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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_700MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "369587" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(62771) " Preface The San Diego survey—a collaborative effort of the Public Policy Institute of California and San Diego Dialogue—is a special edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey. This report summarizes the results of the baseline “awareness” survey for a one-year citizen engagement and dialogue project in San Diego County, organized by San Diego Dialogue in partnership with the Leadership Learning Network, Inc. (chaired by Dan Yankelovich) and funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The intent of the current survey is to provide the first comprehensive, advocacy-free study of the perceptions, attitudes, and public policy preferences of San Diego County residents. The county is the second most populous in California and is one of the fastest growing and most dynamic metropolitan regions in the state. The social, economic, political, and public policy trends in this large county are of considerable interest to researchers and local and state leaders throughout California. San Diego County—a Southern California coastal region with a 4,260 square mile land area stretching from the Orange County and Riverside County borders in the north to the Tijuana, Mexico, border in the south—is home to about 2.8 million residents. The population has increased by 1 million residents since 1980 and is expected to grow by another 1 million by 2020. The county includes 18 cities, with most located near the coast. The largest is San Diego, with 1.2 million residents. The unincorporated communities contain about a half million residents. The county’s population is 24 percent Latino, 9 percent Asian, 6 percent black, and 61 percent non-Hispanic white. The county is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse over time. This survey of 2,000 adult residents, conducted in June 2000, provides baseline awareness questions for measuring changes over time and includes comparisons with other major regions of California and with the state as a whole, focusing in particular on the following areas: • Ratings of the seriousness of specific problems confronting the region today, including growth and land-use issues, fiscal and governance issues, and social and economic trends. • Perceptions of the major causes of the problems today, including the amount of population growth and the nature of land use, fiscal stresses on the system of local governance, and social and economic trends such as inner-city decline and growing income inequality. • Support for policies that others have suggested for solving the problems facing the San Diego area, including specific growth and land-use policies, fiscal and governance reforms, and social and economic policies that seek to improve the conditions of lower-income residents. • Variations in perceptions and policy preferences between all adult residents, “likely voters” who most actively participate in local elections, and Latinos and young adults (18 to 34 year olds)—who are underrepresented in the political process today—and differences across the four regions of the county (the central city of San Diego, South Bay, north county, and east county). • Overall evaluations of San Diego County as a place to live, including quality of life ratings, commuting problems, future growth expectations, and plans to continue living in the county. Copies of this report or other PPIC Statewide Surveys may be ordered by e-mail (order@ppic.org) or phone (415-291-4400). -i- - ii - Contents Preface Press Release San Diego Context Problems Causes Solutions Survey Methodology Survey Questions and Results Survey Advisory Committee i v 1 7 13 17 21 23 27 - iii - Press Release CONCERNS ABOUT GROWTH LOOM LARGE IN SAN DIEGO Residents See Government as Major Part of Problem, But Optimism About Region’s Future Reigns SAN FRANCISCO, California, July 19, 2000 — San Diegans have seen the future and it looks like L.A. Residents say traffic, housing, and a host of other growth-related worries threaten the county and government is failing to meet the challenge, according to a new survey by the Public Policy Institute of California and San Diego Dialogue. At the same time, residents express surprising optimism about the region’s ability to overcome its troubles and say they won’t head for greener pastures anytime soon. The large-scale public opinion survey of 2,000 San Diego County residents reveals a nearly unanimous (93%) expectation that the county’s population will grow in the next ten years, with eight in ten residents saying it will grow rapidly. Strikingly, only 18 percent believe the county will be a better place to live in 2010, while 38 percent say it will be worse. San Diegans are more likely than Californians as a whole to believe that their region will experience rapid growth in the next ten years (82% to 59%) and are less likely to say that it will be a better place to live a decade from now (18% to 28%). Given this concern, San Diegans are quick to find growth-related issues at the heart of the county’s problems. When asked to name the single biggest problem facing their part of San Diego, residents say traffic (29%), followed by crime (15%) and population growth and development (13%). Growthrelated concerns again top the list when residents are asked to rank a number of local problems. Three in four say that traffic (78%) and the lack of affordable housing (74%) are serious problems in their part of the county, and more than half (58%) say that pollution is a serious problem. Three other issues — immigration (57%), local taxes (54%), and homelessness and poverty (51%) — are also seen as big problems by a majority of residents. Residents in the north county are more likely than those in other regions to see traffic, development, lack of parks, and population increases as serious problems, while people in the South Bay are more concerned than other county residents about pollution. “The effects of San Diego’s tremendous growth are hitting home for many residents,” said PPIC Statewide Survey Director Mark Baldassare. “And with the county’s population projected to increase by 1 million residents in the next 20 years, it’s not surprising that there is uncertainty and some doubt about what the future will hold.” Government Viewed as Ineffective, Corrupt While growth may be the key problem, government is a central cause, according to San Diegans. When asked about a number of potential reasons for the region’s problems, residents cite “the government spending money on the wrong things” more than any other reason (75%), followed by too fast growth (63%), ineffective government (61%), poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods (61%), and too much growth in the wrong places (60%). Majorities also view other governmentrelated issues — including excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing (59%), government allocation of state and local taxes (58%), greed and corruption in government (56%), and -v- Press Release overdevelopment resulting from insufficient government regulations (51%) — as major causes of their area’s problems. San Diegans’ profound distrust of government surfaces again when residents are asked to rate proposed solutions to the region’s problems. The highest level of support is found for reducing corruption in government (89%), followed closely by building a superior transit system (85%), investing more money in public schools (85%), and reforming local government so that it serves the interests of the entire community (84%). Ironically, solid majorities also support strengthening the powers of local government so that it can deal with problems more effectively (70%) and making it easier for local governments to raise money by reforming the property tax system (55%). However, residents make it clear that they intend to control the purse strings: only 46 percent say they support making it easier for local governments to raise money by requiring a simple majority rather than a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes. While South Bay residents are most likely to think that reducing corruption in government is a good idea (92%), they are also the most likely to support strengthening local government (80%), reforming the property tax system (68%), and requiring only a simple majority vote to pass local taxes (56%). “Residents are relatively scathing in their assessment of government in San Diego County,” said Baldassare. “However, they also understand that local officials have a key role to play in solving the region’s problems and are willing to provide at least some of the fiscal tools that governments need. There is a significant opportunity here.” Glass Half Full Indeed, despite the perils of a growth-filled future, San Diego residents find much promise in their region. Two in three residents say that the county is headed in the right direction, and only about one in four say that things are going in the wrong direction. Similarly, most (84%) say that the quality of life in San Diego County is going either “very well” (24%) or “somewhat well” (60%), while relatively few think that the quality of life in their county is going badly (15%). Although most San Diegans expect rapid growth and few expect conditions to improve, two in three residents still intend to live in San Diego County a decade from now. Sixty-four percent say they see themselves living in the county in 2010, while 30 percent say they will call another county home. Not coincidentally, the majority of residents also believe that solutions to the problems facing their part of San Diego are within reach: Fifty-nine percent say they are optimistic that local problems will be solved, with South Bay residents even more hopeful than most (64%). “Many difficult choices lie ahead for San Diegans, their elected leaders, and their community organizations as we confront the challenges presented by population growth and our unique geographic situation,” said Chuck Nathanson, Executive Director of San Diego Dialogue. “But the level of optimism and commitment to the county that this survey reveals is remarkably powerful and encouraging.” Interestingly, Latinos hold an even more optimistic view of the county and its future than adult residents generally. They are more likely to believe that the problems facing their area of the county will be solved (71% to 59%), to say that things are generally headed in the right direction (73% to 66%), and to think that the quality of life in the county is going very well or somewhat well (91% to 84%). Latinos are also more likely to think that the county will be a better place to live in 2010 (31%) than a worse place (25%). Despite their overall optimism, younger residents (ages 18 to 34) are the least likely to say they see themselves living in the county ten years from now (55%). - vi - Press Release About the Survey The Special Survey of San Diego County — a collaborative effort of the Public Policy Institute of California and San Diego Dialogue — is a special edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey. The survey offers the first comprehensive, advocacy-free study of the perceptions, attitudes, and public policy preferences of San Diego residents. It provides baseline information for a one-year citizen engagement and dialogue project in the county, organized by San Diego Dialogue in partnership with Leadership Learning Network, Inc. (chaired by Dan Yankelovich) and funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Findings are based on a telephone survey of 2,000 San Diego County adult residents interviewed from June 12 to June 18, 2000. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The sampling error for the total sample is +/- 2%. For additional information on survey methodology, see page 21. Dr. Mark Baldassare is a senior fellow at PPIC. He is founder and director of the PPIC Statewide Survey, which he has conducted since 1998. For over two decades, he has conducted surveys for the University of California, Irvine, and major news organizations, including the Orange County Edition of the Los Angeles Times, the Orange County Register, the San Francisco Chronicle, KCAL-TV, and KRON-TV. Dr. Baldassare is the author of numerous books, including California in the New Millennium: The Changing Social and Political Landscape (University of California Press, 2000). PPIC is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to objective, nonpartisan research on economic, social, and political issues that affect the lives of Californians. The Institute was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. #### - vii - San Diego Context The County’s Future Almost all San Diego County residents expect the population to increase in their county, and 82 percent predict rapid growth in the next 10 years. This nearly unanimous perception of growth is found among likely voters, younger adults, Latinos, and across the four regions of the county. Looking ahead, only 18 percent expect their county to be a better place to live in 2010, while 38 percent expect it to be a worse place to live and 42 percent think that it will be about the same. Likely voters are the most pessimistic, and younger adults remain somewhat more optimistic than all adults. Latinos are much more likely than all adults to say that San Diego will be a better place to live in the future (31% to 18%). In every region, more residents think the county will be a worse rather than a better place to live ten years from now. Comparing these results to those of an earlier PPIC Statewide Survey (June 2000), we find that residents in San Diego County (82%) are more likely than residents of the state as a whole (59%) to believe that their region will experience rapid growth in the next 10 years. San Diego County residents are also less likely than Californians as a whole to say that their region will be a better place to live in 2010 than it is today (18% to 28%). "In the next 10 years, do you think the population of San Diego County will grow rapidly, grow slowly, stay about the same, or decline?” Grow rapidly Grow slowly Stay about the same Decline Don't know All Adults 82% 11 5 1 1 Likely Voters 83% 10 5 1 1 Ages 18 to 34 82% 11 4 2 1 Latino 82% 9 6 2 1 "Ten years from now, do you think San Diego County will be a better place to live than it is now, a worse place to live than it is now, or about the same?” Better place Worse place Same Don't know All Adults 18% 38 42 2 Likely Voters 16% 41 41 2 Ages 18 to 34 21% 34 44 1 Latino 31% 25 41 3 -1- San Diego Context Overall Mood Today Although they are concerned about the county’s future, most residents are upbeat about overall conditions today. Two in three adult residents say that things in San Diego County are generally going in the right direction, and only about one in four say that things are going in the wrong direction. Similarly, most (84%) say that the quality of life in San Diego County is going either “very well” (24%) or “somewhat well” (60%), while relatively few think that the quality of life in their county is going badly (15%). There are no differences in the overall mood today between all adults and likely voters, younger adults, Latinos, or across the four regions of the county. In comparing the survey's results to those of the June 2000 Statewide Survey, we find that San Diego residents are less likely than Californians as a whole to say things are going very well in their region (24% to 29%). San Diego residents are also less likely