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Where the Wild Things Aren’t: Making the Delta a Better Place for Native Species

By Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, William Fleenor, Jeffrey Mount ...

How can California address the Delta’s many problems—and manage its ecosystem more effectively in the future? The authors propose a strategy for realistically achieving co-equal goals of water supply reliability and ecosystem protection in this troubled region.

This research was supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

Several companion reports contain related findings:

Aquatic Ecosystem Stressors in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta (Mount et al. 2012) summarizes the science of Delta ecosystem stressors for a policymaking audience.

Costs of Ecosystem Management Actions for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta (Medellín-Azuara et al. 2013) assesses costs of water management actions.

Integrated Management of Delta Stressors: Institutional and Legal Options (Gray et al. 2013) lays out proposals for institutional reform of science, management, and regulation.

Scientist and Stakeholder Views on the Delta Ecosystem (Hanak et al. 2013) presents detailed results of the two surveys conducted by the report’s authors.

Stress Relief: Prescriptions for a Healthier Delta Ecosystem (Hanak et al. 2013) summarizes the overall research project and the recommendations it generated.

Report

Aquatic Ecosystem Stressors in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

By Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, William Fleenor, Jeffrey Mount ...

This report looks at five broad categories of stressors on the Delta’s native fishes, examining causes of stress, allocations of responsibility, and options for management.

This research was supported with funding from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

Several companion reports contain related findings:

Costs of Ecosystem Management Actions for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta (Medellín-Azuara et al. 2013) assesses costs of water management actions.

Integrated Management of Delta Stressors: Institutional and Legal Options (Gray et al. 2013) lays out proposals for institutional reform of science, management, and regulation.

Scientist and Stakeholder Views on the Delta Ecosystem (Hanak et al. 2013) presents detailed results of the two surveys conducted by the report’s authors.

Stress Relief: Prescriptions for a Healthier Delta Ecosystem (Hanak et al. 2013) summarizes the overall research project and the recommendations it generated.

Where the Wild Things Aren’t: Making the Delta a Better Place for Native Species (Moyle et al. 2012) outlines a realistic long-term vision for achieving a healthier ecosystem.

Report

Water and the California Economy

By Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, Richard Howitt, Brian Gray ...

California’s economy can grow and prosper despite droughts and water shortages caused by a changing climate—but only if threats to the water system are addressed now. So far, innovative water management has supported the needs of a growing population but serious concerns remain, including water supply reliability and declining groundwater basins.

This research was supported with funding from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

Report

Transitions for the Delta Economy

By Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, Richard Howitt, Josué Medellín-Azuara

Enormous changes—from natural forces to management decisions—are coming to California’s fragile Delta region and will have broad effects on its residents. This report finds that in the first half of this century, the Delta as a whole is likely to experience a loss of 1 percent of economic activity as a result of these changes. It also identifies planning priorities for managing the Delta’s future.

This research was supported with funding from the Watershed Sciences Center at UC Davis.

Report

Managing California’s Water: From Conflict to Reconciliation

By Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, Jeffrey Mount, Richard Howitt ...

California has struggled to manage its water effectively for more than 30 years. Today, the state needs to consider a set of wide-ranging reforms—for the benefit of the economy and the environment.

Executive Summary

Full Report [PDF, 9.06 MB]

To view individual chapters, click on the links below.

Introduction

Floods, Droughts, and Lawsuits: A Brief History of California Water Policy

California Water Today

Drivers of Change

Urgent and Fundamental Challenges

Reconciling Ecosystems: Reversing Declines in Native Species

Orchestrating the Management of Water Scarcity, Quality, and Flooding

Managing Water as a Public Commodity

Effective and Adaptive Governance

Pathways to Reform

A Way Forward

Technical Appendix: Managing California’s Water: Insights from Interviews with Water Policy Experts


This research was supported with funding from S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Pisces Foundation, Resources Legacy Fund, and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority.

Report

Driving Change: Reducing Vehicle Miles Traveled in California

By Ellen Hanak, Louise Bedsworth, Jed Kolko

Can Californians cut down on their driving? Encouraging job growth near transit stations will help. So will pursuing policies that raise the cost of driving. This report examines California’s progress in these and other areas, finding both opportunities and challenges ahead.

This research was supported with funding from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as part of the California 2025 project on the state's future, and the David A. Coulter Family Foundation.

Report

California Water Myths

By Ellen Hanak, Jay Lund, Jeffrey Mount, Richard Howitt ...

California faces enormous challenges in establishing a sustainable path for water resource management. One challenge is the rhetoric surrounding major water issues in the state. This study highlights eight common water myths, focusing on water supply, ecosystems, and legal and governance issues. In combating these myths, the report sets the stage for a more informed approach to water policy and management.

More information and additional myths can be found in Myths of California Water - Implications and Reality.

Interactive Map: Per Capita Urban Water Use: 1960-2005

Interactive Feature: Virtual Tour (Center For Watershed Sciences, UC Davis)

Supported with funding from S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Pisces Foundation, Resources Legacy Fund, and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority.

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