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JTF 1105PostElectionJTF

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object(Timber\Post)#3711 (44) { ["ImageClass"]=> string(12) "Timber\Image" ["PostClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Post" ["TermClass"]=> string(11) "Timber\Term" ["object_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["custom"]=> array(5) { ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_1105PostElectionJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "886042" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4970) "NOVEMBER 2005 SPECIAL ELECTION November 2005 Voters rejected all eight propositions. Californians voiced their opinions on November 8th by defeating all eight propositions in an election with campaign spending estimated at about $250 million. Proposition 73 (parental notification of abortion) received the most support at 47%, followed by Proposition 75 (union dues and political contributions) at 46% and Proposition 74 (public school teacher tenure) at 45 percent support. Four in ten Californians supported Proposition 77 (40%) on redistricting, Propositions 78 (42%) and 79 (39%) on prescription drug discounts, and Proposition 76 on state spending limits (38%); only 34 percent of voters supported Proposition 80 on electric regulation. Voter turnout was higher than expected. About 7.9 million Californians, or 49.6 percent of registered voters, cast ballots on November 8th. This turnout exceeded predictions and is higher than the special elections in 1979 and 1993, although well below the turnout for the recall election in 2003. Regional trends indicate that the Democratic-leaning San Francisco Bay Area had above-average voter turnout (56%) and that the more Republican-leaning Inland Empire (Riverside and San Bernardino Counties) had below-average voter turnout (44%), while Los Angeles, the Central Valley, and the Orange County/San Diego regions had voter turnouts near the statewide average. Governor’s four initiatives were opposed in urban coastal regions. Governor Schwarzenegger backed four initiatives that all failed to gain majority support. Californians were most united in their opposition to Propositions 76 and 77, where support was limited to Orange County and a portion of the Central Valley. As for Propositions 74 and 75, support was evident in inland counties, but opposition was strong in the urban coastal counties. The November 8th electorate had negative perceptions of the state of the state. Our PPIC post-election survey revealed that most Californians who voted in the November 8th election were pessimistic about the direction in which the state is headed (68%: wrong direction) and about the California economy (50%: moving into bad economic times). Majorities also disapprove of the performance of the governor (56%) and the state legislature (66%). A majority of voters also think the special election was a bad idea (60%), and 51 percent say they were unhappy about having to vote in the special election. Most voters are critical of the governor’s use of the initiative process (33% approve, 60% disapprove) and of the way the governor and legislature are working together in making public policy (14% approve, 76% disapprove). Special election had high interest, but voters want some changes. Eight in ten Californians who voted in the special election were following news about the election very closely (44%) or fairly closely (41%). Voters were most likely to say they found the voter information guide and sample ballot helpful in deciding how to vote. Knowing that the governor’s four initiatives did not pass, many voters nonetheless believe that major changes are needed in the public school system (71%), the way that campaigns are financed (59%), the way the governor and legislature go about state spending (69%), and the way that the governor and legislature go about redistricting (49%). Initiatives are still popular, but voters want reforms. Nearly half of California’s voters (48%) think that policy decisions made by the voters are probably better than those made by the governor and legislators, and a strong majority (66%) believe that ballot initiatives bring up important issues not addressed by the governor and state legislature. Among the political reforms suggested, voters support having initiatives placed on the ballot only in general elections (53%), increasing public disclosure of initiative funding sources (85%), and allowing a period of time for compromise solutions before initiatives go to the ballot (83%). Other initiative reforms with voter support include implementing a system of review and revision (77%) and requiring campaigns to participate in televised debates (77%). Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org November 2005 Special Election 2005 Special Election Results Proposition 73 Proposition 74 Proposition 75 Proposition 76 Proposition 77 Proposition 78 Proposition 79 Proposition 80 Yes 47.2% 44.8 46.5 37.7 40.3 41.5 39.4 34.4 No 52.8% 55.2 53.5 62.3 59.7 58.5 60.6 65.6 2005 Voter Turnout by Region Statewide Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/San Diego Inland Empire Other Percent Turnout 49.6% 49.6 55.7 46.9 48.1 43.7 52.2 Proposition 74 Teacher Tenure Proposition 75 Public Union Dues Yes Yes No No Proposition 76 Spending/Funding Proposition 77 Redistricting Yes Yes No No Source: California Secretary of State, results as of December 1, 2005. Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org" } ["___content":protected]=> string(132) "

JTF 1105PostElectionJTF

" ["_permalink":protected]=> string(88) "https://www.ppic.org/publication/november-2005-special-election/jtf_1105postelectionjtf/" ["_next":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_prev":protected]=> array(0) { } ["_css_class":protected]=> NULL ["id"]=> int(8517) ["ID"]=> int(8517) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_content"]=> string(0) "" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2017-05-20 02:38:18" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(3729) ["post_status"]=> string(7) "inherit" ["post_title"]=> string(23) "JTF 1105PostElectionJTF" ["post_type"]=> string(10) "attachment" ["slug"]=> string(23) "jtf_1105postelectionjtf" ["__type":protected]=> NULL ["_wp_attached_file"]=> string(27) "JTF_1105PostElectionJTF.pdf" ["wpmf_size"]=> string(6) "886042" ["wpmf_filetype"]=> string(3) "pdf" ["wpmf_order"]=> string(1) "0" ["searchwp_content"]=> string(4970) "NOVEMBER 2005 SPECIAL ELECTION November 2005 Voters rejected all eight propositions. Californians voiced their opinions on November 8th by defeating all eight propositions in an election with campaign spending estimated at about $250 million. Proposition 73 (parental notification of abortion) received the most support at 47%, followed by Proposition 75 (union dues and political contributions) at 46% and Proposition 74 (public school teacher tenure) at 45 percent support. Four in ten Californians supported Proposition 77 (40%) on redistricting, Propositions 78 (42%) and 79 (39%) on prescription drug discounts, and Proposition 76 on state spending limits (38%); only 34 percent of voters supported Proposition 80 on electric regulation. Voter turnout was higher than expected. About 7.9 million Californians, or 49.6 percent of registered voters, cast ballots on November 8th. This turnout exceeded predictions and is higher than the special elections in 1979 and 1993, although well below the turnout for the recall election in 2003. Regional trends indicate that the Democratic-leaning San Francisco Bay Area had above-average voter turnout (56%) and that the more Republican-leaning Inland Empire (Riverside and San Bernardino Counties) had below-average voter turnout (44%), while Los Angeles, the Central Valley, and the Orange County/San Diego regions had voter turnouts near the statewide average. Governor’s four initiatives were opposed in urban coastal regions. Governor Schwarzenegger backed four initiatives that all failed to gain majority support. Californians were most united in their opposition to Propositions 76 and 77, where support was limited to Orange County and a portion of the Central Valley. As for Propositions 74 and 75, support was evident in inland counties, but opposition was strong in the urban coastal counties. The November 8th electorate had negative perceptions of the state of the state. Our PPIC post-election survey revealed that most Californians who voted in the November 8th election were pessimistic about the direction in which the state is headed (68%: wrong direction) and about the California economy (50%: moving into bad economic times). Majorities also disapprove of the performance of the governor (56%) and the state legislature (66%). A majority of voters also think the special election was a bad idea (60%), and 51 percent say they were unhappy about having to vote in the special election. Most voters are critical of the governor’s use of the initiative process (33% approve, 60% disapprove) and of the way the governor and legislature are working together in making public policy (14% approve, 76% disapprove). Special election had high interest, but voters want some changes. Eight in ten Californians who voted in the special election were following news about the election very closely (44%) or fairly closely (41%). Voters were most likely to say they found the voter information guide and sample ballot helpful in deciding how to vote. Knowing that the governor’s four initiatives did not pass, many voters nonetheless believe that major changes are needed in the public school system (71%), the way that campaigns are financed (59%), the way the governor and legislature go about state spending (69%), and the way that the governor and legislature go about redistricting (49%). Initiatives are still popular, but voters want reforms. Nearly half of California’s voters (48%) think that policy decisions made by the voters are probably better than those made by the governor and legislators, and a strong majority (66%) believe that ballot initiatives bring up important issues not addressed by the governor and state legislature. Among the political reforms suggested, voters support having initiatives placed on the ballot only in general elections (53%), increasing public disclosure of initiative funding sources (85%), and allowing a period of time for compromise solutions before initiatives go to the ballot (83%). Other initiative reforms with voter support include implementing a system of review and revision (77%) and requiring campaigns to participate in televised debates (77%). Public Policy Institute of California 415-291-4400 www.ppic.org November 2005 Special Election 2005 Special Election Results Proposition 73 Proposition 74 Proposition 75 Proposition 76 Proposition 77 Proposition 78 Proposition 79 Proposition 80 Yes 47.2% 44.8 46.5 37.7 40.3 41.5 39.4 34.4 No 52.8% 55.2 53.5 62.3 59.7 58.5 60.6 65.6 2005 Voter Turnout by Region Statewide Central Valley San Francisco Bay Area Los Angeles Orange/San Diego Inland Empire Other Percent Turnout 49.6% 49.6 55.7 46.9 48.1 43.7 52.2 Proposition 74 Teacher Tenure Proposition 75 Public Union Dues Yes Yes No No Proposition 76 Spending/Funding Proposition 77 Redistricting Yes Yes No No Source: California Secretary of State, results as of December 1, 2005. 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