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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_SpecialElectionsJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "96875" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(6074) "SPECIAL ELECTIONS IN CALIFORNIA APRIL 2009 ƒ ONLY SIX STATEWIDE SPECIAL ELECTIONS CALLED SINCE 1973—HALF OF THEM SINCE 2003. In California, statewide special elections may be called by the governor, state legislature, or both, although in recent decades most have been called by governors; they may be held at any time and for any reason. Governors have called special elections to expedite voting on a qualified initiative or to keep an initiative off a general election ballot. If a petition to recall an elected official qualifies, a special election is required unless the petition qualifies within 180 days of a regular election. If the recall involves the governor, as it did in 2003, the lieutenant governor is responsible for calling a special election. Prior to 2009, California’s five most recent special elections were called in 1973, 1979, 1993, 2003, and 2005; of the 22 propositions in these elections, 16 failed and six passed. ƒ 1973, 1979: TAXATION, SCHOOL BUSING, SPENDING LIMITS. Governor Ronald Reagan called a special election for November 6, 1973. Proposition 1, the lone ballot measure, failed. This citizens’ initiative would have cut property and income taxes and placed spending limits on budget surpluses. Fewer than half of registered voters went to the polls. Governor Jerry Brown called a special election for November 6, 1979, primarily to address school busing (Proposition 1) and spending limits (Proposition 4). These measures, along with two other propositions, passed with only 37% of registered voters participating in the election. ƒ 1993: BALANCING THE BUDGET. Facing a two-year state budget deficit and the expiration of a half-cent state sales tax, Governor Pete Wilson called a special election for November 2, 1993. The 36% of registered voters who turned out passed two of seven initiatives, including Proposition 172, which made permanent the half-cent state sales tax dedicated to local public safety programs. ƒ 2003, 2005, 2009: RECALL, GOVERNANCE REFORM, BALANCING THE BUDGET. Lieutenant Governor Cruz Bustamante called a special election for October 7, 2003, after a petition to recall Governor Gray Davis qualified for the ballot. With a relatively large voter turnout (61% of registered voters), Davis was recalled and Arnold Schwarzenegger was elected to replace him. After campaigning to reform state government, Governor Schwarzenegger called a special election for November 8, 2005, for voters to decide on measures that would limit state spending and establish an independent redistricting commission, among other reforms. Half of registered voters cast ballots, rejecting all eight ballot initiatives. ƒ MAY 2009: FATE OF THE STATE BUDGET HANGS IN THE BALANCE. In February, the governor and legislature approved a state budget and called for a May 19 special election seeking required voter approval of six measures to resolve a deficit of more than $40 billion. Proposition 1A would affect future budgets by establishing a spending limit and rainy day fund, 1B would provide supplemental payments to education starting in 2011–12, 1C would borrow funds from the voter-established state lottery for the general fund, 1D and 1E would shift past voter-approved targeted special funding into the general fund, and 1F would prohibit pay increases for elected officials during budget deficit years. If Propositions 1C, 1D, and 1E fail, the 2009–2010 budget will be out of balance and require alternative solutions by elected officials. www.ppic.org Special Elections in California 1973—Governor Ronald Reagan Ballot Measure Proposition 1 Title Tax and Expenditure Limitations Turnout: 47.6% of registered voters, 32% of eligible adults Result Failed Yes 46% No 54% 1979—Governor Jerry Brown Turnout: 37.4% of registered voters, 24.8% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Proposition 1 Proposition 2 Title School Assignment and Transportation of Pupils Loan Interest Rates Result Passed Passed Yes 69% 65 No 31% 35 Proposition 3 Property Taxation – Veteran’s Exemption Passed 76 24 Proposition 4 Limitation of Government Appropriations Passed 74 26 1993—Governor Pete Wilson Turnout: 36.4% of registered voters, 27.7% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Proposition 168 Proposition 169 Title Low-Rent Housing Projects Budget Implementation Result Failed Failed Yes No 40% 60% 39 61 Proposition 170 Property Taxes. Schools. Majority Vote. Development-Fee Limits Failed 31 69 Proposition 171 Property Taxation. Transfer of Base Year Value Passed 52 48 Proposition 172 Proposition 173 Proposition 174 Local Public Safety Protection and Improvement Act of 1993 California Housing and Jobs Investment Bond Act. $185 Million Legislative Bond Act Education. Vouchers Passed Failed Failed 58 42 30 42 58 70 2003—Lieutenant Governor Cruz Bustamante Turnout: 61.2% of registered voters, 43.1% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Governor Recall Governor Title Shall Gray Davis be recalled from the office of Governor? Arnold Schwarzenegger Result Passed Won Yes No 55% 45% 49 – Proposition 53 Funds Dedicated for State and Local Infrastructure Failed 36 64 Proposition 54 Classification by Race, Ethnicity, Color, or National Origin Failed 36 64 2005—Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Turnout: 50.1% of registered voters, 35.4% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Proposition 73 Proposition 74 Title Waiting Period Before Termination of Minor’s Pregnancy Public School Teachers’ Waiting Period for Permanent Status Result Failed Failed Yes No 47% 53% 45 55 Proposition 75 Public Employee Union Dues. Employee Consent Requirement Failed 47 53 Proposition 76 School Funding. State Spending Failed 38 62 Proposition 77 Redistricting Failed 40 60 Proposition 78 Proposition 79 Prescription Drug Discount Program Prescription Drug Rebate Program Failed Failed 42 58 39 61 Proposition 80 Electric Service Providers. Regulation Failed 34 66 Sources: Secretary of State, Statements of Vote: 1973, 1979, 1993, 2003, 2005. Voter Information Guide, May 19, 2009, Special Election. Contact: surveys@ppic.org www.ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(132) "

JTF SpecialElectionsJTF

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(89) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/special-elections-in-california/jtf_specialelectionsjtf/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8512) ["ID"]=> int(8512) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:38:14" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3724) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "JTF SpecialElectionsJTF" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(23) "jtf_specialelectionsjtf" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_SpecialElectionsJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(5) "96875" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(6074) "SPECIAL ELECTIONS IN CALIFORNIA APRIL 2009 ƒ ONLY SIX STATEWIDE SPECIAL ELECTIONS CALLED SINCE 1973—HALF OF THEM SINCE 2003. In California, statewide special elections may be called by the governor, state legislature, or both, although in recent decades most have been called by governors; they may be held at any time and for any reason. Governors have called special elections to expedite voting on a qualified initiative or to keep an initiative off a general election ballot. If a petition to recall an elected official qualifies, a special election is required unless the petition qualifies within 180 days of a regular election. If the recall involves the governor, as it did in 2003, the lieutenant governor is responsible for calling a special election. Prior to 2009, California’s five most recent special elections were called in 1973, 1979, 1993, 2003, and 2005; of the 22 propositions in these elections, 16 failed and six passed. ƒ 1973, 1979: TAXATION, SCHOOL BUSING, SPENDING LIMITS. Governor Ronald Reagan called a special election for November 6, 1973. Proposition 1, the lone ballot measure, failed. This citizens’ initiative would have cut property and income taxes and placed spending limits on budget surpluses. Fewer than half of registered voters went to the polls. Governor Jerry Brown called a special election for November 6, 1979, primarily to address school busing (Proposition 1) and spending limits (Proposition 4). These measures, along with two other propositions, passed with only 37% of registered voters participating in the election. ƒ 1993: BALANCING THE BUDGET. Facing a two-year state budget deficit and the expiration of a half-cent state sales tax, Governor Pete Wilson called a special election for November 2, 1993. The 36% of registered voters who turned out passed two of seven initiatives, including Proposition 172, which made permanent the half-cent state sales tax dedicated to local public safety programs. ƒ 2003, 2005, 2009: RECALL, GOVERNANCE REFORM, BALANCING THE BUDGET. Lieutenant Governor Cruz Bustamante called a special election for October 7, 2003, after a petition to recall Governor Gray Davis qualified for the ballot. With a relatively large voter turnout (61% of registered voters), Davis was recalled and Arnold Schwarzenegger was elected to replace him. After campaigning to reform state government, Governor Schwarzenegger called a special election for November 8, 2005, for voters to decide on measures that would limit state spending and establish an independent redistricting commission, among other reforms. Half of registered voters cast ballots, rejecting all eight ballot initiatives. ƒ MAY 2009: FATE OF THE STATE BUDGET HANGS IN THE BALANCE. In February, the governor and legislature approved a state budget and called for a May 19 special election seeking required voter approval of six measures to resolve a deficit of more than $40 billion. Proposition 1A would affect future budgets by establishing a spending limit and rainy day fund, 1B would provide supplemental payments to education starting in 2011–12, 1C would borrow funds from the voter-established state lottery for the general fund, 1D and 1E would shift past voter-approved targeted special funding into the general fund, and 1F would prohibit pay increases for elected officials during budget deficit years. If Propositions 1C, 1D, and 1E fail, the 2009–2010 budget will be out of balance and require alternative solutions by elected officials. www.ppic.org Special Elections in California 1973—Governor Ronald Reagan Ballot Measure Proposition 1 Title Tax and Expenditure Limitations Turnout: 47.6% of registered voters, 32% of eligible adults Result Failed Yes 46% No 54% 1979—Governor Jerry Brown Turnout: 37.4% of registered voters, 24.8% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Proposition 1 Proposition 2 Title School Assignment and Transportation of Pupils Loan Interest Rates Result Passed Passed Yes 69% 65 No 31% 35 Proposition 3 Property Taxation – Veteran’s Exemption Passed 76 24 Proposition 4 Limitation of Government Appropriations Passed 74 26 1993—Governor Pete Wilson Turnout: 36.4% of registered voters, 27.7% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Proposition 168 Proposition 169 Title Low-Rent Housing Projects Budget Implementation Result Failed Failed Yes No 40% 60% 39 61 Proposition 170 Property Taxes. Schools. Majority Vote. Development-Fee Limits Failed 31 69 Proposition 171 Property Taxation. Transfer of Base Year Value Passed 52 48 Proposition 172 Proposition 173 Proposition 174 Local Public Safety Protection and Improvement Act of 1993 California Housing and Jobs Investment Bond Act. $185 Million Legislative Bond Act Education. Vouchers Passed Failed Failed 58 42 30 42 58 70 2003—Lieutenant Governor Cruz Bustamante Turnout: 61.2% of registered voters, 43.1% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Governor Recall Governor Title Shall Gray Davis be recalled from the office of Governor? Arnold Schwarzenegger Result Passed Won Yes No 55% 45% 49 – Proposition 53 Funds Dedicated for State and Local Infrastructure Failed 36 64 Proposition 54 Classification by Race, Ethnicity, Color, or National Origin Failed 36 64 2005—Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Turnout: 50.1% of registered voters, 35.4% of eligible adults Ballot Measure Proposition 73 Proposition 74 Title Waiting Period Before Termination of Minor’s Pregnancy Public School Teachers’ Waiting Period for Permanent Status Result Failed Failed Yes No 47% 53% 45 55 Proposition 75 Public Employee Union Dues. Employee Consent Requirement Failed 47 53 Proposition 76 School Funding. State Spending Failed 38 62 Proposition 77 Redistricting Failed 40 60 Proposition 78 Proposition 79 Prescription Drug Discount Program Prescription Drug Rebate Program Failed Failed 42 58 39 61 Proposition 80 Electric Service Providers. Regulation Failed 34 66 Sources: Secretary of State, Statements of Vote: 1973, 1979, 1993, 2003, 2005. 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