OF STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS As Arnold Schwarzenegger nears the end of his tenure as governor, 61 percent of general election voters disapprove of the way he is handling his job; only 32 percent approve. Approval among voters is lower than in November 2008 (42% approve, 49% disapprove), but r esults today sharply differ from November 2006, when voters were nearly twice as likely to approve (60%) than disapprove (32%). Still, views today are fairly on par with those in November 2005 (39% approve, 56% disapprove), when voters defeated all eight propositions on the special -election ballot , four of which were sponsored by G overnor Schwarzenegger . Majorities across parties disapprove of his job performance , with Democrats (68%) most likely to say so . Latinos (74%) are far more likely than whites (57%) to disapprove; approval of the governor rises as age and income levels rise . Only 12 percent of voters approve of the way the California Legislature is handling its job— 81 percent disapprove. Nevertheless , voters r e-elected every incumbent state legislator on November 2. A pproval today is lower —and disapproval is much higher —than in 2008 (21% approve, 69% disapprove) and 2005 (20% approve, 66% disapprove) . In 2006, voters were far more likely than today to approve of the legislature (36% approve, 49% disapprove). Today, fewer than one in four across groups approve . “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that…” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind … Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling his job as g overnor of California? Approve 32 % 26 % 39 % 35 % Disapprove 61 68 55 55 Don't know 7 6 6 10 … the California Legislature is handling its job? Approve 12 18 6 9 D isapprove 81 71 91 85 Don't know 7 11 3 6 In a year with a record -late budget, just 13 percent approve of the way the legislature and governor are working together in making public policy; 79 percent disapprove. Approval is down 10 points, and disapproval is up 13 points from November 2008. In contrast, a majority of vot ers (53%) approved of the way the two were working together in November 2006, and 36 percent disapproved. Ratings today are most similar to November 2005 (14% approve, 76% disapprove). One in five or fewer across political, regional, and demographic groups approve of the way the governor and legislature are working together. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature and the governor are working together in making public policy?” Approve Disapprove Don't know General Election Voters 13% 79 % 8 % Party Democrat s 17 75 8 Republicans 10 84 6 Independent s 12 79 9 Region Central Valley 12 83 5 San Francisco Bay Area 16 75 9 Los Angeles 16 73 11 Other Southern California 11 84 5 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 17 TRUST IN STATE GOVERNMENT An overwhelming majority of California voters (84%) say they can trust the state government in Sacramento to do what is right only some of the time (68%) or none of the time (16%). Only 14 percent say they can trust the state government just abo ut always (2%) or most of the time (12%). Trust is down 14 points from November 2006, when 28 percent said they could trust the state government most of the time or just about always. The low level of trust expressed today is similar to that found in our 2005 post -election survey (17%). Today, a mere 8 percent of Republicans and 11 percent of independents say they can trust the state government, compared to 21 percent of Democrats. Fewer than one in five across regions and nearly all demographic groups trust the state government most of the time or always. “How much of the time do you think you can trust the state government in Sacramento to do what is right ?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Just about always 2% 3 % 2 % 1 % M ost of the time 12 18 6 10 Only some of the time 68 70 69 66 None of the time (volunteered) 16 7 23 21 Don't know 2 2 -- 2 When it comes to perceptions of waste, a strong majority of voters (65%) think state government wastes a lot of taxpayer money; 28 percent say some is wasted, and 5 percent think not very much is wasted. About six in 10 voters in November 2006 (57%) and November 2005 (61%) said a lot was wasted. Today, views across parties differ: although eight in 10 Republicans and seven in 10 independents think a lot of taxpayer money gets wasted, far fewer Democrats (51%) hold this view. Across regions, voters in the Other Southern California region (71%) and the Central Valley (70%) are the most likely to say a lot of taxpayer money is wasted , followed by those in Los Angeles (64%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (55%). Two in three L atinos (66%), whites (65%), women (65%), and men (65%) think a lot is wasted. The perception that a lot of taxpayer money is wasted is lower among college graduates and among those under age 35 . Nearly all voters across demographic groups think at leas t some taxpayer money is wasted. “Do you think the people in state government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind A lot 65% 51 % 82 % 68 % Some of it 28 38 16 27 Don’t waste very much of it 5 8 1 3 D on't know 2 3 1 2 Asked whether the state government is run by a few big interests or for the benefit of all the people, three in four (76%) respond that it is run by a few big interests; 14 percent think it is run for the benefit of all. In 2006, 68 percent said a few big interests. Voters today express nearly identical views as special -election voters did in 2005 (78% big interests ). At least s even in 10 across all groups say a few big interests. PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 18 CONFIDENCE IN STATE POLICYMAKING Two in three California voters say they have either not too much (43%) or no trust and confidence (23%) in the state’s elected officials when it comes to making public policy. One in three say they have a great deal (3%) or fair amount (30%) of trust and c onfidence. These results are similar to those of November 2008, when 63 percent said they had not too much or no confidence. In November 2006, trends were reversed: a majority (52%) had either a fair amount or great deal of confidence. Voters express somewhat lower trust today (33%) than did special -election voters in November 2005 (41%). Although majorities across parties today do not trust the state’s elected officials in making public policy, Republicans (81%) and independents (73%) are far more likel y than Democrats (53%) to say they have either not too much or no confidence at all. Trust also varies across regions, with Other Southern California voters (72%) being the most likely to lack trust, followed by voters in the Central Valley (68%), Los Ange les (63%), an d the San Francisco Bay Area (59%). The percentage saying they have not too much or no trust in elected officials rises with age and annual household income levels . “H ow much trust and confid ence do you have in the state's elected officials when it comes to making public policy ?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind A great deal 3% 3 % 1 % 5 % A fair amount 30 43 17 22 Not too much 43 40 47 46 None at all 23 13 34 27 Don't know 1 1 1 -- California voters are much more likely to hold at least a fair amount of trust and confidence in their fellow voters (44%: 9% great deal, 35% fair amount) than in state elected officials when it comes to making public policy decisions. Still, a majority (55%) lack s trust an d confidence in California’s voters when it comes to ballot -box policymaking (40% n ot too much, 15% none at all). This post -election survey marks the first time in which fewer than half of voters express at least a fair amount of confidence (52% November 2008, 52% November 2006, 50% November 2005, 55% November 2004). Trust in voters diverges across parties: although a majority of Democrats (54%) trust voters to make public policy at the ballot box, majorities of ind ependents (57%) and Republicans (65%) do not. Fifty -five percent of Latinos have at least a fair amount of trust and confidence, compared to 59 percent of whites who do not. Fewer than half across regions, gender, age, education, and income groups have a g reat deal or fair amount of trust and confidence in ballot -box policymaking. “How much trust and confidence do you have in California's voters when it comes to making public policy at the ballot box? ” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind A great deal 9% 13 % 5 % 8 % A fair amount 35 41 28 33 Not too much 40 37 46 37 None at all 15 9 19 20 Don't know 1 -- 2 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 19 VOTING ON STATE PROPOSITIONS Six in 10 voters say they were very (18%) or somewhat (42%) happy about having to vote on the nine state propositions on the November 2 ballot. Far fewer were unhappy (20% somewhat, 8% very unhappy). Happiness about voting on propositions was similar in the November 2008 election, which included 12 state propositions (19% very, 43% somewhat happy), and in the November 2006 election, which included 13 propositions (18% very, 42% somewhat happy). Voters were much l ess happy in the November 2005 special electi on, which included eight propositions but no candidate s (22% very, 24% somewhat happy; 22% somewhat unhappy , 29% very unhappy); voters rejected all eight propositions. Solid majorities across parties say they were happy about having to vote on the nine propositions on Nov . 2. Majorities across regions and demographic groups are positive, but voters ages 18– 34 and those with household incomes under $80,000 are much more likely than older and more affluent voters to say they were happy about this . Vote -by -mail voters and those who voted at their local polling place express similar views: about six in 10 say they were happy about having to vote on the nine propositions. “Overall, how did y ou feel about having to vote on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd general election ballot ?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Very happy 18% 15 % 19 % 22 % Somewhat happy 42 45 40 42 Somewhat unhappy 20 22 20 16 Very unhappy 8 7 8 7 N either (volunteered) 9 9 9 10 Don't know 3 2 4 3 Most voters (61%) say that voting on the nine state propositions made them feel no different about California politics; 21 percent say it made them feel better, while only 15 percent say it made them feel worse. In 2008, voters were somewhat more likely to say it made them feel worse about politics (23% better, 22% worse, 52% no different). In the 2006 election, which featured a number of infrastructure bonds, more voters fe lt better about California politics (30% better, 14% worse, 54% no different). By contrast, in 2005, voters were far more likely to feel worse (21% better, 38% worse, 38% no different). Across parties, regions, and demographic groups today, majorities say voting on the propositions made them feel no different about California politics. Still, voters 35 and older, those with at least some college education, and those with household incomes of $80,000 or more are somewhat more likely than others to say it ma de them feel worse. Latinos (33%) are much more likely than whites (19%) to say they felt better about politics; Los Angeles voters (28%) are most likely across regions to say they felt better . “Overall, would you say voting on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd election ballot has made you feel better, worse, or no different about California politics?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Better 21% 24 % 20 % 19 % W orse 15 12 18 16 No different 61 63 58 62 Don't know 3 1 4 3 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 20 SATISFACTION WITH THE CITIZENS ’ INITIAT IVE PROCESS Two in three voters are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working in California today (13% very satisfied , 53% somewhat satisfied). Three in 10 (31%) are not satisfied with the process. I n recent general elections, voters also expressed satisfaction (2008: 18% very, 49% somewhat satisfied; 2006: 19% very, 50% somewhat satisfied), although voters today are slightly less likely to say they are very satisfied. In the 2005 initiative- only special election, voters were much less satisfied (10% very, 43% somewhat satisfied , 44% not satisfied) with the way the initiative process was working. More than six in 10 voters across parties (69% Republicans, 65% Democrats, 65% independents), regions (70% Other Southern California region, 65% Los Angeles, 65% San Francisco, 63% Central Valley), and demographic groups are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working . Satisfaction declines somewhat with age. Men are somewhat more likely than women to be very satisfied (17% to 10%), while women are more likely to be somewhat satisfied with the initiative process (58% to 48%). “Generally speaking, would you say you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, or not satisfied with the way the initiative process is working in California today?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Very satisfied 13% 11 % 15 % 15 % Somewhat satisfied 53 54 54 50 Not satisfied 31 32 29 33 Don't know 3 3 2 2 Although most voters are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working, many believe it needs major (42%) or minor changes (34%) ; one in five say it is basically fine the way it is. At least two in three voters in 2005 (72%), 2006 (67%), and 2008 (70%) said change was needed, but they were somewhat less likely to call for major changes in 2008 (35%) and 2006 (35%); 38 percent held this view in 2005. More than seven in 10 across parties today believe the process is in need of change, but Democrats (45%) and independents (43%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (38%) to say major change is needed. More than seven in 10 across regions and demographic groups also believe major or minor changes are needed in the initiative process. Across regions, Central Valley voters (49%) are the most likely to say major change is needed, followed by Los Angeles (42%), San Francisco Bay Area (40%), and Other South ern California (40%) voters. Latinos are much more likely than whites (54% to 40%) to say major change is needed, while voters 55 and older are somewhat more likely than yo unger voters to hold this view. V oters with household incomes under $40,000 are more likely than more affluent voters to say major changes are needed and t he percentage saying this drops as education levels rise. Among those who are not satisfied with the initiative process, 77 percent say major changes are needed; among those who are sat isfied with the process, just 26 percent say major changes are needed. “Do you think the citizens’ initiative process in California is in need of major changes, minor changes, or that it is basically fine the way it is?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Major changes 42% 45 % 38 % 43 % Minor changes 34 35 36 30 Fine the way it is 19 15 21 21 Don't know 5 5 5 6 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 21 OVERALL PERCEPTIONS OF NOVEMBER 2 BALLOT INITIATIVES Two in three voters believe that the wording of initiatives on the state ballot was too complicated and confusing (32% strongly agree, 35% somewhat agree). At least six in 10 voters held this view in 2008 (31% strongly, 32% somewhat agree) and 2006 (33% st rongly, 30% somewhat agree). Fewer voters agreed in 2005 (28% strongly, 27% somewhat agree). About two in three across parties today say that the ballot wording was too complicated and confusing , with solid majorities across regions and demographic groups concurring . Still, some differences emerge: Other Southern California voters (72%) are the most likely to hold this view, followed by San Francisco Bay Area (68%), Los Angeles (66%), and Central Valley (62%) voters. Voters 35 and older (71%) are much more likely than voters younger than 35 (58%) to say the initiative wording wa s too complicated and confusing. “For the following items, please say if you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree. The wording of initiatives on the state ballot was too complicated and confusing.” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Strongly agree 32% 34 % 32 % 31 % Somewhat agree 35 35 36 36 Somewhat disagree 21 21 20 21 Strongly disagree 10 9 10 12 Don’t know 2 1 2 -- Voters are more divided about the number of initiatives —nine —on the state ballot: 47 percent agree strongly or somewhat that there were too many, while 51 percent strongly or somewhat disagree . Voters were also divided in 2008 (52% agree, 46% disagree) whe n they voted on 12 initiatives. After voting on 13 initiatives in 2006, voters were more likely to agree there were too many (60% agree, 38% disagree). Although unhappy about having to vote on eight initiatives in 2005, a majority did not see the number as a problem (41% agreed, 57% disagreed that there were too many). A majority of Democrats (53%) believe there were too many initiatives on the state ballot, while majorities of independents (55%) and Republicans (54%) disagree. Voters in the Other Southern California region are more likely to disagree (53%) than agree (44%) that there were too many initiatives, with voters elsewhere more divided. Latinos are far more likely than whites (60% to 43%), and women are somewhat more likely than men (51% to 44%), t o say the ballot had too many initiatives . This perception increases with age ; voters across income groups are divided. Those with at least some college education are less likely than voters with less education to agree there were too many initiatives. “There were too many initiatives on the state ballot.” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Strongly agree 21% 26 % 16 % 19 % Somewhat agree 26 27 27 25 Somewhat disagree 35 31 37 40 Strongly disagree 16 15 17 15 Don’t know 2 1 3 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 22 APPROVAL RATINGS OF FEDERAL ELECTED OFFICIALS A slim majority of California voters (53%) approve of the way Barack Obama is handling his job as president, while 44 percent disapprove. Voters today are deeply divided along party lines: about eight in 10 Dem ocrats (82%) approve of his job performance, while a similar proportion of Republicans (83%) disapprove. Independents are more likely to approve (54%) than disapprove (42%). More than six in 10 voters in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%) and Los Angeles (62 %) approve of the president, compared to far fewer in the Other Southern California region (43%) and Central Valley (41%). Latinos are far more likely than whites (69% to 46%) to approve. Two in three voters age s 18 to 34 approve, compared to about half of older voters. Approval declines sharply as annual household income rises. Voters are far less likely to approve of the way Congress is doing its job: 21 percent approve, while 73 percent disapprove. Despite this opinion, voters re-elected all incumbent California members of Congress. Although majorities of voters across parties disapprove, Republicans (87%) are the most likely to disapprove, followed by independents (78%) and Democrats (60%). More than two in three across regions and majorities across dem ographic groups disapprove of Congress. Latinos are far more approving than whites (34% to 18%) ; approval declines at higher age levels. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way …” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind … that Barack Obama is handling his job as president of the United States? Approve 53 % 82 % 15 % 54 % Disapprove 44 14 83 42 Don't know 3 4 2 4 … the U.S. Congress is handling its job? Approve 21 32 10 17 Disapprove 73 60 87 78 Don't know 6 8 3 5 Twenty -five percent approve and 71 percent disapprove of the way Congress and the president are working together in making public policy. Democrats (37%) are much more likely to approve than independents (24%) or Republicans (9%). San Francisco Bay Area (30%) and Los Angeles (27%) voters are more approving than Central Valley (22%) and Other Southern California (20%) voters. Latinos are twice as likely as whites to approve (41% to 19%). Approval declines as age and income rise. Voters with a high school education or l ess are more approving than those with higher education levels. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the U.S. Congress and the president are working together in making public policy?” Approve Disapprove Don't know General Election Voters 25% 71 % 4 % Party Democrats 37 58 5 Republicans 9 87 4 Independents 24 72 4 Region Central Valley 22 72 6 San Francisco Bay Area 30 64 6 Los Angeles 27 71 2 Other Southern California 20 76 4 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 23 CONTROL OF CONGRESS California voters are somewhat more likely to say their preference for the outcome of this year’s congressional elections was a Congress that would be controlled by Democrats (4 5%) rather than one controlled by Republicans (39%); 13 percent volunteer they preferred neither outcome. Findings fall predictably along party lines , with about eight in 10 Democrats saying they preferred Democrats control Congress and eight in 10 Republicans saying they preferred Republicans. Independents express mixed views (38% D emocrats, 33% Republicans). Sixty percent of San Francisco Bay Area voters and 53 percent of Los Angeles voters say they preferred a Congress controlled by Democrats , with half of voters in the Other Southern California region (51%) and Central Valley (50% ) preferring Republicans. A strong majority of Latinos (63%) preferred Democrats, while whites somewhat preferred Republicans (46% to 39% for Democrats). Men are divided ; women say they preferred Democrats. Voters under 35 preferred Democrats, while voters 35 and older were divided. P reference for Democratic control declines sharply as annual income rises. “What was your preference for the outcome of this year's congressional elections: a Congress controlled by Republicans or a Congress controlled by Demo crats?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Controlled by Republicans 39% 9 % 82 % 33 % Controlled by Democrats 45 79 6 38 Neither (volunteered) 13 8 11 25 Don't know 3 4 1 4 Forty- one percent of voters view the upcoming switch in control of the House of Representatives from Democrats to Republicans as a good thing, 34 percent say it is a bad thing, while one in five (21%) say it makes no difference. Republicans are far more likely to say the switch is a good thing (79%) t han are Democrats to say it’s a bad thing (59%). Independents again give more mixed opinions (34% good thing, 28% bad thing, 34% no difference). Among those who preferred a Congress controlled by Republicans, 85 percent say the switch is a good thing and 11 percent say it makes no difference. Amo ng those who preferred Democratic control, 67 percent call the switch a bad thing and 21 percent say it makes no difference. About half of voters in the Other Southern California region (50%) and Central Valley (49%) say it’s good, while 46 percent in the San Francisco Bay Area say it’s a bad thing ; Los Angeles voters are divided (34% good, 39% bad) . A plurality of Latinos (43%) say the switch to Republican control is bad; a plurality of whites (47%) say it is good. Pluralities across education groups call the switch good; a plurality of voters 35 and older say the change in control is good and a plurality of younger voters say it’s bad. “As you may know, as a result of the recent election, control of the U.S. House of Representatives will switch from the Democrats to the Republicans. Do you think that this switch is a good thing, a bad thing, or doesn’t it make any difference?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Good thing 41% 16 % 79 % 34 % Bad thing 34 59 5 28 Does n’t make any difference 21 21 15 34 Don't know 4 4 1 4 December 2010 Californians and Their Government 24 REGIONAL MAP December 2010 Californians and Their Government 25 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from Dean Bonner, project manager for this survey, and survey research associates Sonja Petek and Nicole Willcoxon. The Californians and Their Government series is supported with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. We benefit from discussions with PPIC staff, foundation staff, and other policy experts; however, the methods, questions, and content of this report were solely determined by Mark Baldassare and the survey staff. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 2,003 California voters in the November 2 election, including 1,80 1 interviewed on landline telephones and 202 interviewed on cell phones. Interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days between November 3 and 14, 2010. Interviews took an average of 19 minutes to complete. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reach ing eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender . Eligible respondents were those who reported that they ha d voted in the November election, either at their local polling place, by mail ballot, or at an early voting site. Cell phone interviews were included in this survey to account for the growing number of Californians who use them. These interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimburse ment to help defray the potential cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Landline and cell phone interviewing was c onducted in English and Spanish according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc. translated the survey into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI Inc. conducted the telephone interviewing. With assistance from Abt SRBI , we used recent U.S. Census Bureau and state figures to compare the demo graphic characteristics of the survey sample with characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the census and state figures. Abt SRBI use d data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey and data from the 2005 –2007 American Community Survey for California, both to estimate landline and cell phone service in California and to compare it against landline and cell phone service reported in the survey. In screening for voters in this survey , we gathered information about non -voters and voters in the November 2 election and used these data along with other information to prepare the weights. The survey data in this report were statistically weighted to account for any differences in demographics, telephone service, and actual election results. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±2.7 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total sample of 2,003 voters. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2.7 percentage points of what they would be if all voters in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger and s ampling error is only one type of error to PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 26 which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for four geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Val ley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, and “Other Southern California” includes Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties. Voters from other geographic areas are incl uded in the overall results, but sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for Latinos because they account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. Sample sizes for African Americans and Asian Americans are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of registered Democrats, Republicans, and independents (those registered as “decline to state”). We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier post-election surveys. We also present election results from the California Secretary of State as of November 29, 2010, 3:34 p.m. December 2010 Californians and Their Government 27 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT November 3 –14, 2010 2,003 California Voters in the November 2 Election : English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ±2.7% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMP LE 1. First, thinking about the state as a w hole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today? 64% jobs, economy [code, don’t read] 13 state budget, deficit, taxes 4 education, schools 3 immigration, illegal immigration 2 government in general, elected officials, political parties 12 other 2 don’t know 2. Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 22% right direction 68 wrong direction 10 don’t know 3. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 27% good times 61 bad times 12 don’t know 4. For governor, did you happen to vote for [rotate] (1) Meg Whitman, the Republican; (2) Jerry Brown, t he Democrat; or someone else? [actual vote] 54% Jerry Brown, the Democrat 41 Meg Whitman, the Republican 5 someone else (specify) 5. Next, for U.S. Senator, did you happen to vote for [rotate] (1) Carly Fiorina, the Republican; (2) Barbara Boxer, the Democrat; or someone else? [actual vote] 52% Barbara Boxer, the Democrat 42 Carly Fiorina, the Republican 5 someone else (specify) 6. Thinking about the election that was just held, were you more enthusiastic about voting than usual, or less enthusiastic? 46% more enthusiastic 29 less enthusiastic 23 same (volunteer ed) 2 don’t know Now, thinking about the November 2nd election, the ballot included nine state propositions, all of which are citizens’ initiatives. 7. Overall, how did you fe el about having to vote on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd general election ballot — would you say you were very happy, somewhat happy, somewhat unhappy, or very unhappy? 18% very happy 42 somewhat happy 20 somewhat unhappy 8 very unhappy 9 neither (volunteered) 3 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 28 8. Overal l, would you say voting on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd election ballot has made you feel better, worse, or no different about California politics? 21% better 15 worse 61 no different 3 don’t know 9. And regardless of how you voted, before deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions, how closely were you following news about these measures ? 31% very closely 45 fairly closely 16 not too closely 7 not at all closely 1 don’t know 10. People learned about the ballot propositions a number of different ways. What way did you find the most helpful in deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions? [code, don’t read] 34% Official Voter Information G uide and sample ballot 19 Internet 9 Internet in general 4 Internet news sites 3 official proposition sites 3 voter resource sites 14 advertisements —radio, television , newspaper , mail 12 news and media coverage —radio , television, newspaper 6 newspaper endorsements —columns, editorials 5 opinio ns of friends , family , coworkers 2 endorsements of interest groups, politicians, celebrities 4 something/ someone else 4 don’t know 11. Did you happen to get any news or information about the nine state propositions on the November election ballot on the Internet or through email? 45% yes 54 no 1 don’t know 12. Overall, how satisfied were you with the information you had to make choices on the ballot propositions? 28% very satisfied 50 somewhat satisfied 15 not too satisfied 6 not at all satisfied 1 it depends (volunteered) /don’t know 13. Which one of the nine state propositions on the November 2nd ballo t were you most interested in? [code, don’t read] 38% Proposition 19 —Legalizes Marijuana under California but not Federal Law 4 Proposition 20 —Redistricting of Congressional Districts 5 Proposition 21 —Establishes $18 Annual Vehicle License Surcharge to Help Fund St ate Parks and Wildlife Programs 1 Proposition 22 —Prohibits the State from Borrowing or Taking Funds Used for Transportation, Redevelopment, or Local Government Pr ojects and S ervices 16 Proposition 23 —Suspends Implementat ion of Air Pollution Control Law (AB 32) 1 Proposition 24 —Repeals Recent Legislatio n that Would Allow Busi - ness es to Lower Their Tax Liability 10 Proposition 25 —Changes Legislative Vote Requirement to Pass Budget and Budget Related Legislation from Two -Thirds to a Simple Majority Vote 2 Proposition 26 —Requires that Certain State and L ocal Fees Be Approved by Two -Thirds Vote 1 Proposition 27 —Eliminates State Commission on Redistricting 5 none of them (volunteered) 3 all equally (volunteered) 2 other (specify) 12 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 29 For each of the following, please tell me if you voted yes or no on the measure. First, 14. Proposition 19 was called the “Legalizes Marijuana Under California but Not Federal Law. Permits Local Governments to Regulate and Tax Commercial Production, Distribution, and Sale of Marijuana. Initiative Statute.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 47% voted yes 53 voted no [q14a asked of those who say they voted yes] 14a.And why did you vote yes? [code, don’t read] 29% allows for the taxation of marijuana; tax revenue will help with budget defic it 12 personal freedom; same as drinking; not a big deal 11 frees up police/courts to do other things; police/courts should not waste their time on marijuana 10 less crime; less drug violence 9 it’s the right thing to do; it is important 7 allows for regulation of marijuana 5 help s with the economy 4 decrimin alization/should not be illegal 3 black market/drug cartels will be limited or weakened 9 some other reason 1 don’t know [skip to q15 ] [q 14b asked of those who say they voted no ] 14b. And why did you vote no? [code , don’t read] 33% drugs should be illegal 12 not good for state, not ready, causes more problems 8 child safety 7 conflicts with federal law/would lose federal funding 7 initiative was poorly written 5 drivers would be able to drive under the influence/make driving more dangerous 5 it is the right thing to do/it is important 3 people going to work or school under the influence 17 some other reason 3 don’t know 15. As you may know , Proposition 19 did not pass . How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 19 —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 35% very important 35 somewhat important 21 not too important 8 not at all important 1 don’t know 16. Proposition 23 was called the “Suspends Implementation of Air Pollution Control Law ( AB 32 ) Requiring Major Sources of Emissions to Report and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions That Cause Global Warming, Until Unemployment Drops to 5.5 Percent or Less for Full Year. Initiative Statute.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 38% voted yes 62 voted no PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 30 [q 16a asked of those who say they voted yes] 16a.And why did you vote yes? [code, don’t read] 22% Prop osition 23 will save taxpayers and consumers money/helps the economy; AB 32 will cost taxpayers and consumers money/hurts the economy 20 Proposition 23 will save jobs; AB 32 will cause jobs to be lost/hurts businesses 11 global warming/greenhouse effect do es n ot exist 4 global warming/greenhouse gases don’t need to be regulated 3 essential services will be protected 2 California alone can’t reduce global warming 2 energy costs would be higher if proposition doesn’t pass 2 friends/family supported it 25 some other reason 9 don’t know [skip to q17 ] [q 16b asked of those who say they voted no ] 16 b.And why did you vote no? [code , don’t read] 18% air pollution would increase/increased health risks 12 big oil companies supported it/ Texas oil companies/ big polluters supported it 10 5.5 percent unemployment unrealistic; essentially ends AB 32 7 important to counter global warming 7 support AB 32, AB 32 should not be delayed or changed 6 I’m an environmentalist, need to protect environment 6 not good for the economy 4 jobs will be lost/loss of green tech jobs 22 some other reason 8 don’t know 17. As you may kno w, Proposition 23 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 23 —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 49% very important 31 somewhat important 11 not too important 5 not at all important 4 don’t know 18. Proposition 24 is called the “Repeals Recent Legislation That Would Allow Businesses to Lower Their Tax Liability. Initiative Statute.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 42% voted yes 58 voted no [q18a asked of those who say they voted yes] 18a.And why did you vote yes? [code, don’t read] 34% helps small businesses/pro small business 11 good for the economy 7 ends unfair tax loopholes 6 makes corporations pay their fair share 3 bad for the economy 3 prevents deeper budget cuts/puts education and public safety ahead of corporations; raises revenue for the state 27 some other reason 9 don’t know [skip to q19 ] PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 31 [q 18b asked of those who say they voted no ] 18 b.And why did you vote no? [code , don’t read] 16% unfair to businesses; adds to California’s bad business climate 6 hurts small businesses 6 taxes employers for creating jobs/ penalizes employers for creating jobs 5 against taxes; vote no on all taxes 5 bad for the economy 3 job loss/hurts job growth; sends jobs out of state 2 does not actually close loopholes 2 does not guarantee money would go to education or public safety 2 good for the economy 2 opposed by group/public figure I trust 29 some other reason 22 don’t know 19. As you may know , Proposition 24 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 24 —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 22% very important 38 somewhat important 22 not too important 11 not at all important 7 don’t know 20. Proposition 25 was called the “ Changes Legislative Vote Requirement to Pass Budget and Budget -related Legislation from Tw o-Thirds to a Simple Majority. Retains Two -Thirds Vote Requirement for Taxes. Initiative Constitution al Amendment.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 55% voted yes 45 voted no [q20a asked of those who say they voted yes ] 20a. And why did you vote yes ? [code , don’t read] 50% easier to pass budget; breaks legislative gridlock 7 preserves two -thirds vote to raise taxes 6 small minority will not be able to hold up budget/few legislators will not be able to hold budget hostage 5 budget process will be reformed 5 holds legislators accountable/ no budget, no pay 3 late budgets waste taxpayer money 3 makes California like 47 other states/other states don’t have two- thirds requirement 3 majority vote should be enough 11 some other reason 7 don’t know [skip to q21 ] [q 20b asked of those who say they voted no ] 20 b.And why did you vote no? [code, don’t read] 49% should have to get two -thirds vote to pass budget; allows politicians to circumvent constitution’s two -thirds vote requirement 10 one party should not control budget; gives voice to minority party 7 makes it easier to raise taxes 2 eliminates the right of the voter to use the re ferendum to reject hidden taxes 2 makes it easier for politicians to increase lavish expense accounts 22 some other reason 8 don’t know 21. As you m ay know, Proposition 25 passed. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 25— is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 43% very important 35 somewhat important 11 not too important 6 not at all important 5 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 32 22. Changing topics, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling his job as governor of California? 32% approve 61 disapprove 7 don’t know 23. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California L egislature is handling its job? 12% approve 81 disapprove 7 don’t know 24. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California L egislature and the governor are working tog ether in making public policy? 13% approve 79 disapprove 8 don’t know 25. How much of the time do you think you can trust the state government in Sacramento to do what is right ? 2% just about always 12 most of the time 68 only some of the time 16 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know 26. Would you say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 76% a few big interests 14 benefit of all of the people 10 don’t know 27. Do you think the people in state government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 65% a lot 28 some 5 don’t waste very much 2 don’t know 28. In general, how much trust and confidence do you have in the state’s elected officials when it comes to making public policy? 3% a great deal 30 a fair amount 43 not too much 23 none at all 1 don’t know 29. How much trust and confidence do you have in California’s voters when it comes to making public policy at the ballot box ? 9% a great deal 35 a fair amount 40 not too much 15 none at all 1 don’t know Changing topics, California uses the direct initiative process, which enables voters to bypass the legislature and have issues put on the ballot —as state propositions —for voter approv al and rejection. 30. Generally speaking, would you say you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, or not satisfied with the way the initiative process is working in California today? 13% very satisfied 53 somewhat satisfied 31 not satisfied 3 don’ t know 31. Do you think the citizens’ initiative process in California is in need of major changes, minor changes or that it is basically fine the way it is? 42% major changes 34 minor changes 19 fine the way it is 5 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 33 In thinking about the initiatives on the November 2nd election ballot, please say if you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree with the following statements. [rotate questions 32 and 33] 32. The wording of initiatives on the state ballot wa s too complicated and confusing. 32% strongly agree 35 somewhat agree 21 somewhat disagree 10 strongly disagree 2 don’t know 33. There were too many initiatives on the state ballot. 21% strongly agree 26 somewhat agree 35 somewhat disagree 16 strong ly disagree 2 don’t know On another topic, 34. Do you think it is a good idea or bad idea to lower the vote requirement to pass a state budget and state taxes from a two -thirds vote to a simple majority or 50 percent plus one vote? 46% good idea 48 bad idea 6 don’t know 35. Do you favor or oppose raising the state taxes paid by California corporations to address the state budget deficit? 40% favor 53 oppose 7 don’t know 36. Next, do you think that California doing things to reduce global warming in the future would cause there to be more jobs for people around the state, would cause there to be fewer jobs, or wouldn’t affect the number of jobs for people around the state? 41% more jobs 26 fewer jobs 26 wou ldn’t affect the number of jobs 7 don’t know 37. In general, do you think the use of marijuana should be made legal, or not? 49% yes, legal 49 no, illegal 2 don’t know 38. Changing topics, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Barack O bama is handling his job as president of the United States? 53% approve 44 disapprove 3 don’t know 39. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the U.S. Congress is handling its job? 21% approve 73 disapprove 6 don’t know 40. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the U.S. Congress and the president are working tog ether in making public policy? 25% approve 71 disapprove 4 don’t know 41. Next, what was your preference for the outcome of this year's congressional elections: [ro tate] a Congress controlled by Republicans [ or ] a Congress controlled by Democrats? 39% controlled by Republicans 45 controlled by Democrats 13 neither (volunteered) 3 don’t know 42. As you may know, as a result of the recent election, control of the U.S. House of Representatives will switch from the Democrats to the Republicans. Do you think that this switch is a good thing, a bad thing, or doesn’t it make any difference? 41% good thing 34 bad thing 21 does not make a difference 4 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 34 43. Are you registered to vote as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 45% Democrat [skip to q43 b] 34 Republican [skip to q43c] 1 another party ( specify) [skip to q44 ] 20 independent [ask q43 a] 43 a.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 30% Republican party 37 Democratic party 31 neither (volunteered) 2 don’t know [skip to question 44] 43b.Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 58% strong 39 not ve ry strong 3 don’t know [skip to question 44] 43c. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 56% strong 39 not very strong 5 don’t know 44. On another topic, would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 10% very liberal 21 somewhat liberal 29 middle -of -the -road 23 somewhat conservative 16 very conservative 1 don’t know 4 5 . Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 33% great deal 45 fair amount 19 only a little 2 none 1 don’t know [d1-d1 7: demographic questions] PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Walter B. Hewlett, Chair Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Mark Baldassare President and Chief Executive Officer Public Policy Institute of C alifornia Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Mar ía Blanco Vice President , Civic Engagement California Community Foundation John E. Bryson Retired Chairman and CEO Edison International Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Education State of California Robert M. Hertzberg Partner Mayer Brown, LLP Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs David Mas Masumoto Author and farmer Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Mueller & Naylor, LLP Constance L. Rice Co-Director The Advancement Project Thomas C. Sutton Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Pacific Life Insurance Company The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research on major economic, social, and political issues. The institute’s goal is to raise public awareness and to give elected representatives and other decisionmakers a more informed basis for developing policies and programs. The institute’s research focuses on the underlying forces shaping California’s future, cutting across a wide range of public pol icy concerns, including economic development, education, environment and resources, governance, population, public finance, and social and health policy. PPIC is a private operating foundation. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. PPIC was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. Mark Baldassare is President and Chief Executive Officer of PPIC. Walter B. Hewlett is Chair of the Board of Directors. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source and the copyright notice below is included. Copyright © 2010 Public Policy Institute of California All rights reserved. San Francisco, CA PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, California 94111 phone: 415.291.4400 fax: 415.291.4401 PPIC SACRAMENTO CENT ER Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 phone: 916.440.1120 fax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org survey@ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(104) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(113) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-their-government-december-2010/s_1210mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8783) ["ID"]=> int(8783) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:40:48" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4122) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(9) "S 1210MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(9) "s_1210mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(13) "S_1210MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "555264" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(91685) "& p p i c s tat e w i d e s u r v e y Californians Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner Sonja Petek Nicole Willcoxon in collaboration with The James Irvine Foundation CONTENTS About the Survey 2 Press Release 3 November 2010 Election 6 State and National Political Context 14 Regional Map 24 Methodology 25 Questionnaire and Results 27 their government DECEMBER 2010 December 2010 Californians and Their Government 3 PPIC Statewide Survey CONTACT Linda Strean 415-291-4412 Andrew Hattori 415- 291-4417 NEWS RELEASE EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PST on Wednesday , December 1 , 2010. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: http://www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT Post-election Survey: Marijuana, Climate Change, Budget Reform Captured Voters’ Attention INDEPENDENTS KEY TO DOUBLE-DIGIT WINS FOR BROWN AND BOXER SAN FRANCISCO , December 1 , 2010 —Of the nine propositions on the November statewide ballot, Proposition 19 —the unsuccessful measure to legalize marijuana —attracted the mo st interest among voters, and those who voted against it felt more strongly about the out come than those who voted yes. These are among the key findings of a post -election survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) with support from The James Irvine Foundation. In the PPIC survey of 2,003 voters who reported par ticipating in the election, 38 percent say they were most interested in Proposition 19, followed by 16 percent who name Proposition 23, the measure to suspend the state’s air pollution law (AB 32) . And, similar to Proposition 19, those who voted no on Prop osition 23 are much more likely than those who voted yes to call the outcome of the vote on the measure important. Ten percent say they were most interested in Proposition 25 —the measure to lower the legislative vote threshold for state budget passage —whil e 5 percent were most interested in Proposition 21, which would have raised the vehicle license fee to pay for parks. Despite concerns about a lack of enthusiasm about this national midterm election, California voters were engaged: Most report being more enthusiastic about voting than usual (46%) or equally enthusiastic (23%), while just 29 percent say they were less enthusiastic. Most (76%) say they followed news of the nine ballot propositions either very or fairly closely, down only slightly from PPIC’s December 2008 post - election survey. Republicans, Democrats, and independents report similar levels of attention, with Republicans more likely to say they paid very close attention to news about the propositions (37% Republicans, 29% Democrats, 26% indepen dents). “Californians did see important reasons to vote,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. “They are not in a mood to spend money— but the vote on Proposition 25 shows that they are in a mood to make change. In the candidate races, a president who is popular in California helped Democrats here.” INDEPENDENTS GAVE BOOST TO BROWN, BOXER In the candidate contests at the top of the ballot, the support of independents was key for winners Jerry Brown and Barbara Boxer. In the g overnor’s race, Democrat Brown beat Republican Meg Whitman by 13 points (54% to 41%) with the support of 86 percent of Democrats and 56 percent of independents . Latinos (75%) and women (59%) voted for Brown. Whitman got the votes of 85 percent of Republicans. Men (50% Brown, 4 6% Whitman) and whites (47% Brown, 49% Whitman) were more divided. Voters age 18– 34 (65%) supported Brown, as did half of older voters (52%, ages 35 and over). PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 4 Boxer was re -elected to her U.S. Senate seat by 10 points (52% to 42%) with the support of most Democrats (86%) and indepe ndents (53%). Most women (58%) and Latinos (62%) voted for Boxer. Republican challenger Carly Fiorina had the support of most Republicans (88%). Whites (48% Boxer, 49% Fiorina) and men (49% Boxer, 47% Fiorina) were divided. Younger voters (62%) favored Boxer. At a time when more voters are casting ballots by mail, those who voted this way were more divided ( 50% Brown, 46 % Whitman) than those who went to the polls (57 % Brown , 40 % Whitman) . In the Senate race, t hose who vote d by mai l (52% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) and those who voted in person (54% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) favored Boxer. PROPOSITION 19 FAILS AMONG GOP, LATINO, W HITE, WOMEN, OLDER VOTERS Proposition 19 lost by 6 points (47% yes, 53% no). Republicans (73%), Latinos (60%), whites (53%), women (58%), and older voters (58% ages 35 and older) voted no . Majorities of Democrats (56%) and independents (55%) voted yes, as did voters ages 18– 34 (62%). Most voters say the outcome of the vote was very important (35%) or somewhat important ( 35%) to them. Just 18 percent of those who voted yes call the outcome very important, while 51 percent of those who voted no feel the same way. Asked the open -ended question of why they voted for or against the measure, the top reason given by those voting yes is that it would have allowed marijuana to be taxed (29%) . The next most frequently cited reasons: marijuana use is a personal issue or not a big deal (12%) and passage would have freed the police/courts to do other things (11%) or would have led to l ess crime and drug violence (10%). The top reasons given by those who voted against the measure are that drugs should be illegal (33%) and legalization is not good for the state (12%). But on the general issue of legalization voters are more evenly divided than the vote on Proposition 19 indicate s. When voters are asked more generally about whether they think marijuana should be made legal or not, 49 percent are in favor and 49 percent are opposed. Among those who voted no on the ballot measure, 11 percent favor legalization in general . PROPOSITION 23: HALF OF VOTERS VIEW OUTCOME AS VERY IMPORTANT The partisan differences among voters on Proposition 19 are also apparent in the vote on Proposition 23, which would have suspended the state’s air pollution law until unemployment remained at 5.5 percent for a year. The proposition failed by 24 points (38% yes, 62% no). Most Democrats (72%) and independents (64%) voted against the measure . More than half of Republicans (54%) voted yes. The measure was opposed by whites (62%), Latinos (60%), women (66%), and men (56% ). Those voting yes most frequently cite economic reasons (22%) or saving jobs (20%) for their decision, and 11 percent say global warming does not exist. Those voting no cite increased air pollution (18 %), support of the measure by big oil companies or polluters (12%) , or a belief that the measure’s 5.5 percent unemployment requirement would essentially end implementation of California’s air quality law (10%) . How important was the outcome of this proposition? Most call it very important (49%) or somewhat important (31%); 58 percent of those voting no call the outcome very important, while 47 percent of those voting yes say so. Proponents of Proposition 23 said the state’s air pollution law would cost th e state large numbers of jobs at a time of high unemployment, but this was not an argument that resonated with most voters. Asked what effect state action to reduce global warming would have on jobs, a plurality (41%) say it would result in more jobs, 26 percent say fewer jobs, and 26 percent say jobs would not be affected. PARTISANS SPLIT SHAR PLY ON PROPOSITION 25 Proposition 25 passed by 10 points (55% to 45%). Across party lines, differences are once again stark: 71 percent of Democrats and 57 percent of independents voted yes and 66 percent of Republicans PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 5 voted no. Majorities of Latinos (68%), whites (53%), and both women (58%) and men (52%) report voting yes. By far, the top reason voters cite for supporting the measure is that Proposition 25 will make it easier to pass the state budget (50%). And the top reason for voting no is that the legislature should be required to get a two- thirds vote to pass the budget (49%). Most say the outcome of the vote on this proposition is very important (43%) or somewhat important (35%), with those who voted for it (55%) much more likely than those who voted against it (44%) to call the outcome very important. PPIC also asked voters about Proposition 24, which failed by 16 points (42% to 58%). Majorities of voters acro ss parties report voting no (64% Democrats, 54% Republicans, 54% independents) on the measure to repeal recent legislation allowing businesses to lower their tax liability. Proponents of Proposition 24 argued that its passage would help small business and 34 percent of voters cite this reason for voting yes. Among those who voted no, 16 percent say it would be unfair to businesses, but the greatest proportion —22 percent —say they don’t know why they voted no. MANY SAY INITIATIVES WERE TOO CONFUSING Two-thir ds of voters say the wording of the initiatives on the ballot was too complicated or confusing (32% strongly agree, 35% somewhat agree). And for the first time in a PPIC post-election survey, less than half say they have confidence in their fellow voters t o make public policy decisions at the ballot box (35% a fair amount of confidence, 9% a great deal). But most also say they were very happy (18%) or somewhat happy (42%) that they had to vote on nine ballot propositions. This is similar to November 2008, w hen there were 12 propositions on the ballot, and November 2006, when there were 13. And two-thirds of voters are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working (13% very satisfied, 53% somewhat satisfied), although many believe the system needs major changes (42%) or minor ones (34%). MORE KEY FINDINGS  Voter information guide still top information source—pag e 8 The state’s voter information guide and sample ballot is the most helpful source of information about statewide ballot propositions , according to 34 percent of voters. Just 19 percent say the Internet is the most helpful information source —but this is up 6 points since 2008 (13%) and more than double the 2005 percentage (8%).  Californians’ concerns a stark contrast to last gubernatorial e lection—pag e 15 A s a measure of how much conditions have changed since November 2006, concerns about jobs and the economy have skyrocketed 50 points (64% today, 14% 2006) when state voters are asked to name the most important is sue facing people in California.  Low marks for state’s leaders, little trust in government —p ages 16, 17 Just 13 percent of general election voters approve of the way the legislature and governor work together to make public policy , and only 12 percent approve of the job done by the legislature— where all incumbents on the ballot were re -elec ted. An overwhelming majority (84%) say they can trust state government to do what is right only some of the time (68%) or none of the time (16%).  Obama approval rating at 53 percent —p age 22 A slim majority of voters approves of the way President Barack Obama is handling his job. Far fewer ( 21 %) approve of the way Congress is doing its job.  Switch to a GOP -controlled U.S. House: 41 percent say it’s a good thing —pag e 23 State voters are somewhat more likely to say they wanted the midterm election to result in a Congress controlled by Democrats (45%) than by Republicans (39%). But they are also more likely to see the switch in control of the House of Representatives from D emocrats to Republicans as a good thing (41%) than a bad thing (34%), and 21 percent say it won’t make a difference . December 2010 Californians and Their Government 6 NOVEMBER 2010 ELECTION KEY FINDINGS  Three in four California voters were closely following news about the nine state propositions. Proposition 19, which would have legalized m arijuana in the state, garnered the most interest from voter s.  A plurality of California voters (34%) continue to name the state’s Official Voter Information Guide as the most helpful information source in deciding how to vote on the propositions . Forty -five percent say they receive d news and information about the nine state propositions through email or the I nternet. Most voters were satisfied with the information available to them on the propositions . ( page 7)  There were large partisan differences in support for Propositions 19, 23 , and 25, while Democrats and Republicans both opposed Proposition 24. Those who voted no on Propositions 19 and 23 placed more importance than yes-voters on the outcomes , while those who voted yes on Propositions 24 and 25 placed more importance than no-voters on the outcomes . ( page 8)  (page s 9–12) Democrats Jerry Brown and U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer won on Election Day with the help of more than eight in 10 Democrats and over half of independents. Brown gained support from six in 10 women and three in four Latinos, while Boxer had the support of six in 10 women and Latinos . (p age 1 3) 354045 0 20 40 60 200620082010 Percent voters Received Proposition News, Information on Internet or by Email Percentsaying "yes" 38 1610 16 8 12 Prop 19 Prop 23 Prop 25 Other None/All (vol) Don't know Proposition ReceivingMost Voter Interest 35 49 22 43 35 31 38 35 0 20 40 60 80 100 Prop 19Prop 23Prop 24Prop 25 Percent voters Somewhat important Very important Importance of the Outcome of the Vote On... Percent voters PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 7 VOTER INTERESTS California voters approved four of nine propositions on the ballot in the November 2 General Election, and elected a new governor. Most voters who participated in the election report being more enthusiastic than usual about voting (46%) ; fewer say they were less enthusiastic (29%) or had the same level of enthusiasm (23%). Republicans (54%) were much more likely than Democrats (44%) or independents (40%) to be very enthusiastic . Most voters followed news about the nine measures either very (31%) or fairly (45%) closely, down slightly from 2008 (81%), when 12 propositions were on the ballot . Attention was lower than in the November 2005 special election (85%), which included eight propositions but no candidate s. Still, results are similar to November 2006 —the last midterm election— when 77 percent followed news about those 13 propositions at least fairly closely. Today, independents (73%), Democrats (76%), and Republicans (78%) report similar levels of attention— but Republicans are more likely than Democrats and independents to say they paid very close attention. Whites (78%), Latinos (76%), men (77%), and women (76%) report similar levels of attenti on. Following news very closely increases with age (15% age 18 –34 , 31% age 35–54, 40% age 55 an d older ). “Regardless of how you voted, before deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions, how closely were you following news about these measures?” V ery closely Fairly closely Not too closely Not at all closely Don't know General Election Voters 31% 45 % 16 % 7 % 1 % Party Democrats 29 47 18 6 – Republicans 37 41 14 7 1 Independents 26 47 17 10 – Region Central Valley 32 46 15 6 1 San Francisco Bay Area 29 47 17 6 1 Los Angeles 32 45 15 8 – Other Southern California 33 43 15 7 2 Of the nine ballot propositions, a plurality of voters (38%) say they were most interested in Proposition 19 (marijuana legalization); 16 percent say Proposition 23 (AB 32 suspension), 10 percent say Proposition 25 (majority budget vote), and 5 percent say Proposition 21 (vehicle license fee for parks ). Fewer than 5 percent mention any other single proposition. Of these four, only Proposition 25 passed. Across party and demographic groups, voters express the most interest in Proposition 19 and then Proposition 23. Latinos (48%) are much more likely than whites (34%) to say Proposition 19 . Half of voters ages 18 to 34 express the most interest in Proposition 19 ; interest declines as age, education, and income rise. “Which one of the nine state propositions on the November 2nd ballot were you most interested in? ” Top f our propositions mentioned Proposition 19 Proposition 23 Proposition 25 Proposition 21 General Election Voters 38% 16 % 10 % 5 % Party Democrat s 42 16 9 6 Republican s 34 16 12 3 Independent s 37 16 10 4 Region Central Valley 38 13 14 4 San Francisco Bay Area 35 15 12 5 Los Angeles 41 18 9 5 Other Southern California 38 18 8 3 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 8 VOTER INFORMATION SOURCES California voters continue to name the Secretary of State’s Official Voter Information Guide (34%) as most helpful in deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions, followed by the Internet (19%), advertisements (14%), and news and media coverage (12%). Mention of the voter information guide was similar in 2008 (37%) and 2005 (31%), but was higher in 2006 (42%). Use of the Internet increased by 6 points since 2008 and has more than doubled since 2005 (8% 2005, 8% 2006, 13% 2008, 19% today). Today, pluralities of Democrats (33%), Republicans (34 %), and independents (35%) see the voter information guide as most helpful. Across regions, voters in the Central Valley (42%) are the most likely and Los Angeles voters (28%) least likely to find the voter guide most helpful. Whites (37%) are more likely than Latinos (28%) to name the voter guide, while Latinos are more likely th an whites to name advertisements (21% to 12%). The percentage finding the voter information guide most helpful is higher among those age 35 and older . Mention of the I nternet decreases sharply with age, but increases slightly with education. “People learned about the ballot propositions a number of different ways. Which way did you find the most helpful in deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions?” Top four sources mentioned General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Official Voter Information G uide and sample ballot 34% 33 % 34 % 35 % Internet 19 17 17 23 Advertisements 14 15 15 13 News and media coverage 12 14 11 10 Although the Internet was not the most helpful source of information for most voters, 45 percent of voters report receiving news or information about the nine state propositions on the November election ballot on the Internet or through email ; 54 percent say they did not . The percentage reporting Internet use marks a new hi gh in our post -election surveys, up 5 point s since 2008 (40%) and 10 points since 2006 (35%). Across parties, independents (50%) are the most likely to say they obtained information through the Internet or email, followed by Republic ans (46%) and Democrats (42%). Men are much more likely than women (51% to 40%) to report receiving electronic information; the percentage reporting they received information online decreases sharply with age , but increases sharply with education and income. F or making choices on the ballot propositions, nearly eight in 10 California voters were very (28%) or somewhat (50%) satisfied with the information they had. Satisfaction with information was slightly higher in 2008 (84%) and similar in 2006 (81%). Today, three in four or more across all political, regional, and demographic groups report they were at least somewhat satisfied with the information available; still, fewer than a third across these groups are very satisfied. “Overall, how satisfied were you with the information you had to make choices on the ballot propositions?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Very satisfied 28% 27 % 30 % 26 % Somewhat satisfied 50 51 49 50 Not too satisfied 15 15 14 16 Not at all satisfied 6 5 6 6 D on't know 1 2 1 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 9 PROPOSITION 19—MARIJUANA LEGALIZATI ON Proposition 19, which would have legalized marijuana in California and allow ed it to be regulated and taxed, failed by 6 points (47 % yes, 53% no). Partisan differences are clear , with majorities of Democrats (56%) and independents (55%) voting yes, and 73 percent of Republicans voting no. There are also differences across ideological groups, with seven in 10 liberals (69%) supporting the measure, and three in four conservati ves (74%) opposing it . Moderates were divided (48% yes, 52% no). Voters age s 18 to 34 are far more likely than older voters to have vote d yes. Majorities of Latinos (60%) and whites (53%) report voting no , as do a solid majority of women (58%). M en were divided (50% yes, 50% no). The top reason given for voting yes on the measure, i n an open-ended question , is that it would have allowed for the taxation of marijuana (29%). Yes-voters also say that marijuana use is a personal issue or not a big deal (12%), that it would have freed up the police/courts to do other things (11%), or that it would lead to less crime an d drug violence (10%). Among no-voters, the top reasons given for opposition are that drugs should be illegal (33%), and that legalization is not goo d for the state (12%). Fewer cite child safety (8%), the potential conflict with federal law (7%), or that the initiative was poorly written (7%). “Proposition 19 was called the ‘Legalizes Marijuana Under California but Not Federal Law. Permits Local Governments to Regulate and Tax Commercial Production, Distribution, and Sale of Marijuana. Initiative Statute. ’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure?” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 56% 27 % 55 % 40 % 47 % 62 % 42 % 42 % Voted no 44 73 45 60 53 38 58 58 Seven in 10 voters say the outcome of the vote on Proposition 19 was very (35%) or somewhat (35%) important. No -voters are far more likely than yes -voters to consider the outcome very important (51% to 18%). Republican s (44%) are much more likely than Democrats (32%) or independents (27%) to say very important. Latinos (45%) are much more likely than whites (33%) to hold this view and the percentage saying very important decr eases with education and income and is similar across age groups. “As you may know, Proposition 19 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 19 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 1 9 V oted yes Voted no Very important 35% 18 % 51 % Somewhat important 35 41 30 Not too important 21 32 12 Not at all important 8 9 5 D on't know 1 – 2 When asked more generally about whether they think marijuana should be legal or not , voters are divided (49% legal, 49% illegal). Similar to the vote on Proposition 19, Democrats (59%) and independents (57%) favor legalization, while most Republicans (69%) oppose it. Most Latinos (59%) think marijuana should not be legal, while whites ar e divided (50% legal, 47% illegal). Half of men favor legalization (52% legal, 45% illegal) , while half of women say marijuana should be illegal (45% legal, 52% illegal). Similar to the vote o n Proposition 19, voters age 18– 34 (65%) favor legalization, while older voters prefer keeping it illegal. Among no-voters on Proposition 19 , 11 percent favor legalization in general . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 10 PROPOSITION 23—AB 32 SUSPENSION Proposition 23—which would have suspended California’s air pollution control law (AB 32) until unemployment fell to at least 5.5 percent for a full year —failed by 24 points (38% yes, 62% no). A wide partisan divide is present , with seven in 10 Democrats (72%) and 64 percent of independents voting no, while over half of Republicans (54%) vot ed yes. Liberals (77%) and moderates (67%) report voting no, while 56 percent of conservatives were in support. Majorities of whites (62%), Latinos (60%), women (66%), and men (56%) were opposed, as were majorities across age, education, and income groups. The top reasons for voting yes? Four in 10 voters cite economic reasons (22%) or saving jobs (20%) ; 11 percent say global warming does not exist . Among n o-voters, 18 percent say air pollution would increase, 12 percent say big oil companies/Texas oil companies/ big polluters supported it, and 10 percent say the 5.5 percent unemployment requirement would essentially end AB 32. Fewer mention that it was important to counter global warming (7%) or support for AB 32 (7%). “Proposition 23 was called the ‘Suspends Implementation of Air Pollution Control Law (AB 32) Requiring Major Sources of Emissions to Report and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions That Cause Global Warming, Until Unemployment Drops to 5.5 Percent or Less for Full Year. Initiative Statute.’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure?” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 28% 54 % 36 % 40 % 38 % 41 % 36 % 40 % Voted no 72 46 64 60 62 59 64 60 Eight in 10 voters say the outcome of Proposition 23 was very (49%) or somewhat (31%) important. No -voters (58%) are much more likely than yes -voters (47%) to say very important and Democrats (53%) are somewhat more likely than independents (47%) and Republicans (44%) to hold this view. About half of Latinos (52%), whites (49%), men (49%) , and women (49%) say the outcome was very important and the percentage saying the outcome was very important increases somewhat with age . “As you may know, Proposition 23 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 23 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 23 Voted yes Voted no Very important 49% 47 % 58 % Somewhat important 31 36 30 Not too important 11 12 8 N ot at all important 5 2 3 D on't know 4 3 1 Proponents of Proposition 23 ar gued that AB 32 would cost the state large numbers of jobs in a time of economic insecurity, while opponents said AB 32 is spurring growth in green jobs. When asked what effect state action to reduce global warming would have on jobs, a plurality o f voters (41%) say it would result in more jobs, 26 percent say fewer jobs and 26 percent say jobs would not be affected. Half of those who voted no on Proposition 23 (52%) say more jobs would result; half of yes-voter s (49%) say fewer jobs would result. More than eight in 10 Democrats say state action would result in more jobs (58%) or have no effect (25%). W hile nearly half of Republicans (47%) say it would result in fewer jobs , the same share say no effect (26%) or more jobs (20%) . Independents do not think job loss would result (37% more jobs, 30% no effect , 27% fewer jobs). Half of Latinos (49%) say more jobs, compared to fewer whites (37%) . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 11 PROPOSITION 24—BUSINESS TAX LIABILI TY Proposition 24 , which would have repealed recent legislation allowing businesses to reduce their tax liability, failed by 16 points (42% to 58%). Majorities of v oters across parties report voting no (64% Democrats, 54% Republicans, 54% independents), as do at least half across demographic groups. Latinos (66%) were more likely to vote no than whites (57%), while six in 10 men (59%) and women (58%) voted no. Suppor t for Proposition 24 is lower among voters age s 18 to 34 and decline s as education level s rise . Proponents of Proposition 24 argued that it would help small business and one in three voters (34%) cite this reason for voting yes . O ne in 10 say that it would be good for the economy (11%) ; f ewer cite ending unfair tax loopholes (7%) or mak ing corporations pay their fair share (6%). Among no-voters, 22 percent say they are not sure why they voted no; 16 percent say it would have been unfair to businesses, while fewer say the measure would hurt small businesses (6%) or that it taxed em ployers for creating jobs (6%) . “Proposition 24 is called the ‘ Repeals Recent Legislation That Would Allow Businesses to Lower Their Tax Liability. Initiative Statute.’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure? ” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 36% 46 % 46 % 34 % 43 % 36 % 42 % 43 % Voted no 64 54 54 66 57 64 58 57 Six in 10 voters say the outcome of Proposition 24 is very (22%) or somewhat (38%) important. Yes -voters (34%) are somewhat more likely than no -voters (26%) to say the outcome is very important. About one in five Democrats (18%) and about o ne in four independents (24%) and Republicans (27%) hold this view. Relatively few Latinos (22%), whites (23%), men (22%), or women (23%) say the outcome is very important , and fewer than three in 10 across age, education, and income groups hold this view. “As you may know, Proposition 24 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 24 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 24 Voted yes Voted no Very important 22% 34 % 26 % Somewhat important 38 46 44 Not too important 22 14 21 Not at all important 11 3 8 D on't know 7 3 1 According to the Legislative Analyst ’s Office, Proposition 24 would have repealed legislation set to take effect in 2011, thereby raising state revenues through higher taxes paid by corporations. In a separate question , just over half of voters (53%) oppose raising taxes on corporations to address the state budget deficit . Six in 10 yes - (59%) and half of no-voters (51%) on Proposition 24 oppose raising corporate taxes . Six in 10 Democrats (61%) are in favor, while three in four Republicans (77%) and six in 10 independents (59%) are in opposition. Half of Latinos (52%) favor raising corporate taxes , while over half of whites (55%) oppose this idea. Half of voters age s 18 to 34 are in favor, but over half of older voters are opposed. A solid majority of voters in households earning at least $80,000 annually oppose raising corporate taxes; those with l ower incomes are divided . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 12 PROPOSITION 25—MAJORITY BUDGET VOTE Proposition 25, which lowers the legislative requirement to pass a state budget from a two -thirds threshold to a simple majority vote —while retaining a two- thirds vote for new taxes —passed by 10 points (55% yes, 45% no). Seven in 10 Democrats (71%) and 57 percent of independents voted yes, while two in three Republ icans (66%) voted no. There was also an ideological divide, with liberal s (76%) and moderates (56%) voting yes and six in 10 conservatives (63%) voting no. Nearly s even in 10 Latinos (68%) report voting yes , as do just over half of whites (53%); both women (58%) and men (52%) also report voting yes. At least half across age, education, and income groups report voting yes. By far, the top reason for voting yes on Proposition 25 is that it would be easier to pass the budget (50%). Fewer mention that it preser ved the two-thirds vote to raise taxes (7%) or that a small minority would not be able to hold up the budget (6%). By far t he top reason given for voting no is that the legislature should be required to get two -thirds of legislators to pass a budget (49%). Fewer say that one party should not control the budget (10%) or that it would make it easier to raise taxes (7%). “Proposition 25 was called the ‘ Changes Legislative Vote Requirement to Pass Budget and Budget- related Legislation From Two- Thirds to a Simple Majority. Retains Two -Thirds Vote Requirement for Taxes. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.’ Did you vote yes or no on this measure? ” Party Race/Ethnicity Age Dem Rep Ind Latino s White s 18 –34 35 –54 55 and older Voted yes 71% 34 % 57 % 68 % 53 % 57 % 54 % 54 % Voted no 29 66 43 32 47 43 46 46 Nearly eight in 10 voters say the outcome of the vote on Proposition 25 is very (43%) or somewhat (35%) important. Yes -voters (55%) are much more likely than n o-voters (44%) to say the outcome is very important. Fewer than half across parties say the outcome is very important (47% Republicans, 43% i ndependents, 41% Democrats). Whites (46%) are somewhat more likely than Latinos (38%) to hold this view and the perce ntage saying very important increases with age, education, and income. “As you may know, Proposition 25 pass ed. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 25 ?” General Election Voters Proposition 25 Voted yes Voted no Very important 43% 55 % 44 % Somewhat important 35 37 35 Not too important 11 6 12 Not at all important 6 1 5 D on't know 5 1 4 When asked whether the vote requirement for passing both a state budget and state taxes should be reduced from a two -thirds vote to a simple majority, voters are divided (46% good idea, 48% bad idea) . Seven in 10 yes -voters (72%) on Proposition 25 say it is a good idea, while eight in 10 no-voters (81%) say it’s a bad idea. A strong majority of Democrats (63 %) say good idea, while a strong majority of Republicans ( 69%) say reducing the two -thirds vote requirement is a bad idea. I ndependents are somewhat more likely to say bad idea (49%) than good idea (41%). Latinos (56%) are much more likely than whites (44%) to say it’s a good idea; men , women , and voters across age groups are divided . PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 13 GOVERNOR AND U.S. SENATE ELECTIONS Democrat Jerry Brown won the governor ship by 13 points (54% to 41%) over Republican Meg Whitman with the support of Democrats (86%) , independents (56%), Latin os (75%) , and women (59%). Eighty-five percent of Republicans voted for Whitman. Men (50% Brown, 46% Whitman) and whites (47% Brown, 49% Whitman) were more divided. V oters ages 18 to 34 (65%) supported Brown, compared to half of older vo ters. Support for B rown declines a t higher income levels. Those who voted at their local polling place preferred Brown over Whitman (57 % to 40%), while those who voted by mail ballot were more divided ( 50% Brown, 46% Whitman). “For governor, did you happen to vote for Meg Whitman, the Republican, or Jerry Brown, the Democrat?” General Election Voters Jerry Brown Meg Whitman Someone else General Election Results 54% 41% 5% Party Democrat s 86 12 2 Republican s 12 85 3 Independent s 56 38 6 Gender Men 50 46 4 Women 59 39 2 Race/Ethnicity Latinos 75 22 3 Whites 47 49 4 Household Income Under $40,000 66 29 5 $40,000 to under $80,000 53 44 3 $80,000 or more 50 48 2 Senator Barbara Boxer won re -election by a 10 -point margin (52% to 42 %) with support from Democrats (86%), independents (53%), Latinos (62%), and women (58%) . Carly Fiorina had the support of most Republicans (88%). Whites (48% Boxer, 49% Fiorina) and m en (49% Boxer, 47% Fiorina) were divided. S upport for Boxer decreas ed as incomes rose ; voters ages 18 to 34 (62%) favored Boxer. Boxer won both mail -in voters (52% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) and those who voted at the polls (54% Boxer, 44% Fiorina) . “For U.S. Senator, did you happen to vote for Carly Fiorina , the Republican, or Barbara Boxer , the Democrat ?” General Election Voters Barbara Boxer Carly Fiorina Someone else General Election Results 52% 43% 5% Party Democrat s 86 13 1 Republican s 1 0 88 2 Independent s 53 41 6 Gender Men 49 47 4 Women 58 40 2 Race/Ethnicity Latinos 62 35 3 Whites 48 49 3 Household Income Under $40,000 60 36 4 $40,000 to under $80,000 54 43 3 $80,000 or more 49 49 2 December 2010 Californians and Their Government 14 STATE AND NATIONAL POLITICAL CONTEXT KEY FINDINGS  Strong majorities of voters (64%) mention jobs and the economy as the most important issue facing the state. Strong majorities also say the state is headed in the wrong direction (68 %) and can expect bad economic times (61%).  One in three voters approve of the governor’s job performance, one in 10 approve of the legislature’s job performance, and eight in 10 disapprove of the way that the governor and legislature are working t ogether in making public policy . ( page 15)  Overwhelming majorities of California voters say they can trust state government only some or none of the time. When it comes to making policy , only one in three have confidence in their elected officials (33%); fewer than half have confi dence in their fellow voters (44 %). ( page 16)  A strong majority of voters are at least somewhat happy about having to vote on the nine state propositions. Six in 10 sa y that voting on the propositions did not make them feel any different about California politics . ( page s 17 , 18 )  Two in three voters are at least somewhat satisfied with the initiative process, but three in four say the process needs at least minor changes. ( page 19)  Most voters approve of President Obama, but only one in five appro ve of Congress, and seven in 10 disapprove of the way that the two are working together . A plurality think the switch to Republican control of the House of Representatives is a good thing (41%), 34 percent say it is a bad thing and 21 percent say it makes no difference. ( page 20 ) 505252 44 41 52 3733 0 20 40 60 80 100 2005200620082010 Percent voters California's voters State's elected officials Confidence In ...to Make Public Policy Percent saying “a great deal” or “a fair amount ” 14 53 23 13 76 36 66 79 0 20 40 60 80 100 2005200620082010 Percent voters Approve Disapprove Approval of theWay the Legislature and Governor are Working Together 6413 21 2 Jobs, economy State budget, taxes Other Don't know Mos tImportant Issue Facing California Today Percent voters (page s 22, 23 ) PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 15 OVERALL MOOD Heading into the midterm elections, California voters were faced with a persistent economic downturn, high unemployment, and a state fiscal crisis. These conditions are refle cted in voters’ naming of jobs and the economy (64%) the most important issue facing California; 13 percent mention the state budget. Fewer name education (4%) or other issues. In December 2008, voters also said the economy (59%) and state budget (13%) were the top issues, followed by gay rights and same -sex marriage (4%). Mention of jobs and the economy is up an astounding 50 points since November 2006 (20% immigration, 14% economy, and 13% education). Today, the economy is the top concern across parties, with Democrats (68%) most likely to say so , followed by Republicans (62%) and independents (59%). At least six in 10 across region s and demographic groups cite the economy as the most important issue. “Thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today?” Top three issues mentioned Jobs, economy State budget, deficit, taxes Education, schools General Election Voters 64% 13 % 4 % Party Democrats 68 10 6 Republicans 62 15 2 Independents 59 15 4 Region Central Valley 69 13 2 San Francisco Bay Area 60 13 6 Los Angeles 65 10 4 Other Southern California 63 14 5 With the economy as the top concern on voters’ minds, six in 10 think bad economic times are ahead in California; only 27 percent anticipate good times. Although the percent saying bad times is down 14 points from 2008 (17% good, 75% bad), the mood is starkly different from 2006, when more voters (51%) said good times were ahead than said bad times (36%). In November 2005, the outlook was less pessimistic than today (35% good times, 50% bad times). Today, strong majorities of Republicans (78%) and independents (66%) say bad times are ahead, compared to 46 percent of Democrats. Voters in the Central Valley (69%) and Other Southern California region (68%) are much more likely than San Francisco Bay Area (56%) and Los Angeles voters (53%) to say bad times. Whites (66%) are far m ore likely than Latinos (49%) to say bad times are ahead; the share saying so rises as education and income levels rise . “Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? ” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Good times 27% 39 % 14 % 23 % Bad times 61 46 78 66 Don't know 12 15 8 11 A strong majority of voters (68%) also say California is heading in the wrong direction; just 22 percent say right direction —nearly identical to 2008 (19% right, 68% wrong), but in stark contrast t o 2006 (53% right, 39% wrong). Nearly all Republicans (87%) and seven in 10 independents (71%) say wrong direction , compared to half of Democrats (51%) . Solid majorities across regions and demographic groups say the state is headed in the wrong direction. PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 16 APPROVAL RATINGS OF STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS As Arnold Schwarzenegger nears the end of his tenure as governor, 61 percent of general election voters disapprove of the way he is handling his job; only 32 percent approve. Approval among voters is lower than in November 2008 (42% approve, 49% disapprove), but r esults today sharply differ from November 2006, when voters were nearly twice as likely to approve (60%) than disapprove (32%). Still, views today are fairly on par with those in November 2005 (39% approve, 56% disapprove), when voters defeated all eight propositions on the special -election ballot , four of which were sponsored by G overnor Schwarzenegger . Majorities across parties disapprove of his job performance , with Democrats (68%) most likely to say so . Latinos (74%) are far more likely than whites (57%) to disapprove; approval of the governor rises as age and income levels rise . Only 12 percent of voters approve of the way the California Legislature is handling its job— 81 percent disapprove. Nevertheless , voters r e-elected every incumbent state legislator on November 2. A pproval today is lower —and disapproval is much higher —than in 2008 (21% approve, 69% disapprove) and 2005 (20% approve, 66% disapprove) . In 2006, voters were far more likely than today to approve of the legislature (36% approve, 49% disapprove). Today, fewer than one in four across groups approve . “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that…” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind … Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling his job as g overnor of California? Approve 32 % 26 % 39 % 35 % Disapprove 61 68 55 55 Don't know 7 6 6 10 … the California Legislature is handling its job? Approve 12 18 6 9 D isapprove 81 71 91 85 Don't know 7 11 3 6 In a year with a record -late budget, just 13 percent approve of the way the legislature and governor are working together in making public policy; 79 percent disapprove. Approval is down 10 points, and disapproval is up 13 points from November 2008. In contrast, a majority of vot ers (53%) approved of the way the two were working together in November 2006, and 36 percent disapproved. Ratings today are most similar to November 2005 (14% approve, 76% disapprove). One in five or fewer across political, regional, and demographic groups approve of the way the governor and legislature are working together. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature and the governor are working together in making public policy?” Approve Disapprove Don't know General Election Voters 13% 79 % 8 % Party Democrat s 17 75 8 Republicans 10 84 6 Independent s 12 79 9 Region Central Valley 12 83 5 San Francisco Bay Area 16 75 9 Los Angeles 16 73 11 Other Southern California 11 84 5 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 17 TRUST IN STATE GOVERNMENT An overwhelming majority of California voters (84%) say they can trust the state government in Sacramento to do what is right only some of the time (68%) or none of the time (16%). Only 14 percent say they can trust the state government just abo ut always (2%) or most of the time (12%). Trust is down 14 points from November 2006, when 28 percent said they could trust the state government most of the time or just about always. The low level of trust expressed today is similar to that found in our 2005 post -election survey (17%). Today, a mere 8 percent of Republicans and 11 percent of independents say they can trust the state government, compared to 21 percent of Democrats. Fewer than one in five across regions and nearly all demographic groups trust the state government most of the time or always. “How much of the time do you think you can trust the state government in Sacramento to do what is right ?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Just about always 2% 3 % 2 % 1 % M ost of the time 12 18 6 10 Only some of the time 68 70 69 66 None of the time (volunteered) 16 7 23 21 Don't know 2 2 -- 2 When it comes to perceptions of waste, a strong majority of voters (65%) think state government wastes a lot of taxpayer money; 28 percent say some is wasted, and 5 percent think not very much is wasted. About six in 10 voters in November 2006 (57%) and November 2005 (61%) said a lot was wasted. Today, views across parties differ: although eight in 10 Republicans and seven in 10 independents think a lot of taxpayer money gets wasted, far fewer Democrats (51%) hold this view. Across regions, voters in the Other Southern California region (71%) and the Central Valley (70%) are the most likely to say a lot of taxpayer money is wasted , followed by those in Los Angeles (64%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (55%). Two in three L atinos (66%), whites (65%), women (65%), and men (65%) think a lot is wasted. The perception that a lot of taxpayer money is wasted is lower among college graduates and among those under age 35 . Nearly all voters across demographic groups think at leas t some taxpayer money is wasted. “Do you think the people in state government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind A lot 65% 51 % 82 % 68 % Some of it 28 38 16 27 Don’t waste very much of it 5 8 1 3 D on't know 2 3 1 2 Asked whether the state government is run by a few big interests or for the benefit of all the people, three in four (76%) respond that it is run by a few big interests; 14 percent think it is run for the benefit of all. In 2006, 68 percent said a few big interests. Voters today express nearly identical views as special -election voters did in 2005 (78% big interests ). At least s even in 10 across all groups say a few big interests. PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 18 CONFIDENCE IN STATE POLICYMAKING Two in three California voters say they have either not too much (43%) or no trust and confidence (23%) in the state’s elected officials when it comes to making public policy. One in three say they have a great deal (3%) or fair amount (30%) of trust and c onfidence. These results are similar to those of November 2008, when 63 percent said they had not too much or no confidence. In November 2006, trends were reversed: a majority (52%) had either a fair amount or great deal of confidence. Voters express somewhat lower trust today (33%) than did special -election voters in November 2005 (41%). Although majorities across parties today do not trust the state’s elected officials in making public policy, Republicans (81%) and independents (73%) are far more likel y than Democrats (53%) to say they have either not too much or no confidence at all. Trust also varies across regions, with Other Southern California voters (72%) being the most likely to lack trust, followed by voters in the Central Valley (68%), Los Ange les (63%), an d the San Francisco Bay Area (59%). The percentage saying they have not too much or no trust in elected officials rises with age and annual household income levels . “H ow much trust and confid ence do you have in the state's elected officials when it comes to making public policy ?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind A great deal 3% 3 % 1 % 5 % A fair amount 30 43 17 22 Not too much 43 40 47 46 None at all 23 13 34 27 Don't know 1 1 1 -- California voters are much more likely to hold at least a fair amount of trust and confidence in their fellow voters (44%: 9% great deal, 35% fair amount) than in state elected officials when it comes to making public policy decisions. Still, a majority (55%) lack s trust an d confidence in California’s voters when it comes to ballot -box policymaking (40% n ot too much, 15% none at all). This post -election survey marks the first time in which fewer than half of voters express at least a fair amount of confidence (52% November 2008, 52% November 2006, 50% November 2005, 55% November 2004). Trust in voters diverges across parties: although a majority of Democrats (54%) trust voters to make public policy at the ballot box, majorities of ind ependents (57%) and Republicans (65%) do not. Fifty -five percent of Latinos have at least a fair amount of trust and confidence, compared to 59 percent of whites who do not. Fewer than half across regions, gender, age, education, and income groups have a g reat deal or fair amount of trust and confidence in ballot -box policymaking. “How much trust and confidence do you have in California's voters when it comes to making public policy at the ballot box? ” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind A great deal 9% 13 % 5 % 8 % A fair amount 35 41 28 33 Not too much 40 37 46 37 None at all 15 9 19 20 Don't know 1 -- 2 2 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 19 VOTING ON STATE PROPOSITIONS Six in 10 voters say they were very (18%) or somewhat (42%) happy about having to vote on the nine state propositions on the November 2 ballot. Far fewer were unhappy (20% somewhat, 8% very unhappy). Happiness about voting on propositions was similar in the November 2008 election, which included 12 state propositions (19% very, 43% somewhat happy), and in the November 2006 election, which included 13 propositions (18% very, 42% somewhat happy). Voters were much l ess happy in the November 2005 special electi on, which included eight propositions but no candidate s (22% very, 24% somewhat happy; 22% somewhat unhappy , 29% very unhappy); voters rejected all eight propositions. Solid majorities across parties say they were happy about having to vote on the nine propositions on Nov . 2. Majorities across regions and demographic groups are positive, but voters ages 18– 34 and those with household incomes under $80,000 are much more likely than older and more affluent voters to say they were happy about this . Vote -by -mail voters and those who voted at their local polling place express similar views: about six in 10 say they were happy about having to vote on the nine propositions. “Overall, how did y ou feel about having to vote on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd general election ballot ?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Very happy 18% 15 % 19 % 22 % Somewhat happy 42 45 40 42 Somewhat unhappy 20 22 20 16 Very unhappy 8 7 8 7 N either (volunteered) 9 9 9 10 Don't know 3 2 4 3 Most voters (61%) say that voting on the nine state propositions made them feel no different about California politics; 21 percent say it made them feel better, while only 15 percent say it made them feel worse. In 2008, voters were somewhat more likely to say it made them feel worse about politics (23% better, 22% worse, 52% no different). In the 2006 election, which featured a number of infrastructure bonds, more voters fe lt better about California politics (30% better, 14% worse, 54% no different). By contrast, in 2005, voters were far more likely to feel worse (21% better, 38% worse, 38% no different). Across parties, regions, and demographic groups today, majorities say voting on the propositions made them feel no different about California politics. Still, voters 35 and older, those with at least some college education, and those with household incomes of $80,000 or more are somewhat more likely than others to say it ma de them feel worse. Latinos (33%) are much more likely than whites (19%) to say they felt better about politics; Los Angeles voters (28%) are most likely across regions to say they felt better . “Overall, would you say voting on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd election ballot has made you feel better, worse, or no different about California politics?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Better 21% 24 % 20 % 19 % W orse 15 12 18 16 No different 61 63 58 62 Don't know 3 1 4 3 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 20 SATISFACTION WITH THE CITIZENS ’ INITIAT IVE PROCESS Two in three voters are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working in California today (13% very satisfied , 53% somewhat satisfied). Three in 10 (31%) are not satisfied with the process. I n recent general elections, voters also expressed satisfaction (2008: 18% very, 49% somewhat satisfied; 2006: 19% very, 50% somewhat satisfied), although voters today are slightly less likely to say they are very satisfied. In the 2005 initiative- only special election, voters were much less satisfied (10% very, 43% somewhat satisfied , 44% not satisfied) with the way the initiative process was working. More than six in 10 voters across parties (69% Republicans, 65% Democrats, 65% independents), regions (70% Other Southern California region, 65% Los Angeles, 65% San Francisco, 63% Central Valley), and demographic groups are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working . Satisfaction declines somewhat with age. Men are somewhat more likely than women to be very satisfied (17% to 10%), while women are more likely to be somewhat satisfied with the initiative process (58% to 48%). “Generally speaking, would you say you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, or not satisfied with the way the initiative process is working in California today?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Very satisfied 13% 11 % 15 % 15 % Somewhat satisfied 53 54 54 50 Not satisfied 31 32 29 33 Don't know 3 3 2 2 Although most voters are satisfied with the way the initiative process is working, many believe it needs major (42%) or minor changes (34%) ; one in five say it is basically fine the way it is. At least two in three voters in 2005 (72%), 2006 (67%), and 2008 (70%) said change was needed, but they were somewhat less likely to call for major changes in 2008 (35%) and 2006 (35%); 38 percent held this view in 2005. More than seven in 10 across parties today believe the process is in need of change, but Democrats (45%) and independents (43%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (38%) to say major change is needed. More than seven in 10 across regions and demographic groups also believe major or minor changes are needed in the initiative process. Across regions, Central Valley voters (49%) are the most likely to say major change is needed, followed by Los Angeles (42%), San Francisco Bay Area (40%), and Other South ern California (40%) voters. Latinos are much more likely than whites (54% to 40%) to say major change is needed, while voters 55 and older are somewhat more likely than yo unger voters to hold this view. V oters with household incomes under $40,000 are more likely than more affluent voters to say major changes are needed and t he percentage saying this drops as education levels rise. Among those who are not satisfied with the initiative process, 77 percent say major changes are needed; among those who are sat isfied with the process, just 26 percent say major changes are needed. “Do you think the citizens’ initiative process in California is in need of major changes, minor changes, or that it is basically fine the way it is?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Major changes 42% 45 % 38 % 43 % Minor changes 34 35 36 30 Fine the way it is 19 15 21 21 Don't know 5 5 5 6 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 21 OVERALL PERCEPTIONS OF NOVEMBER 2 BALLOT INITIATIVES Two in three voters believe that the wording of initiatives on the state ballot was too complicated and confusing (32% strongly agree, 35% somewhat agree). At least six in 10 voters held this view in 2008 (31% strongly, 32% somewhat agree) and 2006 (33% st rongly, 30% somewhat agree). Fewer voters agreed in 2005 (28% strongly, 27% somewhat agree). About two in three across parties today say that the ballot wording was too complicated and confusing , with solid majorities across regions and demographic groups concurring . Still, some differences emerge: Other Southern California voters (72%) are the most likely to hold this view, followed by San Francisco Bay Area (68%), Los Angeles (66%), and Central Valley (62%) voters. Voters 35 and older (71%) are much more likely than voters younger than 35 (58%) to say the initiative wording wa s too complicated and confusing. “For the following items, please say if you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree. The wording of initiatives on the state ballot was too complicated and confusing.” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Strongly agree 32% 34 % 32 % 31 % Somewhat agree 35 35 36 36 Somewhat disagree 21 21 20 21 Strongly disagree 10 9 10 12 Don’t know 2 1 2 -- Voters are more divided about the number of initiatives —nine —on the state ballot: 47 percent agree strongly or somewhat that there were too many, while 51 percent strongly or somewhat disagree . Voters were also divided in 2008 (52% agree, 46% disagree) whe n they voted on 12 initiatives. After voting on 13 initiatives in 2006, voters were more likely to agree there were too many (60% agree, 38% disagree). Although unhappy about having to vote on eight initiatives in 2005, a majority did not see the number as a problem (41% agreed, 57% disagreed that there were too many). A majority of Democrats (53%) believe there were too many initiatives on the state ballot, while majorities of independents (55%) and Republicans (54%) disagree. Voters in the Other Southern California region are more likely to disagree (53%) than agree (44%) that there were too many initiatives, with voters elsewhere more divided. Latinos are far more likely than whites (60% to 43%), and women are somewhat more likely than men (51% to 44%), t o say the ballot had too many initiatives . This perception increases with age ; voters across income groups are divided. Those with at least some college education are less likely than voters with less education to agree there were too many initiatives. “There were too many initiatives on the state ballot.” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Strongly agree 21% 26 % 16 % 19 % Somewhat agree 26 27 27 25 Somewhat disagree 35 31 37 40 Strongly disagree 16 15 17 15 Don’t know 2 1 3 1 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 22 APPROVAL RATINGS OF FEDERAL ELECTED OFFICIALS A slim majority of California voters (53%) approve of the way Barack Obama is handling his job as president, while 44 percent disapprove. Voters today are deeply divided along party lines: about eight in 10 Dem ocrats (82%) approve of his job performance, while a similar proportion of Republicans (83%) disapprove. Independents are more likely to approve (54%) than disapprove (42%). More than six in 10 voters in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%) and Los Angeles (62 %) approve of the president, compared to far fewer in the Other Southern California region (43%) and Central Valley (41%). Latinos are far more likely than whites (69% to 46%) to approve. Two in three voters age s 18 to 34 approve, compared to about half of older voters. Approval declines sharply as annual household income rises. Voters are far less likely to approve of the way Congress is doing its job: 21 percent approve, while 73 percent disapprove. Despite this opinion, voters re-elected all incumbent California members of Congress. Although majorities of voters across parties disapprove, Republicans (87%) are the most likely to disapprove, followed by independents (78%) and Democrats (60%). More than two in three across regions and majorities across dem ographic groups disapprove of Congress. Latinos are far more approving than whites (34% to 18%) ; approval declines at higher age levels. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way …” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind … that Barack Obama is handling his job as president of the United States? Approve 53 % 82 % 15 % 54 % Disapprove 44 14 83 42 Don't know 3 4 2 4 … the U.S. Congress is handling its job? Approve 21 32 10 17 Disapprove 73 60 87 78 Don't know 6 8 3 5 Twenty -five percent approve and 71 percent disapprove of the way Congress and the president are working together in making public policy. Democrats (37%) are much more likely to approve than independents (24%) or Republicans (9%). San Francisco Bay Area (30%) and Los Angeles (27%) voters are more approving than Central Valley (22%) and Other Southern California (20%) voters. Latinos are twice as likely as whites to approve (41% to 19%). Approval declines as age and income rise. Voters with a high school education or l ess are more approving than those with higher education levels. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the U.S. Congress and the president are working together in making public policy?” Approve Disapprove Don't know General Election Voters 25% 71 % 4 % Party Democrats 37 58 5 Republicans 9 87 4 Independents 24 72 4 Region Central Valley 22 72 6 San Francisco Bay Area 30 64 6 Los Angeles 27 71 2 Other Southern California 20 76 4 PPIC Statewide S urvey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 23 CONTROL OF CONGRESS California voters are somewhat more likely to say their preference for the outcome of this year’s congressional elections was a Congress that would be controlled by Democrats (4 5%) rather than one controlled by Republicans (39%); 13 percent volunteer they preferred neither outcome. Findings fall predictably along party lines , with about eight in 10 Democrats saying they preferred Democrats control Congress and eight in 10 Republicans saying they preferred Republicans. Independents express mixed views (38% D emocrats, 33% Republicans). Sixty percent of San Francisco Bay Area voters and 53 percent of Los Angeles voters say they preferred a Congress controlled by Democrats , with half of voters in the Other Southern California region (51%) and Central Valley (50% ) preferring Republicans. A strong majority of Latinos (63%) preferred Democrats, while whites somewhat preferred Republicans (46% to 39% for Democrats). Men are divided ; women say they preferred Democrats. Voters under 35 preferred Democrats, while voters 35 and older were divided. P reference for Democratic control declines sharply as annual income rises. “What was your preference for the outcome of this year's congressional elections: a Congress controlled by Republicans or a Congress controlled by Demo crats?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Controlled by Republicans 39% 9 % 82 % 33 % Controlled by Democrats 45 79 6 38 Neither (volunteered) 13 8 11 25 Don't know 3 4 1 4 Forty- one percent of voters view the upcoming switch in control of the House of Representatives from Democrats to Republicans as a good thing, 34 percent say it is a bad thing, while one in five (21%) say it makes no difference. Republicans are far more likely to say the switch is a good thing (79%) t han are Democrats to say it’s a bad thing (59%). Independents again give more mixed opinions (34% good thing, 28% bad thing, 34% no difference). Among those who preferred a Congress controlled by Republicans, 85 percent say the switch is a good thing and 11 percent say it makes no difference. Amo ng those who preferred Democratic control, 67 percent call the switch a bad thing and 21 percent say it makes no difference. About half of voters in the Other Southern California region (50%) and Central Valley (49%) say it’s good, while 46 percent in the San Francisco Bay Area say it’s a bad thing ; Los Angeles voters are divided (34% good, 39% bad) . A plurality of Latinos (43%) say the switch to Republican control is bad; a plurality of whites (47%) say it is good. Pluralities across education groups call the switch good; a plurality of voters 35 and older say the change in control is good and a plurality of younger voters say it’s bad. “As you may know, as a result of the recent election, control of the U.S. House of Representatives will switch from the Democrats to the Republicans. Do you think that this switch is a good thing, a bad thing, or doesn’t it make any difference?” General Election Voters Party Dem Rep Ind Good thing 41% 16 % 79 % 34 % Bad thing 34 59 5 28 Does n’t make any difference 21 21 15 34 Don't know 4 4 1 4 December 2010 Californians and Their Government 24 REGIONAL MAP December 2010 Californians and Their Government 25 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from Dean Bonner, project manager for this survey, and survey research associates Sonja Petek and Nicole Willcoxon. The Californians and Their Government series is supported with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. We benefit from discussions with PPIC staff, foundation staff, and other policy experts; however, the methods, questions, and content of this report were solely determined by Mark Baldassare and the survey staff. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 2,003 California voters in the November 2 election, including 1,80 1 interviewed on landline telephones and 202 interviewed on cell phones. Interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days between November 3 and 14, 2010. Interviews took an average of 19 minutes to complete. Landline interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reach ing eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender . Eligible respondents were those who reported that they ha d voted in the November election, either at their local polling place, by mail ballot, or at an early voting site. Cell phone interviews were included in this survey to account for the growing number of Californians who use them. These interviews were conducted using a computer -generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching an eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimburse ment to help defray the potential cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Landline and cell phone interviewing was c onducted in English and Spanish according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc. translated the survey into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI Inc. conducted the telephone interviewing. With assistance from Abt SRBI , we used recent U.S. Census Bureau and state figures to compare the demo graphic characteristics of the survey sample with characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the census and state figures. Abt SRBI use d data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey and data from the 2005 –2007 American Community Survey for California, both to estimate landline and cell phone service in California and to compare it against landline and cell phone service reported in the survey. In screening for voters in this survey , we gathered information about non -voters and voters in the November 2 election and used these data along with other information to prepare the weights. The survey data in this report were statistically weighted to account for any differences in demographics, telephone service, and actual election results. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±2.7 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total sample of 2,003 voters. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2.7 percentage points of what they would be if all voters in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger and s ampling error is only one type of error to PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 26 which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for four geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Val ley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, and “Other Southern California” includes Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties. Voters from other geographic areas are incl uded in the overall results, but sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for Latinos because they account for about a third of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. Sample sizes for African Americans and Asian Americans are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of registered Democrats, Republicans, and independents (those registered as “decline to state”). We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier post-election surveys. We also present election results from the California Secretary of State as of November 29, 2010, 3:34 p.m. December 2010 Californians and Their Government 27 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT November 3 –14, 2010 2,003 California Voters in the November 2 Election : English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ±2.7% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMP LE 1. First, thinking about the state as a w hole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today? 64% jobs, economy [code, don’t read] 13 state budget, deficit, taxes 4 education, schools 3 immigration, illegal immigration 2 government in general, elected officials, political parties 12 other 2 don’t know 2. Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 22% right direction 68 wrong direction 10 don’t know 3. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 27% good times 61 bad times 12 don’t know 4. For governor, did you happen to vote for [rotate] (1) Meg Whitman, the Republican; (2) Jerry Brown, t he Democrat; or someone else? [actual vote] 54% Jerry Brown, the Democrat 41 Meg Whitman, the Republican 5 someone else (specify) 5. Next, for U.S. Senator, did you happen to vote for [rotate] (1) Carly Fiorina, the Republican; (2) Barbara Boxer, the Democrat; or someone else? [actual vote] 52% Barbara Boxer, the Democrat 42 Carly Fiorina, the Republican 5 someone else (specify) 6. Thinking about the election that was just held, were you more enthusiastic about voting than usual, or less enthusiastic? 46% more enthusiastic 29 less enthusiastic 23 same (volunteer ed) 2 don’t know Now, thinking about the November 2nd election, the ballot included nine state propositions, all of which are citizens’ initiatives. 7. Overall, how did you fe el about having to vote on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd general election ballot — would you say you were very happy, somewhat happy, somewhat unhappy, or very unhappy? 18% very happy 42 somewhat happy 20 somewhat unhappy 8 very unhappy 9 neither (volunteered) 3 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 28 8. Overal l, would you say voting on the nine state propositions on the November 2nd election ballot has made you feel better, worse, or no different about California politics? 21% better 15 worse 61 no different 3 don’t know 9. And regardless of how you voted, before deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions, how closely were you following news about these measures ? 31% very closely 45 fairly closely 16 not too closely 7 not at all closely 1 don’t know 10. People learned about the ballot propositions a number of different ways. What way did you find the most helpful in deciding how to vote on the nine state propositions? [code, don’t read] 34% Official Voter Information G uide and sample ballot 19 Internet 9 Internet in general 4 Internet news sites 3 official proposition sites 3 voter resource sites 14 advertisements —radio, television , newspaper , mail 12 news and media coverage —radio , television, newspaper 6 newspaper endorsements —columns, editorials 5 opinio ns of friends , family , coworkers 2 endorsements of interest groups, politicians, celebrities 4 something/ someone else 4 don’t know 11. Did you happen to get any news or information about the nine state propositions on the November election ballot on the Internet or through email? 45% yes 54 no 1 don’t know 12. Overall, how satisfied were you with the information you had to make choices on the ballot propositions? 28% very satisfied 50 somewhat satisfied 15 not too satisfied 6 not at all satisfied 1 it depends (volunteered) /don’t know 13. Which one of the nine state propositions on the November 2nd ballo t were you most interested in? [code, don’t read] 38% Proposition 19 —Legalizes Marijuana under California but not Federal Law 4 Proposition 20 —Redistricting of Congressional Districts 5 Proposition 21 —Establishes $18 Annual Vehicle License Surcharge to Help Fund St ate Parks and Wildlife Programs 1 Proposition 22 —Prohibits the State from Borrowing or Taking Funds Used for Transportation, Redevelopment, or Local Government Pr ojects and S ervices 16 Proposition 23 —Suspends Implementat ion of Air Pollution Control Law (AB 32) 1 Proposition 24 —Repeals Recent Legislatio n that Would Allow Busi - ness es to Lower Their Tax Liability 10 Proposition 25 —Changes Legislative Vote Requirement to Pass Budget and Budget Related Legislation from Two -Thirds to a Simple Majority Vote 2 Proposition 26 —Requires that Certain State and L ocal Fees Be Approved by Two -Thirds Vote 1 Proposition 27 —Eliminates State Commission on Redistricting 5 none of them (volunteered) 3 all equally (volunteered) 2 other (specify) 12 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 29 For each of the following, please tell me if you voted yes or no on the measure. First, 14. Proposition 19 was called the “Legalizes Marijuana Under California but Not Federal Law. Permits Local Governments to Regulate and Tax Commercial Production, Distribution, and Sale of Marijuana. Initiative Statute.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 47% voted yes 53 voted no [q14a asked of those who say they voted yes] 14a.And why did you vote yes? [code, don’t read] 29% allows for the taxation of marijuana; tax revenue will help with budget defic it 12 personal freedom; same as drinking; not a big deal 11 frees up police/courts to do other things; police/courts should not waste their time on marijuana 10 less crime; less drug violence 9 it’s the right thing to do; it is important 7 allows for regulation of marijuana 5 help s with the economy 4 decrimin alization/should not be illegal 3 black market/drug cartels will be limited or weakened 9 some other reason 1 don’t know [skip to q15 ] [q 14b asked of those who say they voted no ] 14b. And why did you vote no? [code , don’t read] 33% drugs should be illegal 12 not good for state, not ready, causes more problems 8 child safety 7 conflicts with federal law/would lose federal funding 7 initiative was poorly written 5 drivers would be able to drive under the influence/make driving more dangerous 5 it is the right thing to do/it is important 3 people going to work or school under the influence 17 some other reason 3 don’t know 15. As you may know , Proposition 19 did not pass . How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 19 —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 35% very important 35 somewhat important 21 not too important 8 not at all important 1 don’t know 16. Proposition 23 was called the “Suspends Implementation of Air Pollution Control Law ( AB 32 ) Requiring Major Sources of Emissions to Report and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions That Cause Global Warming, Until Unemployment Drops to 5.5 Percent or Less for Full Year. Initiative Statute.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 38% voted yes 62 voted no PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 30 [q 16a asked of those who say they voted yes] 16a.And why did you vote yes? [code, don’t read] 22% Prop osition 23 will save taxpayers and consumers money/helps the economy; AB 32 will cost taxpayers and consumers money/hurts the economy 20 Proposition 23 will save jobs; AB 32 will cause jobs to be lost/hurts businesses 11 global warming/greenhouse effect do es n ot exist 4 global warming/greenhouse gases don’t need to be regulated 3 essential services will be protected 2 California alone can’t reduce global warming 2 energy costs would be higher if proposition doesn’t pass 2 friends/family supported it 25 some other reason 9 don’t know [skip to q17 ] [q 16b asked of those who say they voted no ] 16 b.And why did you vote no? [code , don’t read] 18% air pollution would increase/increased health risks 12 big oil companies supported it/ Texas oil companies/ big polluters supported it 10 5.5 percent unemployment unrealistic; essentially ends AB 32 7 important to counter global warming 7 support AB 32, AB 32 should not be delayed or changed 6 I’m an environmentalist, need to protect environment 6 not good for the economy 4 jobs will be lost/loss of green tech jobs 22 some other reason 8 don’t know 17. As you may kno w, Proposition 23 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 23 —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 49% very important 31 somewhat important 11 not too important 5 not at all important 4 don’t know 18. Proposition 24 is called the “Repeals Recent Legislation That Would Allow Businesses to Lower Their Tax Liability. Initiative Statute.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 42% voted yes 58 voted no [q18a asked of those who say they voted yes] 18a.And why did you vote yes? [code, don’t read] 34% helps small businesses/pro small business 11 good for the economy 7 ends unfair tax loopholes 6 makes corporations pay their fair share 3 bad for the economy 3 prevents deeper budget cuts/puts education and public safety ahead of corporations; raises revenue for the state 27 some other reason 9 don’t know [skip to q19 ] PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 31 [q 18b asked of those who say they voted no ] 18 b.And why did you vote no? [code , don’t read] 16% unfair to businesses; adds to California’s bad business climate 6 hurts small businesses 6 taxes employers for creating jobs/ penalizes employers for creating jobs 5 against taxes; vote no on all taxes 5 bad for the economy 3 job loss/hurts job growth; sends jobs out of state 2 does not actually close loopholes 2 does not guarantee money would go to education or public safety 2 good for the economy 2 opposed by group/public figure I trust 29 some other reason 22 don’t know 19. As you may know , Proposition 24 did not pass. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 24 —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 22% very important 38 somewhat important 22 not too important 11 not at all important 7 don’t know 20. Proposition 25 was called the “ Changes Legislative Vote Requirement to Pass Budget and Budget -related Legislation from Tw o-Thirds to a Simple Majority. Retains Two -Thirds Vote Requirement for Taxes. Initiative Constitution al Amendment.” Did you vote yes or no on this measure? [actual vote] 55% voted yes 45 voted no [q20a asked of those who say they voted yes ] 20a. And why did you vote yes ? [code , don’t read] 50% easier to pass budget; breaks legislative gridlock 7 preserves two -thirds vote to raise taxes 6 small minority will not be able to hold up budget/few legislators will not be able to hold budget hostage 5 budget process will be reformed 5 holds legislators accountable/ no budget, no pay 3 late budgets waste taxpayer money 3 makes California like 47 other states/other states don’t have two- thirds requirement 3 majority vote should be enough 11 some other reason 7 don’t know [skip to q21 ] [q 20b asked of those who say they voted no ] 20 b.And why did you vote no? [code, don’t read] 49% should have to get two -thirds vote to pass budget; allows politicians to circumvent constitution’s two -thirds vote requirement 10 one party should not control budget; gives voice to minority party 7 makes it easier to raise taxes 2 eliminates the right of the voter to use the re ferendum to reject hidden taxes 2 makes it easier for politicians to increase lavish expense accounts 22 some other reason 8 don’t know 21. As you m ay know, Proposition 25 passed. How important to you is the outcome of the vote on Proposition 25— is it very important, somewhat important, not too important , or not at all important? 43% very important 35 somewhat important 11 not too important 6 not at all important 5 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 32 22. Changing topics, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling his job as governor of California? 32% approve 61 disapprove 7 don’t know 23. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California L egislature is handling its job? 12% approve 81 disapprove 7 don’t know 24. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California L egislature and the governor are working tog ether in making public policy? 13% approve 79 disapprove 8 don’t know 25. How much of the time do you think you can trust the state government in Sacramento to do what is right ? 2% just about always 12 most of the time 68 only some of the time 16 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know 26. Would you say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 76% a few big interests 14 benefit of all of the people 10 don’t know 27. Do you think the people in state government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 65% a lot 28 some 5 don’t waste very much 2 don’t know 28. In general, how much trust and confidence do you have in the state’s elected officials when it comes to making public policy? 3% a great deal 30 a fair amount 43 not too much 23 none at all 1 don’t know 29. How much trust and confidence do you have in California’s voters when it comes to making public policy at the ballot box ? 9% a great deal 35 a fair amount 40 not too much 15 none at all 1 don’t know Changing topics, California uses the direct initiative process, which enables voters to bypass the legislature and have issues put on the ballot —as state propositions —for voter approv al and rejection. 30. Generally speaking, would you say you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, or not satisfied with the way the initiative process is working in California today? 13% very satisfied 53 somewhat satisfied 31 not satisfied 3 don’ t know 31. Do you think the citizens’ initiative process in California is in need of major changes, minor changes or that it is basically fine the way it is? 42% major changes 34 minor changes 19 fine the way it is 5 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 33 In thinking about the initiatives on the November 2nd election ballot, please say if you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree with the following statements. [rotate questions 32 and 33] 32. The wording of initiatives on the state ballot wa s too complicated and confusing. 32% strongly agree 35 somewhat agree 21 somewhat disagree 10 strongly disagree 2 don’t know 33. There were too many initiatives on the state ballot. 21% strongly agree 26 somewhat agree 35 somewhat disagree 16 strong ly disagree 2 don’t know On another topic, 34. Do you think it is a good idea or bad idea to lower the vote requirement to pass a state budget and state taxes from a two -thirds vote to a simple majority or 50 percent plus one vote? 46% good idea 48 bad idea 6 don’t know 35. Do you favor or oppose raising the state taxes paid by California corporations to address the state budget deficit? 40% favor 53 oppose 7 don’t know 36. Next, do you think that California doing things to reduce global warming in the future would cause there to be more jobs for people around the state, would cause there to be fewer jobs, or wouldn’t affect the number of jobs for people around the state? 41% more jobs 26 fewer jobs 26 wou ldn’t affect the number of jobs 7 don’t know 37. In general, do you think the use of marijuana should be made legal, or not? 49% yes, legal 49 no, illegal 2 don’t know 38. Changing topics, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Barack O bama is handling his job as president of the United States? 53% approve 44 disapprove 3 don’t know 39. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the U.S. Congress is handling its job? 21% approve 73 disapprove 6 don’t know 40. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the U.S. Congress and the president are working tog ether in making public policy? 25% approve 71 disapprove 4 don’t know 41. Next, what was your preference for the outcome of this year's congressional elections: [ro tate] a Congress controlled by Republicans [ or ] a Congress controlled by Democrats? 39% controlled by Republicans 45 controlled by Democrats 13 neither (volunteered) 3 don’t know 42. As you may know, as a result of the recent election, control of the U.S. House of Representatives will switch from the Democrats to the Republicans. Do you think that this switch is a good thing, a bad thing, or doesn’t it make any difference? 41% good thing 34 bad thing 21 does not make a difference 4 don’t know PPIC Statewide Survey December 2010 Californians and Their Government 34 43. Are you registered to vote as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 45% Democrat [skip to q43 b] 34 Republican [skip to q43c] 1 another party ( specify) [skip to q44 ] 20 independent [ask q43 a] 43 a.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 30% Republican party 37 Democratic party 31 neither (volunteered) 2 don’t know [skip to question 44] 43b.Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 58% strong 39 not ve ry strong 3 don’t know [skip to question 44] 43c. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 56% strong 39 not very strong 5 don’t know 44. On another topic, would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 10% very liberal 21 somewhat liberal 29 middle -of -the -road 23 somewhat conservative 16 very conservative 1 don’t know 4 5 . Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 33% great deal 45 fair amount 19 only a little 2 none 1 don’t know [d1-d1 7: demographic questions] PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Walter B. Hewlett, Chair Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Mark Baldassare President and Chief Executive Officer Public Policy Institute of C alifornia Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Mar ía Blanco Vice President , Civic Engagement California Community Foundation John E. Bryson Retired Chairman and CEO Edison International Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Education State of California Robert M. Hertzberg Partner Mayer Brown, LLP Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs David Mas Masumoto Author and farmer Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Mueller & Naylor, LLP Constance L. Rice Co-Director The Advancement Project Thomas C. Sutton Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Pacific Life Insurance Company The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research on major economic, social, and political issues. The institute’s goal is to raise public awareness and to give elected representatives and other decisionmakers a more informed basis for developing policies and programs. The institute’s research focuses on the underlying forces shaping California’s future, cutting across a wide range of public pol icy concerns, including economic development, education, environment and resources, governance, population, public finance, and social and health policy. PPIC is a private operating foundation. It does not take or support positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. PPIC was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. Mark Baldassare is President and Chief Executive Officer of PPIC. Walter B. Hewlett is Chair of the Board of Directors. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source and the copyright notice below is included. Copyright © 2010 Public Policy Institute of California All rights reserved. San Francisco, CA PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, California 94111 phone: 415.291.4400 fax: 415.291.4401 PPIC SACRAMENTO CENT ER Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 phone: 916.440.1120 fax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org survey@ppic.org" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:40:48" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(9) "s_1210mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:40:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:40:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(51) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_1210MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }