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object(Timber\Post)#3742 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_PrimaryElectionsJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "172424" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4749) "www.ppic.org PRIMARY ELECTIONS IN CALIFORNIA MAY 2010   THE PRIMARY ELECTION SYSTEM IN CALIFORNIA HAS CHANGED SEVERAL TIMES SINCE 1909 . In 1909, a direct primary system was established in California as a Progressive era reform. Under this closed primary system, only party members could vote on a party’s ballot; decline-to -state voters used a non partisan ballot. C ross-filing was introduced in 1913, allowing candidates to be on eith er party’s ballot. In 1959, a closed primary was restored. In 1996, Proposition 198 changed the system to a “blanket ” format , allowing a ll candidates to appear on the same ballot . T he U.S. Supreme Court declared this unconstitutional in 2000. The legislatu re then instituted a modified closed primary : D ecline -to -state voters can now choose to vote on a party ballot, given party consent.   PROPOSITION 14 ON TH E JUNE BALLOT COULD ONCE AGAIN MODIFY CALIFORNIA’S PRIMARY SYSTEM . I f Proposition 14 passes on June 8 , the state constitution will be amended to allow all voters , regard - less of their party, to choose any candidate on the ballot . The top two vote -getters would then move on to the general election . A strong majority of l ikely voters favor th is change: 60% say they wo uld vote yes , 27% would vote no, and 13% are undecided.   MORE PROPOSITIONS QU ALIFY FOR GENERAL ELECTIONS, YET A HIGHER SHARE PASS IN PRIM ARY ELECTIONS. Since 1990, 225 propositions have qualified for the ballot in California. Of these, 40% q ualified for a primary election and 60% for a general election. But 64% of the measures on primar y ballots passed, compared to 49 % in general elections. Of the 91 primary election propositi ons on the ballot since 1990, 58% were legislative propositions, and 42% were citizen initiatives. Voters passed far more of the legislative propositions (83%) than citizen initiatives (37%).   REGI STRATION RATES IN MOST PRIMARY ELECTION S ARE LOWER THAN THOSE IN GENERAL ELECTION S. MORE DEMOCRATS THAN REPUBLICANS ARE REGISTERED. Since 1918, registration rates have been lower in most primary election s than in general election s. T he last time Republicans made up a majority of registered voters in a primary was in 1932 . From 1936 to 1990, at least half of registered voters in the primary were Democrats. Democratic registration dipped below 50% before the 1994 gubernatorial primary (49% Democrats, 37 % Republicans, 11% decline - to -state ). Today, the partisan gap is a bit wider (45% Democrats, 31% Republicans), and a record high 20% of voters decline to state a party.   VOTER TURNOUT IS LOWER IN PRIMARY ELECTIONS—AND IN GUBERNATORIAL THA N PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES. Primary election turnout rates have been lower than in general ele ctions since 1918, in most cases by at least 10 points. P rimary turnout reached a record high of 69% in 1978 (compared to 70% in the general election) —when Governor Jerry Brown ran as an incumbent in the Democratic primary and Proposition 13 was on the ballot. Primary turnout reached a record low of 34% in 2006. Turnout has been lower in the last six g ubernatorial primaries than in the last six presidential primaries.   CALIFORNIA’S JUNE PR IMARY INCLUDES CONTEST AMONG REPUBLICANS FOR GOVERNOR AND U.S. SENATE. The Republican primary race for governor has narrowed : support for Steve Poizner has increased 18 points (11% March, 29% today), while Meg Whitman’s lead has decreased 23 points (61% March, 38% today) , and 31% are undecided. Democrat Jerry Brown is running unopposed. Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate remain in a cl ose race to challenge Democrat ic Senator Barbara Boxer, who has served since 1993 and holds an approval rating of 50 % among likely voters. Carly Fiorina (25%) is even with Tom Campbell (23 %); both lead Chuck De Vore (16%), and 36% are undecided. www.ppic.org Sources: California Secretary of State. PPIC Statewide Survey, May 2010, 1,168 likely voters, ±3% margin of error. Contact: 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percent of registered voters General elections Prim ary elections VoterTurnout in California 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Percent of registered voters Dem ocrat Republican Decline-to-sta te Gubernatorial Primary Voter Registration Ye s60% No27% Don't know13% Proposition 14 “Top-Two-Vote-Getter” Primary Likely voters, May 2010 40 6460 49 0 20 40 60 80 Percent Prim ary elections General elections Propositions on ballotPropositions passed Ballot Propositions Since 1990 Meg Whitm an38% Steve Poizner29% Som eone else2% Undecided31% Likely voters, May 2010 Carly Fiorina25% To m Cam pbell23%Chuck DeVore16% Undecided36% Republican Senatorial Primary Likely voters, May 2010 Republican GubernatorialPrimary survey@ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(132) "

JTF PrimaryElectionsJTF

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In 1909, a direct primary system was established in California as a Progressive era reform. Under this closed primary system, only party members could vote on a party’s ballot; decline-to -state voters used a non partisan ballot. C ross-filing was introduced in 1913, allowing candidates to be on eith er party’s ballot. In 1959, a closed primary was restored. In 1996, Proposition 198 changed the system to a “blanket ” format , allowing a ll candidates to appear on the same ballot . T he U.S. Supreme Court declared this unconstitutional in 2000. The legislatu re then instituted a modified closed primary : D ecline -to -state voters can now choose to vote on a party ballot, given party consent.   PROPOSITION 14 ON TH E JUNE BALLOT COULD ONCE AGAIN MODIFY CALIFORNIA’S PRIMARY SYSTEM . I f Proposition 14 passes on June 8 , the state constitution will be amended to allow all voters , regard - less of their party, to choose any candidate on the ballot . The top two vote -getters would then move on to the general election . A strong majority of l ikely voters favor th is change: 60% say they wo uld vote yes , 27% would vote no, and 13% are undecided.   MORE PROPOSITIONS QU ALIFY FOR GENERAL ELECTIONS, YET A HIGHER SHARE PASS IN PRIM ARY ELECTIONS. Since 1990, 225 propositions have qualified for the ballot in California. Of these, 40% q ualified for a primary election and 60% for a general election. But 64% of the measures on primar y ballots passed, compared to 49 % in general elections. Of the 91 primary election propositi ons on the ballot since 1990, 58% were legislative propositions, and 42% were citizen initiatives. Voters passed far more of the legislative propositions (83%) than citizen initiatives (37%).   REGI STRATION RATES IN MOST PRIMARY ELECTION S ARE LOWER THAN THOSE IN GENERAL ELECTION S. MORE DEMOCRATS THAN REPUBLICANS ARE REGISTERED. Since 1918, registration rates have been lower in most primary election s than in general election s. T he last time Republicans made up a majority of registered voters in a primary was in 1932 . From 1936 to 1990, at least half of registered voters in the primary were Democrats. Democratic registration dipped below 50% before the 1994 gubernatorial primary (49% Democrats, 37 % Republicans, 11% decline - to -state ). Today, the partisan gap is a bit wider (45% Democrats, 31% Republicans), and a record high 20% of voters decline to state a party.   VOTER TURNOUT IS LOWER IN PRIMARY ELECTIONS—AND IN GUBERNATORIAL THA N PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES. Primary election turnout rates have been lower than in general ele ctions since 1918, in most cases by at least 10 points. P rimary turnout reached a record high of 69% in 1978 (compared to 70% in the general election) —when Governor Jerry Brown ran as an incumbent in the Democratic primary and Proposition 13 was on the ballot. Primary turnout reached a record low of 34% in 2006. Turnout has been lower in the last six g ubernatorial primaries than in the last six presidential primaries.   CALIFORNIA’S JUNE PR IMARY INCLUDES CONTEST AMONG REPUBLICANS FOR GOVERNOR AND U.S. SENATE. The Republican primary race for governor has narrowed : support for Steve Poizner has increased 18 points (11% March, 29% today), while Meg Whitman’s lead has decreased 23 points (61% March, 38% today) , and 31% are undecided. Democrat Jerry Brown is running unopposed. Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate remain in a cl ose race to challenge Democrat ic Senator Barbara Boxer, who has served since 1993 and holds an approval rating of 50 % among likely voters. Carly Fiorina (25%) is even with Tom Campbell (23 %); both lead Chuck De Vore (16%), and 36% are undecided. www.ppic.org Sources: California Secretary of State. PPIC Statewide Survey, May 2010, 1,168 likely voters, ±3% margin of error. Contact: 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percent of registered voters General elections Prim ary elections VoterTurnout in California 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Percent of registered voters Dem ocrat Republican Decline-to-sta te Gubernatorial Primary Voter Registration Ye s60% No27% Don't know13% Proposition 14 “Top-Two-Vote-Getter” Primary Likely voters, May 2010 40 6460 49 0 20 40 60 80 Percent Prim ary elections General elections Propositions on ballotPropositions passed Ballot Propositions Since 1990 Meg Whitm an38% Steve Poizner29% Som eone else2% Undecided31% Likely voters, May 2010 Carly Fiorina25% To m Cam pbell23%Chuck DeVore16% Undecided36% Republican Senatorial Primary Likely voters, May 2010 Republican GubernatorialPrimary survey@ppic.org" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:40:33" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "jtf_primaryelectionsjtf" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:40:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 09:40:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["guid"]=> string(65) "http://148.62.4.17/wp-content/uploads/JTF_PrimaryElectionsJTF.pdf" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_mime_type"]=> string(15) "application/pdf" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" ["status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["attachment_authors"]=> bool(false) }