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Statewide Survey

PPIC Statewide Survey: Californians and Their Government

By Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, Alyssa Dykman, Lunna Lopes

Key findings from the current survey: Four in ten Californians approve of Governor-Elect Newsom’s plans and priorities; half say they want him to take a different policy direction from Governor Brown. Majorities see new state spending on universal health coverage and free community college as high priorities; fewer prioritize high-speed rail. Californians view jobs and the economy as the most important priority for the state’s future; many believe that children will be worse off than their parents.

Report

Higher Education as a Driver of Economic Mobility

By Hans Johnson, Marisol Cuellar Mejia, Sarah Bohn

Higher education is key in helping Californians move up the income ladder—but equity gaps are a big challenge. Among young adults born in California, 60% of Asian Americans and 40% of whites have at least a bachelor’s degree, compared to 21% of African Americans and 18% of Latinos.

Report

New Insights into California Arrests: Trends, Disparities, and County Differences

By Magnus Lofstrom, Brandon Martin, Justin Goss, Joseph Hayes

Over the past few decades, arrests have declined dramatically—especially for misdemeanors. Though racial disparities have narrowed, the gap between African Americans and whites remains substantial. In 2016, the arrest rate for African Americans was three times the white arrest rate.

Statewide Survey

PPIC Statewide Survey: Californians and Their Government

By Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, Alyssa Dykman, Lunna Lopes

Key findings from the current survey: Gavin Newsom remains ahead of John Cox in the governor’s race; Dianne Feinstein continues to lead Kevin de León in the race for US Senate. Two closely watched ballot initiatives—Prop 6, which would repeal recent gas tax increases, and Prop 10, which would expand local rent control authority—are trailing. A majority of likely voters favor the Democratic candidate in their US House district—and Democrats are more likely than Republicans to be enthusiastic about voting.

Report

The 2020 Census and Political Representation in California

By Eric McGhee, Sarah Bohn, Tess Thorman

If the 2020 Census does a poor job of counting traditionally undercounted populations and immigrant communities, the state could easily lose one of its 53 seats in the House of Representatives.

Fact Sheet

Census-Related Funding in California

By Patrick Murphy, Caroline Danielson

The census plays a role in determining federal funding levels for a broad range of state programs. An accurate count in 2020 can help California provide services to populations in need.

Report

K–12 Reforms and California’s English Learner Achievement Gap

By Laura Hill

English Learner (EL) students have been a key part of California’s K–12 system for decades. They currently make up about 21 percent of the public school population. English Learner status is meant to be temporary, and indeed, reclassified English Learners (those who are deemed English proficient) are among the best-performing students in the state. But students who remain ELs for longer periods generally have poor outcomes.

Fact Sheet

Immigrants and Political Engagement

By Mark Baldassare, Dean Bonner, Alyssa Dykman, Lunna Lopes

Just over half of immigrants in California who become US citizens are considered likely voters, a slightly smaller share than for US-born residents. Nearly half of immigrants say that they are paying more attention to politics since President Trump’s election.

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