than Orange County residents to say things in their county are going very well (24% to 38%), based upon a comparison of this survey's responses with those of the Orange County Annual Survey conducted in May 2000. "Do you think things in San Diego County are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction?” Right direction Wrong direction Don't know All Adults 66% 27 7 Likely Voters 65% 30 5 Ages 18 to 34 71% 23 6 Latino 73% 19 8 "Thinking about the quality of life in San Diego County, how do you think things are going?” Very well Somewhat well Somewhat badly Very badly Don't know All Adults 24% 60 12 3 1 Likely Voters 23% 60 12 4 1 Ages 18 to 34 23% 65 9 2 1 Latino 24% 67 6 2 1 - 2- San Diego Context The Daily Commute While overall conditions are positive, traffic is a daily annoyance for most of the county’s work force. About two in three employed residents say that traffic congestion is a problem during their commute, while one in four describe traffic as a “great problem.” There are no differences across demographic and voter groups in citing problems with the commute. North county residents (67%) are more likely than those in other regions to say that they experience at least some traffic problems. Length of commute has a dramatic effect on perceptions of traffic problems. Among those whose commute from home to work is 30 minutes or more, 51 percent say that traffic congestion is a great problem, 37 percent say it is somewhat of a problems, and 12 percent say it is not a problem. Among those with shorter commutes, only 16 percent have a great problem with traffic, while 38 percent have some problems and 46 percent have no problem. San Diego residents (26%) are more likely than Orange County residents (18%) or Central Valley residents (15%) to rank traffic congestion during their commute as a serious problem. We have no comparable results for Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay area, or the state as a whole. "On a typical day, how much of a problem is traffic congestion when you travel to and from work?” (asked only of employed residents) Great problem Somewhat of a problem No problem All Adults 26% 37 37 Likely Voters 25% 38 37 Ages 18 to 34 28% 38 34 Latino 25% 39 36 Great problem Somewhat of a problem No problem Central City 23% 39 38 Region North County South Bay 29% 38 33 27% 35 38 East County 27% 33 40 -3- San Diego Context Migration Plans Even though most San Diegans expect rapid growth and few expect conditions to improve, two in three residents still expect to live in San Diego County in 2010. Only three in 10 expect to move outside the county in the next 10 years. There are no differences between all adults and Latinos and no variation across the four regions of the county. Younger adults, however, are less likely than all adults to see themselves living in the county a decade from now. "Ten years from now, do you see yourself living in San Diego County or somewhere else?” Living in San Diego County Living somewhere else Don't know All Adults 64% 30 6 Likely Voters 68% 26 6 Ages 18 to 34 55% 39 6 Latino 66% 28 6 Living in San Diego County Living somewhere else Don't know Central City 63% 30 7 Region North County South Bay 64% 29 7 65% 31 4 East County 66% 29 5 - 4- San Diego Context Local Civic Life Active involvement in local public affairs is fairly uncommon in the San Diego area, but no less so than in the state as a whole. Fewer than one in 10 residents say they are very involved in working on local and neighborhood issues. One in three say they are somewhat involved, while most (58%) say they are not involved in local issues. Among those most likely to vote, 11 percent are very involved, four in 10 are somewhat involved, and half are not involved in working on local issues. The level of involvement in local civic life does not differ much between all adults, young adults, and Latinos. San Diego city residents are less likely to be involved in working on local and neighborhood issues than those living in the three regions outside the central city. The level of civic involvement in San Diego County is comparable to the level we found for Californians as a whole in the October 1998 Statewide Survey. However, San Diego residents (58%) are a little more likely to report being “not involved” in local and neighborhood affairs than either Orange County residents (54%) or Central Valley residents (51%), when we compare the results of the current survey to the Orange County Annual Survey and a PPIC survey conducted in 1999. "Are you very involved, somewhat involved, or not involved in working on local and neighborhood issues?” Very involved Somewhat involved Not involved All Adults 9% 33 58 Likely Voters 11% 39 50 Ages 18 to 34 7% 34 59 Latino 9% 39 52 Very involved Somewhat involved Not involved Region Central City North County South Bay 8% 31 61 9% 36 55 11% 34 55 East County 9% 35 56 -5- Problems Overall Ranking of Problems County residents were asked to rank 15 problems in terms of the seriousness of each with respect to their local area. Three in four residents named traffic (78%) and the lack of affordable housing (74%) as serious problems. More than half said that pollution (58%), immigration (57%), local taxes (54%), and homelessness and poverty (51%) were serious problems. The lack of parks and open spaces, the lack of government funding for local public services, too much development, the quality of education in public schools, too many people moving into the county, and crime and gangs all registered complaints by fewer than half but more than four in 10 residents. The lack of wellpaying jobs, inadequate public transit, and water availability were mentioned less often. In a separate, open-ended question, San Diego residents also named traffic (29%) as the single biggest problem facing their area of San Diego. In California as a whole, the quality of public schools has consistently been named in recent PPIC Statewide Surveys as the number one issue in California. In PPIC's Central Valley Survey (November 1999), water was perceived to be the most important problem, and the Orange County Annual Survey in May 2000 found that crime topped the list in that county. "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Traffic congestion on freeways and major roads Availability of affordable housing Air and water pollution and other environmental threats The issue of immigration_both legal and illegal The amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay Homelessness and poverty Lack of public parks and open spaces Inadequate government funding for local services Too much big, sprawling development -7- All Adults 78% Likely Voters 82% 74 73 58 57 57 59 54 50 51 49 48 44 48 49 47 51 45 48 Problems Too many people moving into the area Crime and gangs Lack of adequate public transportation Lack of well-paying jobs Availability of water 42 42 41 37 38 42 38 32 29 32 Growth-Related Issues Looking separately at the seven growth-related issues, we note once again that residents are most likely to name traffic as a big problem, followed closely by the availability of affordable housing. More than half also rate pollution (58%) as a big problem, and just under half rank the lack of parks (48%) and too much development (47%) as major concerns, while 42 percent say that too many people moving into their area is a big problem and 29 percent express serious concerns about the availability of water. Compared to all adults, likely voters are more concerned about traffic and development, younger adults are more concerned about affordable housing and a lack of parks, and Latinos are more troubled about pollution and, again, a lack of parks and open space in their local area. Residents in the north county are more likely than those in other regions to perceive traffic, development, lack of parks, and too many people moving in as serious problems. People in the South Bay are more concerned then other county residents about pollution. Central city residents are the most likely to say that the lack of affordable housing is a big problem. - 8- Problems "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Traffic congestion on freeways, major roads All Adults 78% Likely Voters 82% Ages 18 to 34 75% Availability of affordable housing 74 73 78 Air, water, environmental pollution 58 57 61 Lack of parks, open spaces 48 44 54 Too much big, sprawling development 47 51 42 Too many people moving into the area 42 42 42 Availability of water 29 32 22 Latino 72% 75 62 56 41 36 29 Traffic congestion on freeways, major roads Availability of affordable housing Air, water, environmental pollution Lack of parks, open spaces Too much big, sprawling development Too many people moving into the area Availability of water Central City 79% 77 61 47 44 37 28 Region North County South Bay 85% 71 55 50 56 51 78% 72 67 43 44 42 31 25 East County 69% 72 51 47 45 38 30 Fiscal and Governance Issues As for the rankings of the four fiscal and governance issues, San Diego residents (54%) are most likely to say that the amount of local taxes and fees they pay is a big problem. Other issues are considered big problems by fewer than half of the county’s residents, including the lack of government funding for public services (48%), the quality of education in public schools (45%), and the lack of adequate public transportation (38%). Compared to all adults, likely voters are more concerned—and younger adults less concerned— about the adequacy of public transportation in their local area. Latinos are more likely than all adults to say that taxes and the lack of adequate government funding for services are big problems. -9- Problems South Bay residents are more concerned than others in the county about the amount of taxes they pay, the adequacy of government funding for public services, and the quality of public schools. North county and central city residents are the most likely to say that inadequate public transportation is a big problem. "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay Lack of adequate government funding for public services, such as schools, police, libraries Quality of education in public schools All Adults 54% 48 45 Likely Voters 50% 49 48 Ages 18 to 34 54% 49 44 Lack of adequate public transportation 42 32 38 Latino 63% 54 47 36 Amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay Lack of adequate government funding for public services, such as schools, police, libraries Quality of education in public schools Lack of adequate public transportation Central City 51% 49 47 40 Region North County South Bay 55% 62% 44 58 47 52 40 27 East County 55% 47 35 33 Social and Economic Trends Looking at the ratings given to the four social and economic trends, we see that county residents are more likely to rank immigration as a big problem than any of the other issues. Fewer see homelessness and poverty (51%), crime and gangs (41%), and the lack of well-paying jobs (38%) as big problems in their part of the county. Likely voters give similar ratings as all adults to immigration and homelessness and poverty, but they are less concerned about crime and gangs and the lack of well-paying jobs. Younger residents are more likely than all adults to cite the lack of well-paying jobs as a serious issue and are less likely to see immigration as a serious problem. Latinos are much more likely than all adults to say that homelessness and poverty, crime and gangs, and the lack of well-paying jobs are major problems. - 10 - Problems South Bay residents are more likely than people living in other regions of the county to say that immigration, homelessness and poverty, crime and gangs, and the lack of well-paying jobs are big problems. "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Immigration issue—both legal and illegal All Adults 57% Likely Voters 59% Ages 18 to 34 52% Homelessness and poverty 51 49 53 Crime and gangs 41 37 41 Lack of well-paying jobs 38 32 42 Latino 55% 60 58 59 Issue of immigration—both legal and illegal Homelessness and poverty Crime and gangs Lack of well-paying jobs Region Central City North County South Bay 53% 52 39 36 61% 50 45 32 66% 60 53 53 East County 55% 44 35 42 Likelihood of Solving Problems Even though many residents see a range of serious problems in their part of the county, most believe that solutions are within reach. Most residents (59%) believe that the problems facing their area will be solved. There are no differences between all adults and likely voters in terms of this optimism. Younger adults and Latinos are more optimistic than all adults, and South Bay residents are more optimistic than people living in other regions of the county about the prospects for resolving local problems. - 11 - Problems "Are you optimistic or pessimistic that the problems facing your part of San Diego will be solved?" Optimistic Pessimistic Don’t know All Adults 59% 36 5 Likely Voters 57% 39 4 Ages 18 to 34 64% 31 5 Latino 71% 23 6 Optimistic Pessimistic Don’t know Central City 59% 36 5 Region North County South Bay 59% 36 5 64% 29 7 East County 59% 38 3 - 12 - Causes Overall Ranking of Causes County residents were asked if they thought that 16 reasons that others have given for the county’s problems were major or minor causes of those problems. Government spending money on the wrong things was named more than any other reason as a major cause of the serious problems facing San Diego County today—75 percent of the county's residents are convinced that this is true. Six in 10 residents believe that 11 additional factors are major causes of San Diego’s problems: rapid growth, ineffective government, poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods, too much growth in the wrong places, excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing, the growing gap between rich and poor, the way government goes about allocating state and local taxes, people being unwilling to live in parts of San Diego that are rundown and unsafe, greed and corruption in real estate development, greed and corruption in government, and ineffective regional planning. About half of those interviewed lay the blame on three more factors—too much immigration, over-development, and unfair taxes. "I’m going to read some of the reasons people give for the problems in San Diego. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a major or minor cause of the big, serious problems facing your part of San Diego (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Government spending money on the wrong things Too fast growth Ineffective government Poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods Too much growth in the wrong places Cost of housing being driven up by excessive government regulations Growing gap between the rich and poor The way government goes about allocating state and local taxes People unwilling to live in rundown, unsafe areas Greed and corruption in real estate development Greed and corruption in government Lack of effective regional planning Too much immigration Over-development because of insufficient government regulations All Adults 75% 63 61 61 60 59 59 58 58 57 56 56 52 51 Likely Voters 77% 63 64 59 60 54 56 60 55 56 54 61 52 48 - 13 - Causes Unfair taxes Lack of convenient public transportation 49 45 40 40 Growth-Related Causes Looking separately at the three growth-related factors, we see that six in 10 residents believe that rapid growth (63%), too much growth in the wrong places (60%), and greed and corruption in real estate development (57%) are major sources of the county's problems. There are no major differences between all adults, likely voters, and younger adults. Latinos are more likely than all adults to say that greed and corruption in real estate development is a major cause of the county's problems. They are less likely than all adults to cite too fast growth as a cause. As for regional differences, those living in the north county and South Bay are the most likely to consider all three growth-related factors as major rather than minor causes of San Diego’s problems. "Is __________ a major or minor cause of the problems in San Diego?" (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Too fast growth Too much growth in the wrong places Greed and corruption in real estate development All Adults 63% 60 57 Likely Voters 63% 60 56 Ages 18 to 34 61% 61 60 Latino 58% 59 62 Too fast growth Too much growth in the wrong places Greed and corruption in real estate development Central City 61% 59 Region North County South Bay 67% 64 68% 63 55 61 62 East County 59% 55 57 Fiscal and Governance Causes Among the nine fiscal and governance issues, government spending money on the wrong things (75%) was mentioned the most as a major reason for the county's problems. Importantly, the strength of this conviction is similar across all political, demographic, and geographic groups. Six in 10 residents cite ineffective government, excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing, and the way state and local taxes are allocated as major sources of problems. Over half of the county's residents believe that ineffective regional planning, greed and corruption in government, over-development due to insufficient regulations, and unfair taxes are significant reasons for the county’s problems. Four in 10 residents say the lack of adequate public transportation is a major cause of problems. - 14 - Causes Likely voters are more concerned than all adults about a lack of effective regional planning. Younger adults are less likely than all adults to believe that the lack of effective regional planning is a major cause of problems. Latinos are more likely than all adults to consider a number of factors as major rather than minor forces underlying the county's problems—the cost of housing due to excessive regulations, the way government allocates state and local funds, greed and corruption in government, over-development because of insufficient regulations, and unfair taxes. Similarly, South Bay residents more often than others cite a number of factors as major causes of the problems in San Diego— excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing, greed and corruption in government, over-development because of insufficient regulations, and unfair taxes. "Is __________ a major or minor cause of the problems in San Diego?" (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Government spending money on the wrong things Ineffective government Cost of housing, excessive regulations The way state and local taxes are allocated Lack of effective regional planning Greed and corruption in government Over-development, insufficient regulations Unfair taxes Lack of convenient public transportation All Adults 75% 61 59 58 56 56 51 49 40 Likely Voters 77% 64 54 60 61 54 48 45 40 Ages 18 to 34 77% 60 62 60 49 58 51 51 37 Latino 76% 60 75 67 55 65 55 63 45 Government spending money on the wrong things Ineffective government Cost of housing, excessive regulations The way state and local taxes are allocated Lack of effective regional planning Greed and corruption in government Over-development, insufficient regulations Unfair taxes Lack of convenient public transportation Central City 75% 62 56 58 56 53 50 44 42 Region North County South Bay 74% 63 60 57 57 75% 60 70 59 58 56 62 52 62 50 64 43 37 East County 79% 57 61 60 54 57 44 52 31 - 15 - Causes Social and Economic Causes Looking at responses to the four social and economic causes of today’s problems, we find that six in 10 residents believe that poor quality inner-city schools, the growing gap between rich and poor, and people unwilling to live in rundown parts of San Diego are major forces underlying the county’s problems. About half think that too much immigration is a major cause of today’s problems. Likely voters are no different from all adults in the way they evaluate the importance of these four social and economic issues in explaining today’s problems. Younger adults are more likely than all adults to think that poor-quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods and people being unwilling to live in rundown parts of San Diego are major issues. Latinos are more likely than all adults to say that poor-quality inner-city schools, the growing gap between rich and poor, and people being unwilling to live in rundown parts of San Diego are among the major reasons for today’s problems. South Bay residents are more likely than those living in other regions to rate all four social and economic issues as major causes of the serious problems facing San Diego County today. "Is __________ a major or minor cause of the problems in San Diego?" (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods All Adults 61% Likely Voters 59% Ages 18 to 34 66% Growing gap between the rich and poor 59 56 62 People being unwilling to live in parts of San 58 55 65 Diego that are neglected, rundown, unsafe Too much immigration 52 52 48 Latino 74% 69 72 53 Poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods Growing gap between the rich and poor People being unwilling to live in parts of San Diego that are neglected, rundown, unsafe Too much immigration Central City 64% 58 Region North County South Bay 59% 60 70% 64 60 53 70 46 55 64 East County 54% 58 56 52 - 16 - Solutions Overall Ranking of Solutions Residents were asked whether 13 proposals suggested for solving the big problems in San Diego were good ideas or not. The highest level of support was for reducing corruption in government (89%), followed closely by building a superior public transit system (85%), investing more money in public schools (85%), and reforming local government so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account (84%). At least seven in 10 residents said it was a good idea to build more low-cost housing, permit regional and local governments to divide the property taxes, build more housing near jobs, build more housing near public transit, and strengthen the power of local governments so they can be more effective in solving problems. About two in three residents liked the proposals to establish growth boundaries and to reduce the flow of immigrants . While about half said it was a good idea to make it easier for local governments to raise more money by reforming the property tax system (55%), fewer than half wanted to make it easier for local governments to raise more money by changing the vote required for passing local taxes from a two-thirds to a simple majority (46%). "I’m going to read you some of the proposals people have made for solving the big, serious problems in San Diego. For each one, please tell me whether you think it is a good idea or not." (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Making a big effort to reduce corruption in government Building a superior public transit system, so that more people have an incentive to use mass transit instead of their cars Investing more money in public schools, so that poor children have the same quality education as wealthy children Reforming local government, so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account instead of people looking out for their own neighborhood Making an all-out effort to build more low-cost housing Permitting regional and local governments to decide how to divide property taxes, rather than have the State Legislature make the decisions Building more housing near job centers Building more housing near public transit Strengthening the powers of local governments, so that they can deal more effectively with big, serious problems Establishing growth boundaries that discourage further development Reducing the flow of immigrants—both legal and illegal—across the U.S. borders Making it easier for local governments to raise more money by reforming the property tax system Making it easier for local governments to raise more money by requiring a simple majority rather than a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes All Adults 89% 85 Likely Voters 87% 82 85 78 84 81 77 72 72 72 72 71 71 70 70 65 69 67 64 64 55 47 46 38 - 17 - Solutions Growth-Related Policies Among the four growth-related solutions, building a superior public transit system (85%) was the most popular idea for solving San Diego’s problems. This is not surprising, since 78 percent of the county's residents rated traffic congestion as a serious problem, ranking it at the top of the list of 15 problems discussed earlier in this report. Seven in 10 residents said they liked the proposals for building more housing near job centers, building more housing near public transit, and establishing growth boundaries. There are no differences between all adults and likely voters in their support of these four policy options. Younger adults are more likely than all adults to think that growth boundaries are a good idea. Latinos give more support than all adults to all four proposals. The idea of establishing growth boundaries has more support in the north county and South Bay than in the central city and east county. South Bay residents are more in favor than other county residents of building more housing near job centers. While the idea of building a superior public transit system is very popular in all regions, this proposal has lower support in the east county than in the other regions. "Is __________ a good idea or not?" (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Building a superior public transit system Building more housing near job centers Building more housing near public transit Establishing growth boundaries All Adults 85% 72 71 69 Likely Voters 82% 71 70 67 Ages 18 to 34 85% 74 74 73 Latino 89% 82 78 75 Building a superior public transit system Building more housing near job centers Building more housing near public transit Establishing growth boundaries Central City 85% 73 70 67 Region North County South Bay 87% 71 72 86% 76 72 73 73 East County 81% 72 70 67 Fiscal and Governance Reforms Looking at the six fiscal and governance reform proposals, we find that the most popular solution for solving the big problems in San Diego is to reduce government corruption, followed closely by reforming local government so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account. Seven in 10 residents think it is a good idea to permit regional and local governments to divide the property taxes, rather than let the State Legislature make the decisions, and the same margin of support favors strengthening the power of local governments so they can be more effective in solving problems. About half like the idea of reforming the property tax system (55%), while fewer - 18 - Solutions want to make it easier for local governments to raise more money by requiring a simple majority instead of a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes (46%). Likely voters differ from all adults in that they are less favorably disposed to strengthening the powers of local government, reforming the property tax system, and allowing local taxes to pass with a simple majority vote. Younger adults and Latinos are more likely than all adults to favor four of the proposals—reforming local government to make it more responsive, strengthening local government to make it more effective, reforming the property tax system, or allowing local taxes to pass with a simple majority vote. As for regional differences, South Bay residents show more support than other county residents for four of the proposals —reforming local government to make it more responsive, strengthening local government to make it more effective, reforming the property tax system, and making it easier to pass local taxes. Central city residents are less likely than other county residents to say that permitting regional and local governments to divide the property taxes and strengthening the power of local governments are good ideas for solving the problems facing San Diego. East county residents are less favorable than other county residents toward the proposals requiring only a simple majority vote for local tax increases and making it easier for local governments to raise money by reforming the property tax system. "Is __________ a good idea or not?" (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Reducing corruption in government Reforming local government to better serve the interests of the community Letting regional and local governments decide how to divide property taxes Strengthening the powers of local governments Reforming the property tax system Requiring only a simple majority vote to pass local taxes All Adults 89% 84 72 70 55 46 Likely Voters 87% 81 72 65 47 38 Ages 18 to 34 91% 88 75 77 68 55 Latino 93% 89 70 85 70 63 Reducing corruption in government Reforming local government to better serve the interests of the community Letting regional and local governments decide how to divide property taxes Strengthening the powers of local governments Reforming the property tax system Requiring only a simple majority vote to pass local taxes Region Central City North County South Bay 88% 90% 92% 83 84 88 East County 89% 83 69 74 75 74 69 72 80 67 54 57 68 51 44 49 56 41 - 19 - Solutions Social and Economic Policies As for the three social and economic policy suggestions, most residents (85%) support the idea of investing more money in public schools. Three in four residents want to make an all-out effort to build more low-income housing. Two in three residents think it is a good idea to reduce the flow of immigrants. Compared to all adults, likely voters are less in favor of investing in public schools and in making an all-out effort to build low-cost housing; still, about three in four support these ideas. Latinos and younger adults are more likely than all adults to say that giving poor children the same education as wealthy children and building low-cost housing are good ideas for solving today’s problems. Younger adults are less likely than all adults to say that reducing immigration is a good idea. In looking at differences across regions, South Bay residents are more supportive of all three social and economic proposals than other county residents. "Is __________ a good idea or not?" (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Giving poor children same education as wealthy Making a big effort to build more low-cost housing Reducing the flow of immigrants All Adults 85% 77 64 Likely Voters 78% 72 64 Ages 18 to 34 93% 81 59 Latino 95% 88 62 Giving poor children same education as wealthy Making a big effort to build more low-cost housing Reducing the flow of immigrants Central City 85% 77 59 Region North County South Bay 84% 90% 77 86 67 70 East County 82% 73 67 - 20 - Survey Methodology The San Diego Survey is a special edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey, which is directed by Mark Baldassare, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, with research assistance from Eric McGhee, Mina Yaroslavsky, and Christopher Hoene. The questions were designed to provide a baseline awareness survey for a one-year citizen engagement and dialogue project. The methodology, questions, and content of this report were solely determined by Mark Baldassare. The survey benefited from consultation with Dan Yankelovich, Chuck Nathanson, Scott Grimes, Barbara Lee, and Monica Schweidler on behalf of the San Diego Dialogue project. The findings presented in this report are based on a telephone survey of 2,000 San Diego County adult residents interviewed from June 12 to June 18, 2000. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights, using a computer-generated random sample of telephone numbers, ensuring that both listed and unlisted telephone numbers were called. All telephone exchanges in San Diego County were eligible for calling. Telephone numbers in the survey sample were called up to five times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing by using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Each interview took an average of 20 minutes to complete. Interviewing was conducted in English or Spanish. Maria Tello translated the survey into Spanish. We used recent U.S. Census, state, and county figures to compare the demographic characteristics of the survey sample with characteristics of San Diego County’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to U.S. Census, state, and county figures. The survey data in this report were statistically weighted to account for any demographic differences. The sampling error for the total sample of 2,000 adults is +/- 2 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in San Diego County were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger. Sampling error is just one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. As part of the baseline awareness survey, we compare the responses of all adults with those from “likely voters” in local elections and with the responses of Latinos and young adults (ages 18 to 34), who are currently underrepresented in the political process. The sampling error for the 925 likely voters is +/- 3%; for the 792 young adults, it is +/- 4%; and for the 416 Latinos, it is +/- 5%. The sample sizes for the African American and Asian subgroups are not large enough for separate statistical analysis. Throughout the report, we refer to four geographic regions in San Diego County. The “Central City" of San Diego includes much of the city of San Diego as well as the city of Coronado, composing 42 percent of the county’s population. “North County” includes the cities of Carlsbad, Del Mar, Encinitas, Escondido, Oceanside, San Marcos, Solana Beach, Vista, and neighboring unincorporated areas (25 percent of the county's population). “East County” includes El Cajon, La Mesa, Lemon Grove, Poway, Santee, and adjoining unincorporated areas (21 percent of the population). “South Bay” includes Chula Vista, Imperial Beach, National City, and adjacent unincorporated areas (12 percent of the population). In some cases, the San Diego Survey uses questions and the results of responses recorded in the PPIC Statewide Surveys conducted since 1998, the Orange County Annual Surveys conducted by Mark Baldassare and Cheryl Katz since 1982, national surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center since 1998, and a survey by the University of Virginia for the American Association of Retired Persons in 1996. - 21 - PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: SPECIAL SURVEY ON SAN DIEGO COUNTY IN COLLABORATION WITH SAN DIEGO DIALOGUE JUNE 12 – JUNE 18, 2000 2,000 SAN DIEGO COUNTY ADULT RESIDENTS; ENGLISH AND SPANISH MARGIN OF ERROR +/- 2% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE 1. First, I’d like to begin by asking you some questions about the part of San Diego you live in. Which of the following best describes the area where you now live? 20% the central city of San Diego 40 northern San Diego 25 eastern San Diego 15 South Bay 2. What do you think is the biggest and most serious problem facing your part of San Diego? (code don’t read) 29% traffic, transportation 15 crime, gangs 13 population growth, development 5 housing, housing costs, housing availability 5 drugs 4 schools, education 2 environment, pollution 2 water 1 immigration 1 race relations, ethnic tensions 1 local government taxes 1 government regulations 1 welfare 1 jobs and the economy 1 health care, HMO reform 1 lack of values, morals, religion 2 other answers 15 don’t know I am going to read you a list of problems other people have told us about. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego or not a big, serious problem. (rotate questions 3-17) 3. How about traffic congestion on freeways and major roads? 78% big, serious problem 21 not a big, serious problem 1 don't know 4. How about too much big, sprawling development? 47% big, serious problem 49 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 5. How about too many people moving into your area? 42% big, serious problem 56 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know - 23 - 6. How about the availability of affordable housing? 74% big, serious problem 22 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 7. How about the lack of opportunities for wellpaying jobs? 38% big, serious problem 53 not a big, serious problem 9 don't know 8. How about crime and gangs? 41% big, serious problem 57 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 9. How about the quality of education in the public schools? 45% big, serious problem 41 not a big, serious problem 14 don't know 10. How about a lack of adequate government funding for local public services, such as schools, police, and libraries? 48% big, serious problem 42 not a big, serious problem 10 don't know 11. How about a lack of public parks, and fewer and fewer open spaces? 48% big, serious problem 50 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 12. How about the amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay? 54% big, serious problem 40 not a big, serious problem 6 don't know 13. How about the availability of water? 29% big, serious problem 68 not a big, serious problem 3 don't know 14. How about the issue of immigration—both legal and illegal? 57% big, serious problem 39 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 15. How about air and water pollution and other environmental threats? 58% big, serious problem 40 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 16. How about homelessness and poverty? 51% big, serious problem 47 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 17. How about a lack of adequate public transportation? 38% big, serious problem 58 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 18. Are you optimistic or pessimistic that the problems facing your part of San Diego will be solved? 59% optimistic 36 pessimistic 5 don't know I’m going to read some of the reasons people give for the problems in San Diego. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a major or minor cause of the big, serious problems facing your part of San Diego.(rotate questions 19-34) 19. What about too fast growth? 63% major cause 35 minor cause 2 don't know 20. What about the government spending money on the wrong things? 75% major cause 19 minor cause 6 don't know 21. What about the growing gap between the rich and the poor? 59% major cause 36 minor cause 5 don't know 22. What about too much immigration? 52% major cause 44 minor cause 4 don't know 23. What about a lack of effective regional planning? 56% major cause 36 minor cause 8 don't know 24. What about greed and corruption in government? 56% major cause 37 minor cause 7 don't know 25. What about greed and corruption in real estate development? 57% major cause 32 minor cause 11 don't know 26. What about unfair taxes? 49% major cause 45 minor cause 7 don't know 27. What about ineffective government? 61% major cause 34 minor cause 5 don't know 28. What about too much growth in the wrong places? 60% major cause 35 minor cause 5 don't know 29. What about the cost of housing being driven up by excessive government regulations? 59% major cause 34 minor cause 7 don't know 30. What about over-development because of insufficient government regulations? 51% major cause 42 minor cause 7 don't know 31. What about poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods? 61% major cause 28 minor cause 11 don't know 32. What about people being unwilling to live in parts of San Diego that have been neglected and that are rundown and unsafe? 58% major cause 35 minor cause 7 don't know 33. What about a lack of convenient public transportation? 40% major cause 56 minor cause 4 don't know 34. What about the way government goes about allocating state and local taxes? 58% major cause 28 minor cause 14 don't know - 24 - I’m going to read you some of the proposals people have made for solving the big, serious problems in your part of San Diego. For each one, please tell me whether you think it is a good idea or not. (rotate questions 35-47) 35. How about making it easier for local governments to raise more money by reforming the property tax system? 55% good idea 37 not a good idea 8 don't know 36. How about making it easier for local governments to raise more money by requiring a simple majority rather than a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes? 46% good idea 49 not a good idea 5 don't know 37. How about permitting regional and local governments to decide how to divide property taxes, rather than have the state legislature make the decisions? 72% good idea 21 not a good idea 7 don't know 38. How about establishing growth boundaries that discourage further development? 69% good idea 26 not a good idea 5 don't know 39. How about building more housing near job centers? 72% good idea 24 not a good idea 4 don't know 40. How about building more housing near public transit? 71% good idea 27 not a good idea 2 don't know 41. How about making an all-out effort to build more low-cost housing? 77% good idea 21 not a good idea 2 don't know 42. How about building a superior public transit system, so that more people have an incentive to use mass transit instead of their cars? 85% good idea 14 not a good idea 1 don't know 43. How about investing more money in our public schools, so that poor children have the same quality education as wealthy children? 85% good idea 13 not a good idea 2 don't know 44. How about reforming local government so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account, instead of everyone looking out for their own neighborhood? 84% good idea 13 not a good idea 3 don't know 45. How about strengthening the powers of local governments so that they can deal more effectively with big, serious problems? 70% good idea 25 not a good idea 5 don't know 46. How about reducing the flow of immigrants— both legal and illegal—across the U.S. borders? 64% good idea 30 not a good idea 6 don't know 47. How about making a big effort to reduce corruption in government? 89% good idea 9 not a good idea 2 don't know 48. On another topic, do you think things in San Diego County are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 66% right direction 27 wrong direction 7 don't know 49. Thinking about the quality of life in San Diego County, how do you think things are going—very well, somewhat well, somewhat badly, or very badly? 24% very well 60 somewhat well 12 somewhat badly 3 very badly 1 don't know 50. In the next 10 years, do you think that the population of San Diego County will grow rapidly, grow slowly, stay about the same, or decline? 82% grow rapidly 11 grow slowly 5 stay about the same 1 decline 1 don't know - 25 - 51. Ten years from now, do you think that San Diego County will be a better place to live than it is now, a worse place to live than it is now, or about the same? 18% better place 38 worse place 42 the same 2 don't know 52. Ten years from now, do you see yourself living in San Diego County or somewhere else? (if elsewhere: Is that inside or outside of California?) 64% San Diego County 9 elsewhere, in California 21 elsewhere, outside California 6 don't know 53. On another topic, are you currently employed full time or part time or are you not employed? 59% full-time employed 11 part-time employed 30 not employed (skip to q. 57) 54. What is the location of the place where you report to work? 32% the central city of San Diego 39 northern San Diego County 13 eastern San Diego County 9 South Bay 3 outside of San Diego County 4 other, not sure (specify) 55. On a typical day, how long does it take you to get from your home to the place where you report to work? 32% under 15 minutes 37 15 minutes to under 30 minutes 16 30 minutes to under 45 minutes 7 45 minutes to under 60 minutes 5 60 minutes or more 3 it depends, other answers 56. On a typical day, how much of a problem is traffic congestion when you travel to and from work? Would you say it is no problem at all, somewhat of a problem, or a great problem? 37% no problem at all 37 somewhat of a problem 26 great problem 57. On another topic, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain you are registered to vote? 75% yes 25 no (skip to q. 59) 58. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent or as "decline to state"? 31% Democrat 35 Republican 3 other party 27 independent, decline to state 4 don’t know, refuse 59. Would you consider yourself to be politically very liberal, somewhat liberal, middle-of-theroad, somewhat conservative, or very conservative? 8% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 32 middle-of-the-road 25 somewhat conservative 11 very conservative 4 don’t know, refuse 60. Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics—a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 20% great deal 44 fair amount 27 only a little 9 none 61. How often would you say you vote—always, nearly always, part of the time, seldom or never? 47% always 19 nearly always 10 part of the time 7 seldom 17 never 62. How about working on local and neighborhood issues—are you very involved, somewhat involved, or not involved? 9% very involved 33 somewhat involved 58 not involved [Questions 63 – 72: demographic questions] - 26 - PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY Advisory Committee Ruben Barrales President Joint Venture–Silicon Valley Network Angela Blackwell President Policy Link Paul Brest President The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mollyann Brodie Vice President Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director Institute of Governmental Studies University of California, Berkeley Dennis A. Collins President The James Irvine Foundation Matt Fong Attorney Sheppard Mullin William Hauck President California Business Roundtable Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Senior Associate Claremont Graduate University Monica Lozano Associate Publisher and Executive Editor La Opinión Donna Lucas President NCG Porter Novelli Max Neiman Director Center for Social and Behavioral Research University of California, Riverside Jerry Roberts Managing Editor San Francisco Chronicle Dan Rosenheim News Director KPIX-TV Richard Schlosberg President The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Carol Stogsdill Senior Vice President APCO Associates Cathy Taylor Editorial Page Editor Orange County Register Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Great Valley Center - 27 -" } ["___content":protected]=> string(102) "

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" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(102) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/ppic-statewide-survey-special-survey-of-san-diego-july-2000/s_700mbs/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8120) ["ID"]=> int(8120) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:35:02" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3229) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(8) "S 700MBS" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(8) "s_700mbs" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(12) "S_700MBS.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "369587" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(62771) " Preface The San Diego survey—a collaborative effort of the Public Policy Institute of California and San Diego Dialogue—is a special edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey. This report summarizes the results of the baseline “awareness” survey for a one-year citizen engagement and dialogue project in San Diego County, organized by San Diego Dialogue in partnership with the Leadership Learning Network, Inc. (chaired by Dan Yankelovich) and funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The intent of the current survey is to provide the first comprehensive, advocacy-free study of the perceptions, attitudes, and public policy preferences of San Diego County residents. The county is the second most populous in California and is one of the fastest growing and most dynamic metropolitan regions in the state. The social, economic, political, and public policy trends in this large county are of considerable interest to researchers and local and state leaders throughout California. San Diego County—a Southern California coastal region with a 4,260 square mile land area stretching from the Orange County and Riverside County borders in the north to the Tijuana, Mexico, border in the south—is home to about 2.8 million residents. The population has increased by 1 million residents since 1980 and is expected to grow by another 1 million by 2020. The county includes 18 cities, with most located near the coast. The largest is San Diego, with 1.2 million residents. The unincorporated communities contain about a half million residents. The county’s population is 24 percent Latino, 9 percent Asian, 6 percent black, and 61 percent non-Hispanic white. The county is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse over time. This survey of 2,000 adult residents, conducted in June 2000, provides baseline awareness questions for measuring changes over time and includes comparisons with other major regions of California and with the state as a whole, focusing in particular on the following areas: • Ratings of the seriousness of specific problems confronting the region today, including growth and land-use issues, fiscal and governance issues, and social and economic trends. • Perceptions of the major causes of the problems today, including the amount of population growth and the nature of land use, fiscal stresses on the system of local governance, and social and economic trends such as inner-city decline and growing income inequality. • Support for policies that others have suggested for solving the problems facing the San Diego area, including specific growth and land-use policies, fiscal and governance reforms, and social and economic policies that seek to improve the conditions of lower-income residents. • Variations in perceptions and policy preferences between all adult residents, “likely voters” who most actively participate in local elections, and Latinos and young adults (18 to 34 year olds)—who are underrepresented in the political process today—and differences across the four regions of the county (the central city of San Diego, South Bay, north county, and east county). • Overall evaluations of San Diego County as a place to live, including quality of life ratings, commuting problems, future growth expectations, and plans to continue living in the county. Copies of this report or other PPIC Statewide Surveys may be ordered by e-mail (order@ppic.org) or phone (415-291-4400). -i- - ii - Contents Preface Press Release San Diego Context Problems Causes Solutions Survey Methodology Survey Questions and Results Survey Advisory Committee i v 1 7 13 17 21 23 27 - iii - Press Release CONCERNS ABOUT GROWTH LOOM LARGE IN SAN DIEGO Residents See Government as Major Part of Problem, But Optimism About Region’s Future Reigns SAN FRANCISCO, California, July 19, 2000 — San Diegans have seen the future and it looks like L.A. Residents say traffic, housing, and a host of other growth-related worries threaten the county and government is failing to meet the challenge, according to a new survey by the Public Policy Institute of California and San Diego Dialogue. At the same time, residents express surprising optimism about the region’s ability to overcome its troubles and say they won’t head for greener pastures anytime soon. The large-scale public opinion survey of 2,000 San Diego County residents reveals a nearly unanimous (93%) expectation that the county’s population will grow in the next ten years, with eight in ten residents saying it will grow rapidly. Strikingly, only 18 percent believe the county will be a better place to live in 2010, while 38 percent say it will be worse. San Diegans are more likely than Californians as a whole to believe that their region will experience rapid growth in the next ten years (82% to 59%) and are less likely to say that it will be a better place to live a decade from now (18% to 28%). Given this concern, San Diegans are quick to find growth-related issues at the heart of the county’s problems. When asked to name the single biggest problem facing their part of San Diego, residents say traffic (29%), followed by crime (15%) and population growth and development (13%). Growthrelated concerns again top the list when residents are asked to rank a number of local problems. Three in four say that traffic (78%) and the lack of affordable housing (74%) are serious problems in their part of the county, and more than half (58%) say that pollution is a serious problem. Three other issues — immigration (57%), local taxes (54%), and homelessness and poverty (51%) — are also seen as big problems by a majority of residents. Residents in the north county are more likely than those in other regions to see traffic, development, lack of parks, and population increases as serious problems, while people in the South Bay are more concerned than other county residents about pollution. “The effects of San Diego’s tremendous growth are hitting home for many residents,” said PPIC Statewide Survey Director Mark Baldassare. “And with the county’s population projected to increase by 1 million residents in the next 20 years, it’s not surprising that there is uncertainty and some doubt about what the future will hold.” Government Viewed as Ineffective, Corrupt While growth may be the key problem, government is a central cause, according to San Diegans. When asked about a number of potential reasons for the region’s problems, residents cite “the government spending money on the wrong things” more than any other reason (75%), followed by too fast growth (63%), ineffective government (61%), poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods (61%), and too much growth in the wrong places (60%). Majorities also view other governmentrelated issues — including excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing (59%), government allocation of state and local taxes (58%), greed and corruption in government (56%), and -v- Press Release overdevelopment resulting from insufficient government regulations (51%) — as major causes of their area’s problems. San Diegans’ profound distrust of government surfaces again when residents are asked to rate proposed solutions to the region’s problems. The highest level of support is found for reducing corruption in government (89%), followed closely by building a superior transit system (85%), investing more money in public schools (85%), and reforming local government so that it serves the interests of the entire community (84%). Ironically, solid majorities also support strengthening the powers of local government so that it can deal with problems more effectively (70%) and making it easier for local governments to raise money by reforming the property tax system (55%). However, residents make it clear that they intend to control the purse strings: only 46 percent say they support making it easier for local governments to raise money by requiring a simple majority rather than a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes. While South Bay residents are most likely to think that reducing corruption in government is a good idea (92%), they are also the most likely to support strengthening local government (80%), reforming the property tax system (68%), and requiring only a simple majority vote to pass local taxes (56%). “Residents are relatively scathing in their assessment of government in San Diego County,” said Baldassare. “However, they also understand that local officials have a key role to play in solving the region’s problems and are willing to provide at least some of the fiscal tools that governments need. There is a significant opportunity here.” Glass Half Full Indeed, despite the perils of a growth-filled future, San Diego residents find much promise in their region. Two in three residents say that the county is headed in the right direction, and only about one in four say that things are going in the wrong direction. Similarly, most (84%) say that the quality of life in San Diego County is going either “very well” (24%) or “somewhat well” (60%), while relatively few think that the quality of life in their county is going badly (15%). Although most San Diegans expect rapid growth and few expect conditions to improve, two in three residents still intend to live in San Diego County a decade from now. Sixty-four percent say they see themselves living in the county in 2010, while 30 percent say they will call another county home. Not coincidentally, the majority of residents also believe that solutions to the problems facing their part of San Diego are within reach: Fifty-nine percent say they are optimistic that local problems will be solved, with South Bay residents even more hopeful than most (64%). “Many difficult choices lie ahead for San Diegans, their elected leaders, and their community organizations as we confront the challenges presented by population growth and our unique geographic situation,” said Chuck Nathanson, Executive Director of San Diego Dialogue. “But the level of optimism and commitment to the county that this survey reveals is remarkably powerful and encouraging.” Interestingly, Latinos hold an even more optimistic view of the county and its future than adult residents generally. They are more likely to believe that the problems facing their area of the county will be solved (71% to 59%), to say that things are generally headed in the right direction (73% to 66%), and to think that the quality of life in the county is going very well or somewhat well (91% to 84%). Latinos are also more likely to think that the county will be a better place to live in 2010 (31%) than a worse place (25%). Despite their overall optimism, younger residents (ages 18 to 34) are the least likely to say they see themselves living in the county ten years from now (55%). - vi - Press Release About the Survey The Special Survey of San Diego County — a collaborative effort of the Public Policy Institute of California and San Diego Dialogue — is a special edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey. The survey offers the first comprehensive, advocacy-free study of the perceptions, attitudes, and public policy preferences of San Diego residents. It provides baseline information for a one-year citizen engagement and dialogue project in the county, organized by San Diego Dialogue in partnership with Leadership Learning Network, Inc. (chaired by Dan Yankelovich) and funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Findings are based on a telephone survey of 2,000 San Diego County adult residents interviewed from June 12 to June 18, 2000. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish. The sampling error for the total sample is +/- 2%. For additional information on survey methodology, see page 21. Dr. Mark Baldassare is a senior fellow at PPIC. He is founder and director of the PPIC Statewide Survey, which he has conducted since 1998. For over two decades, he has conducted surveys for the University of California, Irvine, and major news organizations, including the Orange County Edition of the Los Angeles Times, the Orange County Register, the San Francisco Chronicle, KCAL-TV, and KRON-TV. Dr. Baldassare is the author of numerous books, including California in the New Millennium: The Changing Social and Political Landscape (University of California Press, 2000). PPIC is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to objective, nonpartisan research on economic, social, and political issues that affect the lives of Californians. The Institute was established in 1994 with an endowment from William R. Hewlett. #### - vii - San Diego Context The County’s Future Almost all San Diego County residents expect the population to increase in their county, and 82 percent predict rapid growth in the next 10 years. This nearly unanimous perception of growth is found among likely voters, younger adults, Latinos, and across the four regions of the county. Looking ahead, only 18 percent expect their county to be a better place to live in 2010, while 38 percent expect it to be a worse place to live and 42 percent think that it will be about the same. Likely voters are the most pessimistic, and younger adults remain somewhat more optimistic than all adults. Latinos are much more likely than all adults to say that San Diego will be a better place to live in the future (31% to 18%). In every region, more residents think the county will be a worse rather than a better place to live ten years from now. Comparing these results to those of an earlier PPIC Statewide Survey (June 2000), we find that residents in San Diego County (82%) are more likely than residents of the state as a whole (59%) to believe that their region will experience rapid growth in the next 10 years. San Diego County residents are also less likely than Californians as a whole to say that their region will be a better place to live in 2010 than it is today (18% to 28%). "In the next 10 years, do you think the population of San Diego County will grow rapidly, grow slowly, stay about the same, or decline?” Grow rapidly Grow slowly Stay about the same Decline Don't know All Adults 82% 11 5 1 1 Likely Voters 83% 10 5 1 1 Ages 18 to 34 82% 11 4 2 1 Latino 82% 9 6 2 1 "Ten years from now, do you think San Diego County will be a better place to live than it is now, a worse place to live than it is now, or about the same?” Better place Worse place Same Don't know All Adults 18% 38 42 2 Likely Voters 16% 41 41 2 Ages 18 to 34 21% 34 44 1 Latino 31% 25 41 3 -1- San Diego Context Overall Mood Today Although they are concerned about the county’s future, most residents are upbeat about overall conditions today. Two in three adult residents say that things in San Diego County are generally going in the right direction, and only about one in four say that things are going in the wrong direction. Similarly, most (84%) say that the quality of life in San Diego County is going either “very well” (24%) or “somewhat well” (60%), while relatively few think that the quality of life in their county is going badly (15%). There are no differences in the overall mood today between all adults and likely voters, younger adults, Latinos, or across the four regions of the county. In comparing the survey's results to those of the June 2000 Statewide Survey, we find that San Diego residents are less likely than Californians as a whole to say things are going very well in their region (24% to 29%). San Diego residents are also less likely than Orange County residents to say things in their county are going very well (24% to 38%), based upon a comparison of this survey's responses with those of the Orange County