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Statewide Survey – March 2017

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The PPIC Statewide Survey provides a voice for the public and likely voters— informing policymakers, encouraging discussion, and raising awareness on critical issues of the day. © 201 7 Public Policy Institute of California The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research. PPIC is a public charity. It does not take or s upport positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source. Research publications reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of our funders or of the staff, officers, advisory councils, or board of directors of the Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 3 CONTACT Linda Strean 415 -291 -4412 Serina Correa 415 -291 -4417 News Release EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday , March 22, 2017. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND THE IR GOVERNMENT Majority Oppose Trump’s Travel Ban FEW SEE TERRORISM, SECURITY AS A BIG PROBLEM IN CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO, March 22 , 2017—Most Californians disapprove of President Donald Trump’s order banning travel to the US by people from six majority Muslim countries, according to a statewide survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) with funding from the James Irvine Foundation. When Californians are asked about the president’s revised order to temporarily ban travelers from the six nations, 58 percent disapprove while 37 percent approve. There is a sharp par tisan divide on the question: 85 percent of Republicans approve, 81 percent of Democrats disapprove, and independents are more likely to disapprove (5 4%) than approve (42% ). “As the new administration’s terrorism policies take shape, most Californians are opposed to the travel ban involving six Muslim majority countries,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. When Californians are asked to asse ss how Trump is handling terrorism and homeland security , 57 percent disapprove (37% approve) . Most Californians say the federal government is doing very well (19%) or fairly well (38%) at reducing the threat of terrorism . More than half of residents acro ss parties, regions, and demographic groups say the government is doing well. This view is most widely held among Republicans (70%) and residents of the Inland Empire (67%), where the terrorist attack in San Bernardino occurred in December 2015. Only abou t a quarter of state residents (27%) today call terrorism and security a big problem in California. The percentage of Californians characterizing terrorism as a big problem has dropped 16 points since January 2016 and is now similar to what it had been in periodic surveys dating back to December 2001. Across regions, residents in the Inland Empire (34%) are the most likely to call terrorism a big problem and those in the San Francisco Bay Area (21%) the least likely. Regarding another aspect of anti -terrorism policies, about half of Californians (52%) say the government has gone too far in restricting civil liberties, while 36 percent say the government has not gone far enough to protect the country. Two-Thirds Favor P ath to Citizenship for Undocumented Immigrants A strong majority of Californians (68%) say that undocumented immigrants living in the US should be allowed to stay and eventually apply for citizenship, while 12 percent say undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay legally but not be allowed to apply for citizenship. Only 15 percent say these immigrants should be required to leave. Across parties, an overwhelming majority of Democrats (8 2%) and a solid majority of independents (62%) say undocumented immigrants should be allowed to eventually apply for citizenship, as do 46 percent of Republicans. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 4 How important is immigration policy to Californians? When asked to name the most important issue facing the state , immigration or illegal immigration is No. 2 (16%), behind jobs and the economy (20%). Just a quarter of Californians (25%) favor building a wall along the entire border with Mexico, as the president proposes. A strong majority of Republicans (68%) are in favor of the wall, while overwhelming majo rities of independents (73%) and Democrats (92%) oppose it. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups, regions, and age, education, and income groups are opposed. “The proposal to build a wall along the entire Mexic an border is not gaining any traction in California,” Baldassare said. Most Support Business, Environmental Regulation As President Trump focuses on reducing government regulations, the survey asks Californians what they think about government regulation of business. Most state residents (56%) say i t is necessary to protect the public interest , while 37 percent say it does more harm than good. Across partisan groups, 69 percent of Democrats say business regulation is necessary and 65 percent of Republicans s ay it does more harm than good. In the area of environmental regulation, just over half of Californians (54%) say stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the costs, while 37 percent say stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy. A Third Approve of Trump’s Job Performance About a third of Californians (31% all adults, 35% likely voters) approve of the job President Trump is doing. His approval rating is unchanged from January (30% adults, 34% likely voters). Partisan divisions today remain deep (82% Republicans approve, 91% Democrats and 57% independents disapprove). Men are 15 points more likely than women to approve (39% to 24%), and whites (45%) are more likely than Latinos (17%) and African Americans (16%) to approve. Asked whether Trump is trustworthy, 31 percent of adults and 3 5 percent of likely voters say yes ; 64 percent of adults and likely voters say no. Slightly more than a third of California adults (36%) and a quarter of likely voters (27%) approve of the way Congress is handling its job. Republicans (48%) are much more likely than Democrats (23%) or independents (28%) to approve. Among Republicans, approval has increased 9 points since January (39%). About half of Californians (51 % adults, 49% likely voters) approve of their own repr esentative to the US House. Half of Californians (49% adults, 51% likely voters) approve of Senator Dianne Feinstein’s job performance. As Senator Kamala Harris begins her term, she has a 46 percent approval rating from all adults and 49 percent from like ly voters. Notably, about 30 perce nt of adults and 25 percent of likely voters are unsure how to rate Harris. How much trust do Californians place in the federal government in Washington? Just under a third say they can trust government to do what is right just about always (7%) or most of the time (22%). Most (62%) say they can trust it some of the time, and 7 percent say none of the time. In periodic surveys since 1998, fewer than half have said they trust the government just ab out always or most of the time. Majorities Approve of Governor Governor Jerry Brown has a job approval rating of 58 percent among all adults and 61 percent among likely voters. His rating is similar to January (62% both all adults and likely voters) and higher than last March (51% adults, 53% likely voters). Today his approval rating is 79 percent among Democrats, 53 percent among independents, and 26 percent among Republicans. About half of Californians (51% adults, 48% likely voters) approve of the way the legislature is doing its job. Similar proportions of residents (53% adults, 52% likely voters) approve of their representatives in the assembly and senate . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 5 Most Favor Spending on Flood Management In the aftermath of widespread flooding and a crisis at Oroville Dam, a solid major ity of residents (61%) say it is very important for California to spend more money on water and flood management infrastructure in their part of the state. An additional 27 percent say this is somewhat important . Majorities across regions say more spending in this area is very important. “After the recent rains, many Californians have added water and flood management to their wish list for meeting the state’s infrastructure needs,” Baldassare said. Asked about the governor’s proposal to build tunnels in t he Sacramento–San Joaquin Valley Delta, about half (51%) say it is very important (26% somewhat important, 14% not too impor tant or not at all important). There are wide regio nal differences: 64 percent of Los Angeles residents call the tunnels very import ant but just 40 percent in the Central Valley express this view. Opinion within the Central Valley varies: i n the San Joaquin Valley 79 percent of resident s say the tunnels are at least somewhat important, while 58 percent of Sacramento Metro and North Valley residents express this view . Residents Split on High -Speed Rail Californians are closely divided between favoring (48%) and opposing (46%) construction of a high - speed rail system in California. A total of 66 percent say they would favor high -speed rail if it cost less than the current estimate of $64 billion over the next 20 years. Across regions, support for high -speed rail is highest in Los Angeles (56 %) and lowest in the Central Valley (39%). Most Say Criminal Justice System Inequitable A quarter of residents (25%) call violence and street crime a big problem in their communities (35% somewhat of a problem). In January 2016, 20 percent called it a big problem . The view that crime is a big problem is more common in the Central Valley (32%) and Los Angeles (29%) than in Orange/San Diego (20%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (19%). It is also somewhat more common among Latinos (32%) and African Americans (30%) than among whites (22%) and other racial/ethnic groups (19 %). How are local police doing in controlling crime? Two -thirds of residents say police are doing an excellent job (30%) or a good one (35%). African Americans (38%) are far less likely to say police are doing an excellent or good job than are Latinos (62 %), whites (74%), and members of other racial/ethnic groups (63%). Solid majorities across parties say police are doing an excellent or good job. Two -thirds of residents (66%) say that blacks and other minorities do not receive treatment equal to whites in the criminal justice system —up from 55 percent in January 2015. Today, 90 percent of African Americans express this view, as do solid majorities of Latinos, whites, and Californians in other racial/ethnic groups. This view is also more common among younge r adults than older ones (74% age 18–34, 68% 35 –54, 56% 55 and older). “While most Californians give excellent or good ratings to their local police, there is a large and growing belief that there are racial disparities in the criminal justice system,” Baldassare said. State, Local Tax System Considered Fair As the April tax filing deadline ap proaches, most Californians say the state and local tax system is fair (6% very fair, 49% moderately fair). However, most residents also say they pay more taxes to state and local governments than they feel they should (35% much more, 23% somewhat m ore). At the same time, less than half (42%) say major changes are needed in the state and local tax systems. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 6 Federal Issues Key Findings Thirty-one percent of California adults approve of President Trump and 36 percent approve of Congress. About half approve of their own representatives to the House of Representatives (51%) , Senator Dianne Feinstein (49%) , and Senator Kamala Harris (4 6% ). (pages 7, 8 ) An overwhelming majority of Californians say that undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States should be allowed to stay in the country and eventually apply for citizenship (68%) or should be allowed to stay but without prospects for citizenship (12%). Fifteen percent think these immigrants shoul d be required to leave the US. Most (72%) oppose building a wall along the entire Mexico border. (page s 8, 9) One in four Californians (27% ) view terrorism and security as a big problem in the state today; 35 percent say it is somewhat of a problem and 35 percent say it is not much of a problem. S ix in ten say the US government is doing very (19%) or fairly well (3 8%) in reducing the threat of terrorism. Fewer than four in ten approve of President Trump’s handling of terrorism (37%) or his revised travel ban (37%) . (page 10) A majority of Californ ians say that government regulation of business is necessar y to protect the public interest (56 %). A similar majority thinks that stricter environmental laws are worth the costs (54 %). (page 11) Trust in the federal government remains low. Majorities say they can trust the federal government to do what is right only some or none of the time (69 %), that government i s run by a few big interests (70 %), and that a lot of taxpayer money is wasted (61 %). Sixty -four percent view President T rump as not trustworthy . (page 12) 86 87 92 72 66 73 37 37 28 0 20 40 60 80 100 May-16 Oct-16Mar-17 Percent DemocratsIndependentsRepublicans Opposition to building a border wall 6870 71 6070 11 15 12 1512 0 20 40 60 80 100 CentralValley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland EmpirePercent Allowed to stay, no path to citizenship Allowed to stay and apply for citizenship Preferred options for undocumented immigrants 37 1785 4240 58 81 1254 58 0 20 40 60 80 100 All adults Dem Rep IndLikely votersPercent Approve Disapprove Support for President Trump’s revised travel ban PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 7 Approval Ratings of Federal Elected Officials Donald Trump’s low approval ratings (31% adults, 35% likely voters) are unchanged from January ( 30 % adults, 34% likely voters). Today, an overwhelming majority of Republicans (82%) approve of President Trump while an overwhelming majority of Democrats (91%) disapprove. Independents are far more likely to disapprove (57%) than to approve (36%). Fewer than four in ten Californians ac ross all regions approve. Men are 15 points more likely than women to approve (39% to 24%) , and whites (45%) are much more likely than Latinos (17%) and African Americans (16%) to approve. In a recent Gallup weekly tracking poll, adults nationwide (42%) ar e more likely to approve of President Trump. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Donald Trump is handling his job as president?” Approve Disapprove Don’t know All adults 31% 61% 7% Likely voters 35 62 3 Party Democrats 8 91 2 Republicans 82 14 4 Independents 36 57 7 Region Central Valley 39 51 9 San Francisco Bay Area 28 64 7 Los Angeles 26 70 5 Orange/San Diego 32 60 8 Inland Empire 37 51 12 Slightly more than a third of adults (36%) and a quarter of likely voters (27%)—similar to January ( 33% adults, 25% likely voters) —approve of the way the US Congress is handling its job. Republicans (48%) are much more likely than Democrats (23%) and independents (28%) to approve. Notably, among Republicans , approval of C ongress has increased 9 poin ts since January (39%). Approval for Congress declines as income levels rise (42% under $40,000, 38% $40,000 to unde r $80,000, 28% $80,000 or more) ; the same is true with education . According to a March CNN/ORC poll, a somewhat lo wer share of adults nationwide approve of Congress (28% approve, 69% disapprove). About half of California adults (51%) and likely voters (49%) approve of their own representative s to the US House. Approval ratings were similar in September (51% adults, 4 7% likely voters ) and January 2016 (5 4% adults, 51% likely voters ). Democrats (56%) are more likely than Republicans and independents (46% each ) to approve of their own representative s. About half across regions approve (53% San Francisco Bay Area , 51% Central Valley, 50% Los Angeles, 50% Orange/San Diego, 48% Inland Empire). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind the way the US Congress is handling its job Approve 36% 23% 48% 28% 27% Disapprove 55 72 42 63 68 Don't know 9 5 10 10 6 the way your own representative to the US House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job Approve 51 56 46 46 49 Disapprove 32 31 42 36 38 Don't know 17 14 12 18 13 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 8 App roval Ratings of California’s U S Senators About half of Californians (49%) and likely voters (51%) approve of the way Senator Dianne Feinstein is handling her job, while one in three Californians and four in ten likely voters disapprove. Senator Feinstein’s appr oval rating was slightly higher in January 2016 (56% adults, 56% likely voters ). Today, majorities of Democrats (67%) and independents (53%) approve of her performance, compared to 25 percent of Republicans. Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%) are much more likely than those in other regions to approve of Senator Feinstein (50% Los Angeles, 48% Orange/San Diego, 40% Central Valley, 40% Inland Empire). Senator Feinstein’s approval rating is slightly higher among older Californians (43% 18 to 34; 50% 35 to 54, 52% 55 and older) and college graduates (44% high school or less; 48% some college; 57% college graduate). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as US Senator?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Approve 49% 67% 25% 53% 51% Disapprove 32 18 64 38 39 Don’t know 19 15 10 10 10 As Kamala Harris begins her tenure as California’s junior senator, 46 percent of adults and 49 percent of likely voters approve of her performance. Notably, three in ten adults and a quarter of likely voters are not sure how to rate Senator Harris. Across parties, Democrats (6 4% ) are much more likely than independents (46%) and Republicans (25%) to approve. Across regions, Senator Harris’ s approval rating is highe r in the San Francisco Bay Area (53%) and Los Angeles (51%), than elsewhere (43% Central Valley, 41% Orange/San Diego , 38% Inland Empire ). Across demographic groups, a pproval of Senator Harris is slightly higher among college graduates (44% high school, 45% some college, 52% college graduates) and is highest among African Americans (63%). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Kamala Harris is handling her job as US Senator?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Approve 46% 64% 25% 46% 49% Disapprove 23 15 44 27 26 Don’t know 30 20 31 26 25 Immigration Policy On January 25, President Trump issued an executive order aimed at tightening border security and immigration enforcement. Today, a strong majority of Californians (68%) say that undocumented immigrants living in the US should be allowed to stay and eventua lly apply for citizenship; 12 percent say they should be allowed to stay legally, but not allowed to apply for citizenship. Only 15 percent say that undocumented immigrants currently living in the US should be required to leave. Across parties, an overwhel ming majority of Democrats (82%) and a solid majority of independents (62%) say PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 9 undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay and eventually apply for citizenship as do a plurality of Republicans (46%). A similar question in a February CBS News poll fo und that adults nationwide are somewhat less likely to say that undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay and eventually apply for citizenship (60% ), while 13 percent say they should be able to stay legally but not allowed to apply for citizenship and 23 percent say they should be required to leave. At least six in ten Californians across all regions say that undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay and have a path to citizenship. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (82%) are the most likely to say that undocumented immigrants should have a path to citizenship, followed by African Americans (76%), whites (62%), and other racial/ethnic groups (58%). Majorities across all age, education, and income groups say that undocumente d immigrants should be able to eventually apply for citizenship, though those age 55 and older are less likely than 18 -to -34 -year -olds, college graduate s are less likely than those with only a high school education, and Californians with incomes over $80,0 00 per year are less likely than those with an annual income under $40,000 to say so. “Which comes closest to your view about undocumented imm igrants who are living in the US ? They sho uld be allowed to stay in the US and eventually apply for citizenship, they shoul d be allowed to stay in the US legally, but not be allowed to apply for citizenship, or they should be required to leave the US ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Stay and eventually apply for citizenship 68% 82% 46% 62% 66% Stay legally but not allowed to apply for citizenship 12 10 10 14 11 Required to leave the US 15 6 36 19 19 Don’t know 5 3 7 5 4 Twenty -five percent of Californians and 29 percent of likely voters favor building a wall along the entire border with Mexico. Responses were similar in September (25% adults, 34% likely voters) and May (26% adults, 33% likely voters). Today, a strong majority of Republicans (68%) are in favor, while overwhelming majorities of independents (73%) and Democrats (92%) are opposed. Solid majorities across racial/ethnic groups are opposed, with Latinos (86%) most likely to hold this view. More than six in t en adults across regions and age, education, and income groups oppose building a wall along the border with Mexico. Among those who approve of President Trump, 65 percent favor building a wall. Among those who disapprove of the president, 94 percent are op posed. In a February Pew Research Center poll, 35 percent of adults nationwide favored building a wall while 62 percent were opposed. “All in all, would you favor or oppose building a wall along the entire border with Mexico?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 25% 6% 68% 26% 29% Oppose 72 92 28 73 69 Don’t know 3 1 4 1 2 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 10 Terrorism About one in four Californians think that terrorism and security present a big problem in California today; 35 percent say terrorism is somewhat of a problem and 35 percent say it is not much of a problem. The share calling terrorism a big problem has dropped 16 points since January 2016 —shortly after the terrorist attack in San Bernardino —but is similar to the share in surveys dating back to December 2001. Republicans (44%) are more than twice as likely as Democrats (18%) to view this as a big problem. Across regions, Inland Empire residents (34%) are the most likely —and San Francisco Bay Area residents (21%) least likely —to call terrorism a big problem. “How much of a problem is terrorism and security in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Big problem 27% 18% 44% 25% 24% Somewhat of a problem 35 35 33 37 35 Not much of a problem 35 45 20 34 39 Don't know 3 1 3 3 2 When it comes to the government’s handling of terrorism, about six in ten Californians say the US government is doing very (19%) or fairly well (38%) in reducing the threat. A similar share held this view in January 2016 (24% very, 37% fairly). More than half of Californians across parties, regions, and demographic groups think the government is doing well— this perception is most widely held among Republicans (70%) and Inland Empire residents (67%). Regarding the government’s anti -terrorism policies, 52 percent of Californians think that they have gone too far in restricting th e average person's civil liberties, while 36 percent think that they have not gone far enough to protect the country. Partisans are divided on this issue , while pluralities among nearly all demographic groups (except those age 55 and older) say policies have gone too far. “In general, how well do you think the US government is doing in r educing the threat of terrorism?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Very well 19% 12% 17% 16% 14% Fairly well 38 41 53 38 44 Not too well 24 25 16 29 22 Not at all well 15 18 12 14 16 Don't know 4 5 2 3 3 Thirty -seven percent of Californians approve of the way that President Trump is handling terrorism and homeland security issues (57 % disapprove). An overwhelming majority of Republicans (80%) approve, an overwhelming majority of Democrats (86%) disapprove , and independents are more evenly divided (45% approve, 52% disapprove). Fewer than half across regions and demographic groups approve. When it comes to President Trump’s revised travel ban, 37 percent approve and 5 8 percent disapprove. Likely voters hold similar opinions (40% approve, 58% disapprove). Most Republicans (85%) approve, most Democrats (81%) disapprov e, and independents are more likely to disapprove (54%) than approve (4 2% ). Fewer than half across regions and demographic groups approve of the president’s travel ban. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 11 Government Regulation Given President Trump’s focus on reducing government regulations, how do Californians perceive government regulation of busi ness? A majority of Californians (56%) think government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest, while 37 percent think it does more harm than good. Findings were similar last March (60% necessary ), but somewhat l ower in March 20 12 (48% necessary ). There is a deep divide between partisans , with 69 percent of Democrats saying regulation is necessary and 65 percent of Republicans saying it does more harm than good. The belief that regulation is necessary is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (63%) and lowest in the Inland Empire (48%). A plurality of Californians across demographic groups think regulation is necessary. Notably, Californians across age groups hold similar views, while college graduates are more likely than others t o think that the regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest. “Please indicate which statement comes closest to your own view, even if neither is exactly right—government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest, or government regulation of business does more harm than good? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Necessary to protect the public interest 56% 69% 31% 49% 56% Does more harm than good 37 24 65 47 39 Don't know 7 7 4 4 5 D ifferences between state policy and emerging federal policy appear to be developing in the area of environmental regulation . President Trump has proposed instituting changes at the Environmental Protection Agency , including rolling back regulations on water and fuel economy standards as well as altering the role that climate change plays in environmental rules. Slightly more than half of Californians (54%) think stricter environmental laws and regulations are wort h the cost, while fewer (37%) think stricter laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy. Finding s today are similar to March 2014 (55% worth costs, 38% too costly) and pluralit ies have said they are worth the cost in surveys since 1998. M ost Democrats (71%) think these laws are worth the cost while most Republicans (61%) say they are too costly. Pluralities across regional, age, and income groups think these laws and regulations are worth the cost. Notably, Californians age 18 to 34 (59%) are more likely than those age 55 and older (49%) to say they are worth the cost. Among those who approve of President Trump, about six in ten say government regulation of business does more harm than good (60%) and that stricter environmental laws and re gulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy (58%) . “Please indicate which statement comes closest to your own view, even if neither is exactly right —stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy, or stricter envi ronmental laws and regulations are worth the cost? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Cost too many jobs and hurt the economy 37% 23% 61% 42% 34% Worth the cost 54 71 34 52 61 Don't know 9 6 6 6 5 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 12 Trust in Federal G overnment President Trump is viewed as trustworthy by 31 percent of adults, while 64 percent view him as untrustworthy. In a Pew Research Center national survey in February , 37 percent said he was trustworthy and 59 percent said he was untrustworthy. In California, most Democrats (91%) and independents (60%) view him as untrustworthy while most Republicans (81%) view him as trustworthy. M ajorities across regions and demographic groups view him as untrustworthy . Among likely voters, 35 percent say that President Trump is trustworthy and 64 percent say that he is untrustworthy. T hree in ten California adults say they can trust the federal government to do what is right just about always (7%) or most of the time (22%), while seven in ten say it can be trusted some (62%) or none (7%) of the time. Fewer than half have said that they trust the government just about always or most of the time in surveys dating back to 1998. While most Republicans view Donald Trump as trustworthy, three in ten say they can trust government most of the time or just about always. Fewer Democrats hold this view , as do fewer than four in ten across regions and demographic groups. “Next, how much of the time do you think you can trust the federal government in Washington today to do what is righ t—just about always, most of the time, or only some of the time?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Just about always 7% 3% 5% 4% 2% Most of the time 22 15 24 18 18 Some of the time 62 71 63 73 69 None of the time (volunteered) 7 10 5 5 10 Don’t know 2 1 2 – 1 Nearly all Californians think the federal government wastes a lot of (61%) or some (27%) taxpayer money; just 8 percent say it does not waste very much. The belief that the federal government waste s a lot of money was similar in October (55%); a majority has held this view dating back to 1998. Majorities across parties think that the government wastes a lot (59% Democrats, 69% independents, 71% Republicans) . Majorities across regions and demographic groups agree, with a t least six in ten across education and income groups holding this view. A strong majority of Californians (70%) think that the federal government is run by a few big interests looking out for themselves rather than for the benefit of all the people (25%). This belief was similar in October (64%) ; a majority has maintained this view in surveys since 1998. Partisans are once again distrustful of government , with more than two in three saying government is run by a few big interests. M ore than two in three across regions hold this view , as do more than six in ten across age, education, and income groups. “Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the ben efit of all of the people?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind A few big interests 70% 78% 68% 78% 79% Benefit of all the people 25 19 28 19 17 Don’t know 5 3 5 4 4 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 13 State Issues Key Findings  Governor Brown has the approval of 58 percent of Californians, while slight majorities approve of the state legislature (5 1% ) and their own legislators in the state assembly and senate (5 3% ). (page 14)  Californians are most likely to name j obs and the economy (20% ) and immigration (16 %) as the most important issues. M ore than h alf of Californians think the state is heading in the right direction (55 %) and that there will be good economic times in the next 12 months (5 1% ). (page 15 )  While more than half of Californians think the state and local tax system is very (6%) or moderately fair (49%), a similar share also think they pay much more (35 %) or somewhat more (2 3% ) than they should in state and local taxes. (page 16 )  Most Californians (6 1% ) think that it is very important for the state to spend more money on water and flood management infrastructure in their part of California. About half (51%) say it is very important to build tunnels in the Sacramento –San Joaquin Delta to improve the reliability of water supplies . (page 17)  Californians are divided on the high- speed rail system (48 % favor, 4 6% oppose) . One in three say it is very important for California’s future quality of life and economic vitality . (page 18 )  One in four (2 5% ) Californians view violence and street crime in their local community as a big problem; 35 percent say it is somewhat and 39 percent say it is not much of a problem . Two in three adults think their local police are doing an excellent or good job in controlling crime, but two in three think minorities do not receive equal treatment in the criminal justice system . (page 19) 58 51 0 20 40 60 80 Mar-12 Mar-13Mar-14Mar-15Mar-16Mar-17 Percent all adults Governor Brown California Legislature Approval ratings of state elected officials 65 5663 6062 40 4964 4852 0 20 40 60 80 100 CentralValley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Percent Spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure Building tunnels in the Sacramento– San Joaquin Delta Water policy options viewed as very important 39 3329 55 61 66 0 20 40 60 80 100 2015 20162017 Percent all adults Receive equal treatment Do not receive equal treatment Minorities in the criminal justice system PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 14 Approval Ratings of State Elected Officials About six in ten Californians (58% adults, 61% likely voters) approve of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as California governor. The governor’s approval rating was sim ilar in January (62% adults, 62% likely voters) and lower last March (51% adults, 53% likely voters). Today, the governor’s approval rating is 79 percent among Democrats, 53 percent among independents, and 26 percent among Republicans. More than h alf across regions, age, and rac ial/ethnic groups say they approve. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California?” Approve Disapprove Don’t know All adults 58% 25% 17% Likely voters 61 32 7 Party Democrats 79 9 12 Republicans 26 65 8 Independents 53 35 12 Region Central Valley 52 31 17 San Francisco Bay Area 64 21 15 Los Angeles 60 21 19 Orange/San Diego 56 30 13 Inland Empire 53 28 19 Fifty-one percent of adults and 48 percent of likely voters approve of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job. Approval of the legislature was in a similar range in January (57% adults, 50% likely voters) and lower last March (44% adul ts, 38% likely voters). Today, 66 percent of Democrats , compared to 43 percent of independents and 24 percent of Republicans , say that they approve. Half or more adult residents in almost all regions (5 5% San Francisco Bay Area, 53 % Orange/San Diego , 51% Los Angeles, 50% Central Valley )— with the exception of the Inland Empire (40%)— approve of the legislature. Similarly, 5 3 percent of adults and 52 percent of likely voters approve of the way that their own state legislators are representing them . The shares holding this view were similar in September 2016 (52% adults, 4 9 % likely voters) and approval was slightly lower among likely voters in January 2016 (49% adults, 45% likely voters ). Today, 6 6 percent of Democrats, 4 5 percent of independents, and 35 percent of Republicans approve of their legislators. Half or more adult residents in almost all regions (61% San Francisco Bay Area, 52% Central Valley, 52% Los Angeles, 50% Orange/San Diego)— with the exception of the Inland Empire (46%) —approve of their legislat ors. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind the way that the California Legislature is handling its job Approve 51% 66% 24% 43% 48% Disapprove 33 19 67 45 41 Don't know 16 15 10 12 11 the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and senate districts are doing at this time Approve 53 66 35 45 52 Disapprove 32 22 54 42 38 Don't know 16 12 11 13 11 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 15 Overall Mood Californians are most likely to name jobs and the economy ( 20% adults, 19% likely voters) and immigration (16% adults, 15% likely voters) as the most important issues facing pe ople in California today; fewer than one in ten name other issues including government, water, and health care . In March 2016, jo bs and the economy (27% adults, 29% likely voters) and water and the drought (20% adults, 23% likely voters) were the top two issues while fewer named immigration (7% adults, 8% likely voters). Today, jobs and the economy and immigration are the top two issues in all regions . “First, thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today?” Top 5 issues All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Jobs, economy 20% 21% 23% 18% 18% 21% 19% Immigration, illegal immigration 16 13 15 19 17 17 15 Government, elected officials 8 8 11 7 5 7 10 Water, drought 8 12 6 6 9 8 9 Health care, health insurance 7 8 8 5 6 5 10 Fifty -five percent of adults and 5 3 percent of likely voters say that things in California are generally going in the right direction. The view that the state is headed in the right direction was similar in January (58% adults, 58% likely voters) and lower among likely voters last March (50% adults, 45% likely voters). Today, Democrats (71 %) are far more likely than independents (4 8% ) and Republicans (24%) to say that things are going in the right direction. Half or more adult residents in all regions (62% San Francisco Bay Area, 55% Inland Empire, 55% Orange/San Diego, 54% Los Angeles) with the exception of the Central Valley (46%) say that things in California are generally going in the right direction. “Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wr ong direction?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Right direction 55% 71% 24% 48% 53% Wrong direction 39 23 72 48 43 Don’t know 6 6 4 4 4 Half of Californians (5 1% adults, 50% likely voters) today are saying that California will have good times financially in the next 12 months. Expectations for good economic times were in similar ranges in January (53% adults, 51% likely voters) and last March (51% adults, 46% lik ely voters). Today, about half of independents (52%) and Democrats (49%) are optimistic; 44 percent of Republicans expect good times . A bout half or more across age and education groups are optimistic. About half or more across the state’s regions ( 55% Orange/San Diego, 54% Central Valley, 51% Los Angeles, 49% San Francisco Bay Area ), with the exception of the Inland Empire (43% ), expect good times financially in California . Men are much more likely than women to be optimistic (57% to 45%) and African Americ ans (27%) are by far the least optimistic across racial/ethnic groups. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 16 State and Local Tax System As the April 18 deadline for income tax returns approach es and as the Trump administration considers a federal tax overhaul , how do Californians perceive th eir state and local tax system? The present state and local tax system is viewed as moderately or very fair by majorities of California adults (6% very, 49% moderately) and likely voters (4 % very, 49% moderately). Californians gave similar responses last M arch (56% adults, 54% likely voters said very or moderately fair). Today, Democrats (6 0% ) and independents (5 3% ) are much more likely than Republicans (39%) to say that the state and local tax system is very or moderately fair. Majorities across income gro ups say that the state and local tax sys tem is very or moderately fair . “Overall, how fair do you think our present state and local tax system is— would you say it is very fair, moderately fair, not too fair, or not at all fair?” All adults Household income Likely voters Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Very fair 6% 7% 5% 5% 4% Moderately fair 49 51 52 49 49 Not too fair 24 25 25 24 26 Not at all fair 18 16 16 21 19 Don’t know 3 1 2 1 2 However, almost six in ten Californians say they pay more taxes to state and local governments than they feel they should (3 5% much more and 23% somewhat more for adults; 3 4% much more and 2 5% somewhat more for likely voters). The public’s perceptions of p aying much or somewhat more than they should in state and local taxes were similar last March (56% adults, 61% likely voters) before the passage of Proposition 55 (Proposition 30 tax extension) last fall. Today, Republicans (7 7% ) are more likely than indep endents (67% ) and far more likely than Democrats (4 8% ) to say that they pay much or somewhat more than they should. Majorities across income groups say they are paying much more or somewhat more than they should ; lower -income residents are the least likely to hold this perception . “When you combine all of the taxes you pay to state and local governments, do you feel that you pay much more than you should, somewhat more than you should, about the right amount, or less than you should?” All adults Household income Likely voters Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Much more than you should 35% 32% 34% 40% 34% Somewhat more than you should 23 19 23 28 25 About the right amount 37 44 37 29 36 Less than you should 2 3 2 2 2 Don’t know 3 3 3 1 2 About four in ten Californians (42% adults, 44% likely voters) say major changes are needed in the state and local tax system , compared to about half in May 2015 (49% adults, 54% likely voters). Today, fewer than half of homeowners (44%) and those earning $80,000 or more (43%) say major changes are needed. Democrats (3 1% ) are much less likely than independents (4 6% ) and Republicans (6 2%) to hold this view. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 17 State Water Supply California’s wet season brought on flo oding across the state and an infrastructure crisis at Oroville Dam. Today, a so lid majority of Californians (61 %) say it is very important for the state to be spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure in their part of California. An additional 27 percent see this spending as somewhat important, and only one in ten say it is not too (7%) or not at all important (3%). Majorities across regions say more water and flood management infrastructure spending is very importa nt, ranging from 56 percent in the San Francisco Bay Area to 65 percent in the Central Valley. About six in ten across parties, age, education, and income groups say the same. “How important do you think it is for the state to be spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure in your part of California?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Very important 61% 65% 56% 63% 60% 62% 60% Somewhat important 27 25 28 28 30 22 30 Not too important 7 5 8 5 8 13 6 Not at all important 3 3 6 2 2 4 3 Don't know 1 2 1 2 – – 1 Californians are less likely to view the governor’s specific proposal to improve the reliability of water supplies by building tunnels in the Sacramento –San Joaquin Delta as very important . Slightly more than half (51%) say it is very important, 26 percent say it is somewhat important, and 1 4 percent say it is not too or not at all important. Responses were similar a year ago (54% adults, 45% likely voters sa id very important). Today, we find wide differences across regions, with 64 percent in Los Angeles calling the tunnels very important an d 40 percent saying the same in the Central Valley. There is a difference in opinion within the Central Valley itself, with residents of the San Joaquin Valley (48% very, 31% somewhat) more likely than residents of Sacramento Metro and the North Valley (39 % very, 19% somewhat) to say the tunnels are important. Across parties, Democrats (51%) and independents (49%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (43%) to say the tunnels are very important, and those who approve of the governor are much more likely than those who disapprove to hold this view (5 7% to 4 0% ). The view that the tunnels are very important is less common among those with higher incomes than among those with lower incomes (40% $80,000 or more; 56% $40,000 to $80,000; 58% under $40,000). Ac ross racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (63%) and African Americans (55%) are more likely than whites (42%) to express this view. “The governor has proposed to improve the reliability of water supplies by building tunnels in the Sacramento –San Joaquin Delta. How important is this proposal for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Very important 51% 40% 49% 64% 48% 52% 47% Somewhat important 26 28 23 22 31 30 25 Not too important 7 10 6 6 5 9 8 Not at all important 7 15 9 2 5 3 9 Don't know 9 8 12 6 11 6 11 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 18 High -Speed Rail In November 2008 , California voters passed Proposition 1A —the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century —with 53 percent support. Today, about three in ten Californians (3 3% adults, 28% likely voters ) say the state’s high-speed rail system is very important for the state’s future quality of lif e and economic vitality. In our surveys since 2012, between 28 and 36 percent of adults have said the same. In our current survey, Democrats (37%) are nearly three times as likely as Republicans (13%) to say the high -speed rail system is very important for the state’s future (31% among independents). Across regions, Los Angeles residents (42%) are most likely to say it is very important. The likelihood of saying high -speed rail is very important declines with increasing age and income. “Thinking ahead, how important is the high-speed rail system for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Very important 33% 28% 32% 42% 33% 27% 28% Somewhat important 31 29 33 28 32 33 29 Not too important 16 15 14 14 17 27 16 Not at all important 17 25 18 14 18 11 25 Don't know 2 3 3 2 1 1 2 Californians are closely divided between favoring (48%) and opposing (46%) a high-speed rail system in California. A total of 66 percent say they would be in favor if the system cost less , while 28 percent would still be opposed. Among likely voters, a majority oppose building a high -speed rail system (54%), and 37 percent would still be opposed if it cost less. In response to a similar question last year, 52 percent of adults and 44 percent of likely voters said they favored building the system. Across regions today, support for the system is highest in Los Angeles (56%) a nd lowest in the Central Valley (39%). Democrats (55%) and independents (47%) are far more likely than Republicans (22%) to be in favor, and Latinos (54%) and African Americans (49%) are somewhat more likely than whites (41%) to be in favor. Across age gro ups, a majority of young Californians favor the system (57% 18 to 34), and support declines with increasing age (47% 35 to 54, 40% 55 and older). Those who approve of Governor Brown are much more likely than those who disapprove to favor the system (59% to 20%). “As you may know, California voters passed a $10 billion state bond in 2008 for planning and construction of a high -speed rail system from Anaheim to the Central Valley and San Francisco. The estimated costs associated with this 520 mile phase of th e high-speed rail system are about $64 billion over the next 20 years. Do you favor or oppose building a high -speed rail system in California?” 3950 56 4548 53 454049 44 0 20 40 60 80 CentralValley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Percent all adults 71 47 39 54 46 22 4755 41 48 0 20 406080 Republicans Independents Democrats Likely voters All adults Percent Favor Oppose PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 19 Crime, Police, and Race One in four Californians say that violence and street crime are a big problem in their local community. Californian s are slightly more likely today than they were in January 2016 to say crime is a big problem ( 20 % adults, 15% likely voters ). Across regions, the view that crime is a big problem is somewhat more common in the Central Valley and Los Angeles than in Orange/San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area. It is also somewhat more common among Latinos (32%) and African Americans (30%) than among whites (2 2%) and members of other racial/ethnic groups (19%). College graduates and thos e with annual incomes of $80,000 or more (13% each) are much less likely than others to say crime is a big problem. “How much of a problem are violence and street crime in your local community today?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Big problem 25% 32% 19% 29% 20% 26% 20% Somewhat of a problem 35 38 43 35 26 33 35 Not much of a problem 39 29 38 36 55 41 44 Don't know – 1 – – – – – Two in three Californians say their local police are doing an excellent (30%) or good (35%) job controlling crime in their community. Responses were similar in January 2 016 (29% excellent, 36% good). Today, African Americans (38%) are far less likely than Latinos (62%), whites (7 4%), and members of other racial/ethnic groups (63%) to say the police are doing an excellent or good job. Across regions, responses range from 59 percent saying excellent or good in the San Francisco Bay Area to 71 percent saying the same in Orange/San Diego. Across parties, Republicans (78%) are most likely to say police are doing an excellent or good j ob (70% independents, 63% Democrats). Two in three Californians say blacks and other minorities do not receive treatment equal to whites in the criminal justice system. That is up from 55 percent in January 2015. Today, 90 percent of African Americans exp ress this view, as do solid majorities of Latinos, whites, and member s of other racial /ethnic groups. This view is much more common among younger than older adults (74% 18 to 34, 68% 35 to 54, 56% 55 and older). Strong majorities of Democrats and independe nts say blacks and other minorities are treated differently, while a majority of Republicans say they are not. “Do you think blacks and other minorities receive equal treatment as whites in the criminal justice system or not?” All adults Party Race/Ethnicity Dem Rep Ind African Americans Latinos Whites Others Receive equal treatment 29% 12% 56% 32% 6% 24% 36% 32% Do not receive equal treatment 66 86 34 65 90 70 60 65 Don't know 5 2 9 3 4 6 4 3 14 2536 32 24 37 38 31 31 28 17 27 30 9 810 0 20 40 60 80 100 African Americans Latinos WhitesOthers Percent PoorFairGoodExcellent “How would you rate the job your local police are doing in controlling crime in your community?” PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 20 Regional Map PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 21 Methodology The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from associate survey director Dean Bonner, project manager for this survey, and survey research a ssociates David Kordus and Lunna Lopes. The Californians and Their Government survey is supported with funding from the James Irvine Foundation, the California Endowment, and the PPIC Donor Circle . The PPIC Statewide Survey invites input, comments, and sug gestions from policy and public opinion experts and from its own advisory committee, but survey methods, questions, and content are determined solely by PPIC’s survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 1,70 6 Califor nia adult residents, including 1,106 interviewed on cell phones and 600 interviewed on landline telephones . Interviews took an average of 18 minutes to complete. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights from March 5 – 14 , 201 7. Cell phone interviews were condu cted using a computer-generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching a n eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Landline interviews were conducted using a compute r-generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. For both landlines and cell phones, Survey Sampling International estimates which phone numbers are likely to be associated with Asian American individuals. These phone numbers are called up to three additional times to increase our ability to interview Asian American adults. Live landline and cell phone interviews were conducted by Abt SRBI, Inc., in English and Spanish, according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc., translated new survey questions into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI use s the US Census Bureau’s 2011 –2015 American Community Survey’s (ACS) Public Use Microdata Series for California (with regional coding information from the University of Minnesota’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series for California) to compare certain d emographic characteristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the ACS figures. To estimate landline and cell phone s ervice in California, Abt SRBI used 2015 state -level estimates released by the National Center for Health Statistics —which used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the ACS —and 2016 estimates for the West Census Region in the latest NH IS report. The estimates for California were then compared against landline and cell phone service reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party registration of registered voters in our sample to party registration statewide. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 22 adjusted for differences across regional, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone serv ice, and party registration groups. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±3. 3 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total unweighted sample of 1,70 6 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the r esults will be within 3. 3 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for unweighted subgroups is larger: for the 1,500 adults asked Q22b (travel ban) from March 6 –14, the sampling error is ±3.5 percent; for the 1, 385 registered voters, it is ±3. 7 percent; for the 1,069 likely voters, it is ±4. 2 percent. Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for five geographic regions, accounting for approximate ly 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. We also refer to two geographic subreg ions within the Central Valley. “Sacramento Metro and the North Valley ” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Placer, Sacramento, Shasta, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba counties. “San Joaquin Valley” includes Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare counties. Residents of other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample size s for these less populous areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for non -Hispanic whites, who account for 43 percent of the state’s adult population, and also for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population, and non- Hispanic African Americans, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups — such as non-Hispanic Asian Americans and Native Americans—are combined into an “other” category ; they are included in the results rep orted for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, registered Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in other parties are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated per their responses to survey questions about voter registration, pr evious election participation, and current interest in politics. The percentages presented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to those in national surveys by Gallup, CBS News, CNN/ORC , and the Pew Research Center . Additional details about our methodology can be found at www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 23 Questionnaire and Results CALIFORNIANS AND THE IR GOVERNMENT March 5– 14, 2017 1,706 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ±3. 3% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE P ERCENTAGES MAY NOT A DD TO 100 DUE TO ROUNDING First, thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today? [code, don’t read] 20% jobs, economy 16 immigration, illegal immigration 8 government in general, problems with elected officials, parties 8 water, drought 7 health care, health insurance 5 education, schools, teachers 5 infrastructure 4 homelessness 4 housing costs, availability 3 crime, gangs, drugs 3 environment, pollution, global warming 3 state budget, deficit, taxes 2 race relations, racial and ethnic issues 8 other (specify) 4 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 58% approve 25 disapprove 17 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 51% approve 33 disapprove 16 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and senate districts are doing at this time? 53% approve 32 disapprove 16 don’t know Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 55% right direction 39 wrong direction 6 don’t know Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 51% good times 40 bad times 9 don’t know Next, Overall, how fair do you think our present state and local tax system is— would you say it is very fair, moderately fair, not too fair, or not at all fair? 6% very fair 49 moderately fair 24 not too fair 18 not at all fair 3 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 24 When you combine all of the taxes you pay to state and local governments, do you feel that you pay much more than you should, somewhat more than you should, about the right amount, or less than you should? 35% much more 23 somewhat more 37 about the right amount 2 less than you should 3 don’t know Overall, do you think the state and local tax system is in need of major changes, minor changes, or do you think it is fine the way it is? 42% major changes 37 minor changes 18 fine the way it is 3 don’t know On another topic, [rotate questions 10 and 11 ] How important do you think it is for the state to be spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure in your part of California —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 61% very important 27 somewhat important 7 not too important 3 not at all important 1 don’t know The governor has proposed to improve the reliability of water supplies by building tunnels in the Sacramento -San Joaquin Delta. How important is this proposal for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 51% very important 26 somewhat important 7 not too important 7 not at all important 9 don’t know On another topic , Next, as you may know, California voters passed a $10 billion state bond in 2008 for planning and construction of a high -speed rail system from Anaheim to the Central Valley and San Francisco. The estimated costs associated with this 520 mile phase of the high -speed rail system are about $64 billion over the next 20 years. Do you favor or oppose building a high -speed rail system in California? (If oppose, ask: “What if the high -speed rail system cost less, would you favor or oppose building it?”) 48% favor 18 oppose, but would favor if it cost less 28 oppose, even if it cost less 6 don’t know Thinking ahead, how important is the high - speed rail system for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California—is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 33% very important 31 somewhat important 16 not too important 17 not at all important 2 don’t know On another topic, Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Donald Trump is hand ling his job as president? 31% approve 61 disapprove 7 don’t know 14a. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that President Trump is handling terrorism and homeland security issues? 37% approve 57 disapprove 6 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 25 14b. Please tell me which of the following best reflects your impression of Donald Trump so far. Does Donald Trump impress you as trustworthy or not trustworthy? 31% trustworthy 64 not trustworthy 5 don’t know [rotate questions 15 and 16] Overall, do you app rove or disapprove o f the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as US senator? 49% approve 32 disapprove 19 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Kamala Harris is handling her job as US senator? 46% approve 23 disap prove 30 don’t know O verall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the US Congress is handling its job? 36% approve 55 disapprove 9 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way your own representative to the US House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job? 51% approve 32 disapprove 17 don’t know Changing topics, Which comes closest to your view about undocumented imm igrants who are living in the US? [rotate order ] (1 ) the y sho uld be allowed to stay in the U S and eventually apply for citizenship, ( 2) they should be allowed to stay in the US legally, but not be allowed to apply for citizenship, [ or ], (3) they should be required to leave the US . 68% they should be allowed to stay in the US and eventually apply for citizenship 12 they sho uld be allowed to stay in the US legally, but not be allowed to apply for citizenship 15 they should be required to leave the US 5 don’t know All in all, would you favor or oppose building a wall along the entire bo rder with Mexico? 25% favor 72 oppose 3 don’t know On another topic, how much of a problem is terrorism and security in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 27% big problem 35 somewhat of a problem 35 not much of a problem 3 don’t know In gener al, how well do you think the U S government is doing in reducing the threat of terrorism—very well, fairly well, not too well, or not at all well? 19% very well 38 fairly well 24 not too well 15 not at all well 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 26 22a. What concerns you more about the government's anti -terrorism policies -- [rotate] (1) that they have not gone far enough to protect the country [or] (2) that they have gone too far in restricting the average person's civil liberties? 36% not gone far enough 52 gone too far 6 neither (volunteered) 7 don’t know 22b. [asked beginning March 6] As you may know, Donald Trump has issued a revised executive order that temporarily bans most people from entering the U S who are from the countries of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. Do you approve or disapprove of this action? 37% approve 58 disapprove 5 don’t know Changing topics, For each of the following issues, please indicate which statement comes closest to your own view, even if neither is exactly right. [rotate questions 23 and 24 ] [rotate ] (1) Government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest; [or ] (2) Government regulation of business does more harm than good. 56% government regulation of bus iness is necessary to protect the public interest 37 government regulation of business does more harm than good 7 don’t know [rotate] (1) Stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy [or] (2) Stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the cost. 37% stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy 54 stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the cost 9 don’t know Next, how much of the time do you think you can trust the federal government in Washington today to do what is right —just about always, most of the time, or only some of the time? 7% just about always 22 most of the time 62 only some of the time 7 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 70% a few big interests 25 benefit of all of t he people 5 don’t know Do you think the people in the federal government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 61% a lot 27 some 8 don’t waste very much 3 don’t know On another topic, how much of a problem are violence and street crime i n your local community today—a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 25% big problem 35 somewhat of a problem 39 not much of a problem – don’t know How would you rate the job your loca l police are doing in controlling crime in your community—excellent, good, fair, or poor? 30% excellent 35 good 24 fair 10 poor 1 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 27 Do you think blacks and other minorities receive equal treatment as whites in the criminal justice system or not? 29% receive equal treatment 66 do not receive equal treatment 5 don’t know Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 69% yes [ask q31a] 31 no [skip to q32b] 31a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 45% Democrat [ask q32 ] 26 Republican [skip to q32a] 5 another party (specify) [skip to q33 ] 25 independent [skip to q32 b] Would you call yourself a strong Democr at or not a very strong Democrat? 60% strong 39 not very strong 1 don’t know [skip to q33] 32a. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 58% strong 39 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q33] 32b. Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 28% Republican Party 46 Democratic Party 20 neither (volunteered) 6 don’t know Would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 15% very liberal 21 somewhat liberal 26 middle -of-the -road 23 somewhat conservative 11 very conservative 3 don’t know Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 26% great deal 38 fair amount 26 only a little 10 none – don’t know [d1-d 15 demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect Angela Glover Blackwell President and CEO PolicyLink Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director B ill Lane Center for the American West Stanford University Jon Cohen Vice President of Survey Research SurveyMonkey Joshua J. Dyck Co-Director Center for Public Opinion University of Massachusetts, Lowell Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Sil icon Valley Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Professor Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California Robert Lapsley President California Business Roundtable Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Sonja Petek Fiscal and Policy Analyst California Legislative Analyst’s Office Lisa Pitney Vice President of Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Mindy Romero Founder and Director California Civic Engag ement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change Robert K. Ross, MD President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Carol Whiteside Principal California Strategies The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mas Masumoto, Chair Author and Farmer Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect María Blanco Executive Director Undocumented Student Legal Services Center University of California Office of the President Louise Henry Bryson Chair Emerita, Board of Trustees J. Paul Getty Trust A. Marisa Chun Partner McDermott Will & Emery LLP Chet Hewitt President and CEO Sierra Health Foundation Phil Isenberg Former Chair Delta Stewardship Council Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni, LLP Gerald L. Parsky Chairman Aurora Capital Group Kim Polese Chairman ClearStreet, Inc. Gaddi H. Vasquez Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Edison International Southern California Edison Public Policy Institute of California 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94111 T: 415.291.4400 F: 415.291.4401 PPIC.ORG PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, C A 95814 T: 916.440.1120 F: 916.440.1121" } ["___content":protected]=> string(123) "

Statewide Survey - March 2017

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(109) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-their-government-march-2017/s_317mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(9041) ["ID"]=> int(9041) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:43:19" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(4611) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(29) "Statewide Survey - March 2017" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "s_317mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_317MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "684792" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(74842) "PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 Californians & Their Government Mark Baldassare Dean Bonner David Kordus Lunna Lopes CONTENTS Press Release 3 Federal Issues 6 State Issues 13 Regional Map 20 Methodology 21 Questionnaire and Results 23 Supported with funding from the James Irvine Foundation, the California Endowment, and the PPIC Donor Circle. The PPIC Statewide Survey provides a voice for the public and likely voters— informing policymakers, encouraging discussion, and raising awareness on critical issues of the day. © 201 7 Public Policy Institute of California The Public Policy Institute of California is dedicated to informing and improving public policy in California through independent, objective, nonpartisan research. PPIC is a public charity. It does not take or s upport positions on any ballot measures or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source. Research publications reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of our funders or of the staff, officers, advisory councils, or board of directors of the Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 3 CONTACT Linda Strean 415 -291 -4412 Serina Correa 415 -291 -4417 News Release EMBARGOED: Do not publish or broadcast until 9:00 p.m. PDT on Wednesday , March 22, 2017. Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND THE IR GOVERNMENT Majority Oppose Trump’s Travel Ban FEW SEE TERRORISM, SECURITY AS A BIG PROBLEM IN CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO, March 22 , 2017—Most Californians disapprove of President Donald Trump’s order banning travel to the US by people from six majority Muslim countries, according to a statewide survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) with funding from the James Irvine Foundation. When Californians are asked about the president’s revised order to temporarily ban travelers from the six nations, 58 percent disapprove while 37 percent approve. There is a sharp par tisan divide on the question: 85 percent of Republicans approve, 81 percent of Democrats disapprove, and independents are more likely to disapprove (5 4%) than approve (42% ). “As the new administration’s terrorism policies take shape, most Californians are opposed to the travel ban involving six Muslim majority countries,” said Mark Baldassare, PPIC president and CEO. When Californians are asked to asse ss how Trump is handling terrorism and homeland security , 57 percent disapprove (37% approve) . Most Californians say the federal government is doing very well (19%) or fairly well (38%) at reducing the threat of terrorism . More than half of residents acro ss parties, regions, and demographic groups say the government is doing well. This view is most widely held among Republicans (70%) and residents of the Inland Empire (67%), where the terrorist attack in San Bernardino occurred in December 2015. Only abou t a quarter of state residents (27%) today call terrorism and security a big problem in California. The percentage of Californians characterizing terrorism as a big problem has dropped 16 points since January 2016 and is now similar to what it had been in periodic surveys dating back to December 2001. Across regions, residents in the Inland Empire (34%) are the most likely to call terrorism a big problem and those in the San Francisco Bay Area (21%) the least likely. Regarding another aspect of anti -terrorism policies, about half of Californians (52%) say the government has gone too far in restricting civil liberties, while 36 percent say the government has not gone far enough to protect the country. Two-Thirds Favor P ath to Citizenship for Undocumented Immigrants A strong majority of Californians (68%) say that undocumented immigrants living in the US should be allowed to stay and eventually apply for citizenship, while 12 percent say undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay legally but not be allowed to apply for citizenship. Only 15 percent say these immigrants should be required to leave. Across parties, an overwhelming majority of Democrats (8 2%) and a solid majority of independents (62%) say undocumented immigrants should be allowed to eventually apply for citizenship, as do 46 percent of Republicans. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 4 How important is immigration policy to Californians? When asked to name the most important issue facing the state , immigration or illegal immigration is No. 2 (16%), behind jobs and the economy (20%). Just a quarter of Californians (25%) favor building a wall along the entire border with Mexico, as the president proposes. A strong majority of Republicans (68%) are in favor of the wall, while overwhelming majo rities of independents (73%) and Democrats (92%) oppose it. Majorities across racial/ethnic groups, regions, and age, education, and income groups are opposed. “The proposal to build a wall along the entire Mexic an border is not gaining any traction in California,” Baldassare said. Most Support Business, Environmental Regulation As President Trump focuses on reducing government regulations, the survey asks Californians what they think about government regulation of business. Most state residents (56%) say i t is necessary to protect the public interest , while 37 percent say it does more harm than good. Across partisan groups, 69 percent of Democrats say business regulation is necessary and 65 percent of Republicans s ay it does more harm than good. In the area of environmental regulation, just over half of Californians (54%) say stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the costs, while 37 percent say stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy. A Third Approve of Trump’s Job Performance About a third of Californians (31% all adults, 35% likely voters) approve of the job President Trump is doing. His approval rating is unchanged from January (30% adults, 34% likely voters). Partisan divisions today remain deep (82% Republicans approve, 91% Democrats and 57% independents disapprove). Men are 15 points more likely than women to approve (39% to 24%), and whites (45%) are more likely than Latinos (17%) and African Americans (16%) to approve. Asked whether Trump is trustworthy, 31 percent of adults and 3 5 percent of likely voters say yes ; 64 percent of adults and likely voters say no. Slightly more than a third of California adults (36%) and a quarter of likely voters (27%) approve of the way Congress is handling its job. Republicans (48%) are much more likely than Democrats (23%) or independents (28%) to approve. Among Republicans, approval has increased 9 points since January (39%). About half of Californians (51 % adults, 49% likely voters) approve of their own repr esentative to the US House. Half of Californians (49% adults, 51% likely voters) approve of Senator Dianne Feinstein’s job performance. As Senator Kamala Harris begins her term, she has a 46 percent approval rating from all adults and 49 percent from like ly voters. Notably, about 30 perce nt of adults and 25 percent of likely voters are unsure how to rate Harris. How much trust do Californians place in the federal government in Washington? Just under a third say they can trust government to do what is right just about always (7%) or most of the time (22%). Most (62%) say they can trust it some of the time, and 7 percent say none of the time. In periodic surveys since 1998, fewer than half have said they trust the government just ab out always or most of the time. Majorities Approve of Governor Governor Jerry Brown has a job approval rating of 58 percent among all adults and 61 percent among likely voters. His rating is similar to January (62% both all adults and likely voters) and higher than last March (51% adults, 53% likely voters). Today his approval rating is 79 percent among Democrats, 53 percent among independents, and 26 percent among Republicans. About half of Californians (51% adults, 48% likely voters) approve of the way the legislature is doing its job. Similar proportions of residents (53% adults, 52% likely voters) approve of their representatives in the assembly and senate . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 5 Most Favor Spending on Flood Management In the aftermath of widespread flooding and a crisis at Oroville Dam, a solid major ity of residents (61%) say it is very important for California to spend more money on water and flood management infrastructure in their part of the state. An additional 27 percent say this is somewhat important . Majorities across regions say more spending in this area is very important. “After the recent rains, many Californians have added water and flood management to their wish list for meeting the state’s infrastructure needs,” Baldassare said. Asked about the governor’s proposal to build tunnels in t he Sacramento–San Joaquin Valley Delta, about half (51%) say it is very important (26% somewhat important, 14% not too impor tant or not at all important). There are wide regio nal differences: 64 percent of Los Angeles residents call the tunnels very import ant but just 40 percent in the Central Valley express this view. Opinion within the Central Valley varies: i n the San Joaquin Valley 79 percent of resident s say the tunnels are at least somewhat important, while 58 percent of Sacramento Metro and North Valley residents express this view . Residents Split on High -Speed Rail Californians are closely divided between favoring (48%) and opposing (46%) construction of a high - speed rail system in California. A total of 66 percent say they would favor high -speed rail if it cost less than the current estimate of $64 billion over the next 20 years. Across regions, support for high -speed rail is highest in Los Angeles (56 %) and lowest in the Central Valley (39%). Most Say Criminal Justice System Inequitable A quarter of residents (25%) call violence and street crime a big problem in their communities (35% somewhat of a problem). In January 2016, 20 percent called it a big problem . The view that crime is a big problem is more common in the Central Valley (32%) and Los Angeles (29%) than in Orange/San Diego (20%) and the San Francisco Bay Area (19%). It is also somewhat more common among Latinos (32%) and African Americans (30%) than among whites (22%) and other racial/ethnic groups (19 %). How are local police doing in controlling crime? Two -thirds of residents say police are doing an excellent job (30%) or a good one (35%). African Americans (38%) are far less likely to say police are doing an excellent or good job than are Latinos (62 %), whites (74%), and members of other racial/ethnic groups (63%). Solid majorities across parties say police are doing an excellent or good job. Two -thirds of residents (66%) say that blacks and other minorities do not receive treatment equal to whites in the criminal justice system —up from 55 percent in January 2015. Today, 90 percent of African Americans express this view, as do solid majorities of Latinos, whites, and Californians in other racial/ethnic groups. This view is also more common among younge r adults than older ones (74% age 18–34, 68% 35 –54, 56% 55 and older). “While most Californians give excellent or good ratings to their local police, there is a large and growing belief that there are racial disparities in the criminal justice system,” Baldassare said. State, Local Tax System Considered Fair As the April tax filing deadline ap proaches, most Californians say the state and local tax system is fair (6% very fair, 49% moderately fair). However, most residents also say they pay more taxes to state and local governments than they feel they should (35% much more, 23% somewhat m ore). At the same time, less than half (42%) say major changes are needed in the state and local tax systems. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 6 Federal Issues Key Findings Thirty-one percent of California adults approve of President Trump and 36 percent approve of Congress. About half approve of their own representatives to the House of Representatives (51%) , Senator Dianne Feinstein (49%) , and Senator Kamala Harris (4 6% ). (pages 7, 8 ) An overwhelming majority of Californians say that undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States should be allowed to stay in the country and eventually apply for citizenship (68%) or should be allowed to stay but without prospects for citizenship (12%). Fifteen percent think these immigrants shoul d be required to leave the US. Most (72%) oppose building a wall along the entire Mexico border. (page s 8, 9) One in four Californians (27% ) view terrorism and security as a big problem in the state today; 35 percent say it is somewhat of a problem and 35 percent say it is not much of a problem. S ix in ten say the US government is doing very (19%) or fairly well (3 8%) in reducing the threat of terrorism. Fewer than four in ten approve of President Trump’s handling of terrorism (37%) or his revised travel ban (37%) . (page 10) A majority of Californ ians say that government regulation of business is necessar y to protect the public interest (56 %). A similar majority thinks that stricter environmental laws are worth the costs (54 %). (page 11) Trust in the federal government remains low. Majorities say they can trust the federal government to do what is right only some or none of the time (69 %), that government i s run by a few big interests (70 %), and that a lot of taxpayer money is wasted (61 %). Sixty -four percent view President T rump as not trustworthy . (page 12) 86 87 92 72 66 73 37 37 28 0 20 40 60 80 100 May-16 Oct-16Mar-17 Percent DemocratsIndependentsRepublicans Opposition to building a border wall 6870 71 6070 11 15 12 1512 0 20 40 60 80 100 CentralValley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland EmpirePercent Allowed to stay, no path to citizenship Allowed to stay and apply for citizenship Preferred options for undocumented immigrants 37 1785 4240 58 81 1254 58 0 20 40 60 80 100 All adults Dem Rep IndLikely votersPercent Approve Disapprove Support for President Trump’s revised travel ban PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 7 Approval Ratings of Federal Elected Officials Donald Trump’s low approval ratings (31% adults, 35% likely voters) are unchanged from January ( 30 % adults, 34% likely voters). Today, an overwhelming majority of Republicans (82%) approve of President Trump while an overwhelming majority of Democrats (91%) disapprove. Independents are far more likely to disapprove (57%) than to approve (36%). Fewer than four in ten Californians ac ross all regions approve. Men are 15 points more likely than women to approve (39% to 24%) , and whites (45%) are much more likely than Latinos (17%) and African Americans (16%) to approve. In a recent Gallup weekly tracking poll, adults nationwide (42%) ar e more likely to approve of President Trump. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Donald Trump is handling his job as president?” Approve Disapprove Don’t know All adults 31% 61% 7% Likely voters 35 62 3 Party Democrats 8 91 2 Republicans 82 14 4 Independents 36 57 7 Region Central Valley 39 51 9 San Francisco Bay Area 28 64 7 Los Angeles 26 70 5 Orange/San Diego 32 60 8 Inland Empire 37 51 12 Slightly more than a third of adults (36%) and a quarter of likely voters (27%)—similar to January ( 33% adults, 25% likely voters) —approve of the way the US Congress is handling its job. Republicans (48%) are much more likely than Democrats (23%) and independents (28%) to approve. Notably, among Republicans , approval of C ongress has increased 9 poin ts since January (39%). Approval for Congress declines as income levels rise (42% under $40,000, 38% $40,000 to unde r $80,000, 28% $80,000 or more) ; the same is true with education . According to a March CNN/ORC poll, a somewhat lo wer share of adults nationwide approve of Congress (28% approve, 69% disapprove). About half of California adults (51%) and likely voters (49%) approve of their own representative s to the US House. Approval ratings were similar in September (51% adults, 4 7% likely voters ) and January 2016 (5 4% adults, 51% likely voters ). Democrats (56%) are more likely than Republicans and independents (46% each ) to approve of their own representative s. About half across regions approve (53% San Francisco Bay Area , 51% Central Valley, 50% Los Angeles, 50% Orange/San Diego, 48% Inland Empire). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind the way the US Congress is handling its job Approve 36% 23% 48% 28% 27% Disapprove 55 72 42 63 68 Don't know 9 5 10 10 6 the way your own representative to the US House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job Approve 51 56 46 46 49 Disapprove 32 31 42 36 38 Don't know 17 14 12 18 13 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 8 App roval Ratings of California’s U S Senators About half of Californians (49%) and likely voters (51%) approve of the way Senator Dianne Feinstein is handling her job, while one in three Californians and four in ten likely voters disapprove. Senator Feinstein’s appr oval rating was slightly higher in January 2016 (56% adults, 56% likely voters ). Today, majorities of Democrats (67%) and independents (53%) approve of her performance, compared to 25 percent of Republicans. Residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%) are much more likely than those in other regions to approve of Senator Feinstein (50% Los Angeles, 48% Orange/San Diego, 40% Central Valley, 40% Inland Empire). Senator Feinstein’s approval rating is slightly higher among older Californians (43% 18 to 34; 50% 35 to 54, 52% 55 and older) and college graduates (44% high school or less; 48% some college; 57% college graduate). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as US Senator?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Approve 49% 67% 25% 53% 51% Disapprove 32 18 64 38 39 Don’t know 19 15 10 10 10 As Kamala Harris begins her tenure as California’s junior senator, 46 percent of adults and 49 percent of likely voters approve of her performance. Notably, three in ten adults and a quarter of likely voters are not sure how to rate Senator Harris. Across parties, Democrats (6 4% ) are much more likely than independents (46%) and Republicans (25%) to approve. Across regions, Senator Harris’ s approval rating is highe r in the San Francisco Bay Area (53%) and Los Angeles (51%), than elsewhere (43% Central Valley, 41% Orange/San Diego , 38% Inland Empire ). Across demographic groups, a pproval of Senator Harris is slightly higher among college graduates (44% high school, 45% some college, 52% college graduates) and is highest among African Americans (63%). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Kamala Harris is handling her job as US Senator?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Approve 46% 64% 25% 46% 49% Disapprove 23 15 44 27 26 Don’t know 30 20 31 26 25 Immigration Policy On January 25, President Trump issued an executive order aimed at tightening border security and immigration enforcement. Today, a strong majority of Californians (68%) say that undocumented immigrants living in the US should be allowed to stay and eventua lly apply for citizenship; 12 percent say they should be allowed to stay legally, but not allowed to apply for citizenship. Only 15 percent say that undocumented immigrants currently living in the US should be required to leave. Across parties, an overwhel ming majority of Democrats (82%) and a solid majority of independents (62%) say PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 9 undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay and eventually apply for citizenship as do a plurality of Republicans (46%). A similar question in a February CBS News poll fo und that adults nationwide are somewhat less likely to say that undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay and eventually apply for citizenship (60% ), while 13 percent say they should be able to stay legally but not allowed to apply for citizenship and 23 percent say they should be required to leave. At least six in ten Californians across all regions say that undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay and have a path to citizenship. Across racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (82%) are the most likely to say that undocumented immigrants should have a path to citizenship, followed by African Americans (76%), whites (62%), and other racial/ethnic groups (58%). Majorities across all age, education, and income groups say that undocumente d immigrants should be able to eventually apply for citizenship, though those age 55 and older are less likely than 18 -to -34 -year -olds, college graduate s are less likely than those with only a high school education, and Californians with incomes over $80,0 00 per year are less likely than those with an annual income under $40,000 to say so. “Which comes closest to your view about undocumented imm igrants who are living in the US ? They sho uld be allowed to stay in the US and eventually apply for citizenship, they shoul d be allowed to stay in the US legally, but not be allowed to apply for citizenship, or they should be required to leave the US ?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Stay and eventually apply for citizenship 68% 82% 46% 62% 66% Stay legally but not allowed to apply for citizenship 12 10 10 14 11 Required to leave the US 15 6 36 19 19 Don’t know 5 3 7 5 4 Twenty -five percent of Californians and 29 percent of likely voters favor building a wall along the entire border with Mexico. Responses were similar in September (25% adults, 34% likely voters) and May (26% adults, 33% likely voters). Today, a strong majority of Republicans (68%) are in favor, while overwhelming majorities of independents (73%) and Democrats (92%) are opposed. Solid majorities across racial/ethnic groups are opposed, with Latinos (86%) most likely to hold this view. More than six in t en adults across regions and age, education, and income groups oppose building a wall along the border with Mexico. Among those who approve of President Trump, 65 percent favor building a wall. Among those who disapprove of the president, 94 percent are op posed. In a February Pew Research Center poll, 35 percent of adults nationwide favored building a wall while 62 percent were opposed. “All in all, would you favor or oppose building a wall along the entire border with Mexico?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Favor 25% 6% 68% 26% 29% Oppose 72 92 28 73 69 Don’t know 3 1 4 1 2 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 10 Terrorism About one in four Californians think that terrorism and security present a big problem in California today; 35 percent say terrorism is somewhat of a problem and 35 percent say it is not much of a problem. The share calling terrorism a big problem has dropped 16 points since January 2016 —shortly after the terrorist attack in San Bernardino —but is similar to the share in surveys dating back to December 2001. Republicans (44%) are more than twice as likely as Democrats (18%) to view this as a big problem. Across regions, Inland Empire residents (34%) are the most likely —and San Francisco Bay Area residents (21%) least likely —to call terrorism a big problem. “How much of a problem is terrorism and security in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Big problem 27% 18% 44% 25% 24% Somewhat of a problem 35 35 33 37 35 Not much of a problem 35 45 20 34 39 Don't know 3 1 3 3 2 When it comes to the government’s handling of terrorism, about six in ten Californians say the US government is doing very (19%) or fairly well (38%) in reducing the threat. A similar share held this view in January 2016 (24% very, 37% fairly). More than half of Californians across parties, regions, and demographic groups think the government is doing well— this perception is most widely held among Republicans (70%) and Inland Empire residents (67%). Regarding the government’s anti -terrorism policies, 52 percent of Californians think that they have gone too far in restricting th e average person's civil liberties, while 36 percent think that they have not gone far enough to protect the country. Partisans are divided on this issue , while pluralities among nearly all demographic groups (except those age 55 and older) say policies have gone too far. “In general, how well do you think the US government is doing in r educing the threat of terrorism?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Very well 19% 12% 17% 16% 14% Fairly well 38 41 53 38 44 Not too well 24 25 16 29 22 Not at all well 15 18 12 14 16 Don't know 4 5 2 3 3 Thirty -seven percent of Californians approve of the way that President Trump is handling terrorism and homeland security issues (57 % disapprove). An overwhelming majority of Republicans (80%) approve, an overwhelming majority of Democrats (86%) disapprove , and independents are more evenly divided (45% approve, 52% disapprove). Fewer than half across regions and demographic groups approve. When it comes to President Trump’s revised travel ban, 37 percent approve and 5 8 percent disapprove. Likely voters hold similar opinions (40% approve, 58% disapprove). Most Republicans (85%) approve, most Democrats (81%) disapprov e, and independents are more likely to disapprove (54%) than approve (4 2% ). Fewer than half across regions and demographic groups approve of the president’s travel ban. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 11 Government Regulation Given President Trump’s focus on reducing government regulations, how do Californians perceive government regulation of busi ness? A majority of Californians (56%) think government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest, while 37 percent think it does more harm than good. Findings were similar last March (60% necessary ), but somewhat l ower in March 20 12 (48% necessary ). There is a deep divide between partisans , with 69 percent of Democrats saying regulation is necessary and 65 percent of Republicans saying it does more harm than good. The belief that regulation is necessary is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (63%) and lowest in the Inland Empire (48%). A plurality of Californians across demographic groups think regulation is necessary. Notably, Californians across age groups hold similar views, while college graduates are more likely than others t o think that the regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest. “Please indicate which statement comes closest to your own view, even if neither is exactly right—government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest, or government regulation of business does more harm than good? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Necessary to protect the public interest 56% 69% 31% 49% 56% Does more harm than good 37 24 65 47 39 Don't know 7 7 4 4 5 D ifferences between state policy and emerging federal policy appear to be developing in the area of environmental regulation . President Trump has proposed instituting changes at the Environmental Protection Agency , including rolling back regulations on water and fuel economy standards as well as altering the role that climate change plays in environmental rules. Slightly more than half of Californians (54%) think stricter environmental laws and regulations are wort h the cost, while fewer (37%) think stricter laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy. Finding s today are similar to March 2014 (55% worth costs, 38% too costly) and pluralit ies have said they are worth the cost in surveys since 1998. M ost Democrats (71%) think these laws are worth the cost while most Republicans (61%) say they are too costly. Pluralities across regional, age, and income groups think these laws and regulations are worth the cost. Notably, Californians age 18 to 34 (59%) are more likely than those age 55 and older (49%) to say they are worth the cost. Among those who approve of President Trump, about six in ten say government regulation of business does more harm than good (60%) and that stricter environmental laws and re gulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy (58%) . “Please indicate which statement comes closest to your own view, even if neither is exactly right —stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy, or stricter envi ronmental laws and regulations are worth the cost? ” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Cost too many jobs and hurt the economy 37% 23% 61% 42% 34% Worth the cost 54 71 34 52 61 Don't know 9 6 6 6 5 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 12 Trust in Federal G overnment President Trump is viewed as trustworthy by 31 percent of adults, while 64 percent view him as untrustworthy. In a Pew Research Center national survey in February , 37 percent said he was trustworthy and 59 percent said he was untrustworthy. In California, most Democrats (91%) and independents (60%) view him as untrustworthy while most Republicans (81%) view him as trustworthy. M ajorities across regions and demographic groups view him as untrustworthy . Among likely voters, 35 percent say that President Trump is trustworthy and 64 percent say that he is untrustworthy. T hree in ten California adults say they can trust the federal government to do what is right just about always (7%) or most of the time (22%), while seven in ten say it can be trusted some (62%) or none (7%) of the time. Fewer than half have said that they trust the government just about always or most of the time in surveys dating back to 1998. While most Republicans view Donald Trump as trustworthy, three in ten say they can trust government most of the time or just about always. Fewer Democrats hold this view , as do fewer than four in ten across regions and demographic groups. “Next, how much of the time do you think you can trust the federal government in Washington today to do what is righ t—just about always, most of the time, or only some of the time?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Just about always 7% 3% 5% 4% 2% Most of the time 22 15 24 18 18 Some of the time 62 71 63 73 69 None of the time (volunteered) 7 10 5 5 10 Don’t know 2 1 2 – 1 Nearly all Californians think the federal government wastes a lot of (61%) or some (27%) taxpayer money; just 8 percent say it does not waste very much. The belief that the federal government waste s a lot of money was similar in October (55%); a majority has held this view dating back to 1998. Majorities across parties think that the government wastes a lot (59% Democrats, 69% independents, 71% Republicans) . Majorities across regions and demographic groups agree, with a t least six in ten across education and income groups holding this view. A strong majority of Californians (70%) think that the federal government is run by a few big interests looking out for themselves rather than for the benefit of all the people (25%). This belief was similar in October (64%) ; a majority has maintained this view in surveys since 1998. Partisans are once again distrustful of government , with more than two in three saying government is run by a few big interests. M ore than two in three across regions hold this view , as do more than six in ten across age, education, and income groups. “Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the ben efit of all of the people?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind A few big interests 70% 78% 68% 78% 79% Benefit of all the people 25 19 28 19 17 Don’t know 5 3 5 4 4 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 13 State Issues Key Findings  Governor Brown has the approval of 58 percent of Californians, while slight majorities approve of the state legislature (5 1% ) and their own legislators in the state assembly and senate (5 3% ). (page 14)  Californians are most likely to name j obs and the economy (20% ) and immigration (16 %) as the most important issues. M ore than h alf of Californians think the state is heading in the right direction (55 %) and that there will be good economic times in the next 12 months (5 1% ). (page 15 )  While more than half of Californians think the state and local tax system is very (6%) or moderately fair (49%), a similar share also think they pay much more (35 %) or somewhat more (2 3% ) than they should in state and local taxes. (page 16 )  Most Californians (6 1% ) think that it is very important for the state to spend more money on water and flood management infrastructure in their part of California. About half (51%) say it is very important to build tunnels in the Sacramento –San Joaquin Delta to improve the reliability of water supplies . (page 17)  Californians are divided on the high- speed rail system (48 % favor, 4 6% oppose) . One in three say it is very important for California’s future quality of life and economic vitality . (page 18 )  One in four (2 5% ) Californians view violence and street crime in their local community as a big problem; 35 percent say it is somewhat and 39 percent say it is not much of a problem . Two in three adults think their local police are doing an excellent or good job in controlling crime, but two in three think minorities do not receive equal treatment in the criminal justice system . (page 19) 58 51 0 20 40 60 80 Mar-12 Mar-13Mar-14Mar-15Mar-16Mar-17 Percent all adults Governor Brown California Legislature Approval ratings of state elected officials 65 5663 6062 40 4964 4852 0 20 40 60 80 100 CentralValley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Percent Spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure Building tunnels in the Sacramento– San Joaquin Delta Water policy options viewed as very important 39 3329 55 61 66 0 20 40 60 80 100 2015 20162017 Percent all adults Receive equal treatment Do not receive equal treatment Minorities in the criminal justice system PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 14 Approval Ratings of State Elected Officials About six in ten Californians (58% adults, 61% likely voters) approve of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as California governor. The governor’s approval rating was sim ilar in January (62% adults, 62% likely voters) and lower last March (51% adults, 53% likely voters). Today, the governor’s approval rating is 79 percent among Democrats, 53 percent among independents, and 26 percent among Republicans. More than h alf across regions, age, and rac ial/ethnic groups say they approve. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California?” Approve Disapprove Don’t know All adults 58% 25% 17% Likely voters 61 32 7 Party Democrats 79 9 12 Republicans 26 65 8 Independents 53 35 12 Region Central Valley 52 31 17 San Francisco Bay Area 64 21 15 Los Angeles 60 21 19 Orange/San Diego 56 30 13 Inland Empire 53 28 19 Fifty-one percent of adults and 48 percent of likely voters approve of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job. Approval of the legislature was in a similar range in January (57% adults, 50% likely voters) and lower last March (44% adul ts, 38% likely voters). Today, 66 percent of Democrats , compared to 43 percent of independents and 24 percent of Republicans , say that they approve. Half or more adult residents in almost all regions (5 5% San Francisco Bay Area, 53 % Orange/San Diego , 51% Los Angeles, 50% Central Valley )— with the exception of the Inland Empire (40%)— approve of the legislature. Similarly, 5 3 percent of adults and 52 percent of likely voters approve of the way that their own state legislators are representing them . The shares holding this view were similar in September 2016 (52% adults, 4 9 % likely voters) and approval was slightly lower among likely voters in January 2016 (49% adults, 45% likely voters ). Today, 6 6 percent of Democrats, 4 5 percent of independents, and 35 percent of Republicans approve of their legislators. Half or more adult residents in almost all regions (61% San Francisco Bay Area, 52% Central Valley, 52% Los Angeles, 50% Orange/San Diego)— with the exception of the Inland Empire (46%) —approve of their legislat ors. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of …?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind the way that the California Legislature is handling its job Approve 51% 66% 24% 43% 48% Disapprove 33 19 67 45 41 Don't know 16 15 10 12 11 the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and senate districts are doing at this time Approve 53 66 35 45 52 Disapprove 32 22 54 42 38 Don't know 16 12 11 13 11 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 15 Overall Mood Californians are most likely to name jobs and the economy ( 20% adults, 19% likely voters) and immigration (16% adults, 15% likely voters) as the most important issues facing pe ople in California today; fewer than one in ten name other issues including government, water, and health care . In March 2016, jo bs and the economy (27% adults, 29% likely voters) and water and the drought (20% adults, 23% likely voters) were the top two issues while fewer named immigration (7% adults, 8% likely voters). Today, jobs and the economy and immigration are the top two issues in all regions . “First, thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today?” Top 5 issues All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Jobs, economy 20% 21% 23% 18% 18% 21% 19% Immigration, illegal immigration 16 13 15 19 17 17 15 Government, elected officials 8 8 11 7 5 7 10 Water, drought 8 12 6 6 9 8 9 Health care, health insurance 7 8 8 5 6 5 10 Fifty -five percent of adults and 5 3 percent of likely voters say that things in California are generally going in the right direction. The view that the state is headed in the right direction was similar in January (58% adults, 58% likely voters) and lower among likely voters last March (50% adults, 45% likely voters). Today, Democrats (71 %) are far more likely than independents (4 8% ) and Republicans (24%) to say that things are going in the right direction. Half or more adult residents in all regions (62% San Francisco Bay Area, 55% Inland Empire, 55% Orange/San Diego, 54% Los Angeles) with the exception of the Central Valley (46%) say that things in California are generally going in the right direction. “Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wr ong direction?” All adults Party Likely voters Dem Rep Ind Right direction 55% 71% 24% 48% 53% Wrong direction 39 23 72 48 43 Don’t know 6 6 4 4 4 Half of Californians (5 1% adults, 50% likely voters) today are saying that California will have good times financially in the next 12 months. Expectations for good economic times were in similar ranges in January (53% adults, 51% likely voters) and last March (51% adults, 46% lik ely voters). Today, about half of independents (52%) and Democrats (49%) are optimistic; 44 percent of Republicans expect good times . A bout half or more across age and education groups are optimistic. About half or more across the state’s regions ( 55% Orange/San Diego, 54% Central Valley, 51% Los Angeles, 49% San Francisco Bay Area ), with the exception of the Inland Empire (43% ), expect good times financially in California . Men are much more likely than women to be optimistic (57% to 45%) and African Americ ans (27%) are by far the least optimistic across racial/ethnic groups. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 16 State and Local Tax System As the April 18 deadline for income tax returns approach es and as the Trump administration considers a federal tax overhaul , how do Californians perceive th eir state and local tax system? The present state and local tax system is viewed as moderately or very fair by majorities of California adults (6% very, 49% moderately) and likely voters (4 % very, 49% moderately). Californians gave similar responses last M arch (56% adults, 54% likely voters said very or moderately fair). Today, Democrats (6 0% ) and independents (5 3% ) are much more likely than Republicans (39%) to say that the state and local tax system is very or moderately fair. Majorities across income gro ups say that the state and local tax sys tem is very or moderately fair . “Overall, how fair do you think our present state and local tax system is— would you say it is very fair, moderately fair, not too fair, or not at all fair?” All adults Household income Likely voters Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Very fair 6% 7% 5% 5% 4% Moderately fair 49 51 52 49 49 Not too fair 24 25 25 24 26 Not at all fair 18 16 16 21 19 Don’t know 3 1 2 1 2 However, almost six in ten Californians say they pay more taxes to state and local governments than they feel they should (3 5% much more and 23% somewhat more for adults; 3 4% much more and 2 5% somewhat more for likely voters). The public’s perceptions of p aying much or somewhat more than they should in state and local taxes were similar last March (56% adults, 61% likely voters) before the passage of Proposition 55 (Proposition 30 tax extension) last fall. Today, Republicans (7 7% ) are more likely than indep endents (67% ) and far more likely than Democrats (4 8% ) to say that they pay much or somewhat more than they should. Majorities across income groups say they are paying much more or somewhat more than they should ; lower -income residents are the least likely to hold this perception . “When you combine all of the taxes you pay to state and local governments, do you feel that you pay much more than you should, somewhat more than you should, about the right amount, or less than you should?” All adults Household income Likely voters Under $40,000 $40,000 to under $80,000 $80,000 or more Much more than you should 35% 32% 34% 40% 34% Somewhat more than you should 23 19 23 28 25 About the right amount 37 44 37 29 36 Less than you should 2 3 2 2 2 Don’t know 3 3 3 1 2 About four in ten Californians (42% adults, 44% likely voters) say major changes are needed in the state and local tax system , compared to about half in May 2015 (49% adults, 54% likely voters). Today, fewer than half of homeowners (44%) and those earning $80,000 or more (43%) say major changes are needed. Democrats (3 1% ) are much less likely than independents (4 6% ) and Republicans (6 2%) to hold this view. PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 17 State Water Supply California’s wet season brought on flo oding across the state and an infrastructure crisis at Oroville Dam. Today, a so lid majority of Californians (61 %) say it is very important for the state to be spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure in their part of California. An additional 27 percent see this spending as somewhat important, and only one in ten say it is not too (7%) or not at all important (3%). Majorities across regions say more water and flood management infrastructure spending is very importa nt, ranging from 56 percent in the San Francisco Bay Area to 65 percent in the Central Valley. About six in ten across parties, age, education, and income groups say the same. “How important do you think it is for the state to be spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure in your part of California?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Very important 61% 65% 56% 63% 60% 62% 60% Somewhat important 27 25 28 28 30 22 30 Not too important 7 5 8 5 8 13 6 Not at all important 3 3 6 2 2 4 3 Don't know 1 2 1 2 – – 1 Californians are less likely to view the governor’s specific proposal to improve the reliability of water supplies by building tunnels in the Sacramento –San Joaquin Delta as very important . Slightly more than half (51%) say it is very important, 26 percent say it is somewhat important, and 1 4 percent say it is not too or not at all important. Responses were similar a year ago (54% adults, 45% likely voters sa id very important). Today, we find wide differences across regions, with 64 percent in Los Angeles calling the tunnels very important an d 40 percent saying the same in the Central Valley. There is a difference in opinion within the Central Valley itself, with residents of the San Joaquin Valley (48% very, 31% somewhat) more likely than residents of Sacramento Metro and the North Valley (39 % very, 19% somewhat) to say the tunnels are important. Across parties, Democrats (51%) and independents (49%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (43%) to say the tunnels are very important, and those who approve of the governor are much more likely than those who disapprove to hold this view (5 7% to 4 0% ). The view that the tunnels are very important is less common among those with higher incomes than among those with lower incomes (40% $80,000 or more; 56% $40,000 to $80,000; 58% under $40,000). Ac ross racial/ethnic groups, Latinos (63%) and African Americans (55%) are more likely than whites (42%) to express this view. “The governor has proposed to improve the reliability of water supplies by building tunnels in the Sacramento –San Joaquin Delta. How important is this proposal for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Very important 51% 40% 49% 64% 48% 52% 47% Somewhat important 26 28 23 22 31 30 25 Not too important 7 10 6 6 5 9 8 Not at all important 7 15 9 2 5 3 9 Don't know 9 8 12 6 11 6 11 PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 18 High -Speed Rail In November 2008 , California voters passed Proposition 1A —the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century —with 53 percent support. Today, about three in ten Californians (3 3% adults, 28% likely voters ) say the state’s high-speed rail system is very important for the state’s future quality of lif e and economic vitality. In our surveys since 2012, between 28 and 36 percent of adults have said the same. In our current survey, Democrats (37%) are nearly three times as likely as Republicans (13%) to say the high -speed rail system is very important for the state’s future (31% among independents). Across regions, Los Angeles residents (42%) are most likely to say it is very important. The likelihood of saying high -speed rail is very important declines with increasing age and income. “Thinking ahead, how important is the high-speed rail system for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Very important 33% 28% 32% 42% 33% 27% 28% Somewhat important 31 29 33 28 32 33 29 Not too important 16 15 14 14 17 27 16 Not at all important 17 25 18 14 18 11 25 Don't know 2 3 3 2 1 1 2 Californians are closely divided between favoring (48%) and opposing (46%) a high-speed rail system in California. A total of 66 percent say they would be in favor if the system cost less , while 28 percent would still be opposed. Among likely voters, a majority oppose building a high -speed rail system (54%), and 37 percent would still be opposed if it cost less. In response to a similar question last year, 52 percent of adults and 44 percent of likely voters said they favored building the system. Across regions today, support for the system is highest in Los Angeles (56%) a nd lowest in the Central Valley (39%). Democrats (55%) and independents (47%) are far more likely than Republicans (22%) to be in favor, and Latinos (54%) and African Americans (49%) are somewhat more likely than whites (41%) to be in favor. Across age gro ups, a majority of young Californians favor the system (57% 18 to 34), and support declines with increasing age (47% 35 to 54, 40% 55 and older). Those who approve of Governor Brown are much more likely than those who disapprove to favor the system (59% to 20%). “As you may know, California voters passed a $10 billion state bond in 2008 for planning and construction of a high -speed rail system from Anaheim to the Central Valley and San Francisco. The estimated costs associated with this 520 mile phase of th e high-speed rail system are about $64 billion over the next 20 years. Do you favor or oppose building a high -speed rail system in California?” 3950 56 4548 53 454049 44 0 20 40 60 80 CentralValley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Percent all adults 71 47 39 54 46 22 4755 41 48 0 20 406080 Republicans Independents Democrats Likely voters All adults Percent Favor Oppose PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 19 Crime, Police, and Race One in four Californians say that violence and street crime are a big problem in their local community. Californian s are slightly more likely today than they were in January 2016 to say crime is a big problem ( 20 % adults, 15% likely voters ). Across regions, the view that crime is a big problem is somewhat more common in the Central Valley and Los Angeles than in Orange/San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area. It is also somewhat more common among Latinos (32%) and African Americans (30%) than among whites (2 2%) and members of other racial/ethnic groups (19%). College graduates and thos e with annual incomes of $80,000 or more (13% each) are much less likely than others to say crime is a big problem. “How much of a problem are violence and street crime in your local community today?” All adults Region Likely voters Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/ San Diego Inland Empire Big problem 25% 32% 19% 29% 20% 26% 20% Somewhat of a problem 35 38 43 35 26 33 35 Not much of a problem 39 29 38 36 55 41 44 Don't know – 1 – – – – – Two in three Californians say their local police are doing an excellent (30%) or good (35%) job controlling crime in their community. Responses were similar in January 2 016 (29% excellent, 36% good). Today, African Americans (38%) are far less likely than Latinos (62%), whites (7 4%), and members of other racial/ethnic groups (63%) to say the police are doing an excellent or good job. Across regions, responses range from 59 percent saying excellent or good in the San Francisco Bay Area to 71 percent saying the same in Orange/San Diego. Across parties, Republicans (78%) are most likely to say police are doing an excellent or good j ob (70% independents, 63% Democrats). Two in three Californians say blacks and other minorities do not receive treatment equal to whites in the criminal justice system. That is up from 55 percent in January 2015. Today, 90 percent of African Americans exp ress this view, as do solid majorities of Latinos, whites, and member s of other racial /ethnic groups. This view is much more common among younger than older adults (74% 18 to 34, 68% 35 to 54, 56% 55 and older). Strong majorities of Democrats and independe nts say blacks and other minorities are treated differently, while a majority of Republicans say they are not. “Do you think blacks and other minorities receive equal treatment as whites in the criminal justice system or not?” All adults Party Race/Ethnicity Dem Rep Ind African Americans Latinos Whites Others Receive equal treatment 29% 12% 56% 32% 6% 24% 36% 32% Do not receive equal treatment 66 86 34 65 90 70 60 65 Don't know 5 2 9 3 4 6 4 3 14 2536 32 24 37 38 31 31 28 17 27 30 9 810 0 20 40 60 80 100 African Americans Latinos WhitesOthers Percent PoorFairGoodExcellent “How would you rate the job your local police are doing in controlling crime in your community?” PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 20 Regional Map PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 21 Methodology The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance from associate survey director Dean Bonner, project manager for this survey, and survey research a ssociates David Kordus and Lunna Lopes. The Californians and Their Government survey is supported with funding from the James Irvine Foundation, the California Endowment, and the PPIC Donor Circle . The PPIC Statewide Survey invites input, comments, and sug gestions from policy and public opinion experts and from its own advisory committee, but survey methods, questions, and content are determined solely by PPIC’s survey team. Findings in this report are based on a survey of 1,70 6 Califor nia adult residents, including 1,106 interviewed on cell phones and 600 interviewed on landline telephones . Interviews took an average of 18 minutes to complete. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights from March 5 – 14 , 201 7. Cell phone interviews were condu cted using a computer-generated random sample of cell phone numbers. All cell phone numbers with California area codes were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as eight times to increase the likelihood of reaching a n eligible respondent. Once a cell phone user was reached, it was verified that this person was age 18 or older, a resident of California, and in a safe place to continue the survey (e.g., not driving). Cell phone respondents were offered a small reimbursement to help defray the cost of the call. Cell phone interviews were conducted with adults who have cell phone service only and with those who have both cell phone and landline service in the household. Landline interviews were conducted using a compute r-generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All landline telephone exchanges in California were eligible for selection, and the sample telephone numbers were called as many as six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. For both landlines and cell phones, Survey Sampling International estimates which phone numbers are likely to be associated with Asian American individuals. These phone numbers are called up to three additional times to increase our ability to interview Asian American adults. Live landline and cell phone interviews were conducted by Abt SRBI, Inc., in English and Spanish, according to respondents’ preferences. Accent on Languages, Inc., translated new survey questions into Spanish, with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Abt SRBI use s the US Census Bureau’s 2011 –2015 American Community Survey’s (ACS) Public Use Microdata Series for California (with regional coding information from the University of Minnesota’s Integrated Public Use Microdata Series for California) to compare certain d emographic characteristics of the survey sample —region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education —with the characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the ACS figures. To estimate landline and cell phone s ervice in California, Abt SRBI used 2015 state -level estimates released by the National Center for Health Statistics —which used data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the ACS —and 2016 estimates for the West Census Region in the latest NH IS report. The estimates for California were then compared against landline and cell phone service reported in this survey. We also used voter registration data from the California Secretary of State to compare the party registration of registered voters in our sample to party registration statewide. The landline and cell phone samples were then integrated using a frame integration weight, while sample balancing PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 22 adjusted for differences across regional, age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, telephone serv ice, and party registration groups. The sampling error, taking design effects from weighting into consideration, is ±3. 3 percent at the 95 percent confidence level for the total unweighted sample of 1,70 6 adults. This means that 95 times out of 100, the r esults will be within 3. 3 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for unweighted subgroups is larger: for the 1,500 adults asked Q22b (travel ban) from March 6 –14, the sampling error is ±3.5 percent; for the 1, 385 registered voters, it is ±3. 7 percent; for the 1,069 likely voters, it is ±4. 2 percent. Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for five geographic regions, accounting for approximate ly 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, “Inland Empire” refers to Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and “Orange/San Diego” refers to Orange and San Diego Counties. We also refer to two geographic subreg ions within the Central Valley. “Sacramento Metro and the North Valley ” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Placer, Sacramento, Shasta, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba counties. “San Joaquin Valley” includes Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare counties. Residents of other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample size s for these less populous areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for non -Hispanic whites, who account for 43 percent of the state’s adult population, and also for Latinos, who account for about a third of the state’s adult population, and non- Hispanic African Americans, who comprise about 6 percent. Results for other racial/ethnic groups — such as non-Hispanic Asian Americans and Native Americans—are combined into an “other” category ; they are included in the results rep orted for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters, but sample sizes are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of those who report they are registered Democrats, registered Republicans, and decline -to -state or independent voters; the results for those who say they are registered to vote in other parties are not large enough for separate analysis. We also analyze the responses of likely voters —so designated per their responses to survey questions about voter registration, pr evious election participation, and current interest in politics. The percentages presented in the report tables and in the questionnaire may not add to 100 due to rounding. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in our earlier surveys and to those in national surveys by Gallup, CBS News, CNN/ORC , and the Pew Research Center . Additional details about our methodology can be found at www.ppic.org/content/other/SurveyMethodology.pdf and are available upon request through surveys@ppic.org . PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 23 Questionnaire and Results CALIFORNIANS AND THE IR GOVERNMENT March 5– 14, 2017 1,706 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR ±3. 3% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE P ERCENTAGES MAY NOT A DD TO 100 DUE TO ROUNDING First, thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today? [code, don’t read] 20% jobs, economy 16 immigration, illegal immigration 8 government in general, problems with elected officials, parties 8 water, drought 7 health care, health insurance 5 education, schools, teachers 5 infrastructure 4 homelessness 4 housing costs, availability 3 crime, gangs, drugs 3 environment, pollution, global warming 3 state budget, deficit, taxes 2 race relations, racial and ethnic issues 8 other (specify) 4 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Jerry Brown is handling his job as governor of California? 58% approve 25 disapprove 17 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 51% approve 33 disapprove 16 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and senate districts are doing at this time? 53% approve 32 disapprove 16 don’t know Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 55% right direction 39 wrong direction 6 don’t know Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 51% good times 40 bad times 9 don’t know Next, Overall, how fair do you think our present state and local tax system is— would you say it is very fair, moderately fair, not too fair, or not at all fair? 6% very fair 49 moderately fair 24 not too fair 18 not at all fair 3 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 24 When you combine all of the taxes you pay to state and local governments, do you feel that you pay much more than you should, somewhat more than you should, about the right amount, or less than you should? 35% much more 23 somewhat more 37 about the right amount 2 less than you should 3 don’t know Overall, do you think the state and local tax system is in need of major changes, minor changes, or do you think it is fine the way it is? 42% major changes 37 minor changes 18 fine the way it is 3 don’t know On another topic, [rotate questions 10 and 11 ] How important do you think it is for the state to be spending more money on water and flood management infrastructure in your part of California —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 61% very important 27 somewhat important 7 not too important 3 not at all important 1 don’t know The governor has proposed to improve the reliability of water supplies by building tunnels in the Sacramento -San Joaquin Delta. How important is this proposal for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California —is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 51% very important 26 somewhat important 7 not too important 7 not at all important 9 don’t know On another topic , Next, as you may know, California voters passed a $10 billion state bond in 2008 for planning and construction of a high -speed rail system from Anaheim to the Central Valley and San Francisco. The estimated costs associated with this 520 mile phase of the high -speed rail system are about $64 billion over the next 20 years. Do you favor or oppose building a high -speed rail system in California? (If oppose, ask: “What if the high -speed rail system cost less, would you favor or oppose building it?”) 48% favor 18 oppose, but would favor if it cost less 28 oppose, even if it cost less 6 don’t know Thinking ahead, how important is the high - speed rail system for the future quality of life and economic vitality of California—is it very important, somewhat important, not too important, or not at all important? 33% very important 31 somewhat important 16 not too important 17 not at all important 2 don’t know On another topic, Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Donald Trump is hand ling his job as president? 31% approve 61 disapprove 7 don’t know 14a. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that President Trump is handling terrorism and homeland security issues? 37% approve 57 disapprove 6 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 25 14b. Please tell me which of the following best reflects your impression of Donald Trump so far. Does Donald Trump impress you as trustworthy or not trustworthy? 31% trustworthy 64 not trustworthy 5 don’t know [rotate questions 15 and 16] Overall, do you app rove or disapprove o f the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as US senator? 49% approve 32 disapprove 19 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Kamala Harris is handling her job as US senator? 46% approve 23 disap prove 30 don’t know O verall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the US Congress is handling its job? 36% approve 55 disapprove 9 don’t know Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way your own representative to the US House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job? 51% approve 32 disapprove 17 don’t know Changing topics, Which comes closest to your view about undocumented imm igrants who are living in the US? [rotate order ] (1 ) the y sho uld be allowed to stay in the U S and eventually apply for citizenship, ( 2) they should be allowed to stay in the US legally, but not be allowed to apply for citizenship, [ or ], (3) they should be required to leave the US . 68% they should be allowed to stay in the US and eventually apply for citizenship 12 they sho uld be allowed to stay in the US legally, but not be allowed to apply for citizenship 15 they should be required to leave the US 5 don’t know All in all, would you favor or oppose building a wall along the entire bo rder with Mexico? 25% favor 72 oppose 3 don’t know On another topic, how much of a problem is terrorism and security in California today? Is it a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 27% big problem 35 somewhat of a problem 35 not much of a problem 3 don’t know In gener al, how well do you think the U S government is doing in reducing the threat of terrorism—very well, fairly well, not too well, or not at all well? 19% very well 38 fairly well 24 not too well 15 not at all well 4 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 26 22a. What concerns you more about the government's anti -terrorism policies -- [rotate] (1) that they have not gone far enough to protect the country [or] (2) that they have gone too far in restricting the average person's civil liberties? 36% not gone far enough 52 gone too far 6 neither (volunteered) 7 don’t know 22b. [asked beginning March 6] As you may know, Donald Trump has issued a revised executive order that temporarily bans most people from entering the U S who are from the countries of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. Do you approve or disapprove of this action? 37% approve 58 disapprove 5 don’t know Changing topics, For each of the following issues, please indicate which statement comes closest to your own view, even if neither is exactly right. [rotate questions 23 and 24 ] [rotate ] (1) Government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest; [or ] (2) Government regulation of business does more harm than good. 56% government regulation of bus iness is necessary to protect the public interest 37 government regulation of business does more harm than good 7 don’t know [rotate] (1) Stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy [or] (2) Stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the cost. 37% stricter environmental laws and regulations cost too many jobs and hurt the economy 54 stricter environmental laws and regulations are worth the cost 9 don’t know Next, how much of the time do you think you can trust the federal government in Washington today to do what is right —just about always, most of the time, or only some of the time? 7% just about always 22 most of the time 62 only some of the time 7 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 70% a few big interests 25 benefit of all of t he people 5 don’t know Do you think the people in the federal government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 61% a lot 27 some 8 don’t waste very much 3 don’t know On another topic, how much of a problem are violence and street crime i n your local community today—a big problem, somewhat of a problem, or not much of a problem? 25% big problem 35 somewhat of a problem 39 not much of a problem – don’t know How would you rate the job your loca l police are doing in controlling crime in your community—excellent, good, fair, or poor? 30% excellent 35 good 24 fair 10 poor 1 don’t know PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY MARCH 2017 PPIC.ORG/SURVEY Californians and Their Government 27 Do you think blacks and other minorities receive equal treatment as whites in the criminal justice system or not? 29% receive equal treatment 66 do not receive equal treatment 5 don’t know Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote in California? 69% yes [ask q31a] 31 no [skip to q32b] 31a. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 45% Democrat [ask q32 ] 26 Republican [skip to q32a] 5 another party (specify) [skip to q33 ] 25 independent [skip to q32 b] Would you call yourself a strong Democr at or not a very strong Democrat? 60% strong 39 not very strong 1 don’t know [skip to q33] 32a. Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 58% strong 39 not very strong 3 don’t know [skip to q33] 32b. Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 28% Republican Party 46 Democratic Party 20 neither (volunteered) 6 don’t know Would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 15% very liberal 21 somewhat liberal 26 middle -of-the -road 23 somewhat conservative 11 very conservative 3 don’t know Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 26% great deal 38 fair amount 26 only a little 10 none – don’t know [d1-d 15 demographic questions] PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect Angela Glover Blackwell President and CEO PolicyLink Mollyann Brodie Senior Vice President Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director B ill Lane Center for the American West Stanford University Jon Cohen Vice President of Survey Research SurveyMonkey Joshua J. Dyck Co-Director Center for Public Opinion University of Massachusetts, Lowell Russell Hancock President and CEO Joint Venture Sil icon Valley Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Professor Sol Price School of Public Policy University of Southern California Robert Lapsley President California Business Roundtable Carol S. Larson President and CEO The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Sonja Petek Fiscal and Policy Analyst California Legislative Analyst’s Office Lisa Pitney Vice President of Government Relations The Walt Disney Company Mindy Romero Founder and Director California Civic Engag ement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change Robert K. Ross, MD President and CEO The California Endowment Most Reverend Jaime Soto Bishop of Sacramento Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento Carol Whiteside Principal California Strategies The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PPIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mas Masumoto, Chair Author and Farmer Mark Baldassare President and CEO Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and CEO GROW Elect María Blanco Executive Director Undocumented Student Legal Services Center University of California Office of the President Louise Henry Bryson Chair Emerita, Board of Trustees J. Paul Getty Trust A. Marisa Chun Partner McDermott Will & Emery LLP Chet Hewitt President and CEO Sierra Health Foundation Phil Isenberg Former Chair Delta Stewardship Council Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Steven A. Merksamer Senior Partner Nielsen, Merksamer, Parrinello, Gross & Leoni, LLP Gerald L. Parsky Chairman Aurora Capital Group Kim Polese Chairman ClearStreet, Inc. Gaddi H. Vasquez Senior Vice President, Government Affairs Edison International Southern California Edison Public Policy Institute of California 500 Washington Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94111 T: 415.291.4400 F: 415.291.4401 PPIC.ORG PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, C A 95814 T: 916.440.1120 F: 916.440.1121" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:43:19" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(8) "s_317mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-25 13:46:46" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-25 20:46:46" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(50) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_317MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }