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RB 512EHRB

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RB 512EHRB

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RB 512EHRB

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Yet the economy has weathered peri- odic droughts, and enough water has been available to support a growing population and economy, thanks to management innovations including water use efficiency, water markets, underground storage (or “banking”), and reuse of highly treated wastewater. Another reason for resilience: California’s economy has become less reliant on water- intensive activities. For instance, agriculture and related manufacturing account for nearly four-fifths of all business and residential water use—but make up just 2 percent of state GDP and 4 percent of all jobs. But California’s current water system raises several red flags. Catastrophic interruptions of water supplies from earthquakes and floods could cause large short-term losses; unre- liable supplies could also jeopardize business and infrastructure investments that support economic growth. Catastrophic flood risk and severely overdrafted groundwater basins are major concerns in some regions. 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