Annual Survey conducted in May 2000. "Do you think things in San Diego County are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction?” Right direction Wrong direction Don't know All Adults 66% 27 7 Likely Voters 65% 30 5 Ages 18 to 34 71% 23 6 Latino 73% 19 8 "Thinking about the quality of life in San Diego County, how do you think things are going?” Very well Somewhat well Somewhat badly Very badly Don't know All Adults 24% 60 12 3 1 Likely Voters 23% 60 12 4 1 Ages 18 to 34 23% 65 9 2 1 Latino 24% 67 6 2 1 - 2- San Diego Context The Daily Commute While overall conditions are positive, traffic is a daily annoyance for most of the county’s work force. About two in three employed residents say that traffic congestion is a problem during their commute, while one in four describe traffic as a “great problem.” There are no differences across demographic and voter groups in citing problems with the commute. North county residents (67%) are more likely than those in other regions to say that they experience at least some traffic problems. Length of commute has a dramatic effect on perceptions of traffic problems. Among those whose commute from home to work is 30 minutes or more, 51 percent say that traffic congestion is a great problem, 37 percent say it is somewhat of a problems, and 12 percent say it is not a problem. Among those with shorter commutes, only 16 percent have a great problem with traffic, while 38 percent have some problems and 46 percent have no problem. San Diego residents (26%) are more likely than Orange County residents (18%) or Central Valley residents (15%) to rank traffic congestion during their commute as a serious problem. We have no comparable results for Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay area, or the state as a whole. "On a typical day, how much of a problem is traffic congestion when you travel to and from work?” (asked only of employed residents) Great problem Somewhat of a problem No problem All Adults 26% 37 37 Likely Voters 25% 38 37 Ages 18 to 34 28% 38 34 Latino 25% 39 36 Great problem Somewhat of a problem No problem Central City 23% 39 38 Region North County South Bay 29% 38 33 27% 35 38 East County 27% 33 40 -3- San Diego Context Migration Plans Even though most San Diegans expect rapid growth and few expect conditions to improve, two in three residents still expect to live in San Diego County in 2010. Only three in 10 expect to move outside the county in the next 10 years. There are no differences between all adults and Latinos and no variation across the four regions of the county. Younger adults, however, are less likely than all adults to see themselves living in the county a decade from now. "Ten years from now, do you see yourself living in San Diego County or somewhere else?” Living in San Diego County Living somewhere else Don't know All Adults 64% 30 6 Likely Voters 68% 26 6 Ages 18 to 34 55% 39 6 Latino 66% 28 6 Living in San Diego County Living somewhere else Don't know Central City 63% 30 7 Region North County South Bay 64% 29 7 65% 31 4 East County 66% 29 5 - 4- San Diego Context Local Civic Life Active involvement in local public affairs is fairly uncommon in the San Diego area, but no less so than in the state as a whole. Fewer than one in 10 residents say they are very involved in working on local and neighborhood issues. One in three say they are somewhat involved, while most (58%) say they are not involved in local issues. Among those most likely to vote, 11 percent are very involved, four in 10 are somewhat involved, and half are not involved in working on local issues. The level of involvement in local civic life does not differ much between all adults, young adults, and Latinos. San Diego city residents are less likely to be involved in working on local and neighborhood issues than those living in the three regions outside the central city. The level of civic involvement in San Diego County is comparable to the level we found for Californians as a whole in the October 1998 Statewide Survey. However, San Diego residents (58%) are a little more likely to report being “not involved” in local and neighborhood affairs than either Orange County residents (54%) or Central Valley residents (51%), when we compare the results of the current survey to the Orange County Annual Survey and a PPIC survey conducted in 1999. "Are you very involved, somewhat involved, or not involved in working on local and neighborhood issues?” Very involved Somewhat involved Not involved All Adults 9% 33 58 Likely Voters 11% 39 50 Ages 18 to 34 7% 34 59 Latino 9% 39 52 Very involved Somewhat involved Not involved Region Central City North County South Bay 8% 31 61 9% 36 55 11% 34 55 East County 9% 35 56 -5- Problems Overall Ranking of Problems County residents were asked to rank 15 problems in terms of the seriousness of each with respect to their local area. Three in four residents named traffic (78%) and the lack of affordable housing (74%) as serious problems. More than half said that pollution (58%), immigration (57%), local taxes (54%), and homelessness and poverty (51%) were serious problems. The lack of parks and open spaces, the lack of government funding for local public services, too much development, the quality of education in public schools, too many people moving into the county, and crime and gangs all registered complaints by fewer than half but more than four in 10 residents. The lack of wellpaying jobs, inadequate public transit, and water availability were mentioned less often. In a separate, open-ended question, San Diego residents also named traffic (29%) as the single biggest problem facing their area of San Diego. In California as a whole, the quality of public schools has consistently been named in recent PPIC Statewide Surveys as the number one issue in California. In PPIC's Central Valley Survey (November 1999), water was perceived to be the most important problem, and the Orange County Annual Survey in May 2000 found that crime topped the list in that county. "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Traffic congestion on freeways and major roads Availability of affordable housing Air and water pollution and other environmental threats The issue of immigration_both legal and illegal The amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay Homelessness and poverty Lack of public parks and open spaces Inadequate government funding for local services Too much big, sprawling development -7- All Adults 78% Likely Voters 82% 74 73 58 57 57 59 54 50 51 49 48 44 48 49 47 51 45 48 Problems Too many people moving into the area Crime and gangs Lack of adequate public transportation Lack of well-paying jobs Availability of water 42 42 41 37 38 42 38 32 29 32 Growth-Related Issues Looking separately at the seven growth-related issues, we note once again that residents are most likely to name traffic as a big problem, followed closely by the availability of affordable housing. More than half also rate pollution (58%) as a big problem, and just under half rank the lack of parks (48%) and too much development (47%) as major concerns, while 42 percent say that too many people moving into their area is a big problem and 29 percent express serious concerns about the availability of water. Compared to all adults, likely voters are more concerned about traffic and development, younger adults are more concerned about affordable housing and a lack of parks, and Latinos are more troubled about pollution and, again, a lack of parks and open space in their local area. Residents in the north county are more likely than those in other regions to perceive traffic, development, lack of parks, and too many people moving in as serious problems. People in the South Bay are more concerned then other county residents about pollution. Central city residents are the most likely to say that the lack of affordable housing is a big problem. - 8- Problems "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Traffic congestion on freeways, major roads All Adults 78% Likely Voters 82% Ages 18 to 34 75% Availability of affordable housing 74 73 78 Air, water, environmental pollution 58 57 61 Lack of parks, open spaces 48 44 54 Too much big, sprawling development 47 51 42 Too many people moving into the area 42 42 42 Availability of water 29 32 22 Latino 72% 75 62 56 41 36 29 Traffic congestion on freeways, major roads Availability of affordable housing Air, water, environmental pollution Lack of parks, open spaces Too much big, sprawling development Too many people moving into the area Availability of water Central City 79% 77 61 47 44 37 28 Region North County South Bay 85% 71 55 50 56 51 78% 72 67 43 44 42 31 25 East County 69% 72 51 47 45 38 30 Fiscal and Governance Issues As for the rankings of the four fiscal and governance issues, San Diego residents (54%) are most likely to say that the amount of local taxes and fees they pay is a big problem. Other issues are considered big problems by fewer than half of the county’s residents, including the lack of government funding for public services (48%), the quality of education in public schools (45%), and the lack of adequate public transportation (38%). Compared to all adults, likely voters are more concerned—and younger adults less concerned— about the adequacy of public transportation in their local area. Latinos are more likely than all adults to say that taxes and the lack of adequate government funding for services are big problems. -9- Problems South Bay residents are more concerned than others in the county about the amount of taxes they pay, the adequacy of government funding for public services, and the quality of public schools. North county and central city residents are the most likely to say that inadequate public transportation is a big problem. "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay Lack of adequate government funding for public services, such as schools, police, libraries Quality of education in public schools All Adults 54% 48 45 Likely Voters 50% 49 48 Ages 18 to 34 54% 49 44 Lack of adequate public transportation 42 32 38 Latino 63% 54 47 36 Amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay Lack of adequate government funding for public services, such as schools, police, libraries Quality of education in public schools Lack of adequate public transportation Central City 51% 49 47 40 Region North County South Bay 55% 62% 44 58 47 52 40 27 East County 55% 47 35 33 Social and Economic Trends Looking at the ratings given to the four social and economic trends, we see that county residents are more likely to rank immigration as a big problem than any of the other issues. Fewer see homelessness and poverty (51%), crime and gangs (41%), and the lack of well-paying jobs (38%) as big problems in their part of the county. Likely voters give similar ratings as all adults to immigration and homelessness and poverty, but they are less concerned about crime and gangs and the lack of well-paying jobs. Younger residents are more likely than all adults to cite the lack of well-paying jobs as a serious issue and are less likely to see immigration as a serious problem. Latinos are much more likely than all adults to say that homelessness and poverty, crime and gangs, and the lack of well-paying jobs are major problems. - 10 - Problems South Bay residents are more likely than people living in other regions of the county to say that immigration, homelessness and poverty, crime and gangs, and the lack of well-paying jobs are big problems. "Is __________ a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego?" (% who consider it a big, serious problem reported below) Immigration issue—both legal and illegal All Adults 57% Likely Voters 59% Ages 18 to 34 52% Homelessness and poverty 51 49 53 Crime and gangs 41 37 41 Lack of well-paying jobs 38 32 42 Latino 55% 60 58 59 Issue of immigration—both legal and illegal Homelessness and poverty Crime and gangs Lack of well-paying jobs Region Central City North County South Bay 53% 52 39 36 61% 50 45 32 66% 60 53 53 East County 55% 44 35 42 Likelihood of Solving Problems Even though many residents see a range of serious problems in their part of the county, most believe that solutions are within reach. Most residents (59%) believe that the problems facing their area will be solved. There are no differences between all adults and likely voters in terms of this optimism. Younger adults and Latinos are more optimistic than all adults, and South Bay residents are more optimistic than people living in other regions of the county about the prospects for resolving local problems. - 11 - Problems "Are you optimistic or pessimistic that the problems facing your part of San Diego will be solved?" Optimistic Pessimistic Don’t know All Adults 59% 36 5 Likely Voters 57% 39 4 Ages 18 to 34 64% 31 5 Latino 71% 23 6 Optimistic Pessimistic Don’t know Central City 59% 36 5 Region North County South Bay 59% 36 5 64% 29 7 East County 59% 38 3 - 12 - Causes Overall Ranking of Causes County residents were asked if they thought that 16 reasons that others have given for the county’s problems were major or minor causes of those problems. Government spending money on the wrong things was named more than any other reason as a major cause of the serious problems facing San Diego County today—75 percent of the county's residents are convinced that this is true. Six in 10 residents believe that 11 additional factors are major causes of San Diego’s problems: rapid growth, ineffective government, poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods, too much growth in the wrong places, excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing, the growing gap between rich and poor, the way government goes about allocating state and local taxes, people being unwilling to live in parts of San Diego that are rundown and unsafe, greed and corruption in real estate development, greed and corruption in government, and ineffective regional planning. About half of those interviewed lay the blame on three more factors—too much immigration, over-development, and unfair taxes. "I’m going to read some of the reasons people give for the problems in San Diego. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a major or minor cause of the big, serious problems facing your part of San Diego (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Government spending money on the wrong things Too fast growth Ineffective government Poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods Too much growth in the wrong places Cost of housing being driven up by excessive government regulations Growing gap between the rich and poor The way government goes about allocating state and local taxes People unwilling to live in rundown, unsafe areas Greed and corruption in real estate development Greed and corruption in government Lack of effective regional planning Too much immigration Over-development because of insufficient government regulations All Adults 75% 63 61 61 60 59 59 58 58 57 56 56 52 51 Likely Voters 77% 63 64 59 60 54 56 60 55 56 54 61 52 48 - 13 - Causes Unfair taxes Lack of convenient public transportation 49 45 40 40 Growth-Related Causes Looking separately at the three growth-related factors, we see that six in 10 residents believe that rapid growth (63%), too much growth in the wrong places (60%), and greed and corruption in real estate development (57%) are major sources of the county's problems. There are no major differences between all adults, likely voters, and younger adults. Latinos are more likely than all adults to say that greed and corruption in real estate development is a major cause of the county's problems. They are less likely than all adults to cite too fast growth as a cause. As for regional differences, those living in the north county and South Bay are the most likely to consider all three growth-related factors as major rather than minor causes of San Diego’s problems. "Is __________ a major or minor cause of the problems in San Diego?" (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Too fast growth Too much growth in the wrong places Greed and corruption in real estate development All Adults 63% 60 57 Likely Voters 63% 60 56 Ages 18 to 34 61% 61 60 Latino 58% 59 62 Too fast growth Too much growth in the wrong places Greed and corruption in real estate development Central City 61% 59 Region North County South Bay 67% 64 68% 63 55 61 62 East County 59% 55 57 Fiscal and Governance Causes Among the nine fiscal and governance issues, government spending money on the wrong things (75%) was mentioned the most as a major reason for the county's problems. Importantly, the strength of this conviction is similar across all political, demographic, and geographic groups. Six in 10 residents cite ineffective government, excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing, and the way state and local taxes are allocated as major sources of problems. Over half of the county's residents believe that ineffective regional planning, greed and corruption in government, over-development due to insufficient regulations, and unfair taxes are significant reasons for the county’s problems. Four in 10 residents say the lack of adequate public transportation is a major cause of problems. - 14 - Causes Likely voters are more concerned than all adults about a lack of effective regional planning. Younger adults are less likely than all adults to believe that the lack of effective regional planning is a major cause of problems. Latinos are more likely than all adults to consider a number of factors as major rather than minor forces underlying the county's problems—the cost of housing due to excessive regulations, the way government allocates state and local funds, greed and corruption in government, over-development because of insufficient regulations, and unfair taxes. Similarly, South Bay residents more often than others cite a number of factors as major causes of the problems in San Diego— excessive regulations driving up the cost of housing, greed and corruption in government, over-development because of insufficient regulations, and unfair taxes. "Is __________ a major or minor cause of the problems in San Diego?" (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Government spending money on the wrong things Ineffective government Cost of housing, excessive regulations The way state and local taxes are allocated Lack of effective regional planning Greed and corruption in government Over-development, insufficient regulations Unfair taxes Lack of convenient public transportation All Adults 75% 61 59 58 56 56 51 49 40 Likely Voters 77% 64 54 60 61 54 48 45 40 Ages 18 to 34 77% 60 62 60 49 58 51 51 37 Latino 76% 60 75 67 55 65 55 63 45 Government spending money on the wrong things Ineffective government Cost of housing, excessive regulations The way state and local taxes are allocated Lack of effective regional planning Greed and corruption in government Over-development, insufficient regulations Unfair taxes Lack of convenient public transportation Central City 75% 62 56 58 56 53 50 44 42 Region North County South Bay 74% 63 60 57 57 75% 60 70 59 58 56 62 52 62 50 64 43 37 East County 79% 57 61 60 54 57 44 52 31 - 15 - Causes Social and Economic Causes Looking at responses to the four social and economic causes of today’s problems, we find that six in 10 residents believe that poor quality inner-city schools, the growing gap between rich and poor, and people unwilling to live in rundown parts of San Diego are major forces underlying the county’s problems. About half think that too much immigration is a major cause of today’s problems. Likely voters are no different from all adults in the way they evaluate the importance of these four social and economic issues in explaining today’s problems. Younger adults are more likely than all adults to think that poor-quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods and people being unwilling to live in rundown parts of San Diego are major issues. Latinos are more likely than all adults to say that poor-quality inner-city schools, the growing gap between rich and poor, and people being unwilling to live in rundown parts of San Diego are among the major reasons for today’s problems. South Bay residents are more likely than those living in other regions to rate all four social and economic issues as major causes of the serious problems facing San Diego County today. "Is __________ a major or minor cause of the problems in San Diego?" (% who consider it a major cause reported below) Poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods All Adults 61% Likely Voters 59% Ages 18 to 34 66% Growing gap between the rich and poor 59 56 62 People being unwilling to live in parts of San 58 55 65 Diego that are neglected, rundown, unsafe Too much immigration 52 52 48 Latino 74% 69 72 53 Poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods Growing gap between the rich and poor People being unwilling to live in parts of San Diego that are neglected, rundown, unsafe Too much immigration Central City 64% 58 Region North County South Bay 59% 60 70% 64 60 53 70 46 55 64 East County 54% 58 56 52 - 16 - Solutions Overall Ranking of Solutions Residents were asked whether 13 proposals suggested for solving the big problems in San Diego were good ideas or not. The highest level of support was for reducing corruption in government (89%), followed closely by building a superior public transit system (85%), investing more money in public schools (85%), and reforming local government so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account (84%). At least seven in 10 residents said it was a good idea to build more low-cost housing, permit regional and local governments to divide the property taxes, build more housing near jobs, build more housing near public transit, and strengthen the power of local governments so they can be more effective in solving problems. About two in three residents liked the proposals to establish growth boundaries and to reduce the flow of immigrants . While about half said it was a good idea to make it easier for local governments to raise more money by reforming the property tax system (55%), fewer than half wanted to make it easier for local governments to raise more money by changing the vote required for passing local taxes from a two-thirds to a simple majority (46%). "I’m going to read you some of the proposals people have made for solving the big, serious problems in San Diego. For each one, please tell me whether you think it is a good idea or not." (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Making a big effort to reduce corruption in government Building a superior public transit system, so that more people have an incentive to use mass transit instead of their cars Investing more money in public schools, so that poor children have the same quality education as wealthy children Reforming local government, so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account instead of people looking out for their own neighborhood Making an all-out effort to build more low-cost housing Permitting regional and local governments to decide how to divide property taxes, rather than have the State Legislature make the decisions Building more housing near job centers Building more housing near public transit Strengthening the powers of local governments, so that they can deal more effectively with big, serious problems Establishing growth boundaries that discourage further development Reducing the flow of immigrants—both legal and illegal—across the U.S. borders Making it easier for local governments to raise more money by reforming the property tax system Making it easier for local governments to raise more money by requiring a simple majority rather than a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes All Adults 89% 85 Likely Voters 87% 82 85 78 84 81 77 72 72 72 72 71 71 70 70 65 69 67 64 64 55 47 46 38 - 17 - Solutions Growth-Related Policies Among the four growth-related solutions, building a superior public transit system (85%) was the most popular idea for solving San Diego’s problems. This is not surprising, since 78 percent of the county's residents rated traffic congestion as a serious problem, ranking it at the top of the list of 15 problems discussed earlier in this report. Seven in 10 residents said they liked the proposals for building more housing near job centers, building more housing near public transit, and establishing growth boundaries. There are no differences between all adults and likely voters in their support of these four policy options. Younger adults are more likely than all adults to think that growth boundaries are a good idea. Latinos give more support than all adults to all four proposals. The idea of establishing growth boundaries has more support in the north county and South Bay than in the central city and east county. South Bay residents are more in favor than other county residents of building more housing near job centers. While the idea of building a superior public transit system is very popular in all regions, this proposal has lower support in the east county than in the other regions. "Is __________ a good idea or not?" (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Building a superior public transit system Building more housing near job centers Building more housing near public transit Establishing growth boundaries All Adults 85% 72 71 69 Likely Voters 82% 71 70 67 Ages 18 to 34 85% 74 74 73 Latino 89% 82 78 75 Building a superior public transit system Building more housing near job centers Building more housing near public transit Establishing growth boundaries Central City 85% 73 70 67 Region North County South Bay 87% 71 72 86% 76 72 73 73 East County 81% 72 70 67 Fiscal and Governance Reforms Looking at the six fiscal and governance reform proposals, we find that the most popular solution for solving the big problems in San Diego is to reduce government corruption, followed closely by reforming local government so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account. Seven in 10 residents think it is a good idea to permit regional and local governments to divide the property taxes, rather than let the State Legislature make the decisions, and the same margin of support favors strengthening the power of local governments so they can be more effective in solving problems. About half like the idea of reforming the property tax system (55%), while fewer - 18 - Solutions want to make it easier for local governments to raise more money by requiring a simple majority instead of a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes (46%). Likely voters differ from all adults in that they are less favorably disposed to strengthening the powers of local government, reforming the property tax system, and allowing local taxes to pass with a simple majority vote. Younger adults and Latinos are more likely than all adults to favor four of the proposals—reforming local government to make it more responsive, strengthening local government to make it more effective, reforming the property tax system, or allowing local taxes to pass with a simple majority vote. As for regional differences, South Bay residents show more support than other county residents for four of the proposals —reforming local government to make it more responsive, strengthening local government to make it more effective, reforming the property tax system, and making it easier to pass local taxes. Central city residents are less likely than other county residents to say that permitting regional and local governments to divide the property taxes and strengthening the power of local governments are good ideas for solving the problems facing San Diego. East county residents are less favorable than other county residents toward the proposals requiring only a simple majority vote for local tax increases and making it easier for local governments to raise money by reforming the property tax system. "Is __________ a good idea or not?" (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Reducing corruption in government Reforming local government to better serve the interests of the community Letting regional and local governments decide how to divide property taxes Strengthening the powers of local governments Reforming the property tax system Requiring only a simple majority vote to pass local taxes All Adults 89% 84 72 70 55 46 Likely Voters 87% 81 72 65 47 38 Ages 18 to 34 91% 88 75 77 68 55 Latino 93% 89 70 85 70 63 Reducing corruption in government Reforming local government to better serve the interests of the community Letting regional and local governments decide how to divide property taxes Strengthening the powers of local governments Reforming the property tax system Requiring only a simple majority vote to pass local taxes Region Central City North County South Bay 88% 90% 92% 83 84 88 East County 89% 83 69 74 75 74 69 72 80 67 54 57 68 51 44 49 56 41 - 19 - Solutions Social and Economic Policies As for the three social and economic policy suggestions, most residents (85%) support the idea of investing more money in public schools. Three in four residents want to make an all-out effort to build more low-income housing. Two in three residents think it is a good idea to reduce the flow of immigrants. Compared to all adults, likely voters are less in favor of investing in public schools and in making an all-out effort to build low-cost housing; still, about three in four support these ideas. Latinos and younger adults are more likely than all adults to say that giving poor children the same education as wealthy children and building low-cost housing are good ideas for solving today’s problems. Younger adults are less likely than all adults to say that reducing immigration is a good idea. In looking at differences across regions, South Bay residents are more supportive of all three social and economic proposals than other county residents. "Is __________ a good idea or not?" (% who consider it a good idea reported below) Giving poor children same education as wealthy Making a big effort to build more low-cost housing Reducing the flow of immigrants All Adults 85% 77 64 Likely Voters 78% 72 64 Ages 18 to 34 93% 81 59 Latino 95% 88 62 Giving poor children same education as wealthy Making a big effort to build more low-cost housing Reducing the flow of immigrants Central City 85% 77 59 Region North County South Bay 84% 90% 77 86 67 70 East County 82% 73 67 - 20 - Survey Methodology The San Diego Survey is a special edition of the PPIC Statewide Survey, which is directed by Mark Baldassare, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, with research assistance from Eric McGhee, Mina Yaroslavsky, and Christopher Hoene. The questions were designed to provide a baseline awareness survey for a one-year citizen engagement and dialogue project. The methodology, questions, and content of this report were solely determined by Mark Baldassare. The survey benefited from consultation with Dan Yankelovich, Chuck Nathanson, Scott Grimes, Barbara Lee, and Monica Schweidler on behalf of the San Diego Dialogue project. The findings presented in this report are based on a telephone survey of 2,000 San Diego County adult residents interviewed from June 12 to June 18, 2000. Interviewing took place on weekend days and weekday nights, using a computer-generated random sample of telephone numbers, ensuring that both listed and unlisted telephone numbers were called. All telephone exchanges in San Diego County were eligible for calling. Telephone numbers in the survey sample were called up to five times to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households. Once a household was reached, an adult respondent (18 or older) was randomly chosen for interviewing by using the “last birthday method” to avoid biases in age and gender. Each interview took an average of 20 minutes to complete. Interviewing was conducted in English or Spanish. Maria Tello translated the survey into Spanish. We used recent U.S. Census, state, and county figures to compare the demographic characteristics of the survey sample with characteristics of San Diego County’s adult population. The survey sample was closely comparable to U.S. Census, state, and county figures. The survey data in this report were statistically weighted to account for any demographic differences. The sampling error for the total sample of 2,000 adults is +/- 2 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. This means that 95 times out of 100, the results will be within 2 percentage points of what they would be if all adults in San Diego County were interviewed. The sampling error for subgroups is larger. Sampling error is just one type of error to which surveys are subject. Results may also be affected by factors such as question wording, question order, and survey timing. As part of the baseline awareness survey, we compare the responses of all adults with those from “likely voters” in local elections and with the responses of Latinos and young adults (ages 18 to 34), who are currently underrepresented in the political process. The sampling error for the 925 likely voters is +/- 3%; for the 792 young adults, it is +/- 4%; and for the 416 Latinos, it is +/- 5%. The sample sizes for the African American and Asian subgroups are not large enough for separate statistical analysis. Throughout the report, we refer to four geographic regions in San Diego County. The “Central City" of San Diego includes much of the city of San Diego as well as the city of Coronado, composing 42 percent of the county’s population. “North County” includes the cities of Carlsbad, Del Mar, Encinitas, Escondido, Oceanside, San Marcos, Solana Beach, Vista, and neighboring unincorporated areas (25 percent of the county's population). “East County” includes El Cajon, La Mesa, Lemon Grove, Poway, Santee, and adjoining unincorporated areas (21 percent of the population). “South Bay” includes Chula Vista, Imperial Beach, National City, and adjacent unincorporated areas (12 percent of the population). In some cases, the San Diego Survey uses questions and the results of responses recorded in the PPIC Statewide Surveys conducted since 1998, the Orange County Annual Surveys conducted by Mark Baldassare and Cheryl Katz since 1982, national surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center since 1998, and a survey by the University of Virginia for the American Association of Retired Persons in 1996. - 21 - PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY: SPECIAL SURVEY ON SAN DIEGO COUNTY IN COLLABORATION WITH SAN DIEGO DIALOGUE JUNE 12 – JUNE 18, 2000 2,000 SAN DIEGO COUNTY ADULT RESIDENTS; ENGLISH AND SPANISH MARGIN OF ERROR +/- 2% AT 95% CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR TOTAL SAMPLE 1. First, I’d like to begin by asking you some questions about the part of San Diego you live in. Which of the following best describes the area where you now live? 20% the central city of San Diego 40 northern San Diego 25 eastern San Diego 15 South Bay 2. What do you think is the biggest and most serious problem facing your part of San Diego? (code don’t read) 29% traffic, transportation 15 crime, gangs 13 population growth, development 5 housing, housing costs, housing availability 5 drugs 4 schools, education 2 environment, pollution 2 water 1 immigration 1 race relations, ethnic tensions 1 local government taxes 1 government regulations 1 welfare 1 jobs and the economy 1 health care, HMO reform 1 lack of values, morals, religion 2 other answers 15 don’t know I am going to read you a list of problems other people have told us about. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a big, serious problem for your part of San Diego or not a big, serious problem. (rotate questions 3-17) 3. How about traffic congestion on freeways and major roads? 78% big, serious problem 21 not a big, serious problem 1 don't know 4. How about too much big, sprawling development? 47% big, serious problem 49 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 5. How about too many people moving into your area? 42% big, serious problem 56 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know - 23 - 6. How about the availability of affordable housing? 74% big, serious problem 22 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 7. How about the lack of opportunities for wellpaying jobs? 38% big, serious problem 53 not a big, serious problem 9 don't know 8. How about crime and gangs? 41% big, serious problem 57 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 9. How about the quality of education in the public schools? 45% big, serious problem 41 not a big, serious problem 14 don't know 10. How about a lack of adequate government funding for local public services, such as schools, police, and libraries? 48% big, serious problem 42 not a big, serious problem 10 don't know 11. How about a lack of public parks, and fewer and fewer open spaces? 48% big, serious problem 50 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 12. How about the amount of property taxes, sales taxes, and other local taxes and fees that residents have to pay? 54% big, serious problem 40 not a big, serious problem 6 don't know 13. How about the availability of water? 29% big, serious problem 68 not a big, serious problem 3 don't know 14. How about the issue of immigration—both legal and illegal? 57% big, serious problem 39 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 15. How about air and water pollution and other environmental threats? 58% big, serious problem 40 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 16. How about homelessness and poverty? 51% big, serious problem 47 not a big, serious problem 2 don't know 17. How about a lack of adequate public transportation? 38% big, serious problem 58 not a big, serious problem 4 don't know 18. Are you optimistic or pessimistic that the problems facing your part of San Diego will be solved? 59% optimistic 36 pessimistic 5 don't know I’m going to read some of the reasons people give for the problems in San Diego. For each one, please tell me if you think it is a major or minor cause of the big, serious problems facing your part of San Diego.(rotate questions 19-34) 19. What about too fast growth? 63% major cause 35 minor cause 2 don't know 20. What about the government spending money on the wrong things? 75% major cause 19 minor cause 6 don't know 21. What about the growing gap between the rich and the poor? 59% major cause 36 minor cause 5 don't know 22. What about too much immigration? 52% major cause 44 minor cause 4 don't know 23. What about a lack of effective regional planning? 56% major cause 36 minor cause 8 don't know 24. What about greed and corruption in government? 56% major cause 37 minor cause 7 don't know 25. What about greed and corruption in real estate development? 57% major cause 32 minor cause 11 don't know 26. What about unfair taxes? 49% major cause 45 minor cause 7 don't know 27. What about ineffective government? 61% major cause 34 minor cause 5 don't know 28. What about too much growth in the wrong places? 60% major cause 35 minor cause 5 don't know 29. What about the cost of housing being driven up by excessive government regulations? 59% major cause 34 minor cause 7 don't know 30. What about over-development because of insufficient government regulations? 51% major cause 42 minor cause 7 don't know 31. What about poor quality schools in inner-city neighborhoods? 61% major cause 28 minor cause 11 don't know 32. What about people being unwilling to live in parts of San Diego that have been neglected and that are rundown and unsafe? 58% major cause 35 minor cause 7 don't know 33. What about a lack of convenient public transportation? 40% major cause 56 minor cause 4 don't know 34. What about the way government goes about allocating state and local taxes? 58% major cause 28 minor cause 14 don't know - 24 - I’m going to read you some of the proposals people have made for solving the big, serious problems in your part of San Diego. For each one, please tell me whether you think it is a good idea or not. (rotate questions 35-47) 35. How about making it easier for local governments to raise more money by reforming the property tax system? 55% good idea 37 not a good idea 8 don't know 36. How about making it easier for local governments to raise more money by requiring a simple majority rather than a two-thirds vote to pass local taxes? 46% good idea 49 not a good idea 5 don't know 37. How about permitting regional and local governments to decide how to divide property taxes, rather than have the state legislature make the decisions? 72% good idea 21 not a good idea 7 don't know 38. How about establishing growth boundaries that discourage further development? 69% good idea 26 not a good idea 5 don't know 39. How about building more housing near job centers? 72% good idea 24 not a good idea 4 don't know 40. How about building more housing near public transit? 71% good idea 27 not a good idea 2 don't know 41. How about making an all-out effort to build more low-cost housing? 77% good idea 21 not a good idea 2 don't know 42. How about building a superior public transit system, so that more people have an incentive to use mass transit instead of their cars? 85% good idea 14 not a good idea 1 don't know 43. How about investing more money in our public schools, so that poor children have the same quality education as wealthy children? 85% good idea 13 not a good idea 2 don't know 44. How about reforming local government so that the interests of the entire community are taken into account, instead of everyone looking out for their own neighborhood? 84% good idea 13 not a good idea 3 don't know 45. How about strengthening the powers of local governments so that they can deal more effectively with big, serious problems? 70% good idea 25 not a good idea 5 don't know 46. How about reducing the flow of immigrants— both legal and illegal—across the U.S. borders? 64% good idea 30 not a good idea 6 don't know 47. How about making a big effort to reduce corruption in government? 89% good idea 9 not a good idea 2 don't know 48. On another topic, do you think things in San Diego County are generally going in the right direction or the wrong direction? 66% right direction 27 wrong direction 7 don't know 49. Thinking about the quality of life in San Diego County, how do you think things are going—very well, somewhat well, somewhat badly, or very badly? 24% very well 60 somewhat well 12 somewhat badly 3 very badly 1 don't know 50. In the next 10 years, do you think that the population of San Diego County will grow rapidly, grow slowly, stay about the same, or decline? 82% grow rapidly 11 grow slowly 5 stay about the same 1 decline 1 don't know - 25 - 51. Ten years from now, do you think that San Diego County will be a better place to live than it is now, a worse place to live than it is now, or about the same? 18% better place 38 worse place 42 the same 2 don't know 52. Ten years from now, do you see yourself living in San Diego County or somewhere else? (if elsewhere: Is that inside or outside of California?) 64% San Diego County 9 elsewhere, in California 21 elsewhere, outside California 6 don't know 53. On another topic, are you currently employed full time or part time or are you not employed? 59% full-time employed 11 part-time employed 30 not employed (skip to q. 57) 54. What is the location of the place where you report to work? 32% the central city of San Diego 39 northern San Diego County 13 eastern San Diego County 9 South Bay 3 outside of San Diego County 4 other, not sure (specify) 55. On a typical day, how long does it take you to get from your home to the place where you report to work? 32% under 15 minutes 37 15 minutes to under 30 minutes 16 30 minutes to under 45 minutes 7 45 minutes to under 60 minutes 5 60 minutes or more 3 it depends, other answers 56. On a typical day, how much of a problem is traffic congestion when you travel to and from work? Would you say it is no problem at all, somewhat of a problem, or a great problem? 37% no problem at all 37 somewhat of a problem 26 great problem 57. On another topic, some people are registered to vote and others are not. Are you absolutely certain you are registered to vote? 75% yes 25 no (skip to q. 59) 58. Are you registered as a Democrat, a Republican, another party, or as an independent or as "decline to state"? 31% Democrat 35 Republican 3 other party 27 independent, decline to state 4 don’t know, refuse 59. Would you consider yourself to be politically very liberal, somewhat liberal, middle-of-theroad, somewhat conservative, or very conservative? 8% very liberal 20 somewhat liberal 32 middle-of-the-road 25 somewhat conservative 11 very conservative 4 don’t know, refuse 60. Generally speaking, how much interest would you say you have in politics—a great deal, a fair amount, only a little, or none? 20% great deal 44 fair amount 27 only a little 9 none 61. How often would you say you vote—always, nearly always, part of the time, seldom or never? 47% always 19 nearly always 10 part of the time 7 seldom 17 never 62. How about working on local and neighborhood issues—are you very involved, somewhat involved, or not involved? 9% very involved 33 somewhat involved 58 not involved [Questions 63 – 72: demographic questions] - 26 - PPIC STATEWIDE SURVEY Advisory Committee Ruben Barrales President Joint Venture–Silicon Valley Network Angela Blackwell President Policy Link Paul Brest President The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mollyann Brodie Vice President Kaiser Family Foundation Bruce E. Cain Director Institute of Governmental Studies University of California, Berkeley Dennis A. Collins President The James Irvine Foundation Matt Fong Attorney Sheppard Mullin William Hauck President California Business Roundtable Sherry Bebitch Jeffe Senior Associate Claremont Graduate University Monica Lozano Associate Publisher and Executive Editor La Opinión Donna Lucas President NCG Porter Novelli Max Neiman Director Center for Social and Behavioral Research University of California, Riverside Jerry Roberts Managing Editor San Francisco Chronicle Dan Rosenheim News Director KPIX-TV Richard Schlosberg President The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Carol Stogsdill Senior Vice President APCO Associates Cathy Taylor Editorial Page Editor Orange County Register Raymond L. Watson Vice Chairman of the Board The Irvine Company Carol Whiteside President Great Valley Center - 27 -" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:35:02" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(8) "s_700mbs" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:35:02" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:35:02" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(50) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/S_700MBS.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }