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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_907MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1299974" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(93233) " TABLE OF CONTENTS About the Survey Press Release State Issues National Issues Regional Map Methodology Questionnaire and Results 1 3 7 15 24 25 27 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Survey provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with objective, advocacy-free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of California residents. Inaugurated in April 1998, this is the 80th PPIC Statewide Survey in a series that has generated a database that includes the responses of over 170,000 Californians. This survey is the 25th in our Californians and Their Government series, which is conducted periodically to examine the social, economic, and political trends that influence public policy preferences and ballot choices. It is supported by funding from The James Irvine Foundation. The current survey seeks to raise public awareness, inform decision makers, and stimulate public discussion about state and national issues. We examine Californians’ opinions about the overall direction of the state at a time when there are questions about the U.S. economic outlook; about overall perceptions of the governor and legislature and their handling of fiscal matters in the wake of this summer’s budget delay; and about attitudes and preferences on legislative and health care reforms in the context of legislative and initiative activities in these policy areas. We also analyze residents’ attitudes toward the president and the current situation in Iraq, as debates continue in Washington, D.C. about the future direction of U.S. policy; their trust in the federal government and their performance ratings of California’s federal elected officials; and their early opinions and preferences in the 2008 presidential primaries. This report presents the responses of 2,003 California adult residents on the following topics: „ State issues, including perceptions of the most important issues facing California today; opinions about the general direction of the state and the outlook for the state’s economy; approval ratings for Governor Schwarzenegger and the state legislature overall and on their handling of the issue of the state budget and taxes; approval ratings for respondents’ own state representatives; trust in state government; and attitudes about legislative redistricting, legislative term limits, and the two-thirds vote needed to pass the state budget. We also consider perceptions about the need for health care reform and preferences on health care policy proposals; how closely residents follow news about health care policy; and awareness and perceived impact of the documentary film “Sicko” and advertisments about health care policy. „ National issues, including overall approval ratings for President Bush and his handling of the situation in Iraq; overall approval ratings of Senators Boxer and Feinstein, Speaker Pelosi, Congress, and respondents’ own Congressional representatives; and trust in federal government. We also consider attitudes regarding the situation in Iraq and policy preferences; candidate preferences in the Democratic and Republican presidential primaries in 2008; and attention to news about the upcoming primary and satisfaction with the candidate choices. „ The extent to which Californians—based on their political party affiliation, region of residence, race/ethnicity, and other demographics—may differ with regard to perceptions, attitudes, and preferences involving state and national issues. Copies of this report may be ordered online (www.ppic.org) or by phone (415-291-4400). For questions about the survey, please contact survey@ppic.org. View our searchable PPIC Statewide Survey database online at http://www.ppic.org/main/survAdvancedSearch.asp. 1 PRESS RELEASE Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: http://www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT California: Doom, Gloom, And What Happened To Our Boom? Mood Sours As Housing Slumps; Leaders Take A Hit WILL HEALTH CARE BE THIS YEAR’S “REDEEMING” ISSUE FOR ELECTEDS? 2008 PRIMARY: GIULIANI LEAD NARROWS; REPUBLICANS SIGNAL DISCONTENT SAN FRANCISCO, California, September 20, 2007 — A dark mood is settling over the golden state as pessimism about California’s economic conditions hits its highest point since 2003, according to a survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. Housing woes and the spectacle of this summer’s budget battle are taking their toll on residents’ economic outlook— and affecting everything from trust in government to approval ratings of state and federal leaders. A strong majority of residents (59%) expect bad economic times in the coming year—a 10-point increase since June (49%) and a 20-point increase since January (39%). Likely voters are equally negative, with 62 percent expecting bad economic times. And the attitude is pervasive: Majorities across all the state’s regions and income levels say troubled economic times are on the way. “There has been a significant shift in attitude this year—and it is very likely being driven by bad news about the stock and housing markets,” says PPIC president and CEO Mark Baldassare. “For so many people, the feeling of overall financial well-being is tied to the value of their homes—something that seems increasingly threatened as they see sales slow, prices dip, and foreclosures rise.” Anxieties this personal are bound to spill over into other areas, and the overall mood in the state is closely in step with the economic outlook: Half of Californians (50%) today believe the state is generally headed in the wrong direction—a 13-point jump since January (37%). News about the economy, and this summer’s very partisan budget clash, are also hurting approval ratings of state leaders. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who has had positive ratings from a majority of residents since January, is now seeing a more lukewarm response: Half (50%) approve of how he’s handling his job—an 8-point drop since January. Approval of how he is handling the state budget has also dropped (40% approve today, 47% approved in January). Notably, however, among likely voters, the governor’s ratings on both overall and fiscal performance have not changed substantially. As has been the case in recent years, the state legislature earns even lower marks. Today, only 34 percent of all adults and 29 percent of likely voters approve of how the legislature is handling its job, a decline among both since January (all adults 40%, likely voters 37%). Approval of how lawmakers are handling the budget is even lower, with 25 percent of residents and 23 percent of likely voters giving them positive marks. Perhaps even more indicative of their worsening mood is how residents rate their own individual legislators. That’s a number that has generally remained stable—but has now dropped from 47 percent in March to 41 percent among all adults, and from 46 percent to 39 percent among likely voters. 3 Californians and Their Government A MATTER OF DISTRUST: AS CONFIDENCE DETERIORATES, RESIDENTS SUPPORT REFORM The falling approval ratings reflect a concomitant drop in trust of state government. A large majority of both residents (69%) and likely voters (75%) say they trust the government to do what is right only some or none of the time. Even worse, only 29 percent trust the government to do what is right most or all of the time, close to the lowest proportion registered by PPIC’s Statewide Survey since October 2003 (27%), when the recall election of then Governor Gray Davis was under way. Likely voters are even more suspicious, with only 25 percent saying they trust the government most or all of the time. Mistrust may arise from deep-seated feelings that state government is run by a few big interest groups, not for the greater good; 69 percent of residents and 73 percent of likely voters hold this view. And strong majorities across all political parties agree (Democrats 73%, Republicans 70%, independents 70%). Moreover, more than half of all residents and likely voters (53% each) say the state wastes a lot of taxpayer money. “This is not a new sentiment; a majority of Californians have held this view since early 2003,” says Baldassare. “However, we’re in choppy fiscal waters right now, and these attitudes could be more consequential for public officials and policies.” Such concerns may go a long way toward explaining robust voter support for various legislative reforms. For example, about two-thirds of likely voters (64%) say term limits in California need at least minor changes, and over half (55%) say they would vote yes on the term limits initiative that would reduce time in office from 14 to 12 years and that is headed for the primary ballot in February. Support for the initiative is shared by half of Democrats (50%) and a majority of Republicans (60%) and independents (56%). Although no redistricting measure is officially slated for next year’s ballot, this reform idea enjoys even stronger support among likely voters, with 66 percent saying they favor an independent citizens’ commission drawing legislative district lines, as opposed to the governor and legislature. Voter support for both term limits and redistricting stems from a desire to put more checks on government—the same reason behind voter opposition to another reform: replacing the two-thirds vote requirement to pass a state budget with a 55 percent majority. While this reform could prevent voterantagonizing budget standoffs, only 39 percent of likely voters think it is a good idea; 56 percent think it is a bad idea. “At this moment, it’s difficult to imagine voters easing up on the reins when it comes to their elected representatives; government has simply become too suspect in people’s minds,” says Baldassare. HIGH-FLYING HEALTH CARE: STRONG AWARENESS, SUPPORT FOR REFORM EFFORTS What’s a leader to do? One policy area in which state officials may have a chance to earn public approval is health care reform. Topped only by immigration (18%), health care (14%) is now second on Californians’ list of most important issues facing the state. It has even edged out jobs and the economy (13%), rising six points since June. In fact, 69 percent of residents and 72 percent of likely voters think California’s health care system is in need of major changes. “This issue has been highly publicized and is resonating with the public right now,” says Baldassare. “If actual reform happens, it could be a shot in the arm for state leaders.” And Californians are paying attention: Nearly half of residents (47%) and a majority of likely voters (55%) say they are following news about Sacramento’s efforts to reform health care at least fairly closely. The interest may be due, in part, to recent high-profile advocacy efforts. For example, half of residents (52%) say they have seen or heard of the documentary film “Sicko,” by filmmaker Michael Moore, with 17 percent saying it has made them more likely to think there is a need for health care reform in the United States. Nearly half (46%) also report having seen, heard, or read advertisements about California health care reform over the summer. 4 PPIC Statewide Survey Press Release But what are Californians actually willing to support? Strong majorities of residents (72%) and likely voters (63%) favor the plan being advocated by Governor Schwarzenegger, which would require all Californians to have health insurance, with costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals. The plan being floated by the state legislature, which would require employers to provide insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state and would cover all children regardless of immigration status, enjoys strong support among all adults (61%) but falls short of a majority among likely voters (47%). While majorities of Democrats (72%) and independents (58%) favor the proposal, a majority of Republicans (68%) oppose it. NEGATIVE ATTITUDES COLOR NATIONAL SCENE AS WELL … Closely reflecting skepticism about state government, Californians are equally—if not more— mistrustful of federal government. Three-fourths of residents (75%) and 81 percent of likely voters say they trust the federal government to do what’s right only some or none of the time. And these attitudes may be rooted in the pervasive belief that the federal government is run by a few big interests (all adults 71%, likely voters 77%) and not for the benefit of all people. This view is shared by strong majorities of Democrats (79%), independents (78%), and Republicans (65%). Moreover, about two-thirds of residents (65%) and even more likely voters (71%) think the federal government wastes a lot of taxpayer money. These attitudes may be reflected in Californians’ approval ratings of President Bush. About seven in ten residents and likely voters (69% each) disapprove of the way he is handling his job, similar to ratings by adults nationwide. Among all Californians, the president’s approval ratings have not surpassed 30 percent once this year. There are, however, major partisan divisions: A huge majority (88%) of Democrats and a very strong majority of independents (74%) disapprove of Bush’s job performance, while a majority of Republicans (58%) approve. Approval of both of California’s Democratic senators is also faltering. Senator Dianne Feinstein’s approval among likely voters is down seven points since March and stands at 52 percent. This mirrors the 7-point drop in support for Senator Barbara Boxer among likely voters (53% in March to 46% today). In fact, disapproval of Congress as a whole has risen significantly across political parties since January (53% to 69%, Republicans; 49% to 64%, independents; 40% to 53%, Democrats). … AND IRAQ IS A KEY REASON; HEADING INTO ’08, GOP VOTERS TROUBLED BY CHOICES The war in Iraq is dominating the national landscape and continues to distress the vast majority of Californians: Only about one in four adults (24%) and likely voters (26%) say things are going at least somewhat well. Among the different answers respondents could choose on this question, Californians were far more likely to choose “things are not going at all well” than any other response (48% all adults, 46% likely voters). This attitude extends to the recent surge of troops in Iraq: Only 25 percent of all Californians believe the strategy has made the situation in that country better, while 27 percent believe it has made things worse, and 43 percent don’t think it has had any effect. Consistent with those perspectives, most Californians (68%) and most likely voters (61%) want the United States to set a timetable to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq in 2008. As with all questions related to Iraq, however, there is a huge partisan divide: Republicans oppose a timetable (63%) and Democrats and independents support one (86% and 64%, respectively). As for Bush’s approval ratings on Iraq, about 7 in 10 adults (72%) and likely voters (68%) disapprove of his management of the war. At the six-year anniversary of the September 11th attacks, the president’s overall approval has dropped a stunning 52 points, from 79 percent in December 2001 to 27 percent today. September 2007 5 Californians and Their Government How are things shaping up for leaders who might inherit the Iraq situation? Among the 2008 Democratic primary candidates, Hillary Clinton (41%) continues to enjoy a strong lead over rivals Barack Obama (23%) and John Edwards (14%) with likely voters today. Among Republican contenders, Rudy Giuliani’s hold on the frontrunner spot is less secure at 22 percent and has narrowed with Fred Thompson (16%) entering the race and already running neck and neck with Mitt Romney (16%) and John McCain (15%). Another possible sign of division within the GOP is that, overall, far fewer Republican (55%) than Democratic (76%) likely voters say they are satisfied with their choice of candidates. MORE KEY FINDINGS ƒ Gender matters? — Pages 17, 18, and 22 Women are more likely than men to approve of the job being done by Senator Feinstein (53% to 45%), Senator Boxer (48% to 41%), and Speaker Nancy Pelosi (48% to 42%); women Democratic likely voters are also more likely to throw their support behind candidate Hillary Clinton (44% to 38%). ƒ Disapproval ratings get slightly more personal — Page 18 Californians’ approval of their own representative in the U.S. House has dropped from a majority in March (55%) to half (50%) today. Likely voters’ support has dropped from 59 percent to 54 percent. ƒ Hope does not spring eternal on Iraq — Page 21 Whatever course of action the U.S. takes in Iraq, most Californians think that establishing a democratic government in that country is not too likely (36%) or not at all likely (30%). ABOUT THE SURVEY This edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey is the 25th in the Californians and Their Government series and is supported by funding from The James Irvine Foundation. This survey is intended to raise public awareness, inform decisionmakers, and stimulate public discussions about the social, economic, and political trends that influence Californians’ public policy preferences and ballot choices. Findings are based on a telephone survey of 2,003 California adult residents interviewed between September 4 and September 11, 2007. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The sampling error for the total sample is +/- 2%. The sampling error for the 1,045 likely voters is +/- 3%. For more information on methodology, see page 25. Mark Baldassare is president and CEO of PPIC, where he holds the Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Public Policy. He is founder of the PPIC Statewide Survey, which he has directed since 1998. PPIC is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public policy through objective, nonpartisan research on the economic, social, and political issues affecting Californians. The institute was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. PPIC does not take or support positions on any ballot measure or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. This report will appear on PPIC’s website (www.ppic.org) after 10 p.m. on September 20, 2007. 6 PPIC Statewide Survey STATE ISSUES KEY FINDINGS „ While immigration still tops the list of most important state issues, the percentage of residents naming this issue has declined, while the share naming health care has risen. Residents’ outlook for the state’s economy has turned more gloomy. (page 8) „ Half of residents approve of the governor’s overall job performance, while one in three offer positive assessments of the state legislature. In the wake of a delayed state budget, fewer approve of the governor’s or legislature’s handling of the state budget and taxes. (page 9) „ A majority of likely voters say they would vote yes on a term limits initiative reducing a legislator’s total time in office from 14 to 12 years. Two in three favor creating an independent citizens’ redistricting commission, taking this power away from the governor and legislature. Despite a late state budget this year, a majority of likely voters oppose changing the two-thirds vote requirement to a 55 percent majority vote to pass a budget. (pages 10, 11) „ Distrust in state government is near an alltime high: Most think it can be trusted only some of the time, most think it is run by a few big interests, and most think it wastes a lot of taxpayer money. (page 12) „ Seven in 10 residents believe California’s health care system needs major changes; there is substantial support for two reform proposals under consideration. (page 13) „ Awareness of health care issues is high, with about half of residents closely following news about state health care reform; about half have heard of the film “Sicko” and about half have seen health care reform advertisements. (page 14) Economic Outlook for California Percent all adults 80 60 50 40 39 20 Expect good times financially Expect bad times financially 59 51 49 40 40 33 0 Jan 07 Mar 07 Jun 07 Sep 07 Approval Ratings of Elected Officials Percent all adults Governor 80 Legislature 59 61 60 60 58 46 40 50 40 33 36 40 37 32 40 34 34 29 20 0 Jan Sep Jan Sep Jan Sep Jan Sep 04 04 05 05 06 06 07 07 Assessing the Need for Legislative Reforms in California Fine as is Minor changes needed Major changes needed 100 80 31 17 20 Percent all adults 60 29 31 30 40 20 36 42 40 0 Term Limits Redistricting Voting on State Budget 7 Californians and Their Government OVERALL MOOD Californians name immigration (18%) as the most important issue facing the state today, followed by health care (14%) and the economy (13%). Fewer than one in 10 mention education (7%), housing (7%), or other issues. Among likely voters, immigration (19%) and health care (18%) are the top concerns. Since June, the number of residents mentioning immigration has declined by 7 points (25% to 18%), while mention of health care has increased by 6 points (8% to 14%); the percentage of residents mentioning the economy has remained the same. As in previous surveys, partisan differences about the state’s most important issue are evident. While Republicans (29%) and independents (20%) name immigration as their top concern, Democrats name health care (21%). Across regions, immigration is the most important issue among residents in Los Angeles (22%) and the Other Southern California region (21%), while health care is the top concern among residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (19%) and Central Valley (18%). Latinos and whites are similar in naming immigration as the most important issue (19% each), but whites are twice as likely as Latinos to mention health care (17% to 8%). “Thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today?” Top five issues mentioned All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind Immigration, illegal immigration 18% 10% 29% 20% Health care, health costs 14 21 10 14 Jobs, economy 13 13 7 14 Education, schools 7985 Housing costs, housing availability 7 6 5 7 Likely Voters 19% 18 10 8 7 Californians are pessimistic about the state’s economy in the coming year. A strong majority of residents (59%) and likely voters (62%) think bad economic times lie ahead. Pessimism about the state’s economic outlook among adults has increased by 10 points since June (49%) and 20 points since January (39%). Today, majorities across all regions and demographic groups are expecting a bad economy. This negativity extends to the overall outlook of the state: Fifty percent of Californians say the state is headed in the wrong direction, while 41 percent say it is headed in the right direction. In January, only 37 percent said the state was headed in the wrong direction, while 55 percent said it was going in the right direction. “Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times?” Good times Bad times Don't know All Adults 33% 59% 8% Central Valley 32 60 8 San Francisco Bay Area 38 53 Region Los Angeles 32 60 9 8 Other Southern California 31 61 8 Under $40,000 33 57 10 Household Income $40,000 to $79,999 30 62 8 $80,000 or more 36 59 5 Homeownership Own Rent 31 60 34 58 9 8 Likely Voters 29 62 9 8 PPIC Statewide Survey State Issues APPROVAL RATINGS OF GOVERNOR SCHWARZENEGGER Today, half of residents (50%) and six in 10 likely voters (59%) approve of the way Governor Schwarzenegger is handling his overall job. Since January, his ratings have declined somewhat among all adults (58% to 50%) but they have not significantly changed among likely voters (61% to 59%). Across political parties, a strong majority of Republicans (73%) and just over half of independents (54%) approve of the governor, while Democrats are divided (44% approve, 43% disapprove). Across regions, residents in the Other Southern California region (54%), the Central Valley (53%), and the San Francisco Bay Area (52%) approve of his job performance, while nearly half of the residents in Los Angeles (47%) disapprove. Whites (65%) are more than twice as likely as Latinos (30%) to approve of the governor’s overall job performance. After the long state budget standoff this summer, residents are divided in their assessment of Governor Schwarzenegger’s fiscal performance (40% approve, 43% disapprove). In January, Californians were more positive about his handling of the state budget and taxes (47% approve, 39% disapprove). Today, a majority of Republicans (59%) approve of his performance in this area, while independents are divided (44% approve, 42% disapprove), and Democrats are more likely to disapprove than approve (48% to 34%). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling …” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind … his job as governor of California? Approve Disapprove Don't know 50% 44% 73% 54% 59% 38 43 18 34 31 12 13 9 12 10 Approve 40 34 59 44 48 … the issue of the state budget and taxes? Disapprove 43 48 25 42 37 Don't know 17 18 16 14 15 APPROVAL RATINGS OF THE STATE LEGISLATURE Approval of the state legislature continues to lag far behind the governor’s approval ratings. One in three residents (34%) and three in 10 likely voters (29%) approve of the way the legislature is handling its job. The legislature’s approval ratings have declined somewhat among adults (40%) and likely voters (37%) since January. Pluralities across parties disapprove of the legislature today, while Republicans are the most negative. In the wake of the recent budget standoff, the legislators receive even lower marks from residents and likely voters with respect to their budgetary responsibilities: Majorities across demographic and political groups disapprove of their fiscal performance. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling …” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Approve 34% 36% 26% 33% 29% … its job? Disapprove 51 48 64 52 59 Don't know 15 16 10 15 12 Approve 25 27 17 26 23 … the issue of the state budget and taxes? Disapprove 59 57 70 59 65 Don't know 16 16 13 15 12 September 2007 9 Californians and Their Government APPROVAL RATINGS OF INDIVIDUAL LEGISLATORS Despite Californians’ negative perceptions of the state legislature as a whole, residents are divided in their assessment of their own individual representatives (41% approve, 40% disapprove). Likely voters are also more approving of their representatives than of the legislative body as a whole. Since March, however, individual legislators’ approval ratings have declined among all residents (47% to 41%) and likely voters (46% to 39%). Across regions, residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (47%) are the most approving of their representatives, while residents in the Central Valley are the least approving (37%). Across parties, more Democrats (46%) than Republicans (38%) or independents (37%) approve of their own legislators. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and state senate districts are doing at this time?” Approve All Adults 41% Central Valley 37% Region San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles 47% 41% Other Southern California 40% Likely Voters 39% Disapprove 40 46 32 41 42 45 Don't know 19 17 21 18 18 16 LEGISLATIVE REFORMS Since the passage of a voter initiative in 1990, state legislators have been subject to limitations in the number of terms they can spend in office. Presently, they are limited to six years in the state assembly and eight years in the state senate, for a total of 14 years. Earlier this month, an initiative qualified for the February 2008 primary election ballot that would alter the current term limits structure. The new law would allow legislators to serve a total of 12 years in either legislative branch, while allowing current members to serve 12 consecutive years in their current house. So what do Californians think about the state’s current term limit structure? Today, 66 percent of residents say major (36%) or minor (30%) changes are needed, while three in 10 think that the term limit structure is fine just as it is (31%). Across parties, independents (67%), Democrats (66%), and Republicans (61%) are similar in their likelihood to say that either major or minor changes are needed. When read the title and summary for the February 2008 initiative, 53 percent of residents and 55 percent of likely voters say they would vote yes. Republicans (60%) and independents (56%) are more likely than Democrats (50%) to support this legislative reform. In May, when read the summary and title, a similar 52 percent of adults and 53 percent of likely voters said they would vote yes. How important is the ballot wording? In March, before the final wording of the initiative was determined, two in three adults (66%) and likely voters (64%) opposed the general idea of changing term limits to 12 years in either branch. A similar question about allowing legislators 14 years in either branch found strong opposition in the past (62% October 2005, 68% May 2006, 72% October 2006). “A statewide initiative for the Feb. 5 primary election ballot called the ‘Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office Initiative Constitutional Amendment’ reduces the total amount of time a person may serve in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 years. It allows a person to serve a total of 12 years either in the assembly, the senate, or a combination of both. It provides a transition period to allow current members to serve a total of 12 consecutive years in the house in which they are currently serving, regardless of any prior service in another house. There would be no direct fiscal impact on state and local governments. If the election were held today would you vote yes or no on this measure?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Yes 53% 50% 60% 56% 55% No 38 43 33 36 39 Don't know 97786 10 PPIC Statewide Survey State Issues LEGISLATIVE REFORMS (CONTINUED) Redistricting is another legislative reform that may find its way onto a 2008 state ballot. Redistricting is the way in which the geographic boundaries of legislative districts are drawn. Currently, the governor and legislature are responsible for this process after each census. In November 2005, voters defeated (by a substantial 20 points) an initiative supported by Governor Schwarzenegger that would have shifted the responsibility from the governor and legislature to a three-person panel of retired judges. Still, three in four voters in a 2005 post-election survey said that changes were needed in the legislative redistricting process. Today, just over seven in 10 adults (71%) and likely voters (73%) say some changes to the redistricting process are needed. Four in 10 residents and likely voters (42% each) say major changes are needed. What changes are Californians willing to support in the way boundaries are redrawn? Some have proposed plans that would create an independent commission of citizens to establish a redistricting plan. Our survey asked about this general idea and found that a strong majority of adults (64%) and likely voters (66%) favor it, including nearly two in three across all parties. Support for this independent commission was similar in March (64% adults, 66% likely voters). “Would you favor or oppose a redistricting reform that requires an independent commission of citizens, instead of the state legislature and governor, to adopt a new redistricting plan after each census?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Favor 64% 62% 65% 66% 66% Oppose 21 24 21 23 22 Don't know 15 14 14 11 12 With another tardy budget this summer, how do Californians feel about changing the way the legislature votes on the state budget? Seven in 10 residents say major (40%) or minor (31%) changes are needed, while two in 10 (20%) say it is fine the way it is. Likely voters express similar views about the need to change the way the legislature votes on the budget. Democrats (74%) and independents (71%) are more likely than Republicans (65%) to say changes are needed, while seven in 10 across age, education, racial/ethnic, and income groups say changes are needed in the voting procedures. One possible reform would be to replace the two-thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority to pass the budget. Voters rejected a ballot initiative proposing this approach by a wide margin in March 2004 (34% yes, 66% no). Today, residents are divided on this reform (44% good idea, 46% bad idea), and a majority of likely voters think it would be a bad idea (56%). Across political parties, independents and Democrats are divided, while a majority of Republicans (66%) think it is a bad idea to replace the twothirds requirement with a 55 percent majority. Findings today are similar to May 2007 (43% good idea, 48% bad idea) and May 2006 (42% good idea, 46% bad idea). “Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea to replace the two-thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for the state legislature to pass a budget?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Good idea 44% 47% 29% 47% 39% Bad idea 46 46 66 45 56 Don't know 10 7 5 8 5 September 2007 11 Californians and Their Government TRUST IN STATE GOVERNMENT Californians’ trust in state government to do what is right is nearing the low point reached around the time of the governor’s recall in October 2003 (4% trust just about always, 23% most of the time). Today, only 29 percent of residents and 25 percent of likely voters say they trust the government in Sacramento just about always or most of the time. In March, 32 percent of adults and 30 percent of likely voters said they trusted the government in Sacramento at least most of the time. Levels of trust across parties are low, with fewer than three in 10 Democrats (29%), independents (28%), and Republicans (26%) saying they trust the state government at least most of the time. Two in three across parties say they trust the state only sometimes. Trust declines with age, education, and income. “How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Sacramento to do what is right?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Just about always 5% 4% 4% 4% 3% Most of the time 24 25 22 24 22 Only some of the time 64 65 66 67 69 None of the time (volunteered) 5 5 8 5 6 Don’t know 21 - - - Distrust is also evident when residents are asked about the influence of interest groups in state government. Seven in 10 adults (69%) and likely voters (73%) say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests rather than for the benefit of all of the people. This pessimism has increased slightly among residents since March (64% by big interests, 28% for the benefit of all) although the percentage expressing pessimism has been consistently above 60 percent since January 2004. Today, strong majorities across all political parties and demographic groups say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests rather than for the benefit of all of the people. “Would you say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind A few big interests 69% 73% 70% 70% 73% Benefit of all the people 24 21 22 24 20 Don't know 76867 Californians’ distrust extends to the government’s fiscal efficiency as well. Half of all residents and likely voters (53% each) say that the state government wastes a lot of the taxpayers’ money. These percentages are similar to those in March (55% adults, 55% likely voters), and our past surveys from February 2003 have found a majority of residents expressing this negative view. Over four in 10 residents across demographic and political groups say a lot of money is wasted by people in state government, although conservatives (58%) are much more likely than liberals (44%) to hold this view. Residents in Los Angeles (59%) and the Central Valley (57%) are more likely than residents in the San Francisco Bay Area and the Other Southern California region (48% each) to say that the state government wastes a lot of money. 12 PPIC Statewide Survey State Issues ATTITUDES TOWARD CALIFORNIA HEALTH CARE REFORMS As the governor and legislature continue to discuss health care reforms, nearly nine in 10 Californians believe the state’s health care system is in need of major (69%) or minor changes (19%), with solid majorities agreeing on the need for change across political groups. Similarly high proportions of residents expressed the need for change in March (87%) and June (89%). Today, more than eight in 10 residents across regions and demographic groups say that at least minor changes are needed. Major changes Minor changes Fine the way it is Don’t know “Do you think California’s health care system is in need of major changes or minor changes or that it is basically fine the way it is?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 69% 77% 63% 68% 19 16 20 21 10 4 13 8 2343 Likely Voters 72% 17 8 3 With the state legislature and Governor Schwarzenegger seeking a compromise health care solution, how do residents view two current reform proposals? Seven in 10 (72%) favor a plan advocated by the governor that would require all residents to have health insurance, with the costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals. Favor among the state’s residents was similar in January (71%), March (71%), and June (72%). Support for this plan is lower among likely voters (63%), and strong majorities of Democrats (79%) and independents (70%) − but only half of Republicans (50%) − favor the plan. Majorities across demographic groups express favor, but Latinos are much more likely than whites to support this proposal (90% to 60%). Support declines as age, education, and income increase. Seventy-six percent of those who say the health care system needs major changes, and 69 percent who say minor changes, favor the governor’s proposal for health care reform. “Would you favor or oppose a plan requiring all Californians to have health insurance, with costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Favor 72% 79% 50% 70% 63% Oppose 23 16 44 24 31 Don't know 5566 6 Six in 10 residents (61%) favor the major components of a health coverage plan that was passed by the state legislature. This legislative plan would require employers to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state, and it would cover all children in California regardless of immigration status. Support is lower among likely voters (47% favor, 49% oppose), and while majorities of Democrats (72%) and independents (58%) would favor the proposal, a strong majority of Republicans (68%) would oppose it. Majorities across the state’s regions support this proposal, with Latinos twice as likely as whites to support the plan (89% to 43%). Support declines sharply with higher age, education, and income. Sixty-four percent of those who say the health care system needs major changes, and 56 percent who say minor changes, favor this legislative proposal. September 2007 13 Californians and Their Government ATTITUDES TOWARD CALIFORNIA HEALTH CARE REFORMS (CONTINUED) “Would you favor or oppose a plan that requires employers to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state to cover all working Californians, and that also guarantees health insurance for all children regardless of immigration status?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Favor 61% 72% 26% 58% 47% Oppose 36 25 68 39 49 Don't know 3363 4 The issue of health care reform has been especially prominent in the media this summer, but has it registered with state residents? Nearly half of the state’s adult residents (47%) are very closely (10%) or fairly closely (37%) following news about the governor’s and legislature’s efforts to reform the California health care system. A similar proportion is closely following news about California politics and elections, but many more residents are closely following specific news about the 2008 presidential election. Attention to news about California’s health care reform is similar across political groups but higher among likely voters than all adults (55% to 47%). What is the impact of advocacy efforts this summer on support for health care reforms? Half of residents (52%) have heard of or seen the documentary film “Sicko” by filmmaker Michael Moore, while 48 percent are unaware of the film. In a recent Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll, a similar percentage of adults nationwide (46%) were aware of Moore’s film. As a result of the film, 17 percent of California residents say they are more likely to think the U.S. health care system needs reform, 3 percent are less likely to think so, and 29 percent say the movie has not changed their opinion. In the KFF poll, 20 percent of adults nationwide said the film made them more likely to see the need for health care reform, while 22 percent said their opinion remained unchanged. Nearly half of residents (46%) also report seeing advertisements about California health care reform. Twenty percent of residents say these ads have made them more likely to think California’s health care system needs reform, while only 2 percent say the ads have made them less likely to think the system needs reform. Twenty-three percent say their opinion is unchanged. Of those who believe the California health care system needs major changes, half (49%) saw ads about the California health care reform and one in four (24%) say the ads have made them more likely to think the health care system needs reform. This summer, have you seen, or heard or read about the movie “Sicko,” a documentary about the U.S. health care system directed by Michael Moore, or not? (if yes: As a result of watching the movie “Sicko,” or from what you have heard or read about it, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the U.S. health care system, or has this movie not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the U.S. health care system?) This summer, have you seen, heard, or read any advertisements about California health care reform, or not? (if yes: As a result of these advertisements, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the California health care system, or have these advertisements not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the California health care system?) Yes, more likely 17% 20% Yes, less likely Yes, but opinion unchanged Yes, but don’t know if opinion has changed No, have not heard of “Sicko”/seen ads 3 29 3 48 2 23 1 54 14 PPIC Statewide Survey NATIONAL ISSUES KEY FINDINGS „ Californians’ approval of President Bush’s overall job performance (27%) and his handling of the situation in Iraq (24%) remain low. (page 16) „ While nearly half of residents approve of the job performances of Senators Feinstein (49%) and Boxer (45%), their approval ratings have declined somewhat since March. (page 17) „ Just one in three residents approve of the job performance of the U.S. Congress, although half approve of their own Congressional representative and 45 percent approve of the way that Speaker Pelosi is handling her job. (pages 17, 18) „ Trust in federal government is even lower than trust in state government. Most think Washington can be trusted only some or none of the time (75%), is run by a few big interests (71%), and wastes a lot of taxpayer money (65%). (page 19) „ The vast majority of residents think things in Iraq are not going well (74%), and only one in four say the deployment of over 20,000 additional U.S. troops has made the situation better. Two in three would like to set a timetable for withdrawing troops in 2008, and just three in 10 think a stable democratic government is likely in Iraq. (pages 20, 21) „ Among likely voters, Hillary Clinton continues to lead the pack for the Democratic presidential nomination. Although Rudy Giuliani tops the race for the Republican presidential nomination, support has declined somewhat since June, while support for Mitt Romney and Fred Thompson has risen. (pages 22, 23) Approval Ratings of President Bush Percent all adults 60 53 51 49 50 46 Overall Iraq 50 40 40 46 46 38 38 33 29 30 34 34 31 33 27 28 20 22 24 10 0 Feb Aug Feb Aug Jan Aug Jan Sep Jan Sep 03 03 04 04 05 05 06 06 07 07 Approval Ratings of Elected Federal Officials Percent saying they "approve" 60 49 50 45 45 40 Percent all adults 30 20 10 0 Barbara Boxer Dianne Feinstein Nancy Pelosi Setting a Timetable for the Withdrawal of U.S. Troops From Iraq in 2008 Percent saying the U.S. 100 "should set a timetable" 80 68 60 64 73 72 63 Percent all adults 40 20 0 All Central SF adults Valley Bay LA Other S. Cal 15 Californians and Their Government APPROVAL RATINGS OF PRESIDENT BUSH President Bush has made little progress in regaining Californians’ favor in 2007. Today, about three in 10 adults (27%) and likely voters (28%) approve of his overall job performance, while 69 percent in each group disapprove. Californians are similar to adults nationwide (30% approve, 64% disapprove), according to a recent CBS News/New York Times poll. Bush’s job approval in California has not surpassed 30 percent this year (29% January, 28% March, 28% June, 26% July) and is 6 points lower than last September (33%). At the six-year anniversary of the September 11 attacks, Bush’s approval has dropped a stunning 52 points from 79 percent in December 2001. While large majorities of Democrats (88%) and independents (74%) today disapprove of the president’s job performance, a majority of Republicans (58%) continue to approve. Although approval is low across regions, it is lowest in the San Francisco Bay Area (19%). Similar proportions of men (28%) and women (27%) and whites (31%) and Latinos (27%) approve. Approval is similarly low across income groups. Bush’s approval decreases with higher education, but increases with age. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that George W. Bush is handling his job as president of the United States?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 27% 10% 58% 22% 69 88 40 74 4224 Likely Voters 28% 69 3 Opinions of President Bush’s handling of the U.S. situation in Iraq are somewhat similar to his overall approval ratings. About one in four residents (24%) and likely voters (28%) approve of the president on this dimension, while about seven in 10 disapprove (72% all adults, 68% likely voters). Californians reflect views held by adults nationwide (26% approve, 71% disapprove), according to the recent CBS News/New York Times poll. In the wake of the deployment of additional troops this year, approval of Bush’s actions in Iraq has remained low (22% January, 23% March, 21% June, 24% today). Approval of the president’s handling of Iraq has steadily declined from a high of 55 percent in September 2002 to 24 percent today. Across political parties today, most Democrats (92%) and independents (76%) disapprove of Bush’s handling of Iraq, while a majority of Republicans (58%) approve. Across regions, disapproval is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (80%). Latinos (80%) and women (75%) are more likely to disapprove than whites (64%) and men (69%). Disapproval is also higher among younger and less affluent Californians. Of those who disapprove of the president’s job performance overall, 93 percent also disapprove of the way he is handling the Iraq situation. And of the 48 percent of Californians who say things in Iraq are not going at all well, 97 percent disapprove of the way the president is handling the situation there. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that President Bush is handling the situation in Iraq?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Approve 24% 6% 58% 21% 28% Disapprove 72 92 38 76 68 Don't know 42434 16 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues APPROVAL RATINGS OF ELECTED FEDERAL OFFICIALS California representatives in Washington fare better than the president, with about half of adults (49%) and likely voters (52%) approving of Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s job performance, while 32 percent of adults and 38 percent of likely voters disapprove. Feinstein’s approval is down from March among all adults (54%) and likely voters (59%), but is similar to last September (51% all adults, 53% likely voters), just before her reelection. Across political parties today, 70 percent of Democrats and 50 percent of independents approve of Feinstein’s overall job performance, while 57 percent of Republicans disapprove. Two in three residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%) and pluralities in Los Angeles (49%) and the Other Southern California region (44%) approve, while Central Valley residents are divided (42% approve, 40% disapprove). Her approval is higher among women than men (53% to 45%). About half of residents across racial/ethnic, age, and income groups approve of Feinstein’s job performance. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as U.S. senator?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 49% 70% 29% 50% 32 19 57 35 19 11 14 15 Likely Voters 52% 38 10 Sen. Barbara Boxer receives slightly lower approval ratings from residents (45%) and likely voters (46%). Boxer’s approval ratings have dropped somewhat since March (50% all adults, 53% likely voters), but are nearly identical to last September (46% all adults, 47% likely voters). While a strong majority of Democrats (69%) approve of her job performance, a majority of Republicans (62%) disapprove. Independents are more likely to approve (44%) than disapprove (38%). Across regions, San Francisco Bay Area residents (58%) are the most likely to approve of the way Boxer is handling her job (48% Los Angeles, 42% Central Valley, 37% Other Southern California region). Latinos are more likely than whites (49% to 42%), and women are more likely than men (48% to 41%) to give Boxer positive ratings. Disapproval increases with higher age and income. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Barbara Boxer is handling her job as U.S. senator?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 45% 69% 20% 44% 34 18 62 38 21 13 18 18 Likely Voters 46% 41 13 Turning to the U.S. Congress, 33 percent of Californians and 28 percent of likely voters approve of the way Congress is handling its job, while 57 percent of residents and 66 percent of likely voters disapprove. Californians are more positive than are adults nationwide (23% approve, 66% disapprove), according to the recent CBS News/New York Times poll. Approval ratings in California were similar in June (33% adults, 30% likely voters), but reflect a drop since January (42% adults, 37% likely voters) when Democrats took control of Congress. September 2007 17 Californians and Their Government APPROVAL RATINGS OF ELECTED FEDERAL OFFICIALS (CONTINUED) Today, majorities in all parties disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job—an increase since January among Republicans (53% to 69%), independents (49% to 64%), and Democrats (40% to 53%) alike. Disapproval today is highest in the Other Southern California region (60%), but majorities also disapprove in the Central Valley (58%), San Francisco Bay Area (56%), and Los Angeles (53%). Disapproval is higher among whites than Latinos (63% to 48%), and rises with higher age, education, and income. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the U.S. Congress is handling its job?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Approve 33% 38% 24% 26% 28% Disapprove 57 53 69 64 66 Don't know 10 9 7 10 6 Californians are much more favorable toward House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, with 45 percent of adults and 44 percent of likely voters approving of the way she is handling her job. According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, adults nationwide are less approving (36% approve and 33% disapprove). Pelosi’s approval ratings have increased since June among all Californians (39%) and are similar among likely voters (43%), but are still lower than in March (52% all adults, 53% likely voters). Today, most Democrats (61%) approve of Pelosi’s job performance, while most Republicans (62%) disapprove, and independents are divided (42% approve, 41% disapprove). Approval of Speaker Pelosi is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (56%), the region that includes her congressional district. Across demographic groups, Latinos are more likely than whites (53% to 40%), and women are more likely than men (48% to 42%) to say they approve. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is handling her job?” Approve All Adults 45% Central Valley 44% Region San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles 56% 45% Other Southern California 39% Likely Voters 44% Disapprove 36 40 34 32 39 45 Don't know 19 16 10 23 22 11 When it comes to the job performance of their own representatives to the U.S. House, half of residents (50%) and likely voters (54%) approve. These approval ratings are lower than in March (55% all adults, 59% likely voters) and last September (55% all adults, 60% likely voters). Pluralities across parties (58% Democrats, 49% Republicans, 48% independents) and regions approve of their own representatives. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way your own representative to the U.S. House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job?” All Adults 50% Central Valley 50% Region San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles 57% 49% Other Southern California 46% 30 31 23 33 34 20 19 20 18 20 Likely Voters 54% 32 14 18 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues TRUST IN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT Reflecting the poor approval ratings of both President Bush and the U.S. Congress, Californians’ trust in the federal government continues to be low. Fewer than one in four adults (23%) and likely voters (18%) think they can trust the government in Washington to do what is right just about always or most of the time. Trust today is lower than in March (28%) and reflects a 23-point drop from January 2002 (46%). Perceptions of the government in Washington differ across parties, with Democrats (19%) and independents (20%) less likely than Republicans (29%) to offer positive assessments. Trust is similarly low across regions, with about one in four in each region saying they trust the government in Washington to do what is right. Latinos (29%) are more likely than whites (21%) to express trust, and men (25%) are somewhat more trusting than women (20%). Trust declines with higher age, education, and income. Just about always Most of the time Only some of the time None of the time (volunteered) Don’t know “How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Washington today to do what is right?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 4% 3% 2% 4% 19 16 27 16 67 69 65 73 8 12 5 7 2-1- Likely Voters 2% 16 71 10 1 More than seven in 10 residents (71%) and likely voters (77%) say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests. Democrats (79%) and independents (78%) are more likely than Republicans (65%) to hold this view. Nearly seven in 10 in all regions express negative views of the federal government, and whites (74%) are more likely than Latinos (62%) to think government is run by a few big interests. “Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind A few big interests 71% 79% 65% 78% 77% Benefit of all the people 23 17 27 19 17 Don't know 64836 Negative perceptions of the federal government extend to its fiscal performance. About two in three Californians (65%) and seven in 10 likely voters (71%) think the federal government wastes a lot of taxpayer money. Perceptions today are similar to March, when 68 percent of Californians and 71 percent of likely voters held this view, and have been fairly consistent over time. Today, Democrats (66%), independents (66%), and Republicans (69%) all hold negative perceptions of the federal government’s fiscal performance. More than six in 10 in all regions think the federal government is wasteful. Whites (69%) are more negative than Latinos (57%), and perceptions of government waste increase with higher age, education, and income. September 2007 19 Californians and Their Government THE WAR IN IRAQ Most Californians continue to take a negative view of the U.S. involvement in Iraq. Only about one in four adults (24%) and likely voters (26%) say things are going well, while another fourth in both groups say they are going not too well and nearly half say they are going not at all well. While residents’ positive assessments have increased from June (18%), they are 9 points below August 2004 (33%), when they were first asked. Californians today are more negative than Americans nationwide, according to a June CNN poll asking a similar question, when 30 percent thought things were going at least moderately well. Democrats (66%) and independents (49%) are more likely than Republicans (16%) to say things are going not at all well in Iraq. About half in the San Francisco Bay Area (54%), Los Angeles (52%), and the Central Valley (48%) are negative, compared to only 40 percent in the Other Southern California region. This negative view is greater among Latinos than whites (56% to 41%) and women than men (51% to 45%). Very well Somewhat well Not too well Not at all well Don’t know “In general, how would you say things are going for the U.S. in Iraq?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 3% 1% 5% 3% 21 6 47 16 26 25 30 31 48 66 16 49 2221 Likely Voters 3% 23 27 46 1 It has been nine months since President Bush ordered the deployment of additional troops to Iraq. How do Californians view its impact? More than four in 10 residents (43%) say the additional troops have had no impact, while one in four say the increase is making the situation worse (27%) and another quarter (25%) say it is better now. One in three likely voters (32%) say things are better. Among adults, negative assessments have dropped 13 points since June (40% to 27%), while the number seeing an improvement is up 7 points (18% to 25%). Californians are more negative about the troop surge than are Americans nationwide, according to a recent CBS News/New York Times Poll (35% better, 12% worse, 45% no impact). Perceptions across parties vary widely, with only one in 10 Democrats (11%) and one in four independents (24%) saying the troop surge is making the situation better, compared to more than half of Republicans (55%). Residents of the Other Southern California region (31%) are the most likely to say the increase has led to improvement, while Los Angeles residents (32%) are the most likely to give a negative assessment. Latinos (12%) are less likely than whites (35%) and women (19%) are less likely than men (30%) to say the troop increase is having a positive impact. “As you may know, the U.S. has sent more than 20,000 additional troops to Iraq. From what you have heard or read, would you say this troop increase is making the situation in Iraq better, making it worse, or is it having no impact on the situation in Iraq so far?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Better 25% 11% 55% 24% 32% Worse 27 33 9 26 21 No impact 43 52 30 44 43 Don’t know 54664 20 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues THE WAR IN IRAQ (CONTINUED) The question of setting a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq has been a prominent issue in Washington. Two in three Californians (68%) and 61 percent of likely voters think a timetable should be set. The percentage of Californians holding this view is virtually unchanged since June (69%). Californians are slightly more supportive of a timetable than are Americans nationwide, according to a June CBS News poll (63% should set a timetable, 34% should not). Once again a huge partisan divide is present, with Democrats (86%) and independents (64%) strongly favoring a timetable and a solid majority of Republicans (63%) opposing it. More than six in 10 residents across the state’s regions think a timetable should be set, with support highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (73%) and Los Angeles (72%). Latinos (84%) are more likely than whites (56%) and women (75%) are more likely than men (61%) to hold this view. While a majority across demographic groups support setting a timetable for withdrawal of troops, support declines with higher age, education, and income. Should Should not Don't know “Do you think the United States should or should not set a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq sometime in 2008?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 68% 86% 35% 64% 28 12 63 34 4222 Likely Voters 61% 37 2 Many Californians are skeptical that a stable democratic government will be established in Iraq, with only three in 10 Californians (30%) saying it is very (8%) or somewhat (22%) likely and two in three saying it is not too (36%) or not at all (30%) probable. Likely voters are similar to all adults in their low levels of optimism about the government in Iraq. Californians’ perceptions on this issue today are virtually unchanged from January (7% very likely, 24% somewhat likely, 32% not too likely, 33% not at all likely). Democrats (20%) and independents (30%) are less optimistic than Republicans (44%) about the likelihood of a stable democratic government in Iraq. Fewer than one in three in all regions holds a positive view, with residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (26%) least likely to hold this perception about the Iraqi government. About three in 10 Latinos, whites, and residents across age, education, and income groups are optimistic. “How likely is it that a stable, democratic government will be established in Iraq? Is it very likely, somewhat likely, not too likely or not at all likely?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Very likely 8% 6% 8% 6% 6% Somewhat likely 22 14 36 24 23 Not too likely 36 37 32 37 35 Not at all likely 30 40 20 32 34 Don’t know 43412 September 2007 21 Californians and Their Government 2008 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ELECTION As California prepares to take the stage of national politics with its early primary next year, how are the presidential primary choices of the state’s likely voters shaping up? Among Democratic primary likely voters, who include Democrats as well as independents who say they’ll vote the Democratic primary ballot, Sen. Hillary Clinton (41%) continues to lead all candidates, followed by Sen. Barack Obama (23%), and former Sen. John Edwards (14%). Nine percent would vote for another candidate and 13 percent are undecided. Californians’ preferences in June were similar to today, with Clinton (41%) ahead, followed by Obama (25%) and Edwards (12%). In March when we presented Democratic primary likely voters with a shorter list, the results were similar (35% Clinton, 24% Obama, 14% Edwards). California Democratic likely voters are similar to Democrats nationwide, according to a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted in early September (41% Clinton, 27% Obama, 14% Edwards). Clinton is the leading candidate today among liberals (39%) and others (43%), and men (38%) and women (44%) alike. Democratic primary likely voters only Hillary Clinton Barack Obama John Edwards Dennis Kucinich Bill Richardson Joe Biden Chris Dodd Mike Gravel Someone else (specify) Don't know “If the Democratic primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for?” Likely voters Ideology Liberal Other Gender Men Women 41% 39% 43% 38% 44% 23 26 20 26 22 14 16 12 16 12 3 3232 3 2451 2 2212 - - 11 - - ---- 1 1312 13 11 13 9 15 On the Republican side, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani (22%) continues to lead among GOP primary likely voters (which includes only Republicans since independents are not eligible to vote in this primary), but his challengers may be gaining ground. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (16%), former Sen. Fred Thompson (16%) and Sen. John McCain (15%) are clustered closely together in a second tier. Eleven percent would vote for someone else and 20 percent are undecided. In June, Giuliani had a double-digit lead over his challengers (31% Giuliani, 16% McCain, 13% Romney, 13% Thompson); however, his support has since dropped 9 points, while Romney and Thompson have increased their share and there are more undecideds. In March, when Republican primary voters were presented with a list of candidates that included only Giuliani, McCain, Newt Gingrich, and Romney, 33 percent supported Giuliani, 19 percent supported McCain, 14 percent Gingrich, and 7 percent Romney. Nationwide, Giuliani has a 9-point lead over his nearest challenger, Thompson (28% to 19%), according to a recent Washington Post/ABC News poll, followed by McCain (18%) and Romney (10%). 22 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues 2008 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ELECTION (CONTINUED) Giuliani is the leading candidate today among conservatives (23%) and others (20%), and among both men (23%) and women (21%). Conservatives are more likely than others, and men are more likely than women to support Thompson. Women are more likely than men to support McCain. About one in five men and women are undecided, and conservatives are more likely than others to have made up their minds about a candidate to support. Republican primary likely voters only Rudy Giuliani Mitt Romney Fred Thompson John McCain Duncan Hunter Mike Huckabee Tom Tancredo Ron Paul Sam Brownback Someone else (specify) Don't know “If the Republican primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for?” Likely voters Ideology Conservative Other Gender Men Women 22% 23% 20% 23% 21% 16 17 14 18 14 16 18 11 21 11 15 16 13 11 19 3 3133 2 2222 2 2113 1 1111 - -1-1 3 2825 20 16 28 18 20 When it comes to satisfaction with their choices of candidates in the presidential primary, six in 10 likely voters (62%) are satisfied, while 35 percent are not satisfied. Democrats (76%) are much more satisfied than Republicans (55%) and independents (52%) with their choices of candidates. California Republicans and Democrats are more satisfied with their choices than their counterparts nationwide, according to a similar question in an August CBS News poll, which found that 67 percent of Democrats and 46 percent of Republicans were satisfied. In California today, satisfaction with the choice of candidates is higher among liberals (70%) than conservatives (58%), and among women (65%) than men (58%). Likely voters only Satisfied Not satisfied Don't know “In general, would you say you are satisfied or not satisfied with your choices of candidates in the presidential primary?” All Likely Voters Party Dem Rep Ideology Liberal Conservative 62% 76% 55% 70% 58% 35 22 40 27 37 32535 Gender Men Women 58% 65% 39 31 34 While the Presidential primary is still more than five months away, many likely voters say they are already following news about candidates for the 2008 presidential elections very (29%) or fairly (54%) closely. More than eight in 10 Democratic, Republican, and independent likely voters, and likely voters across all regions say they are closely following the presidential primary news. September 2007 23 REGIONAL MAP 24 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance in research and writing from Sonja Petek, project manager for this survey, and survey research associates Dean Bonner and Jennifer Paluch. This survey was conducted with funding from The James Irvine Foundation and benefited from discussions with foundation staff, grantees, and policy experts; however, the survey methods, questions, and content of this report were solely determined by Mark Baldassare. The findings in this report are based on a telephone survey of 2,003 California adult residents interviewed from Sept. 4 to 11, 2007. Interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days, using a computer-generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All telephone exchanges in California were eligible. Telephone numbers in the survey sample were called up to six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Each interview took an average of 19 minutes to complete. Interviewing was conducted in English or Spanish. Accent on Languages translated the survey into Spanish with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Schulman, Ronca & Bucuvalas, Inc. conducted the telephone interviewing. We used recent U.S. Census and state data to compare the demographic characteristics of the survey sample with characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the census and state figures. The survey data in this report were statistically weighted to account for any demographic differences. The sampling error for the total sample of 2,003 adults is +/- 2 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger: For the 1,511 registered voters, it is +/- 2.5 percent; for the 1,045 likely voters, it is +/- 3 percent; for the 455 Democratic presidential primary likely voters and the 353 Republican presidential primary likely voters, it is +/- 5 percent. Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for four geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, and “Other Southern California” includes Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties. Residents from other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters. Sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for Latinos because they account for about 30 percent of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. Sample sizes for African Americans and Asian Americans are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of registered Democrats, Republicans, and independents (those who are registered as “decline to state”). We also include the responses of “likely voters”— those who are most likely to vote in the state’s elections based on past voting, current interest, and voting intentions. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in national surveys by CBS News, CBS News/New York Times, CNN, Kaiser Family Foundation, Pew Research Center, and Washington Post/ABC News. 25 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT September 4-11, 2007 2,003 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR +/-2% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE 1. First, thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today? [code, don’t read] 18% immigration, illegal immigration 14 health care, health costs 13 jobs, economy 7 education, schools 7 housing costs, housing availability 5 crime, gangs, drugs 4 environment, pollution 4 state budget, deficit, taxes 4 traffic, transportation, infrastructure 3 gasoline prices 2 energy costs, energy supply 2 population growth, development 2 water, water quality, water availability 10 other 5 don’t know 2. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling his job as governor of California? 50% approve 38 disapprove 12 don’t know 3. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Governor Schwarzenegger is handling the issue of the state budget and taxes? 40% approve 43 disapprove 17 don’t know 4. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 34% approve 51 disapprove 15 don’t know 5. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling the issue of the state budget and taxes? 25% approve 59 disapprove 16 don’t know 6. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and state senate districts are doing at this time? 41% approve 40 disapprove 19 don’t know 7. Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 41% right direction 50 wrong direction 9 don’t know 8. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 33% good times 59 bad times 8 don’t know 27 Californians and Their Government 9. Next, how much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Sacramento to do what is right? 5% just about always 24 most of the time 64 only some of the time 5 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know 10.Would you say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 69% a few big interests 24 benefit of all of the people 7 don’t know 11.Do you think the people in state government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 53% a lot 36 some 8 don’t waste very much 3 don’t know On another topic, [rotate 3 blocks of questions randomly: (1) 12, 13; (2) 14, 15; (3) 16, 17] 12.A statewide initiative for the Feb. 5 primary election ballot called the “Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office Initiative Constitutional Amendment,” reduces the total amount of time a person may serve in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 years. It allows a person to serve a total of 12 years either in the assembly, the senate, or a combination of both. It provides a transition period to allow current members to serve a total of 12 consecutive years in the house in which they are currently serving, regardless of any prior service in another house. There would be no direct fiscal impact on state and local governments. If the election were held today would you vote yes or no on this measure? 53% yes 38 no 9 don’t know 13.As you may know, the California Legislature has operated under term limits since 1990. Under current term limits, a legislator is allowed to serve six years in the state assembly and eight years in the state senate, for a total of 14 years. Do you think that the current term limits in California are in need of major changes, minor changes, or are they fine the way they are? 36% major changes 30 minor changes 31 fine the way they are 3 don’t know 14.As you may know, redistricting is the process in which the physical boundaries of voting districts are changed. Would you favor or oppose a redistricting reform that requires an independent commission of citizens, instead of the state legislature and governor, to adopt a new redistricting plan after each census? 64% favor 21 oppose 15 don’t know 28 PPIC Statewide Survey 15.Do you think the way the governor and legislature go about the redistricting process in California is in need of major changes, minor changes, or is it fine the way it is? 42% major changes 29 minor changes 17 fine the way it is 12 don’t know 16.As you may know, the California state constitution requires that two-thirds of the state legislature agree to a state budget for it to pass. Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea to replace the two-thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for the state legislature to pass a budget? 44% good idea 46 bad idea 10 don’t know 17.Do you think the way the state legislature votes on the state budget is in need of major changes, minor changes, or is it fine the way it is? 40% major changes 31 minor changes 20 fine the way it is 9 don’t know On another topic, [rotate questions 18 and 19] 18.Would you favor or oppose a plan requiring all Californians to have health insurance, with costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals? 72% favor 23 oppose 5 don’t know Questionnaire and Results 19.Would you favor or oppose a plan that requires employers to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state to cover all working Californians, and that also guarantees health insurance for all children regardless of immigration status? 61% favor 36 oppose 3 don’t know 20.Do you think California’s health care system is in need of major changes or minor changes or that it is basically fine the way it is? 69% major changes 19 minor changes 10 fine the way it is 2 don’t know The subject of health care has recently been in the state and national news. [rotate 2 block of questions randomly: (1) 21, 22; (2) 23, 24] 21/22. This summer, have you seen, or heard or read about the movie “Sicko,” a documentary about the U.S. health care system directed by Michael Moore, or not? (if yes: As a result of watching the movie “Sicko,” or from what you have heard or read about it, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the U.S. health care system, or has this movie not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the U.S. health care system?) 17% yes, more likely 3 yes, less likely 29 yes, but opinion unchanged 3 yes, but don’t know if opinion has changed 48 no, have not heard of “Sicko” September 2007 29 Californians and Their Government 23/24. This summer, have you seen, heard, or read any advertisements about California health care reform, or not? (if yes: As a result of these advertisements, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the California health care system, or have these advertisements not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the California health care system?) 20% yes, more likely 2 yes, less likely 23 yes, but opinion unchanged 1 yes, but don’t know if opinion has changed 54 no, have not seen ads 25.How closely are you following news about the governor’s and legislature’s efforts to reform the California health care system? 10% very closely 37 fairly closely 37 not too closely 15 not at all closely 1 don’t know 26.Changing topics, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that George W. Bush is handling his job as president of the United States? 27% approve 69 disapprove 4 don’t know 26a.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that President Bush is handling the situation in Iraq? 24% approve 72 disapprove 4 don’t know [rotate questions 27 and 28] 27.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as U.S. senator? 49% approve 32 disapprove 19 don’t know 30 PPIC Statewide Survey 28.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Barbara Boxer is handling her job as U.S. senator? 45% approve 34 disapprove 21 don’t know 29.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the U.S. Congress is handling its job? 33% approve 57 disapprove 10 don’t know 30.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is handling her job? 45% approve 36 disapprove 19 don’t know 31.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way your own representative to the U.S. House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job? 50% approve 30 disapprove 20 don’t know 32.Changing topics, in general, how would you say things are going for the U.S. in Iraq? 3% very well 21 somewhat well 26 not too well 48 not at all well 2 don’t know 33.As you may know, the U.S. has sent more than 20,000 additional troops to Iraq. From what you have heard or read, would you say this troop increase is making the situation in Iraq better, making it worse, or is it having no impact on the situation in Iraq so far? 25% better 27 worse 43 no impact 5 don’t know 34.Do you think the United States should or should not set a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq sometime in 2008? 68% should 28 should not 4 don’t know 35.How likely is it that a stable, democratic government will be established in Iraq? Is it very likely, somewhat likely, not too likely or not at all likely? 8% very likely 22 somewhat likely 36 not too likely 30 not at all likely 4 don’t know 36.On another topic, people have different ideas about the government in Washington. How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Washington today to do what is right? 4% just about always 19 most of the time 67 only some of the time 8 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know 37.Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 71% a few big interests 23 benefit of all of the people 6 don’t know 38.Do you think the people in the federal government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 65% a lot 29 some 5 don’t waste very much 1 don’t know Questionnaire and Results 39.Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote? 76% yes [ask q39a] 24 no [skip to q40f] 39a.Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 42% Democrat [ask q40a] 33 Republican [skip to q40b] 5 other [skip to q43] 20 independent [skip to q40c] 40a.Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 59% strong 39 not very strong 2 don’t know [skip to q41] 40b.Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 51% strong 45 not very strong 4 don’t know [skip to q42] 40c.Would you join a political party if it was a good reflection of your political views or do you prefer to be unaffiliated with any specific party? 28% join a political party 71 remain unaffiliated 1 don’t know 40d.And were you previously registered with a major party or have you always been an independent? 42% previously registered [ask q40e] 56 always an independent [skip to q40f] 2 don’t know [skip to q40f] September 2007 31 Californians and Their Government 40e.And what party were you previously registered with? [code, don’t read] 47% Republican Party 48 Democratic Party 1 Green Party 3 other (specify) 1 don’t know 40f.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 22% Republican Party 43 Democratic Party 25 neither (volunteered) 10 don’t know [delayed skip: if q39=no, skip to q44] 40g.California voters like yourself will be able to choose between voting in the Democratic primary, or selecting a nonpartisan ballot on Feb. 5. Both ballots include state proposition measures. Do you plan to vote in the Democratic primary, or on the nonpartisan ballot? 18% Democratic primary [ask q41] 64 nonpartisan ballot [skip to q43] 3 not planning to vote (volunteered) [skip to q43] 15 don’t know [skip to q43] [Responses recorded for questions 41 to 44 are for likely voters only.] 41.If the Democratic primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for? [rotate names and then ask “or someone else”] 41% Hillary Clinton 23 Barack Obama 14 John Edwards 3 Dennis Kucinich 3 Bill Richardson 2 Joe Biden - Chris Dodd - Mike Gravel 1 or someone else (specify) 13 don’t know [skip to q43] 42.If the Republican primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for? [rotate names and then ask “or someone else”] 22% Rudy Giuliani 16 Mitt Romney 16 Fred Thompson 15 John McCain 3 Duncan Hunter 2 Mike Huckabee 2 Tom Tancredo 1 Ron Paul - Sam Brownback 3 or someone else (specify) 20 don’t know 43.In general, would you say you are satisfied or not satisfied with your choices of candidates in the presidential primary? 62% satisfied 35 not satisfied 3 don’t know 32 PPIC Statewide Survey 44.How closely are you following news about candidates for the 2008 presidential election? 29% very closely 54 fairly closely 14 not too closely 3 not at all closely 45.Next, where do you get most of your information about what’s going on in politics today—from [rotate] television, newspapers, radio, the Internet, magazines, or talking to other people? 47% television [ask q45a] 17 the Internet [skip to q45c] 15 newspapers [skip to q45b] 12 radio [skip to q46] 5 talking to other people [skip to q46] 2 magazines [skip to q46] 1 other (specify) [skip to q46] 1 don't know [skip to q46] 45a.Would that be major network TV, local TV, or cable news stations such as CNN or MSNBC? 25% major network TV 29 local TV 43 cable TV 2 other (specify) 1 don’t know [skip to q46] 45b.Do you mostly read the paper version of the newspaper, or do you mostly read the newspaper online? 87% paper version of the newspaper 13 newspaper online [skip to q46] 45c.Do you mostly read the websites of newspapers or other types of websites? 43% websites of newspapers 55 other types of websites 2 don’t know Questionnaire and Results 46.How often do you watch local news on television? 46% every day 27 a few times a week 10 once a week 8 less than once a week 9 never 47.How often do you read the local newspaper? 31% every day 19 a few times a week 16 once a week 11 less than once a week 23 never 48.Do you ever go online to get news and information on California politics and elections? (if yes: Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 15% yes, often 28 yes, sometimes 55 no 2 not applicable/don’t use the Internet (volunteered) 49.How closely are you following news stories about California politics and elections? 11% very closely 40 fairly closely 36 not too closely 13 not at all closely 50.And how would you rate the job that news organizations are doing in reporting about California politics and elections? 5% excellent 28 good 44 fair 16 poor 7 don’t know September 2007 33 Californians and Their Government 51.Overall, how satisfied are you with the amount of news coverage on California politics and elections—are you very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, somewhat dissatisfied, or very dissatisfied? 11% very satisfied 56 somewhat satisfied 20 somewhat dissatisfied 7 very dissatisfied 6 don’t know 52.Next, would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 10% very liberal 21 somewhat liberal 29 middle-of-the-road 25 somewhat conservative 11 very conservative 4 don’t know 53.Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 22% great deal 41 fair amount 31 only a little 6 none [d1-d4: demographic questions] [Responses recorded for questions d5 to d5d are for parents of children ages 13 to 17 only.] Thinking about your oldest or only child between the ages of 13 and 17, please tell me how often they participated in the following activities this summer. [rotate questions d5 to d5c] D5.This summer, how often did that child participate in outdoor nature activities such as camping, hiking, backpacking, or an outdoor educational program? 30% never 17 one time 24 2-5 times 14 6-10 times 15 more than 10 times 34 PPIC Statewide Survey D5a.This summer, how often did that child participate in outdoor team activities such as soccer, softball, baseball, or football? 41% never 4 one time 14 2-5 times 7 6-10 times 34 more than 10 times D5b.This summer, how often did that child participate in individual outdoor activities such as biking, tennis, running, or swimming? 17% never 4 one time 17 2-5 times 15 6-10 times 47 more than 10 times D5c.This summer, how often did that child participate in outdoor recreation such as activities on playgrounds, public parks, or public beaches? 11% never 6 one time 27 2-5 times 17 6-10 times 39 more than 10 times D5d.Overall, how satisfied are you with the outdoor activities that are available to that child? 51% very satisfied 34 somewhat satisfied 10 somewhat dissatisfied 4 very dissatisfied 1 don’t know [d6-d13: demographic questions] More analysis of questions related to news and information sources and youth and outdoor activities can be found in our Just the Facts series. Please visit the Statewide Survey page at www.ppic.org to view these publications, “California's Youth and Outdoor Activities” and “Californians' News and Information Sources.” PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Angela Blackwell Founder and Chief Executive Officer PolicyLink Paul Brest President The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mollyann Brodie Vice President Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director Institute of Governmental Studies University of California, Berkeley James E. Canales President The James Irvine Foundation Jon Cohen Director of Polling The Washington Post Matthew K. Fong Special Counsel Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, LLP Russell Hancock President and Chief Executive Officer Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network William Hauck President California Business Roundtable Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Senior Scholar School of Policy, Planning, and Development University of Southern California Carol S. Larson President and Chief Executive Officer The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Monica Lozano Publisher and Chief Executive Officer La Opinión Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Dan Rosenheim News Director KPIX-TV Carol Stogsdill President Stogsdill Consulting Cathy Taylor Vice President and Editorial Commentary Director Orange County Register Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Great Valley Center The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Thomas C. Sutton, Chair Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Pacific Life Insurance Company Mark Baldassare President and Chief Executive Officer Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Linda Griego President and Chief Executive Officer Griego Enterprises, Inc. Edward K. Hamilton Chairman Hamilton, Rabinovitz & Alschuler, Inc. Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Education State of California Walter B. Hewlett Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Leon E. Panetta Director The Leon & Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy Ki Suh Park Design and Managing Partner Gruen Associates Constance L. Rice Co-Director The Advancement Project Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Great Valley Center Copyright © 2007 by Public Policy Institute of California All rights reserved San Francisco, CA Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source and the above copyright notice is included. PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 800 San Francisco, California 94111 phone: 415.291.4400 fax: 415.291.4401 PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 phone: 916.440.1120 fax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org survey@ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(102) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(113) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-californians-and-their-government-september-2007/s_907mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8617) ["ID"]=> int(8617) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:39:13" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3862) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(8) "S 907MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "s_907mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_907MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(7) "1299974" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(93233) " TABLE OF CONTENTS About the Survey Press Release State Issues National Issues Regional Map Methodology Questionnaire and Results 1 3 7 15 24 25 27 ABOUT THE SURVEY The PPIC Statewide Survey provides policymakers, the media, and the general public with objective, advocacy-free information on the perceptions, opinions, and public policy preferences of California residents. Inaugurated in April 1998, this is the 80th PPIC Statewide Survey in a series that has generated a database that includes the responses of over 170,000 Californians. This survey is the 25th in our Californians and Their Government series, which is conducted periodically to examine the social, economic, and political trends that influence public policy preferences and ballot choices. It is supported by funding from The James Irvine Foundation. The current survey seeks to raise public awareness, inform decision makers, and stimulate public discussion about state and national issues. We examine Californians’ opinions about the overall direction of the state at a time when there are questions about the U.S. economic outlook; about overall perceptions of the governor and legislature and their handling of fiscal matters in the wake of this summer’s budget delay; and about attitudes and preferences on legislative and health care reforms in the context of legislative and initiative activities in these policy areas. We also analyze residents’ attitudes toward the president and the current situation in Iraq, as debates continue in Washington, D.C. about the future direction of U.S. policy; their trust in the federal government and their performance ratings of California’s federal elected officials; and their early opinions and preferences in the 2008 presidential primaries. This report presents the responses of 2,003 California adult residents on the following topics: „ State issues, including perceptions of the most important issues facing California today; opinions about the general direction of the state and the outlook for the state’s economy; approval ratings for Governor Schwarzenegger and the state legislature overall and on their handling of the issue of the state budget and taxes; approval ratings for respondents’ own state representatives; trust in state government; and attitudes about legislative redistricting, legislative term limits, and the two-thirds vote needed to pass the state budget. We also consider perceptions about the need for health care reform and preferences on health care policy proposals; how closely residents follow news about health care policy; and awareness and perceived impact of the documentary film “Sicko” and advertisments about health care policy. „ National issues, including overall approval ratings for President Bush and his handling of the situation in Iraq; overall approval ratings of Senators Boxer and Feinstein, Speaker Pelosi, Congress, and respondents’ own Congressional representatives; and trust in federal government. We also consider attitudes regarding the situation in Iraq and policy preferences; candidate preferences in the Democratic and Republican presidential primaries in 2008; and attention to news about the upcoming primary and satisfaction with the candidate choices. „ The extent to which Californians—based on their political party affiliation, region of residence, race/ethnicity, and other demographics—may differ with regard to perceptions, attitudes, and preferences involving state and national issues. Copies of this report may be ordered online (www.ppic.org) or by phone (415-291-4400). For questions about the survey, please contact survey@ppic.org. View our searchable PPIC Statewide Survey database online at http://www.ppic.org/main/survAdvancedSearch.asp. 1 PRESS RELEASE Para ver este comunicado de prensa en español, por favor visite nuestra página de internet: http://www.ppic.org/main/pressreleaseindex.asp PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT California: Doom, Gloom, And What Happened To Our Boom? Mood Sours As Housing Slumps; Leaders Take A Hit WILL HEALTH CARE BE THIS YEAR’S “REDEEMING” ISSUE FOR ELECTEDS? 2008 PRIMARY: GIULIANI LEAD NARROWS; REPUBLICANS SIGNAL DISCONTENT SAN FRANCISCO, California, September 20, 2007 — A dark mood is settling over the golden state as pessimism about California’s economic conditions hits its highest point since 2003, according to a survey released today by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. Housing woes and the spectacle of this summer’s budget battle are taking their toll on residents’ economic outlook— and affecting everything from trust in government to approval ratings of state and federal leaders. A strong majority of residents (59%) expect bad economic times in the coming year—a 10-point increase since June (49%) and a 20-point increase since January (39%). Likely voters are equally negative, with 62 percent expecting bad economic times. And the attitude is pervasive: Majorities across all the state’s regions and income levels say troubled economic times are on the way. “There has been a significant shift in attitude this year—and it is very likely being driven by bad news about the stock and housing markets,” says PPIC president and CEO Mark Baldassare. “For so many people, the feeling of overall financial well-being is tied to the value of their homes—something that seems increasingly threatened as they see sales slow, prices dip, and foreclosures rise.” Anxieties this personal are bound to spill over into other areas, and the overall mood in the state is closely in step with the economic outlook: Half of Californians (50%) today believe the state is generally headed in the wrong direction—a 13-point jump since January (37%). News about the economy, and this summer’s very partisan budget clash, are also hurting approval ratings of state leaders. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who has had positive ratings from a majority of residents since January, is now seeing a more lukewarm response: Half (50%) approve of how he’s handling his job—an 8-point drop since January. Approval of how he is handling the state budget has also dropped (40% approve today, 47% approved in January). Notably, however, among likely voters, the governor’s ratings on both overall and fiscal performance have not changed substantially. As has been the case in recent years, the state legislature earns even lower marks. Today, only 34 percent of all adults and 29 percent of likely voters approve of how the legislature is handling its job, a decline among both since January (all adults 40%, likely voters 37%). Approval of how lawmakers are handling the budget is even lower, with 25 percent of residents and 23 percent of likely voters giving them positive marks. Perhaps even more indicative of their worsening mood is how residents rate their own individual legislators. That’s a number that has generally remained stable—but has now dropped from 47 percent in March to 41 percent among all adults, and from 46 percent to 39 percent among likely voters. 3 Californians and Their Government A MATTER OF DISTRUST: AS CONFIDENCE DETERIORATES, RESIDENTS SUPPORT REFORM The falling approval ratings reflect a concomitant drop in trust of state government. A large majority of both residents (69%) and likely voters (75%) say they trust the government to do what is right only some or none of the time. Even worse, only 29 percent trust the government to do what is right most or all of the time, close to the lowest proportion registered by PPIC’s Statewide Survey since October 2003 (27%), when the recall election of then Governor Gray Davis was under way. Likely voters are even more suspicious, with only 25 percent saying they trust the government most or all of the time. Mistrust may arise from deep-seated feelings that state government is run by a few big interest groups, not for the greater good; 69 percent of residents and 73 percent of likely voters hold this view. And strong majorities across all political parties agree (Democrats 73%, Republicans 70%, independents 70%). Moreover, more than half of all residents and likely voters (53% each) say the state wastes a lot of taxpayer money. “This is not a new sentiment; a majority of Californians have held this view since early 2003,” says Baldassare. “However, we’re in choppy fiscal waters right now, and these attitudes could be more consequential for public officials and policies.” Such concerns may go a long way toward explaining robust voter support for various legislative reforms. For example, about two-thirds of likely voters (64%) say term limits in California need at least minor changes, and over half (55%) say they would vote yes on the term limits initiative that would reduce time in office from 14 to 12 years and that is headed for the primary ballot in February. Support for the initiative is shared by half of Democrats (50%) and a majority of Republicans (60%) and independents (56%). Although no redistricting measure is officially slated for next year’s ballot, this reform idea enjoys even stronger support among likely voters, with 66 percent saying they favor an independent citizens’ commission drawing legislative district lines, as opposed to the governor and legislature. Voter support for both term limits and redistricting stems from a desire to put more checks on government—the same reason behind voter opposition to another reform: replacing the two-thirds vote requirement to pass a state budget with a 55 percent majority. While this reform could prevent voterantagonizing budget standoffs, only 39 percent of likely voters think it is a good idea; 56 percent think it is a bad idea. “At this moment, it’s difficult to imagine voters easing up on the reins when it comes to their elected representatives; government has simply become too suspect in people’s minds,” says Baldassare. HIGH-FLYING HEALTH CARE: STRONG AWARENESS, SUPPORT FOR REFORM EFFORTS What’s a leader to do? One policy area in which state officials may have a chance to earn public approval is health care reform. Topped only by immigration (18%), health care (14%) is now second on Californians’ list of most important issues facing the state. It has even edged out jobs and the economy (13%), rising six points since June. In fact, 69 percent of residents and 72 percent of likely voters think California’s health care system is in need of major changes. “This issue has been highly publicized and is resonating with the public right now,” says Baldassare. “If actual reform happens, it could be a shot in the arm for state leaders.” And Californians are paying attention: Nearly half of residents (47%) and a majority of likely voters (55%) say they are following news about Sacramento’s efforts to reform health care at least fairly closely. The interest may be due, in part, to recent high-profile advocacy efforts. For example, half of residents (52%) say they have seen or heard of the documentary film “Sicko,” by filmmaker Michael Moore, with 17 percent saying it has made them more likely to think there is a need for health care reform in the United States. Nearly half (46%) also report having seen, heard, or read advertisements about California health care reform over the summer. 4 PPIC Statewide Survey Press Release But what are Californians actually willing to support? Strong majorities of residents (72%) and likely voters (63%) favor the plan being advocated by Governor Schwarzenegger, which would require all Californians to have health insurance, with costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals. The plan being floated by the state legislature, which would require employers to provide insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state and would cover all children regardless of immigration status, enjoys strong support among all adults (61%) but falls short of a majority among likely voters (47%). While majorities of Democrats (72%) and independents (58%) favor the proposal, a majority of Republicans (68%) oppose it. NEGATIVE ATTITUDES COLOR NATIONAL SCENE AS WELL … Closely reflecting skepticism about state government, Californians are equally—if not more— mistrustful of federal government. Three-fourths of residents (75%) and 81 percent of likely voters say they trust the federal government to do what’s right only some or none of the time. And these attitudes may be rooted in the pervasive belief that the federal government is run by a few big interests (all adults 71%, likely voters 77%) and not for the benefit of all people. This view is shared by strong majorities of Democrats (79%), independents (78%), and Republicans (65%). Moreover, about two-thirds of residents (65%) and even more likely voters (71%) think the federal government wastes a lot of taxpayer money. These attitudes may be reflected in Californians’ approval ratings of President Bush. About seven in ten residents and likely voters (69% each) disapprove of the way he is handling his job, similar to ratings by adults nationwide. Among all Californians, the president’s approval ratings have not surpassed 30 percent once this year. There are, however, major partisan divisions: A huge majority (88%) of Democrats and a very strong majority of independents (74%) disapprove of Bush’s job performance, while a majority of Republicans (58%) approve. Approval of both of California’s Democratic senators is also faltering. Senator Dianne Feinstein’s approval among likely voters is down seven points since March and stands at 52 percent. This mirrors the 7-point drop in support for Senator Barbara Boxer among likely voters (53% in March to 46% today). In fact, disapproval of Congress as a whole has risen significantly across political parties since January (53% to 69%, Republicans; 49% to 64%, independents; 40% to 53%, Democrats). … AND IRAQ IS A KEY REASON; HEADING INTO ’08, GOP VOTERS TROUBLED BY CHOICES The war in Iraq is dominating the national landscape and continues to distress the vast majority of Californians: Only about one in four adults (24%) and likely voters (26%) say things are going at least somewhat well. Among the different answers respondents could choose on this question, Californians were far more likely to choose “things are not going at all well” than any other response (48% all adults, 46% likely voters). This attitude extends to the recent surge of troops in Iraq: Only 25 percent of all Californians believe the strategy has made the situation in that country better, while 27 percent believe it has made things worse, and 43 percent don’t think it has had any effect. Consistent with those perspectives, most Californians (68%) and most likely voters (61%) want the United States to set a timetable to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq in 2008. As with all questions related to Iraq, however, there is a huge partisan divide: Republicans oppose a timetable (63%) and Democrats and independents support one (86% and 64%, respectively). As for Bush’s approval ratings on Iraq, about 7 in 10 adults (72%) and likely voters (68%) disapprove of his management of the war. At the six-year anniversary of the September 11th attacks, the president’s overall approval has dropped a stunning 52 points, from 79 percent in December 2001 to 27 percent today. September 2007 5 Californians and Their Government How are things shaping up for leaders who might inherit the Iraq situation? Among the 2008 Democratic primary candidates, Hillary Clinton (41%) continues to enjoy a strong lead over rivals Barack Obama (23%) and John Edwards (14%) with likely voters today. Among Republican contenders, Rudy Giuliani’s hold on the frontrunner spot is less secure at 22 percent and has narrowed with Fred Thompson (16%) entering the race and already running neck and neck with Mitt Romney (16%) and John McCain (15%). Another possible sign of division within the GOP is that, overall, far fewer Republican (55%) than Democratic (76%) likely voters say they are satisfied with their choice of candidates. MORE KEY FINDINGS ƒ Gender matters? — Pages 17, 18, and 22 Women are more likely than men to approve of the job being done by Senator Feinstein (53% to 45%), Senator Boxer (48% to 41%), and Speaker Nancy Pelosi (48% to 42%); women Democratic likely voters are also more likely to throw their support behind candidate Hillary Clinton (44% to 38%). ƒ Disapproval ratings get slightly more personal — Page 18 Californians’ approval of their own representative in the U.S. House has dropped from a majority in March (55%) to half (50%) today. Likely voters’ support has dropped from 59 percent to 54 percent. ƒ Hope does not spring eternal on Iraq — Page 21 Whatever course of action the U.S. takes in Iraq, most Californians think that establishing a democratic government in that country is not too likely (36%) or not at all likely (30%). ABOUT THE SURVEY This edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey is the 25th in the Californians and Their Government series and is supported by funding from The James Irvine Foundation. This survey is intended to raise public awareness, inform decisionmakers, and stimulate public discussions about the social, economic, and political trends that influence Californians’ public policy preferences and ballot choices. Findings are based on a telephone survey of 2,003 California adult residents interviewed between September 4 and September 11, 2007. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The sampling error for the total sample is +/- 2%. The sampling error for the 1,045 likely voters is +/- 3%. For more information on methodology, see page 25. Mark Baldassare is president and CEO of PPIC, where he holds the Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Public Policy. He is founder of the PPIC Statewide Survey, which he has directed since 1998. PPIC is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public policy through objective, nonpartisan research on the economic, social, and political issues affecting Californians. The institute was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. PPIC does not take or support positions on any ballot measure or on any local, state, or federal legislation, nor does it endorse, support, or oppose any political parties or candidates for public office. This report will appear on PPIC’s website (www.ppic.org) after 10 p.m. on September 20, 2007. 6 PPIC Statewide Survey STATE ISSUES KEY FINDINGS „ While immigration still tops the list of most important state issues, the percentage of residents naming this issue has declined, while the share naming health care has risen. Residents’ outlook for the state’s economy has turned more gloomy. (page 8) „ Half of residents approve of the governor’s overall job performance, while one in three offer positive assessments of the state legislature. In the wake of a delayed state budget, fewer approve of the governor’s or legislature’s handling of the state budget and taxes. (page 9) „ A majority of likely voters say they would vote yes on a term limits initiative reducing a legislator’s total time in office from 14 to 12 years. Two in three favor creating an independent citizens’ redistricting commission, taking this power away from the governor and legislature. Despite a late state budget this year, a majority of likely voters oppose changing the two-thirds vote requirement to a 55 percent majority vote to pass a budget. (pages 10, 11) „ Distrust in state government is near an alltime high: Most think it can be trusted only some of the time, most think it is run by a few big interests, and most think it wastes a lot of taxpayer money. (page 12) „ Seven in 10 residents believe California’s health care system needs major changes; there is substantial support for two reform proposals under consideration. (page 13) „ Awareness of health care issues is high, with about half of residents closely following news about state health care reform; about half have heard of the film “Sicko” and about half have seen health care reform advertisements. (page 14) Economic Outlook for California Percent all adults 80 60 50 40 39 20 Expect good times financially Expect bad times financially 59 51 49 40 40 33 0 Jan 07 Mar 07 Jun 07 Sep 07 Approval Ratings of Elected Officials Percent all adults Governor 80 Legislature 59 61 60 60 58 46 40 50 40 33 36 40 37 32 40 34 34 29 20 0 Jan Sep Jan Sep Jan Sep Jan Sep 04 04 05 05 06 06 07 07 Assessing the Need for Legislative Reforms in California Fine as is Minor changes needed Major changes needed 100 80 31 17 20 Percent all adults 60 29 31 30 40 20 36 42 40 0 Term Limits Redistricting Voting on State Budget 7 Californians and Their Government OVERALL MOOD Californians name immigration (18%) as the most important issue facing the state today, followed by health care (14%) and the economy (13%). Fewer than one in 10 mention education (7%), housing (7%), or other issues. Among likely voters, immigration (19%) and health care (18%) are the top concerns. Since June, the number of residents mentioning immigration has declined by 7 points (25% to 18%), while mention of health care has increased by 6 points (8% to 14%); the percentage of residents mentioning the economy has remained the same. As in previous surveys, partisan differences about the state’s most important issue are evident. While Republicans (29%) and independents (20%) name immigration as their top concern, Democrats name health care (21%). Across regions, immigration is the most important issue among residents in Los Angeles (22%) and the Other Southern California region (21%), while health care is the top concern among residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (19%) and Central Valley (18%). Latinos and whites are similar in naming immigration as the most important issue (19% each), but whites are twice as likely as Latinos to mention health care (17% to 8%). “Thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today?” Top five issues mentioned All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind Immigration, illegal immigration 18% 10% 29% 20% Health care, health costs 14 21 10 14 Jobs, economy 13 13 7 14 Education, schools 7985 Housing costs, housing availability 7 6 5 7 Likely Voters 19% 18 10 8 7 Californians are pessimistic about the state’s economy in the coming year. A strong majority of residents (59%) and likely voters (62%) think bad economic times lie ahead. Pessimism about the state’s economic outlook among adults has increased by 10 points since June (49%) and 20 points since January (39%). Today, majorities across all regions and demographic groups are expecting a bad economy. This negativity extends to the overall outlook of the state: Fifty percent of Californians say the state is headed in the wrong direction, while 41 percent say it is headed in the right direction. In January, only 37 percent said the state was headed in the wrong direction, while 55 percent said it was going in the right direction. “Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times?” Good times Bad times Don't know All Adults 33% 59% 8% Central Valley 32 60 8 San Francisco Bay Area 38 53 Region Los Angeles 32 60 9 8 Other Southern California 31 61 8 Under $40,000 33 57 10 Household Income $40,000 to $79,999 30 62 8 $80,000 or more 36 59 5 Homeownership Own Rent 31 60 34 58 9 8 Likely Voters 29 62 9 8 PPIC Statewide Survey State Issues APPROVAL RATINGS OF GOVERNOR SCHWARZENEGGER Today, half of residents (50%) and six in 10 likely voters (59%) approve of the way Governor Schwarzenegger is handling his overall job. Since January, his ratings have declined somewhat among all adults (58% to 50%) but they have not significantly changed among likely voters (61% to 59%). Across political parties, a strong majority of Republicans (73%) and just over half of independents (54%) approve of the governor, while Democrats are divided (44% approve, 43% disapprove). Across regions, residents in the Other Southern California region (54%), the Central Valley (53%), and the San Francisco Bay Area (52%) approve of his job performance, while nearly half of the residents in Los Angeles (47%) disapprove. Whites (65%) are more than twice as likely as Latinos (30%) to approve of the governor’s overall job performance. After the long state budget standoff this summer, residents are divided in their assessment of Governor Schwarzenegger’s fiscal performance (40% approve, 43% disapprove). In January, Californians were more positive about his handling of the state budget and taxes (47% approve, 39% disapprove). Today, a majority of Republicans (59%) approve of his performance in this area, while independents are divided (44% approve, 42% disapprove), and Democrats are more likely to disapprove than approve (48% to 34%). “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling …” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind … his job as governor of California? Approve Disapprove Don't know 50% 44% 73% 54% 59% 38 43 18 34 31 12 13 9 12 10 Approve 40 34 59 44 48 … the issue of the state budget and taxes? Disapprove 43 48 25 42 37 Don't know 17 18 16 14 15 APPROVAL RATINGS OF THE STATE LEGISLATURE Approval of the state legislature continues to lag far behind the governor’s approval ratings. One in three residents (34%) and three in 10 likely voters (29%) approve of the way the legislature is handling its job. The legislature’s approval ratings have declined somewhat among adults (40%) and likely voters (37%) since January. Pluralities across parties disapprove of the legislature today, while Republicans are the most negative. In the wake of the recent budget standoff, the legislators receive even lower marks from residents and likely voters with respect to their budgetary responsibilities: Majorities across demographic and political groups disapprove of their fiscal performance. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling …” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Approve 34% 36% 26% 33% 29% … its job? Disapprove 51 48 64 52 59 Don't know 15 16 10 15 12 Approve 25 27 17 26 23 … the issue of the state budget and taxes? Disapprove 59 57 70 59 65 Don't know 16 16 13 15 12 September 2007 9 Californians and Their Government APPROVAL RATINGS OF INDIVIDUAL LEGISLATORS Despite Californians’ negative perceptions of the state legislature as a whole, residents are divided in their assessment of their own individual representatives (41% approve, 40% disapprove). Likely voters are also more approving of their representatives than of the legislative body as a whole. Since March, however, individual legislators’ approval ratings have declined among all residents (47% to 41%) and likely voters (46% to 39%). Across regions, residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (47%) are the most approving of their representatives, while residents in the Central Valley are the least approving (37%). Across parties, more Democrats (46%) than Republicans (38%) or independents (37%) approve of their own legislators. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and state senate districts are doing at this time?” Approve All Adults 41% Central Valley 37% Region San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles 47% 41% Other Southern California 40% Likely Voters 39% Disapprove 40 46 32 41 42 45 Don't know 19 17 21 18 18 16 LEGISLATIVE REFORMS Since the passage of a voter initiative in 1990, state legislators have been subject to limitations in the number of terms they can spend in office. Presently, they are limited to six years in the state assembly and eight years in the state senate, for a total of 14 years. Earlier this month, an initiative qualified for the February 2008 primary election ballot that would alter the current term limits structure. The new law would allow legislators to serve a total of 12 years in either legislative branch, while allowing current members to serve 12 consecutive years in their current house. So what do Californians think about the state’s current term limit structure? Today, 66 percent of residents say major (36%) or minor (30%) changes are needed, while three in 10 think that the term limit structure is fine just as it is (31%). Across parties, independents (67%), Democrats (66%), and Republicans (61%) are similar in their likelihood to say that either major or minor changes are needed. When read the title and summary for the February 2008 initiative, 53 percent of residents and 55 percent of likely voters say they would vote yes. Republicans (60%) and independents (56%) are more likely than Democrats (50%) to support this legislative reform. In May, when read the summary and title, a similar 52 percent of adults and 53 percent of likely voters said they would vote yes. How important is the ballot wording? In March, before the final wording of the initiative was determined, two in three adults (66%) and likely voters (64%) opposed the general idea of changing term limits to 12 years in either branch. A similar question about allowing legislators 14 years in either branch found strong opposition in the past (62% October 2005, 68% May 2006, 72% October 2006). “A statewide initiative for the Feb. 5 primary election ballot called the ‘Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office Initiative Constitutional Amendment’ reduces the total amount of time a person may serve in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 years. It allows a person to serve a total of 12 years either in the assembly, the senate, or a combination of both. It provides a transition period to allow current members to serve a total of 12 consecutive years in the house in which they are currently serving, regardless of any prior service in another house. There would be no direct fiscal impact on state and local governments. If the election were held today would you vote yes or no on this measure?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Yes 53% 50% 60% 56% 55% No 38 43 33 36 39 Don't know 97786 10 PPIC Statewide Survey State Issues LEGISLATIVE REFORMS (CONTINUED) Redistricting is another legislative reform that may find its way onto a 2008 state ballot. Redistricting is the way in which the geographic boundaries of legislative districts are drawn. Currently, the governor and legislature are responsible for this process after each census. In November 2005, voters defeated (by a substantial 20 points) an initiative supported by Governor Schwarzenegger that would have shifted the responsibility from the governor and legislature to a three-person panel of retired judges. Still, three in four voters in a 2005 post-election survey said that changes were needed in the legislative redistricting process. Today, just over seven in 10 adults (71%) and likely voters (73%) say some changes to the redistricting process are needed. Four in 10 residents and likely voters (42% each) say major changes are needed. What changes are Californians willing to support in the way boundaries are redrawn? Some have proposed plans that would create an independent commission of citizens to establish a redistricting plan. Our survey asked about this general idea and found that a strong majority of adults (64%) and likely voters (66%) favor it, including nearly two in three across all parties. Support for this independent commission was similar in March (64% adults, 66% likely voters). “Would you favor or oppose a redistricting reform that requires an independent commission of citizens, instead of the state legislature and governor, to adopt a new redistricting plan after each census?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Favor 64% 62% 65% 66% 66% Oppose 21 24 21 23 22 Don't know 15 14 14 11 12 With another tardy budget this summer, how do Californians feel about changing the way the legislature votes on the state budget? Seven in 10 residents say major (40%) or minor (31%) changes are needed, while two in 10 (20%) say it is fine the way it is. Likely voters express similar views about the need to change the way the legislature votes on the budget. Democrats (74%) and independents (71%) are more likely than Republicans (65%) to say changes are needed, while seven in 10 across age, education, racial/ethnic, and income groups say changes are needed in the voting procedures. One possible reform would be to replace the two-thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority to pass the budget. Voters rejected a ballot initiative proposing this approach by a wide margin in March 2004 (34% yes, 66% no). Today, residents are divided on this reform (44% good idea, 46% bad idea), and a majority of likely voters think it would be a bad idea (56%). Across political parties, independents and Democrats are divided, while a majority of Republicans (66%) think it is a bad idea to replace the twothirds requirement with a 55 percent majority. Findings today are similar to May 2007 (43% good idea, 48% bad idea) and May 2006 (42% good idea, 46% bad idea). “Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea to replace the two-thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for the state legislature to pass a budget?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Good idea 44% 47% 29% 47% 39% Bad idea 46 46 66 45 56 Don't know 10 7 5 8 5 September 2007 11 Californians and Their Government TRUST IN STATE GOVERNMENT Californians’ trust in state government to do what is right is nearing the low point reached around the time of the governor’s recall in October 2003 (4% trust just about always, 23% most of the time). Today, only 29 percent of residents and 25 percent of likely voters say they trust the government in Sacramento just about always or most of the time. In March, 32 percent of adults and 30 percent of likely voters said they trusted the government in Sacramento at least most of the time. Levels of trust across parties are low, with fewer than three in 10 Democrats (29%), independents (28%), and Republicans (26%) saying they trust the state government at least most of the time. Two in three across parties say they trust the state only sometimes. Trust declines with age, education, and income. “How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Sacramento to do what is right?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Just about always 5% 4% 4% 4% 3% Most of the time 24 25 22 24 22 Only some of the time 64 65 66 67 69 None of the time (volunteered) 5 5 8 5 6 Don’t know 21 - - - Distrust is also evident when residents are asked about the influence of interest groups in state government. Seven in 10 adults (69%) and likely voters (73%) say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests rather than for the benefit of all of the people. This pessimism has increased slightly among residents since March (64% by big interests, 28% for the benefit of all) although the percentage expressing pessimism has been consistently above 60 percent since January 2004. Today, strong majorities across all political parties and demographic groups say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests rather than for the benefit of all of the people. “Would you say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind A few big interests 69% 73% 70% 70% 73% Benefit of all the people 24 21 22 24 20 Don't know 76867 Californians’ distrust extends to the government’s fiscal efficiency as well. Half of all residents and likely voters (53% each) say that the state government wastes a lot of the taxpayers’ money. These percentages are similar to those in March (55% adults, 55% likely voters), and our past surveys from February 2003 have found a majority of residents expressing this negative view. Over four in 10 residents across demographic and political groups say a lot of money is wasted by people in state government, although conservatives (58%) are much more likely than liberals (44%) to hold this view. Residents in Los Angeles (59%) and the Central Valley (57%) are more likely than residents in the San Francisco Bay Area and the Other Southern California region (48% each) to say that the state government wastes a lot of money. 12 PPIC Statewide Survey State Issues ATTITUDES TOWARD CALIFORNIA HEALTH CARE REFORMS As the governor and legislature continue to discuss health care reforms, nearly nine in 10 Californians believe the state’s health care system is in need of major (69%) or minor changes (19%), with solid majorities agreeing on the need for change across political groups. Similarly high proportions of residents expressed the need for change in March (87%) and June (89%). Today, more than eight in 10 residents across regions and demographic groups say that at least minor changes are needed. Major changes Minor changes Fine the way it is Don’t know “Do you think California’s health care system is in need of major changes or minor changes or that it is basically fine the way it is?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 69% 77% 63% 68% 19 16 20 21 10 4 13 8 2343 Likely Voters 72% 17 8 3 With the state legislature and Governor Schwarzenegger seeking a compromise health care solution, how do residents view two current reform proposals? Seven in 10 (72%) favor a plan advocated by the governor that would require all residents to have health insurance, with the costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals. Favor among the state’s residents was similar in January (71%), March (71%), and June (72%). Support for this plan is lower among likely voters (63%), and strong majorities of Democrats (79%) and independents (70%) − but only half of Republicans (50%) − favor the plan. Majorities across demographic groups express favor, but Latinos are much more likely than whites to support this proposal (90% to 60%). Support declines as age, education, and income increase. Seventy-six percent of those who say the health care system needs major changes, and 69 percent who say minor changes, favor the governor’s proposal for health care reform. “Would you favor or oppose a plan requiring all Californians to have health insurance, with costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Favor 72% 79% 50% 70% 63% Oppose 23 16 44 24 31 Don't know 5566 6 Six in 10 residents (61%) favor the major components of a health coverage plan that was passed by the state legislature. This legislative plan would require employers to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state, and it would cover all children in California regardless of immigration status. Support is lower among likely voters (47% favor, 49% oppose), and while majorities of Democrats (72%) and independents (58%) would favor the proposal, a strong majority of Republicans (68%) would oppose it. Majorities across the state’s regions support this proposal, with Latinos twice as likely as whites to support the plan (89% to 43%). Support declines sharply with higher age, education, and income. Sixty-four percent of those who say the health care system needs major changes, and 56 percent who say minor changes, favor this legislative proposal. September 2007 13 Californians and Their Government ATTITUDES TOWARD CALIFORNIA HEALTH CARE REFORMS (CONTINUED) “Would you favor or oppose a plan that requires employers to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state to cover all working Californians, and that also guarantees health insurance for all children regardless of immigration status?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Favor 61% 72% 26% 58% 47% Oppose 36 25 68 39 49 Don't know 3363 4 The issue of health care reform has been especially prominent in the media this summer, but has it registered with state residents? Nearly half of the state’s adult residents (47%) are very closely (10%) or fairly closely (37%) following news about the governor’s and legislature’s efforts to reform the California health care system. A similar proportion is closely following news about California politics and elections, but many more residents are closely following specific news about the 2008 presidential election. Attention to news about California’s health care reform is similar across political groups but higher among likely voters than all adults (55% to 47%). What is the impact of advocacy efforts this summer on support for health care reforms? Half of residents (52%) have heard of or seen the documentary film “Sicko” by filmmaker Michael Moore, while 48 percent are unaware of the film. In a recent Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) poll, a similar percentage of adults nationwide (46%) were aware of Moore’s film. As a result of the film, 17 percent of California residents say they are more likely to think the U.S. health care system needs reform, 3 percent are less likely to think so, and 29 percent say the movie has not changed their opinion. In the KFF poll, 20 percent of adults nationwide said the film made them more likely to see the need for health care reform, while 22 percent said their opinion remained unchanged. Nearly half of residents (46%) also report seeing advertisements about California health care reform. Twenty percent of residents say these ads have made them more likely to think California’s health care system needs reform, while only 2 percent say the ads have made them less likely to think the system needs reform. Twenty-three percent say their opinion is unchanged. Of those who believe the California health care system needs major changes, half (49%) saw ads about the California health care reform and one in four (24%) say the ads have made them more likely to think the health care system needs reform. This summer, have you seen, or heard or read about the movie “Sicko,” a documentary about the U.S. health care system directed by Michael Moore, or not? (if yes: As a result of watching the movie “Sicko,” or from what you have heard or read about it, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the U.S. health care system, or has this movie not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the U.S. health care system?) This summer, have you seen, heard, or read any advertisements about California health care reform, or not? (if yes: As a result of these advertisements, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the California health care system, or have these advertisements not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the California health care system?) Yes, more likely 17% 20% Yes, less likely Yes, but opinion unchanged Yes, but don’t know if opinion has changed No, have not heard of “Sicko”/seen ads 3 29 3 48 2 23 1 54 14 PPIC Statewide Survey NATIONAL ISSUES KEY FINDINGS „ Californians’ approval of President Bush’s overall job performance (27%) and his handling of the situation in Iraq (24%) remain low. (page 16) „ While nearly half of residents approve of the job performances of Senators Feinstein (49%) and Boxer (45%), their approval ratings have declined somewhat since March. (page 17) „ Just one in three residents approve of the job performance of the U.S. Congress, although half approve of their own Congressional representative and 45 percent approve of the way that Speaker Pelosi is handling her job. (pages 17, 18) „ Trust in federal government is even lower than trust in state government. Most think Washington can be trusted only some or none of the time (75%), is run by a few big interests (71%), and wastes a lot of taxpayer money (65%). (page 19) „ The vast majority of residents think things in Iraq are not going well (74%), and only one in four say the deployment of over 20,000 additional U.S. troops has made the situation better. Two in three would like to set a timetable for withdrawing troops in 2008, and just three in 10 think a stable democratic government is likely in Iraq. (pages 20, 21) „ Among likely voters, Hillary Clinton continues to lead the pack for the Democratic presidential nomination. Although Rudy Giuliani tops the race for the Republican presidential nomination, support has declined somewhat since June, while support for Mitt Romney and Fred Thompson has risen. (pages 22, 23) Approval Ratings of President Bush Percent all adults 60 53 51 49 50 46 Overall Iraq 50 40 40 46 46 38 38 33 29 30 34 34 31 33 27 28 20 22 24 10 0 Feb Aug Feb Aug Jan Aug Jan Sep Jan Sep 03 03 04 04 05 05 06 06 07 07 Approval Ratings of Elected Federal Officials Percent saying they "approve" 60 49 50 45 45 40 Percent all adults 30 20 10 0 Barbara Boxer Dianne Feinstein Nancy Pelosi Setting a Timetable for the Withdrawal of U.S. Troops From Iraq in 2008 Percent saying the U.S. 100 "should set a timetable" 80 68 60 64 73 72 63 Percent all adults 40 20 0 All Central SF adults Valley Bay LA Other S. Cal 15 Californians and Their Government APPROVAL RATINGS OF PRESIDENT BUSH President Bush has made little progress in regaining Californians’ favor in 2007. Today, about three in 10 adults (27%) and likely voters (28%) approve of his overall job performance, while 69 percent in each group disapprove. Californians are similar to adults nationwide (30% approve, 64% disapprove), according to a recent CBS News/New York Times poll. Bush’s job approval in California has not surpassed 30 percent this year (29% January, 28% March, 28% June, 26% July) and is 6 points lower than last September (33%). At the six-year anniversary of the September 11 attacks, Bush’s approval has dropped a stunning 52 points from 79 percent in December 2001. While large majorities of Democrats (88%) and independents (74%) today disapprove of the president’s job performance, a majority of Republicans (58%) continue to approve. Although approval is low across regions, it is lowest in the San Francisco Bay Area (19%). Similar proportions of men (28%) and women (27%) and whites (31%) and Latinos (27%) approve. Approval is similarly low across income groups. Bush’s approval decreases with higher education, but increases with age. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that George W. Bush is handling his job as president of the United States?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 27% 10% 58% 22% 69 88 40 74 4224 Likely Voters 28% 69 3 Opinions of President Bush’s handling of the U.S. situation in Iraq are somewhat similar to his overall approval ratings. About one in four residents (24%) and likely voters (28%) approve of the president on this dimension, while about seven in 10 disapprove (72% all adults, 68% likely voters). Californians reflect views held by adults nationwide (26% approve, 71% disapprove), according to the recent CBS News/New York Times poll. In the wake of the deployment of additional troops this year, approval of Bush’s actions in Iraq has remained low (22% January, 23% March, 21% June, 24% today). Approval of the president’s handling of Iraq has steadily declined from a high of 55 percent in September 2002 to 24 percent today. Across political parties today, most Democrats (92%) and independents (76%) disapprove of Bush’s handling of Iraq, while a majority of Republicans (58%) approve. Across regions, disapproval is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (80%). Latinos (80%) and women (75%) are more likely to disapprove than whites (64%) and men (69%). Disapproval is also higher among younger and less affluent Californians. Of those who disapprove of the president’s job performance overall, 93 percent also disapprove of the way he is handling the Iraq situation. And of the 48 percent of Californians who say things in Iraq are not going at all well, 97 percent disapprove of the way the president is handling the situation there. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that President Bush is handling the situation in Iraq?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Approve 24% 6% 58% 21% 28% Disapprove 72 92 38 76 68 Don't know 42434 16 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues APPROVAL RATINGS OF ELECTED FEDERAL OFFICIALS California representatives in Washington fare better than the president, with about half of adults (49%) and likely voters (52%) approving of Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s job performance, while 32 percent of adults and 38 percent of likely voters disapprove. Feinstein’s approval is down from March among all adults (54%) and likely voters (59%), but is similar to last September (51% all adults, 53% likely voters), just before her reelection. Across political parties today, 70 percent of Democrats and 50 percent of independents approve of Feinstein’s overall job performance, while 57 percent of Republicans disapprove. Two in three residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (64%) and pluralities in Los Angeles (49%) and the Other Southern California region (44%) approve, while Central Valley residents are divided (42% approve, 40% disapprove). Her approval is higher among women than men (53% to 45%). About half of residents across racial/ethnic, age, and income groups approve of Feinstein’s job performance. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as U.S. senator?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 49% 70% 29% 50% 32 19 57 35 19 11 14 15 Likely Voters 52% 38 10 Sen. Barbara Boxer receives slightly lower approval ratings from residents (45%) and likely voters (46%). Boxer’s approval ratings have dropped somewhat since March (50% all adults, 53% likely voters), but are nearly identical to last September (46% all adults, 47% likely voters). While a strong majority of Democrats (69%) approve of her job performance, a majority of Republicans (62%) disapprove. Independents are more likely to approve (44%) than disapprove (38%). Across regions, San Francisco Bay Area residents (58%) are the most likely to approve of the way Boxer is handling her job (48% Los Angeles, 42% Central Valley, 37% Other Southern California region). Latinos are more likely than whites (49% to 42%), and women are more likely than men (48% to 41%) to give Boxer positive ratings. Disapproval increases with higher age and income. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Barbara Boxer is handling her job as U.S. senator?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 45% 69% 20% 44% 34 18 62 38 21 13 18 18 Likely Voters 46% 41 13 Turning to the U.S. Congress, 33 percent of Californians and 28 percent of likely voters approve of the way Congress is handling its job, while 57 percent of residents and 66 percent of likely voters disapprove. Californians are more positive than are adults nationwide (23% approve, 66% disapprove), according to the recent CBS News/New York Times poll. Approval ratings in California were similar in June (33% adults, 30% likely voters), but reflect a drop since January (42% adults, 37% likely voters) when Democrats took control of Congress. September 2007 17 Californians and Their Government APPROVAL RATINGS OF ELECTED FEDERAL OFFICIALS (CONTINUED) Today, majorities in all parties disapprove of the way Congress is handling its job—an increase since January among Republicans (53% to 69%), independents (49% to 64%), and Democrats (40% to 53%) alike. Disapproval today is highest in the Other Southern California region (60%), but majorities also disapprove in the Central Valley (58%), San Francisco Bay Area (56%), and Los Angeles (53%). Disapproval is higher among whites than Latinos (63% to 48%), and rises with higher age, education, and income. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the U.S. Congress is handling its job?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Approve 33% 38% 24% 26% 28% Disapprove 57 53 69 64 66 Don't know 10 9 7 10 6 Californians are much more favorable toward House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, with 45 percent of adults and 44 percent of likely voters approving of the way she is handling her job. According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, adults nationwide are less approving (36% approve and 33% disapprove). Pelosi’s approval ratings have increased since June among all Californians (39%) and are similar among likely voters (43%), but are still lower than in March (52% all adults, 53% likely voters). Today, most Democrats (61%) approve of Pelosi’s job performance, while most Republicans (62%) disapprove, and independents are divided (42% approve, 41% disapprove). Approval of Speaker Pelosi is highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (56%), the region that includes her congressional district. Across demographic groups, Latinos are more likely than whites (53% to 40%), and women are more likely than men (48% to 42%) to say they approve. “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is handling her job?” Approve All Adults 45% Central Valley 44% Region San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles 56% 45% Other Southern California 39% Likely Voters 44% Disapprove 36 40 34 32 39 45 Don't know 19 16 10 23 22 11 When it comes to the job performance of their own representatives to the U.S. House, half of residents (50%) and likely voters (54%) approve. These approval ratings are lower than in March (55% all adults, 59% likely voters) and last September (55% all adults, 60% likely voters). Pluralities across parties (58% Democrats, 49% Republicans, 48% independents) and regions approve of their own representatives. Approve Disapprove Don't know “Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way your own representative to the U.S. House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job?” All Adults 50% Central Valley 50% Region San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles 57% 49% Other Southern California 46% 30 31 23 33 34 20 19 20 18 20 Likely Voters 54% 32 14 18 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues TRUST IN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT Reflecting the poor approval ratings of both President Bush and the U.S. Congress, Californians’ trust in the federal government continues to be low. Fewer than one in four adults (23%) and likely voters (18%) think they can trust the government in Washington to do what is right just about always or most of the time. Trust today is lower than in March (28%) and reflects a 23-point drop from January 2002 (46%). Perceptions of the government in Washington differ across parties, with Democrats (19%) and independents (20%) less likely than Republicans (29%) to offer positive assessments. Trust is similarly low across regions, with about one in four in each region saying they trust the government in Washington to do what is right. Latinos (29%) are more likely than whites (21%) to express trust, and men (25%) are somewhat more trusting than women (20%). Trust declines with higher age, education, and income. Just about always Most of the time Only some of the time None of the time (volunteered) Don’t know “How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Washington today to do what is right?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 4% 3% 2% 4% 19 16 27 16 67 69 65 73 8 12 5 7 2-1- Likely Voters 2% 16 71 10 1 More than seven in 10 residents (71%) and likely voters (77%) say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests. Democrats (79%) and independents (78%) are more likely than Republicans (65%) to hold this view. Nearly seven in 10 in all regions express negative views of the federal government, and whites (74%) are more likely than Latinos (62%) to think government is run by a few big interests. “Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind A few big interests 71% 79% 65% 78% 77% Benefit of all the people 23 17 27 19 17 Don't know 64836 Negative perceptions of the federal government extend to its fiscal performance. About two in three Californians (65%) and seven in 10 likely voters (71%) think the federal government wastes a lot of taxpayer money. Perceptions today are similar to March, when 68 percent of Californians and 71 percent of likely voters held this view, and have been fairly consistent over time. Today, Democrats (66%), independents (66%), and Republicans (69%) all hold negative perceptions of the federal government’s fiscal performance. More than six in 10 in all regions think the federal government is wasteful. Whites (69%) are more negative than Latinos (57%), and perceptions of government waste increase with higher age, education, and income. September 2007 19 Californians and Their Government THE WAR IN IRAQ Most Californians continue to take a negative view of the U.S. involvement in Iraq. Only about one in four adults (24%) and likely voters (26%) say things are going well, while another fourth in both groups say they are going not too well and nearly half say they are going not at all well. While residents’ positive assessments have increased from June (18%), they are 9 points below August 2004 (33%), when they were first asked. Californians today are more negative than Americans nationwide, according to a June CNN poll asking a similar question, when 30 percent thought things were going at least moderately well. Democrats (66%) and independents (49%) are more likely than Republicans (16%) to say things are going not at all well in Iraq. About half in the San Francisco Bay Area (54%), Los Angeles (52%), and the Central Valley (48%) are negative, compared to only 40 percent in the Other Southern California region. This negative view is greater among Latinos than whites (56% to 41%) and women than men (51% to 45%). Very well Somewhat well Not too well Not at all well Don’t know “In general, how would you say things are going for the U.S. in Iraq?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 3% 1% 5% 3% 21 6 47 16 26 25 30 31 48 66 16 49 2221 Likely Voters 3% 23 27 46 1 It has been nine months since President Bush ordered the deployment of additional troops to Iraq. How do Californians view its impact? More than four in 10 residents (43%) say the additional troops have had no impact, while one in four say the increase is making the situation worse (27%) and another quarter (25%) say it is better now. One in three likely voters (32%) say things are better. Among adults, negative assessments have dropped 13 points since June (40% to 27%), while the number seeing an improvement is up 7 points (18% to 25%). Californians are more negative about the troop surge than are Americans nationwide, according to a recent CBS News/New York Times Poll (35% better, 12% worse, 45% no impact). Perceptions across parties vary widely, with only one in 10 Democrats (11%) and one in four independents (24%) saying the troop surge is making the situation better, compared to more than half of Republicans (55%). Residents of the Other Southern California region (31%) are the most likely to say the increase has led to improvement, while Los Angeles residents (32%) are the most likely to give a negative assessment. Latinos (12%) are less likely than whites (35%) and women (19%) are less likely than men (30%) to say the troop increase is having a positive impact. “As you may know, the U.S. has sent more than 20,000 additional troops to Iraq. From what you have heard or read, would you say this troop increase is making the situation in Iraq better, making it worse, or is it having no impact on the situation in Iraq so far?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Better 25% 11% 55% 24% 32% Worse 27 33 9 26 21 No impact 43 52 30 44 43 Don’t know 54664 20 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues THE WAR IN IRAQ (CONTINUED) The question of setting a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq has been a prominent issue in Washington. Two in three Californians (68%) and 61 percent of likely voters think a timetable should be set. The percentage of Californians holding this view is virtually unchanged since June (69%). Californians are slightly more supportive of a timetable than are Americans nationwide, according to a June CBS News poll (63% should set a timetable, 34% should not). Once again a huge partisan divide is present, with Democrats (86%) and independents (64%) strongly favoring a timetable and a solid majority of Republicans (63%) opposing it. More than six in 10 residents across the state’s regions think a timetable should be set, with support highest in the San Francisco Bay Area (73%) and Los Angeles (72%). Latinos (84%) are more likely than whites (56%) and women (75%) are more likely than men (61%) to hold this view. While a majority across demographic groups support setting a timetable for withdrawal of troops, support declines with higher age, education, and income. Should Should not Don't know “Do you think the United States should or should not set a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq sometime in 2008?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Ind 68% 86% 35% 64% 28 12 63 34 4222 Likely Voters 61% 37 2 Many Californians are skeptical that a stable democratic government will be established in Iraq, with only three in 10 Californians (30%) saying it is very (8%) or somewhat (22%) likely and two in three saying it is not too (36%) or not at all (30%) probable. Likely voters are similar to all adults in their low levels of optimism about the government in Iraq. Californians’ perceptions on this issue today are virtually unchanged from January (7% very likely, 24% somewhat likely, 32% not too likely, 33% not at all likely). Democrats (20%) and independents (30%) are less optimistic than Republicans (44%) about the likelihood of a stable democratic government in Iraq. Fewer than one in three in all regions holds a positive view, with residents in the San Francisco Bay Area (26%) least likely to hold this perception about the Iraqi government. About three in 10 Latinos, whites, and residents across age, education, and income groups are optimistic. “How likely is it that a stable, democratic government will be established in Iraq? Is it very likely, somewhat likely, not too likely or not at all likely?” All Adults Dem Party Rep Likely Voters Ind Very likely 8% 6% 8% 6% 6% Somewhat likely 22 14 36 24 23 Not too likely 36 37 32 37 35 Not at all likely 30 40 20 32 34 Don’t know 43412 September 2007 21 Californians and Their Government 2008 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ELECTION As California prepares to take the stage of national politics with its early primary next year, how are the presidential primary choices of the state’s likely voters shaping up? Among Democratic primary likely voters, who include Democrats as well as independents who say they’ll vote the Democratic primary ballot, Sen. Hillary Clinton (41%) continues to lead all candidates, followed by Sen. Barack Obama (23%), and former Sen. John Edwards (14%). Nine percent would vote for another candidate and 13 percent are undecided. Californians’ preferences in June were similar to today, with Clinton (41%) ahead, followed by Obama (25%) and Edwards (12%). In March when we presented Democratic primary likely voters with a shorter list, the results were similar (35% Clinton, 24% Obama, 14% Edwards). California Democratic likely voters are similar to Democrats nationwide, according to a Washington Post/ABC News poll conducted in early September (41% Clinton, 27% Obama, 14% Edwards). Clinton is the leading candidate today among liberals (39%) and others (43%), and men (38%) and women (44%) alike. Democratic primary likely voters only Hillary Clinton Barack Obama John Edwards Dennis Kucinich Bill Richardson Joe Biden Chris Dodd Mike Gravel Someone else (specify) Don't know “If the Democratic primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for?” Likely voters Ideology Liberal Other Gender Men Women 41% 39% 43% 38% 44% 23 26 20 26 22 14 16 12 16 12 3 3232 3 2451 2 2212 - - 11 - - ---- 1 1312 13 11 13 9 15 On the Republican side, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani (22%) continues to lead among GOP primary likely voters (which includes only Republicans since independents are not eligible to vote in this primary), but his challengers may be gaining ground. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (16%), former Sen. Fred Thompson (16%) and Sen. John McCain (15%) are clustered closely together in a second tier. Eleven percent would vote for someone else and 20 percent are undecided. In June, Giuliani had a double-digit lead over his challengers (31% Giuliani, 16% McCain, 13% Romney, 13% Thompson); however, his support has since dropped 9 points, while Romney and Thompson have increased their share and there are more undecideds. In March, when Republican primary voters were presented with a list of candidates that included only Giuliani, McCain, Newt Gingrich, and Romney, 33 percent supported Giuliani, 19 percent supported McCain, 14 percent Gingrich, and 7 percent Romney. Nationwide, Giuliani has a 9-point lead over his nearest challenger, Thompson (28% to 19%), according to a recent Washington Post/ABC News poll, followed by McCain (18%) and Romney (10%). 22 PPIC Statewide Survey National Issues 2008 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ELECTION (CONTINUED) Giuliani is the leading candidate today among conservatives (23%) and others (20%), and among both men (23%) and women (21%). Conservatives are more likely than others, and men are more likely than women to support Thompson. Women are more likely than men to support McCain. About one in five men and women are undecided, and conservatives are more likely than others to have made up their minds about a candidate to support. Republican primary likely voters only Rudy Giuliani Mitt Romney Fred Thompson John McCain Duncan Hunter Mike Huckabee Tom Tancredo Ron Paul Sam Brownback Someone else (specify) Don't know “If the Republican primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for?” Likely voters Ideology Conservative Other Gender Men Women 22% 23% 20% 23% 21% 16 17 14 18 14 16 18 11 21 11 15 16 13 11 19 3 3133 2 2222 2 2113 1 1111 - -1-1 3 2825 20 16 28 18 20 When it comes to satisfaction with their choices of candidates in the presidential primary, six in 10 likely voters (62%) are satisfied, while 35 percent are not satisfied. Democrats (76%) are much more satisfied than Republicans (55%) and independents (52%) with their choices of candidates. California Republicans and Democrats are more satisfied with their choices than their counterparts nationwide, according to a similar question in an August CBS News poll, which found that 67 percent of Democrats and 46 percent of Republicans were satisfied. In California today, satisfaction with the choice of candidates is higher among liberals (70%) than conservatives (58%), and among women (65%) than men (58%). Likely voters only Satisfied Not satisfied Don't know “In general, would you say you are satisfied or not satisfied with your choices of candidates in the presidential primary?” All Likely Voters Party Dem Rep Ideology Liberal Conservative 62% 76% 55% 70% 58% 35 22 40 27 37 32535 Gender Men Women 58% 65% 39 31 34 While the Presidential primary is still more than five months away, many likely voters say they are already following news about candidates for the 2008 presidential elections very (29%) or fairly (54%) closely. More than eight in 10 Democratic, Republican, and independent likely voters, and likely voters across all regions say they are closely following the presidential primary news. September 2007 23 REGIONAL MAP 24 METHODOLOGY The PPIC Statewide Survey is directed by Mark Baldassare, president and CEO and survey director at the Public Policy Institute of California, with assistance in research and writing from Sonja Petek, project manager for this survey, and survey research associates Dean Bonner and Jennifer Paluch. This survey was conducted with funding from The James Irvine Foundation and benefited from discussions with foundation staff, grantees, and policy experts; however, the survey methods, questions, and content of this report were solely determined by Mark Baldassare. The findings in this report are based on a telephone survey of 2,003 California adult residents interviewed from Sept. 4 to 11, 2007. Interviewing took place on weekday nights and weekend days, using a computer-generated random sample of telephone numbers that ensured that both listed and unlisted numbers were called. All telephone exchanges in California were eligible. Telephone numbers in the survey sample were called up to six times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (age 18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Each interview took an average of 19 minutes to complete. Interviewing was conducted in English or Spanish. Accent on Languages translated the survey into Spanish with assistance from Renatta DeFever. Schulman, Ronca & Bucuvalas, Inc. conducted the telephone interviewing. We used recent U.S. Census and state data to compare the demographic characteristics of the survey sample with characteristics of California’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to the census and state figures. The survey data in this report were statistically weighted to account for any demographic differences. The sampling error for the total sample of 2,003 adults is +/- 2 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in California were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger: For the 1,511 registered voters, it is +/- 2.5 percent; for the 1,045 likely voters, it is +/- 3 percent; for the 455 Democratic presidential primary likely voters and the 353 Republican presidential primary likely voters, it is +/- 5 percent. Sampling error is only one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. We present results for four geographic regions, accounting for approximately 90 percent of the state population. “Central Valley” includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. “San Francisco Bay Area” includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. “Los Angeles” refers to Los Angeles County, and “Other Southern California” includes Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties. Residents from other geographic areas are included in the results reported for all adults, registered voters, and likely voters. Sample sizes for these less populated areas are not large enough to report separately. We present specific results for Latinos because they account for about 30 percent of the state’s adult population and constitute one of the fastest growing voter groups. Sample sizes for African Americans and Asian Americans are not large enough for separate analysis. We compare the opinions of registered Democrats, Republicans, and independents (those who are registered as “decline to state”). We also include the responses of “likely voters”— those who are most likely to vote in the state’s elections based on past voting, current interest, and voting intentions. We compare current PPIC Statewide Survey results to those in national surveys by CBS News, CBS News/New York Times, CNN, Kaiser Family Foundation, Pew Research Center, and Washington Post/ABC News. 25 QUESTIONNAIRE AND RESULTS CALIFORNIANS AND THEIR GOVERNMENT September 4-11, 2007 2,003 California Adult Residents: English, Spanish MARGIN OF ERROR +/-2% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE 1. First, thinking about the state as a whole, what do you think is the most important issue facing people in California today? [code, don’t read] 18% immigration, illegal immigration 14 health care, health costs 13 jobs, economy 7 education, schools 7 housing costs, housing availability 5 crime, gangs, drugs 4 environment, pollution 4 state budget, deficit, taxes 4 traffic, transportation, infrastructure 3 gasoline prices 2 energy costs, energy supply 2 population growth, development 2 water, water quality, water availability 10 other 5 don’t know 2. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Arnold Schwarzenegger is handling his job as governor of California? 50% approve 38 disapprove 12 don’t know 3. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Governor Schwarzenegger is handling the issue of the state budget and taxes? 40% approve 43 disapprove 17 don’t know 4. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling its job? 34% approve 51 disapprove 15 don’t know 5. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that the California Legislature is handling the issue of the state budget and taxes? 25% approve 59 disapprove 16 don’t know 6. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job that the state legislators representing your assembly and state senate districts are doing at this time? 41% approve 40 disapprove 19 don’t know 7. Do you think things in California are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 41% right direction 50 wrong direction 9 don’t know 8. Turning to economic conditions in California, do you think that during the next 12 months we will have good times financially or bad times? 33% good times 59 bad times 8 don’t know 27 Californians and Their Government 9. Next, how much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Sacramento to do what is right? 5% just about always 24 most of the time 64 only some of the time 5 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know 10.Would you say the state government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 69% a few big interests 24 benefit of all of the people 7 don’t know 11.Do you think the people in state government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 53% a lot 36 some 8 don’t waste very much 3 don’t know On another topic, [rotate 3 blocks of questions randomly: (1) 12, 13; (2) 14, 15; (3) 16, 17] 12.A statewide initiative for the Feb. 5 primary election ballot called the “Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office Initiative Constitutional Amendment,” reduces the total amount of time a person may serve in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 years. It allows a person to serve a total of 12 years either in the assembly, the senate, or a combination of both. It provides a transition period to allow current members to serve a total of 12 consecutive years in the house in which they are currently serving, regardless of any prior service in another house. There would be no direct fiscal impact on state and local governments. If the election were held today would you vote yes or no on this measure? 53% yes 38 no 9 don’t know 13.As you may know, the California Legislature has operated under term limits since 1990. Under current term limits, a legislator is allowed to serve six years in the state assembly and eight years in the state senate, for a total of 14 years. Do you think that the current term limits in California are in need of major changes, minor changes, or are they fine the way they are? 36% major changes 30 minor changes 31 fine the way they are 3 don’t know 14.As you may know, redistricting is the process in which the physical boundaries of voting districts are changed. Would you favor or oppose a redistricting reform that requires an independent commission of citizens, instead of the state legislature and governor, to adopt a new redistricting plan after each census? 64% favor 21 oppose 15 don’t know 28 PPIC Statewide Survey 15.Do you think the way the governor and legislature go about the redistricting process in California is in need of major changes, minor changes, or is it fine the way it is? 42% major changes 29 minor changes 17 fine the way it is 12 don’t know 16.As you may know, the California state constitution requires that two-thirds of the state legislature agree to a state budget for it to pass. Do you think it’s a good idea or a bad idea to replace the two-thirds vote requirement with a 55 percent majority vote for the state legislature to pass a budget? 44% good idea 46 bad idea 10 don’t know 17.Do you think the way the state legislature votes on the state budget is in need of major changes, minor changes, or is it fine the way it is? 40% major changes 31 minor changes 20 fine the way it is 9 don’t know On another topic, [rotate questions 18 and 19] 18.Would you favor or oppose a plan requiring all Californians to have health insurance, with costs shared by employers, health care providers, and individuals? 72% favor 23 oppose 5 don’t know Questionnaire and Results 19.Would you favor or oppose a plan that requires employers to provide health insurance to their employees or pay a fee to the state to cover all working Californians, and that also guarantees health insurance for all children regardless of immigration status? 61% favor 36 oppose 3 don’t know 20.Do you think California’s health care system is in need of major changes or minor changes or that it is basically fine the way it is? 69% major changes 19 minor changes 10 fine the way it is 2 don’t know The subject of health care has recently been in the state and national news. [rotate 2 block of questions randomly: (1) 21, 22; (2) 23, 24] 21/22. This summer, have you seen, or heard or read about the movie “Sicko,” a documentary about the U.S. health care system directed by Michael Moore, or not? (if yes: As a result of watching the movie “Sicko,” or from what you have heard or read about it, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the U.S. health care system, or has this movie not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the U.S. health care system?) 17% yes, more likely 3 yes, less likely 29 yes, but opinion unchanged 3 yes, but don’t know if opinion has changed 48 no, have not heard of “Sicko” September 2007 29 Californians and Their Government 23/24. This summer, have you seen, heard, or read any advertisements about California health care reform, or not? (if yes: As a result of these advertisements, are you more likely or less likely to think that there is a need to reform the California health care system, or have these advertisements not changed your opinion about the need for reforming the California health care system?) 20% yes, more likely 2 yes, less likely 23 yes, but opinion unchanged 1 yes, but don’t know if opinion has changed 54 no, have not seen ads 25.How closely are you following news about the governor’s and legislature’s efforts to reform the California health care system? 10% very closely 37 fairly closely 37 not too closely 15 not at all closely 1 don’t know 26.Changing topics, overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that George W. Bush is handling his job as president of the United States? 27% approve 69 disapprove 4 don’t know 26a.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that President Bush is handling the situation in Iraq? 24% approve 72 disapprove 4 don’t know [rotate questions 27 and 28] 27.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Dianne Feinstein is handling her job as U.S. senator? 49% approve 32 disapprove 19 don’t know 30 PPIC Statewide Survey 28.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way that Barbara Boxer is handling her job as U.S. senator? 45% approve 34 disapprove 21 don’t know 29.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the U.S. Congress is handling its job? 33% approve 57 disapprove 10 don’t know 30.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is handling her job? 45% approve 36 disapprove 19 don’t know 31.Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way your own representative to the U.S. House of Representatives in Congress is handling his or her job? 50% approve 30 disapprove 20 don’t know 32.Changing topics, in general, how would you say things are going for the U.S. in Iraq? 3% very well 21 somewhat well 26 not too well 48 not at all well 2 don’t know 33.As you may know, the U.S. has sent more than 20,000 additional troops to Iraq. From what you have heard or read, would you say this troop increase is making the situation in Iraq better, making it worse, or is it having no impact on the situation in Iraq so far? 25% better 27 worse 43 no impact 5 don’t know 34.Do you think the United States should or should not set a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq sometime in 2008? 68% should 28 should not 4 don’t know 35.How likely is it that a stable, democratic government will be established in Iraq? Is it very likely, somewhat likely, not too likely or not at all likely? 8% very likely 22 somewhat likely 36 not too likely 30 not at all likely 4 don’t know 36.On another topic, people have different ideas about the government in Washington. How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Washington today to do what is right? 4% just about always 19 most of the time 67 only some of the time 8 none of the time (volunteered) 2 don’t know 37.Would you say the federal government is pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves, or that it is run for the benefit of all of the people? 71% a few big interests 23 benefit of all of the people 6 don’t know 38.Do you think the people in the federal government waste a lot of the money we pay in taxes, waste some of it, or don’t waste very much of it? 65% a lot 29 some 5 don’t waste very much 1 don’t know Questionnaire and Results 39.Next, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain that you are registered to vote? 76% yes [ask q39a] 24 no [skip to q40f] 39a.Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent? 42% Democrat [ask q40a] 33 Republican [skip to q40b] 5 other [skip to q43] 20 independent [skip to q40c] 40a.Would you call yourself a strong Democrat or not a very strong Democrat? 59% strong 39 not very strong 2 don’t know [skip to q41] 40b.Would you call yourself a strong Republican or not a very strong Republican? 51% strong 45 not very strong 4 don’t know [skip to q42] 40c.Would you join a political party if it was a good reflection of your political views or do you prefer to be unaffiliated with any specific party? 28% join a political party 71 remain unaffiliated 1 don’t know 40d.And were you previously registered with a major party or have you always been an independent? 42% previously registered [ask q40e] 56 always an independent [skip to q40f] 2 don’t know [skip to q40f] September 2007 31 Californians and Their Government 40e.And what party were you previously registered with? [code, don’t read] 47% Republican Party 48 Democratic Party 1 Green Party 3 other (specify) 1 don’t know 40f.Do you think of yourself as closer to the Republican Party or Democratic Party? 22% Republican Party 43 Democratic Party 25 neither (volunteered) 10 don’t know [delayed skip: if q39=no, skip to q44] 40g.California voters like yourself will be able to choose between voting in the Democratic primary, or selecting a nonpartisan ballot on Feb. 5. Both ballots include state proposition measures. Do you plan to vote in the Democratic primary, or on the nonpartisan ballot? 18% Democratic primary [ask q41] 64 nonpartisan ballot [skip to q43] 3 not planning to vote (volunteered) [skip to q43] 15 don’t know [skip to q43] [Responses recorded for questions 41 to 44 are for likely voters only.] 41.If the Democratic primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for? [rotate names and then ask “or someone else”] 41% Hillary Clinton 23 Barack Obama 14 John Edwards 3 Dennis Kucinich 3 Bill Richardson 2 Joe Biden - Chris Dodd - Mike Gravel 1 or someone else (specify) 13 don’t know [skip to q43] 42.If the Republican primary for president were being held today, and these were the candidates, who would you vote for? [rotate names and then ask “or someone else”] 22% Rudy Giuliani 16 Mitt Romney 16 Fred Thompson 15 John McCain 3 Duncan Hunter 2 Mike Huckabee 2 Tom Tancredo 1 Ron Paul - Sam Brownback 3 or someone else (specify) 20 don’t know 43.In general, would you say you are satisfied or not satisfied with your choices of candidates in the presidential primary? 62% satisfied 35 not satisfied 3 don’t know 32 PPIC Statewide Survey 44.How closely are you following news about candidates for the 2008 presidential election? 29% very closely 54 fairly closely 14 not too closely 3 not at all closely 45.Next, where do you get most of your information about what’s going on in politics today—from [rotate] television, newspapers, radio, the Internet, magazines, or talking to other people? 47% television [ask q45a] 17 the Internet [skip to q45c] 15 newspapers [skip to q45b] 12 radio [skip to q46] 5 talking to other people [skip to q46] 2 magazines [skip to q46] 1 other (specify) [skip to q46] 1 don't know [skip to q46] 45a.Would that be major network TV, local TV, or cable news stations such as CNN or MSNBC? 25% major network TV 29 local TV 43 cable TV 2 other (specify) 1 don’t know [skip to q46] 45b.Do you mostly read the paper version of the newspaper, or do you mostly read the newspaper online? 87% paper version of the newspaper 13 newspaper online [skip to q46] 45c.Do you mostly read the websites of newspapers or other types of websites? 43% websites of newspapers 55 other types of websites 2 don’t know Questionnaire and Results 46.How often do you watch local news on television? 46% every day 27 a few times a week 10 once a week 8 less than once a week 9 never 47.How often do you read the local newspaper? 31% every day 19 a few times a week 16 once a week 11 less than once a week 23 never 48.Do you ever go online to get news and information on California politics and elections? (if yes: Do you do this often or only sometimes?) 15% yes, often 28 yes, sometimes 55 no 2 not applicable/don’t use the Internet (volunteered) 49.How closely are you following news stories about California politics and elections? 11% very closely 40 fairly closely 36 not too closely 13 not at all closely 50.And how would you rate the job that news organizations are doing in reporting about California politics and elections? 5% excellent 28 good 44 fair 16 poor 7 don’t know September 2007 33 Californians and Their Government 51.Overall, how satisfied are you with the amount of news coverage on California politics and elections—are you very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, somewhat dissatisfied, or very dissatisfied? 11% very satisfied 56 somewhat satisfied 20 somewhat dissatisfied 7 very dissatisfied 6 don’t know 52.Next, would you consider yourself to be politically: [read list, rotate order top to bottom] 10% very liberal 21 somewhat liberal 29 middle-of-the-road 25 somewhat conservative 11 very conservative 4 don’t know 53.Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics? 22% great deal 41 fair amount 31 only a little 6 none [d1-d4: demographic questions] [Responses recorded for questions d5 to d5d are for parents of children ages 13 to 17 only.] Thinking about your oldest or only child between the ages of 13 and 17, please tell me how often they participated in the following activities this summer. [rotate questions d5 to d5c] D5.This summer, how often did that child participate in outdoor nature activities such as camping, hiking, backpacking, or an outdoor educational program? 30% never 17 one time 24 2-5 times 14 6-10 times 15 more than 10 times 34 PPIC Statewide Survey D5a.This summer, how often did that child participate in outdoor team activities such as soccer, softball, baseball, or football? 41% never 4 one time 14 2-5 times 7 6-10 times 34 more than 10 times D5b.This summer, how often did that child participate in individual outdoor activities such as biking, tennis, running, or swimming? 17% never 4 one time 17 2-5 times 15 6-10 times 47 more than 10 times D5c.This summer, how often did that child participate in outdoor recreation such as activities on playgrounds, public parks, or public beaches? 11% never 6 one time 27 2-5 times 17 6-10 times 39 more than 10 times D5d.Overall, how satisfied are you with the outdoor activities that are available to that child? 51% very satisfied 34 somewhat satisfied 10 somewhat dissatisfied 4 very dissatisfied 1 don’t know [d6-d13: demographic questions] More analysis of questions related to news and information sources and youth and outdoor activities can be found in our Just the Facts series. Please visit the Statewide Survey page at www.ppic.org to view these publications, “California's Youth and Outdoor Activities” and “Californians' News and Information Sources.” PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Angela Blackwell Founder and Chief Executive Officer PolicyLink Paul Brest President The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mollyann Brodie Vice President Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director Institute of Governmental Studies University of California, Berkeley James E. Canales President The James Irvine Foundation Jon Cohen Director of Polling The Washington Post Matthew K. Fong Special Counsel Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, LLP Russell Hancock President and Chief Executive Officer Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network William Hauck President California Business Roundtable Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Senior Scholar School of Policy, Planning, and Development University of Southern California Carol S. Larson President and Chief Executive Officer The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Monica Lozano Publisher and Chief Executive Officer La Opinión Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Dan Rosenheim News Director KPIX-TV Carol Stogsdill President Stogsdill Consulting Cathy Taylor Vice President and Editorial Commentary Director Orange County Register Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Great Valley Center The PPIC Statewide Survey Advisory Committee is a diverse group of experts who provide advice on survey issues. However, survey methods, questions, content, and timing are determined solely by PPIC. PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Thomas C. Sutton, Chair Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Pacific Life Insurance Company Mark Baldassare President and Chief Executive Officer Public Policy Institute of California Ruben Barrales President and Chief Executive Officer San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Linda Griego President and Chief Executive Officer Griego Enterprises, Inc. Edward K. Hamilton Chairman Hamilton, Rabinovitz & Alschuler, Inc. Gary K. Hart Former State Senator and Secretary of Education State of California Walter B. Hewlett Director Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities Donna Lucas Chief Executive Officer Lucas Public Affairs Leon E. Panetta Director The Leon & Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy Ki Suh Park Design and Managing Partner Gruen Associates Constance L. Rice Co-Director The Advancement Project Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board Emeritus The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Great Valley Center Copyright © 2007 by Public Policy Institute of California All rights reserved San Francisco, CA Short sections of text, not to exceed three paragraphs, may be quoted without written permission provided that full attribution is given to the source and the above copyright notice is included. PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA 500 Washington Street, Suite 800 San Francisco, California 94111 phone: 415.291.4400 fax: 415.291.4401 PPIC Sacramento Center Senator Office Building 1121 L Street, Suite 801 Sacramento, California 95814 phone: 916.440.1120 fax: 916.440.1121 www.ppic.org survey@ppic.org" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:39:13" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(8) "s_907mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:39:14" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:39:14" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(50) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_907MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }